FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Samson" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Samson
Samson and Delilah, by Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641)
Samson and Delilah, by Anthony van Dyck (1599-1641)

Samson, Shimshon (Hebrew: שִׁמְשׁוֹן, Standard Šimšon Tiberian Šimšôn; meaning "of the sun" – perhaps proclaiming he was radiant and mighty, or "[One who] Serves [God]") or Shama'un (Arabic) is the third to last of the Judges of the ancient Children of Israel mentioned in the Hebrew Bible, the Tanakh and, the Talmud. He is described in the Book of Judges chapters 13 to 16.[1] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3200x1820, 671 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Samson Delilah ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3200x1820, 671 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Samson Delilah ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Anton) van Dyck (22 March 1599 – 9 December 1641) was a Flemish artist who became the leading court painter in England. ... // Samson is a biblical figure known for his superhuman strength, derived from his hair. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Biblical judges are not to be confused with modern legal judges. ... The Children of Israel, or Bnei Yisrael (בני ישראל) in Hebrew (also Bnai Yisrael, Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... For the musical collective, see Tanakh (band). ... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ... Book of Judges (Hebrew: Sefer Shoftim ספר שופטים) is a book of the Bible originally written in Hebrew. ...


Samson is something of a Herculean figure, using massive strength to combat his enemies and to perform heroic feats unachievable by ordinary men:[2] wrestling a lion,[3] slaying an entire army with nothing more than a donkey's jawbone,[4] and tearing down an entire building.[1] Alcides redirects here. ...

Contents

Biblical narrative

Samson lived when God was punishing the Israelites by giving them "into the hand of the Philistines." An angel from God appears to Manoah, an Israelite from the tribe of Dan, in the city of Zorah, and to his wife, who is sterile. [3][5] This angel predicts that they will have a son who will begin to deliver the Israelites from the Philistines.[3] Requirements, were set up by the angel that she (as well as the child himself) is to abstain from all alcoholic beverages, and her promised child is not to shave or cut his hair. [3][5] In due time the son, Samson, is born; he is reared according to these provisions. [3][5] The historic Philistines (see note Philistines below) were a people that inhabited the southern coast of Canaan around the time of the arrival of the Israelites, their territory being named Philistia in later contexts. ... This article is about the supernatural being. ... Manoah and his barren wife sacrifice a ram to the angel of the Lord (above); the wife wears a wimple in this miniature painted in Paris, ca 1250 (the Maciejowski Bible). ... Tribe of Dan was also a band from the mid 1990s. ... A biblical city associated with the Samson saga. ... Alcoholic beverages An alcoholic beverage is a drink containing ethanol, commonly known as alcohol, although in chemistry the definition of alcohol includes many other compounds. ...

Romanesque capital showing Samson and the lion (13th cent.).
Romanesque capital showing Samson and the lion (13th cent.).

When he becomes a young man, Samson leaves the hills of his people to see the cities of the Philistines. While there, Samson falls in love with a Philistine woman from Timnah that, overcoming the objections of his parents who do not know that "it is of the LORD", he decides to marry her. [3][5] The intended marriage is actually part of God's plan to strike at the Philistines. [3] On the way to ask for the woman's hand in marriage, Samson is attacked by an Asiatic Lion and kills it. [3] He continues on to the Philistine's house, winning her hand in marriage. On his way to the wedding, Samson notices that bees have nested in the carcass of the lion and have made honey. [3] He eats a handful of the honey and gives some to his parents. [3] At the wedding-feast, Samson proposes that he tell a riddle to his thirty groomsmen (all Philistines); if they can solve it, he will give them thirty pieces of fine linen and garments. [3][5] The riddle ("Out of the eater, something to eat; out of the strong, something sweet.") is a veiled account of his second encounter with the lion (at which only he was present). [3] The Philistines are infuriated by the riddle. [3] The thirty groomsmen tell Samson's new wife that they will burn her and her father's household if she does not discover the answer to the riddle and tell it to them. [3] At the urgent and tearful imploring of his bride, Samson tells her the solution, and she tells it to the thirty groomsmen. [3][5] Before sunset on the seventh day they said to him, Image File history File links Size of this preview: 621 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 989 pixels, file size: 699 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 621 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,024 × 989 pixels, file size: 699 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Interior of the Saint-Saturnin church St-Sernin, Toulouse, 1080 – 1120: elevation of the east end Romanesque sculpture, cloister of St. ... A capital of the Composite order In Western architecture, the capital (from the Latin caput, head) forms the crowning member of the column, which projects on each side as it rises, in order to support the abacus and unite the square form of the latter with the circular shaft. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Biblical Timnah, identified with the modern archeological site of Tel Batash, in the Sorek Valley of Israel, near Kibbutz Tal Shahar. ... Trinomial name Panthera leo persica Meyer, 1826 Current distribution of the Asiatic Lion in the wild Synonyms Leo leo goojratensis (India) Leo leo persicus (Persia) The Asiatic Lion (Panthera leo persica; also known as Indian Lion) is a subspecies of the lion found only in India. ...

"What is sweeter than honey?
and what is stronger than a lion?"

Samson said to them,

"If you had not plowed with my heifer,
you would not have solved my riddle." [4]

He flies into a rage and kills thirty Philistines of Ashkelon for their garments, which he gives his thirty groomsmen. [4] [5]Still in a rage, he returns to his father's house, and his bride is given to the best man as his wife. [4][5] Her father refuses to allow him to see her, and wishes to give Samson the younger sister. [4][5] Samson attaches torches to the tails of three hundred foxes, leaving the panicked beasts to run through the fields of the Philistines, burning all in their wake. [4][5] The Philistines find out why Samson burned their crops, and they burn Samson's wife and father-in-law to death. [4][5] In revenge, Samson slaughters many more Philistines, smiting them "hip and thigh." [4][5] Hebrew אַשְׁקְלוֹן (Standard) AÅ¡qÉ™lon Arabic عسقلان Founded in 1951 Government City Also Spelled Ashqelon (officially) District South Population 105,100 (2004) Jurisdiction 55,000 dunams (55 km²) Mayor Roni Mahatzri Ashkelon (Hebrew: ‎; Tiberian Hebrew ʾAÅ¡qÉ™lôn; Arabic: ‎  ; Latin: Ascalon) is a city in the western Negev, in the...


Samson then takes refuge in a cave in the rock of Etam. [4][5][6] An army of Philistines went up and demanded from 3,000 men of Judah to deliver them Samson.[5][6] With Samson's consent, they tie him with two new ropes and are about to hand him over to the Philistines when he breaks free.[6] Using the jawbone of a donkey, he slays one thousand Philistines.[6] At the conclusion of Judges 15 it is said that "Samson led Israel for twenty years in the days of the Philistines."[6] Etam is a proper name in the Bible. ... The Tribe of Judah (Hebrew: יְהוּדָה, Praise; Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ) is one of the Hebrew tribes, founded by Judah, son of Jacob(Israel). ...

Samson and Delilah, by Francesco Morone
Samson and Delilah, by Francesco Morone

Later, Samson goes to Gaza, where he stays at a harlot's house.[4][7] His enemies wait at the gate of the city to ambush him, but he rips the gate up and carries it to "the hill that is in front of Hebron."[4][7] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1294, 317 KB) Description: Title: de: Samson und Dalila Technique: de: Holz Dimensions: de: 76 × 121 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Mailand Current location (gallery): de: Museo Poldi Pezzoli Other notes: Source: The Yorck Project: DVD... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2048x1294, 317 KB) Description: Title: de: Samson und Dalila Technique: de: Holz Dimensions: de: 76 × 121 cm Country of origin: de: Italien Current location (city): de: Mailand Current location (gallery): de: Museo Poldi Pezzoli Other notes: Source: The Yorck Project: DVD... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... Arabic الخليل Government City (from 1997) Also Spelled Al-Khalil (officially) Al-Halil (unofficially) Governorate Hebron Population 167,000 (2006) Jurisdiction  dunams Head of Municipality Mustafa Abdel Nabi , Hebron (Arabic:   al-ḪalÄ«l or al KhalÄ«l; Hebrew:  , Standard Hebrew: Ḥevron, Tiberian Hebrew: Ḥeḇrôn) is a city at the...


He then falls in love with a woman, Delilah, at the Brook of Sorek.[4][7] The Philistines approach Delilah and induce her (with 1100 silver coins each) to try to find the secret of Samson's strength.[4][7] Samson obviously does not want to tell the secret, so at first he teases her, telling her that he can be bound with fresh bowstrings.[4][7] She does so while he sleeps, but when he wakes up he snaps the strings.[4][7] She persists, and he tells her he can be bound with new ropes. She binds him with new ropes while he sleeps, and he snaps them, too.[4][7] She asks again, and he says he can be bound if his locks are woven together.[4][7] She weaves them together, but he undoes them when he wakes.[4][7] Eventually Samson tells Delilah that he will lose his strength with the loss of his hair.[4][7] Delilah calls for a servant to shave Samson's seven locks.[4][7] Since that breaks the Nazarite oath, God leaves him, and Samson is captured by the Philistines.[4][7] They burn out his eyes by holding a hot poker near them.[7] After being blinded, Samson is brought to Gaza, imprisoned, and put to work grinding grain.[7] For other uses, see Delilah (disambiguation). ... The Brook of Sorek, also called the Valley of Sorek, (in Hebrew nachal sorek), mentioned in the Book of Judges 16:4 of the Hebrew Bible, is probably a point on the border between the ancient Philistines and the Tribe of Dan of the ancient Israelites. ... For the 1968 stage production, see Hair (musical), for the 1979 film, see Hair (film). ...


One day the Philistine leaders assemble in a temple for a religious sacrifice to Dagon, their god, for having delivered Samson into their hands.[7][8] They summon Samson so that he may entertain them.[7][8] Three thousand more men and women gather on the roof to watch.[7][8] Once inside the temple, Samson, his hair having grown long again, asks the servant who is leading him to the temple's central pillars if he may lean against them (referring to the pillars).[7][8] Dagon was a major northwest Semitic god, reportedly of grain and agriculture. ...

"Then Samson prayed to the Lord, 'O Lord God, remember me, I pray thee, and strengthen me, I pray thee, only this once, O God, that I may be at once avenged of the Philistines for one of my two eyes.' (Judges 16:28)."[7][8] "Samson said, 'Let me die with the Philistines!' (Judges 16:30)[8] Down came the temple on the rulers and all the people in it.[8][9] Thus he killed many more as he died than while he lived." (Judges 16:30).[9]

After his death, Samson's family recovers his body from the rubble and buries him near the tomb of his father Manoah.[8] Lordship redirects here. ...


In rabbinic literature

Rabbinical literature identifies Samson with Bedan;[5] Bedan was a Judge mentioned by Samuel in his farewell address (1 Samuel 12:11) among the Judges that delivered Israel from their enemies.[10] However, the name "Bedan" is not found in the Book of Judges.[10] The name "Samson" is derived from "shemesh" (= "sun"), so that Samson bore the name of God, who is also "a sun and shield" (Ps. lxxxiv. 12 [A. V. 11]); and as God protected Israel, so did Samson watch over it in his generation, judging the people even as did God. [5] Samson's strength was divinely derived (Talmud, Tractate Sotah 10a); and he further resembled God in requiring neither aid nor help (Midrash Genesis Rabbah xcviii. 18).[5] Rabbinic literature, in the broadest sense, can mean the entire spectrum of Judaisms rabbinic writing/s throughout history. ... Bedan is a deliverer of Israelites. ... Samuel or Shmuel (Hebrew: שְׁמוּאֵל, Standard Tiberian ) is an important leader of ancient Israel in the Book(s) of Samuel in the Hebrew Bible. ... The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... Genesis Rabba (Bereshith Rabba in Hebrew) is a religious text holy to classical Judaism. ...


Jewish legend records that Samson's shoulders were sixty ells broad.[5] He was lame in both feet (Talmud Sotah 10a), but when the spirit of God came upon him he could step with one stride from Zorah to Eshtaol, while the hairs of his head arose and clashed against one another so that they could be heard for a like distance (Midrash Lev. Rabbah viii. 2).[5] Samson was said to be so strong that he could uplift two mountains and rub them together like two clods of earth (ibid.; Sotah 9b), yet his superhuman strength, like Goliath's, brought woe upon its possessor (Midrash Eccl. Rabbah i., end).[5] An ell, when used as a unit of length, is usually 45 inches, i. ... A biblical city associated with the Samson saga. ... This article is about the biblical warrior. ... Ecclesiastes Rabbah or Kohelet Rabbah (קהלת רבה) is an haggadic commentary on Ecclesiastes, included in the collection of the Midrash Rabbot. ...


In licentiousness he is compared with Amnon and Zimri, both of whom were punished for their sins (Lev. R. xxiii. 9).[5] Samson's eyes were put out because he had "followed them" too often (Sotah l.c.). [5] It is said that in the twenty years during which Samson judged Israel he never required the least service from an Israelite (Midrash Numbers Rabbah ix. 25), and he piously refrained from taking the name of God in vain.[5] Therefore, as soon as he told Delilah that he was a Nazarite of God she immediately knew that he had spoken the truth (Sotah l.c.).[5] When he pulled down the temple of Dagon and killed himself and the Philistines the structure fell backward, so that he was not crushed, his family being thus enabled to find his body and to bury it in the tomb of his father (Midrash Gen. Rabbah l.c. § 19).[5] In the Talmudic period many seem to have denied that Samson was a historic figure; he was apparently regarded as a purely mythological personage.[5] This was viewed as heretical by the rabbis of the Talmud, and they refuted this view.[5] The Talmud does so by giving the names of his mother, and states that he had a sister named Nishyan" or "Nashyan" (variant reading).[5] Amnon was Davids eldest son. ... Zimri (praiseworthy), was king of Israel for seven days. ...


Other cultural references

Israeli culture

"[T]he figure of "Samson the hero" played a role in the construction of Zionist collective memory, and in building the identity of the 'new Jew' who leaves behind exilic helplessness for Israeli self-determination," Benjamin Balint, a writer in Jerusalem, has written. Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880–1940), the founder of Revisionist Zionism wrote a 1926 novel in Russian (English translation in 1930), Samson in which the author makes Samson an assimilated Jew attracted by the surrounding, more sophisticated (and un-philistine) Philistine culture. Some important Twentieth century Hebrew poems have also been written about the Bible hero. More recently, elite Israeli combat units have been named "Samson", and the Israeli nuclear program was called the "Samson Option".[11] Zeev Jabotinsky in military uniform Zeev Vladimir (Evgenevich) Jabotinsky (or Zhabotinski) (October 18, 1880 - August 4, 1940) was a Zionist leader, author, orator, and founder of the Jewish Legion in World War I. During World War II a similar and larger unit known as the Jewish Brigade would follow. ... Palestine (comprising todays Israel, the West Bank and the Gaza strip) and Transjordan (todays Kingdom of Jordan) were all part of the British Mandate of Palestine. ... The historic Philistines (see note Philistines below) were a people that inhabited the southern coast of Canaan around the time of the arrival of the Israelites, their territory being named Philistia in later contexts. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... Israel was the sixth country in the world to develop nuclear weapons[2] and is one of four nuclear-armed countries not recognized as a Nuclear Weapons State by the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the other three being India, Pakistan and North Korea,[3] and the International Atomic Energy...


Noam Chomsky and others have said Israel suffers from a "Samson complex" which could lead to the destruction of itself as well as its Arab enemies.[11] Avram Noam Chomsky (born December 7, 1928) is an American linguist, philosopher, political activist, author, and lecturer. ...


Literature

  • In 2006, David Grossman's novel, Lion's Honey: The Myth of Samson was published.
  • In 2006, David Maine published his novel The Book of Samson, the third of his Biblical series of novels which also include Fallen and The Preservationist.
  • In The Canterbury Tales, in the Monk's tale, Samson is described.

Events May 9 - Thomas Blood, disguised as a clergyman, attempts to steal the Crown Jewels from the Tower of London. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... An Etching of Samson, from an 1882 German Bible Samson Agonistes (Greek: Samson the agonist) is a work of blank verse tragedy by John Milton. ... Moshe Chaim Luzzatto (also Moses Chaim, Moses Hayyim, also Luzzato) (1707-1746), also known by the Hebrew acronym as the RAMCHAL (also RAMHAL), was a prominent Italian Jewish rabbi, mystic, and philosopher best remembered today for his ethical treatise Mesillat Yesharim (Path of the Just). ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ... Zeev Jabotinsky in military uniform Zeev Vladimir (Evgenevich) Jabotinsky (or Zhabotinski) (October 18, 1880 - August 4, 1940) was a Zionist leader, author, orator, and founder of the Jewish Legion in World War I. During World War II a similar and larger unit known as the Jewish Brigade would follow. ... Movie poster for Samson and Delilah Samson and Delilah is a 1949 film directed by Cecil B. DeMille, starring Victor Mature and Hedy Lamarr as the title characters. ... David Grossman (born 1954 in Jerusalem) is an Israeli author. ...

Classical Music

Handel wrote his oratorio Samson in 1743. Camille Saint-Saëns wrote an opera, Samson et Dalila between 1868 and 1877. HANDEL was the code-name for the UKs National Attack Warning System in the Cold War. ... Samson is an oratorio by George Frideric Handel. ... // Events February 14 - Henry Pelham becomes British Prime Minister February 21 - - The premiere in London of George Frideric Handels oratorio, Samson. ... Charles Camille Saint-Saëns () (9 October 1835 – 16 December 1921) was a French composer, organist, conductor, and pianist, known especially for his orchestral works The Carnival of the Animals, Danse Macabre, Samson et Dalila, and Symphony No. ... For other uses, see Opera (disambiguation). ... This article or section should be merged with Samson and Delilah (opera) Samson et Dalila is an opera in three acts (or four tableaux) composed by Camille Saint-Saëns, initially in 1866 to 1868, and reworked from 1873 to 1877. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


In 1977, Joseph Horovitz wrote Samson for baritone, mixed choir and brass band Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Joseph Horovitz (born May 26, 1926 in Vienna, Austria) is a British composer and conductor. ... For other uses, see Baritone (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A brass band a musical group consisting mostly or entirely of brass instruments, often with a percussion section. ...


Samson parades

Samson parade Mauterndorf/Austria
Samson parade Mauterndorf/Austria

Quirky annual parades of a Samson figure in 10 different villages in the Lungau, Salzburg (state) and two villages in the north-west Steiermark (Austria). For more information see Wikipedia in German de:Samson (Riese) Image File history File links Size of this preview: 737 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1864 × 1517 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 737 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1864 × 1517 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Bezirk Tamsweg is an administrative district (Bezirk) in the federal state of Salzburg, Austria, and congruent with the Lungau. ... Salzburg is a state or Land of Austria with an area of 7,154 km², located adjacent to the German border. ... Styria (Steiermark in German, Štajerska in Slovenian) is a federal state or Bundesland, located in the south east of Austria. ...


Samson is one of the giant figures at the "Ducasse" festivities, which takes place at Ath, Belgium. For other uses, see Ath (disambiguation). ...


Art

Samson has been a popular subject for paintings:[12]

Anonymous: There are multiple Alexander Andersons: For the British army general, see Alexander Anderson (British general) (1807-1877). ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... The Italian painter Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (1591—1666) known as Guercino (squinter), was born at Cento, a village between Bologna and Ferrara. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... Also see: Titian (disambiguation). ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... View of a building at the Getty Center, from the Central Garden. ... Altarpiece by Burgkmair. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... Self-portrait with skeleton, 1896. ... Giuseppe Caletti (c. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... Portrait of Lucas Cranach the Elder at age 77 by Lucas Cranach the Younger (1550), at the Uffizi Gallery, Florence Lucas Cranach the Elder (Lucas Cranach der Ältere, 1472 – October 16, 1553) was a German painter and printmaker in woodcut and engraving. ... Young Woman, by Salomon de Bray Salomon de Bray (Amsterdam, 1597 - Haarlem, 11 May 1664) was a Dutch architect and painter. ... View of a building at the Getty Center, from the Central Garden. ... Gerard de Jode (1509 - 1591) was a cartographer, engraver and publisher who lived and worked in Antwerp during the 16th century. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... John Doyle may refer to: John Doyle (announcer), whose voice is used by the NIST radio clock John Doyle (artist) (born 1897), Irish artist and grandfather of Arthur Conan Doyle John Doyle (baseball player), Canadian Major League Baseball player John Doyle (comedian), Australian comedian and writer John Doyle (critic) (born... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... Doré photographed by Felix Nadar. ... Albrecht Dürer (pronounced /al. ... The Smithsonian American Art Museum is a museum in Washington, D.C. with an extensive collection of American art. ... Philippe Galle (Haarlem 1537–Antwerp 1612) was best known as a designer and engraver, known for his copperplate engravings reproducing paintings. ... The creation of man, fresco in the Palazzo Medici-Riccardi in Florence, 1684-1686. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... The Italian painter Giovanni Francesco Barbieri (1591—1666) known as Guercino, was born at Cento, a village not far from Bologna. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ... The Agony in the Garden (1455) is the pinnacle of Mantegnas early style. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... Copperplate engraving done 1628 by Matthäus Merian d. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Aureliano Milani (1675-1749) was an Italian painter of the late-Baroque period, active in Bologna and Rome. ... National Gallery is a common name for a countrys major public art gallery. ... Mercurius, sculpture in the Amsterdam town hall Artus (Arnoldus) Quellijn, also known as Artus I Quellinus or Artus Quellinus the Elder (Antwerp, August 30, 1609 - Antwerp August 23, 1668) was a Flemish sculptor, who trained in Rome in the studio of François Duquesnoy and brought the classicizing Baroque style... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... Archie Rand Archie Rand (born 1950) is an artist and academic from Brooklyn, New York, currently Presidential Professor of Art at Brooklyn College. ... Autoportrait Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21 Guido Reni (November 4, 1575, Calvenzano di Vergato, near Bologna - August 18, 1642, Bologna) was a prominent Italian painter of high-Baroque style. ... Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn (July 15, 1606 - October 4, 1669) is generally considered one of the greatest painters in European art history, and the most important United Provinces (Netherlands) painter of the seventeenth century. ... Peter Paul Rubens (June 28, 1577 – May 30, 1640) was a prolific seventeenth-century Flemish and European painter, and a proponent of an exuberant Baroque style that emphasized movement, color, and sensuality. ... View of a building at the Getty Center, from the Central Garden. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... Solomon Joseph Solomon (September 16, 1860, London - July 27, 1927, Birchington) was a British pre-Rafaelite painter, of no relation to Simeon Solomon or his siblings Abraham and Rebecca. ... This page is about the Walker Art Gallery in Liverpool. ... // Steen was born in Leiden, where his well-to-do, Catholic family had run the tavern The Red Halbert for several generations. ... James Joseph Jacques Tissot (October 15, 1836 – August 8, 1902) was a French painter. ... Christian Theological Seminary is an ecumenical seminary of the Protestant denomination, Disciples of Christ. ... The wedding at Cana, 1820. ... Self Portrait With a Sunflower Sir Anthony (Anton) van Dyck (22 March 1599 – 9 December 1641) was a Flemish artist who became the leading court painter in England. ... Gerhard van Honthorst (1590 - 1656), also known as Gherardo della Notte, was a Dutch painter of Utrecht. ... Israhel van Meckenem (also known as Israhel van Meckenem the Younger) was a German printmaker and goldsmith. ... The West building of the National Gallery of Art with the East building visible behind and to to the left The National Gallery of Art is an art museum, located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. The museum was established in 1937 by the Congress, with funds for... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums...

The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums... View of a building at the Getty Center, from the Central Garden. ... View of a building at the Getty Center, from the Central Garden. ... The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, comprising the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum in Golden Gate Park and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor in Lincoln Park is the largest public arts institution in the city of San Francisco and one of the largest art museums...

Samson's burial site

Samson is believed to be buried in Tel Tzora in Israel overlooking the Sorek valley. There reside two large gravestones of Samson and his father Manoah. Nearby stands Manoach’s altar(Judges 13:19-24).[13] It is located between the cities of Zorah and Eshtaol.[8] The Brook of Sorek, also called the Valley of Sorek, (in Hebrew nachal sorek), mentioned in the Book of Judges 16:4 of the Hebrew Bible, is probably a point on the border between the ancient Philistines and the Tribe of Dan of the ancient Israelites. ...


Historicity

The biblical story of Samson is so specific concerning time and place that Samson was undoubtedly a real person, who pitted his great strength against the oppressors of Israel.[1]


Samson in popular culture

Main article: Samson in popular culture

The most detailed film version of the Biblical Samson was the 1949 Cecil B. deMille film Samson and Delilah (1949 film), starring Victor Mature as Samson. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Comay, Joan; Ronald Brownrigg (1993). Who's Who in the Bible:The Old Testament and the Apocrypha, The New Testament (in English). New York: Wing Books, Old Testament, 320. ISBN 0-517-32170-X. 
  2. ^ Comay, Joan; Ronald Brownrigg (1993). Who's Who in the Bible:The Old Testament and the Apocrypha, The New Testament (in English). New York: Wing Books, Old Testament, 316-317. ISBN 0-517-32170-X. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Comay, Joan; Ronald Brownrigg (1993). Who's Who in the Bible:The Old Testament and the Apocrypha, The New Testament (in English). New York: Wing Books, Old Testament, 317. ISBN 0-517-32170-X. 
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u Comay, Joan; Ronald Brownrigg (1993). Who's Who in the Bible:The Old Testament and the Apocrypha, The New Testament (in English). New York: Wing Books, Old Testament, 318. ISBN 0-517-32170-X. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab This article incorporates text from the 1901–1906 Jewish Encyclopedia article "Samson", a publication now in the public domain.
  6. ^ a b c d e Judges 15
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Judges 16
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i Comay, Joan; Ronald Brownrigg (1993). Who's Who in the Bible:The Old Testament and the Apocrypha, The New Testament (in English). New York: Wing Books, Old Testament, 319. ISBN 0-517-32170-X. 
  9. ^ a b Judges 16:30
  10. ^ a b [1]
  11. ^ a b c d Balint, Benjamin, "Eyeless in Israel: Biblical metaphor and the Jewish state," review of Lion's Honey: The Myth of Samson, by David Grossman, The Weekly Standard, October 30, 2006, pages 35–36
  12. ^ [2] "The Text This Week Lectionary, Scripture Study and Worship Links and Resources" Web site, Web page titled "Links to Images of Samson",, accessed November 2, 2006
  13. ^ Philistines are upon you, Samson, Ynet

The Jewish Encyclopedia was an encyclopedia originally published between 1901 and 1906 by Funk and Wagnalls. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Weekly Standard is an American neoconservative [1] magazine published 48 times per year. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Samson
Preceded by
Abdon
Judge of Israel Succeeded by
Eli

Tribe of Dan was also a band from the mid 1990s. ... Abdon the son of Hillel, a Pirathonite, the tenth judge of Israel mentioned in the Book of Judges. ... Biblical judges are not to be confused with modern legal judges. ... Eli (Hebrew: עֵלִי, Standard Tiberian  ; Ascent) was, according to the Books of Samuel, the name of a priest of Shiloh, and one of the last Israelite Judges before the rule of kings in ancient Israel. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Samson (0 words)
Samson’s birth was predicted to the barren wife of Manoah, by an angel of God who at the same time instructed her as to the nature of his upbringing and work.
The family of Samson belonged to the tribe of Dan and lived at Zorah (v 2) in the Shephelah (Palestine Under Joshua and the Judges), not far from the territory of the Philistines, hence probably felt the brunt of Philistine oppressive rule.
Samson’s recorded acts may be divided into 5 episodes, but it should be remembered that neither his whole life nor all his performances of heroism are recorded in the Bible (see Jgs 13:25).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m