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Encyclopedia > Sam Rayburn
Samuel Taliaferro Rayburn
Sam Rayburn

In office
September 16, 1940 – January 3, 1947
January 3, 1949January 3, 1953
January 3, 1955November 16, 1961
Preceded by William B. Bankhead (1941)
Joseph William Martin, Jr. (1949) & (1955)
Succeeded by Joseph William Martin, Jr. (1947) & (1953)
John W. McCormack (1955)

Born January 6, 1882(1882-01-06)
Roane County, Tennessee
Died November 16, 1961 (aged 79)
Political party Democratic
Spouse henery
Religion Primitive Baptist

Samuel Taliaferro Rayburn (January 6, 1882November 16, 1961) was a Democratic politician from Bonham, Texas. "Mr. Sam", as he was widely known, served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives for 17 years, and is regarded by some historians as the most effective Speaker in history. This article is about people called professionals. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Sam Rayburn (born October 20, 1980 in Chickasha, Oklahoma) is a 63 330 pound defensive tackle in the National Football League for the Philadelphia Eagles. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Sam Rayburn, portrait Source: http://teachpol. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... William Brockman Bankhead (April 12, 1874 - September 15, 1940) was an American politician from Alabama. ... Joseph William Martin, Jr (November 3, 1884 - March 6, 1968) was an American politician from North Attleborough, Massachusetts. ... Joseph William Martin, Jr (November 3, 1884 - March 6, 1968) was an American politician from North Attleborough, Massachusetts. ... John William McCormack (December 21, 1891 – November 22, 1980) was an American politician from Boston, Massachusetts. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Roane County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Primitive Baptists are a group of Baptists that have a historical connection to the missionary / anti-missionary controversy that divided Baptists of America in the early part of the 19th century. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Bonham is a city in Fannin County, Texas, United States. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ...

Contents

Background

He was born in lalalalalalalalal, Tennessee, and graduated from Mayo College (now Texas A&M University-Commerce) in Commerce, Texas. After a year of teaching school, he won election to the Texas State Legislature. During his third two-year term in the Legislature, he was elected Speaker of the House at the age of 29. The next year, he won election to the United States House of Representatives in District 4. He entered Congress in 1913 at the beginning of Woodrow Wilson's presidency and served in office for more than 48 years. During this entire time, he never faced a Republican or other serious challenger for reelection. Texas A&M University-Commerce Texas A&M University-Commerce began as East Texas Normal College in 1889 when founder William Leonidas Mayo opened the doors to a one-building campus in Cooper, TX. His creed, which continues today, was ceaseless industry, fearless investigation, unfettered thought, and unselfish service to... Commerce is a city located in Hunt County, Texas. ... Texas Senate in session The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ... It has been suggested that Speakers of the House be merged into this article or section. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... The current boundaries of Texas District 4. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


Speaker of the House

A statue of Rayburn in the Rayburn House Office Building

On September 16, 1940, at the age of 58, Rayburn became Speaker of the United States House of Representatives. His career as Speaker was interrupted only twice: 1947–1948 and 1953–1954, when Republicans controlled the House. During that time, Rayburn served as Minority Leader. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 350 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1052 × 1799 pixels, file size: 351 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Created by user and released into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 350 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1052 × 1799 pixels, file size: 351 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Created by user and released into the public domain. ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... The Minority Leader of the United States House of Representatives serves as floor leader of the opposition party, and is the minority counterpart to the Majority Leader of the United States House of Representatives. ...


Rayburn grew up in abject poverty, and would champion the interests of the poor once in office. He was a close friend of Lyndon B. Johnson and knew Johnson's father Sam Ealy Johnson, from their days in the Texas State Legislature. Rayburn was instrumental to LBJ's ascent to power, particularly his unusual and rapid rise to the position of Minority Leader even though at the time, Johnson had been in the Senate for a mere four years. Johnson also owed his subsequent elevation to Majority Leader to Rayburn. A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Samuel Ealy Johnson, Jr. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ...


Rayburn, though a menacing and powerful presence on the House floor, was incredibly shy outside of work. He had married once, to Metze Jones, sister of Texas Congressman Marvin Jones and Rayburn's colleague, but the marriage ended quickly and no one really ever knew why. Biographer D.B. Hardeman guessed that Rayburn's work schedule and long bachelorhood, combined with the couple's differing views on alcohol contributed to the rift. The court's divorce file in Bonham, Texas, could never be located, and Rayburn avoided speaking of his brief marriage. One of his greatest, most painful regrets was that he did not have a son, or as he put it in Robert Caro's biography of Lyndon B. Johnson, "a towheaded boy to take fishing." Judge John Marvin Jones (February 26, 1882 – March 4, 1976) was a member of the United States House of Representatives from Texas and Chief Judge of the United States Court of Claims. ... Bonham is a city in Fannin County, Texas, United States. ... Robert Allan Caro (born October 30, 1935) is a biographer most noted for his studies of United States political figures Robert Moses and Lyndon B. Johnson. ... LBJ redirects here. ...


Legendary reputation

Sam Rayburn
Sam Rayburn

In shaping legislation, Rayburn preferred working quietly in the background to being in the public spotlight. As Speaker, he won a reputation for fairness and integrity. He despised lobbyists and refused to accept any gifts or money from them. He only said, "I am not for sale," and walked away. In his years in Congress, Rayburn always insisted on paying his own expenses, even going so far as to pay for his own travel expenses when inspecting the Panama Canal when his committee was considering legislation concerning it, rather than exercising his right to have the government pay for it. When he died, his personal savings only totaled $15,000 and most of his holdings were in his family ranch. Download high resolution version (477x640, 28 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (477x640, 28 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Two Panamax running the Miraflores Locks The Panama Canal (Spanish: ) is a major ship canal that traverses the Isthmus of Panama in Central America, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. ...


Rayburn was well known among his colleagues for his after business hours "Board of Education" meetings in hideaway offices in the House. During these off-the-record sessions, the Speaker and powerful committee chairmen would gather for poker, bourbon, and a frank discussion of politics. Rayburn alone determined who received an invitation to these gatherings; to be invited to a "Board of Education" gathering was a high honor.


He coined the term "Sun Belt" while strongly supporting the construction of Route 66. It originally ran south from Chicago, through Oklahoma, and then turned westward from Texas to New Mexico and Arizona before ending at the beach in Santa Monica, California. Arguing in favor of the project, he stated famously that America absolutely must connect "the Frost Belt with the Sun Belt." The Sun Belt, highlighted in red This article is about the region of the United States. ... Route 66 redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Largest metro area Oklahoma City metro area Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,898 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ...


The phrase "A jackass can kick a barn down, but it takes a carpenter to build one," is attributed to Rayburn.[1]


Rayburn died of pancreatic cancer in 1961 at the age of 79, and was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal. By the time of his death, he had served as Speaker for twice as long as any of his predecessors. Pancreatic cancer is a malignant tumor within the pancreatic gland. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Congressional Gold Medal presented to Navajo Code talkers in 2000 The Congressional Gold Medal should not be confused with the Medal of Honor (commonly called the Congressional Medal of Honor), which is also awarded by Congress, but only to military members as the highest military decoration of the United States. ...


Tributes

Stamp issued by the United States Postal Service commemorating Sam Rayburn.
Stamp issued by the United States Postal Service commemorating Sam Rayburn.
  • The Rayburn House Office Building, which contains offices of House members adjacent to the United States Capitol.
  • The ballistic missile submarine USS Sam Rayburn.
  • The Sam Rayburn Reservoir in East Texas was named after him in 1963, and is a popular destination for bass fishing and professional fishing tournaments.
  • Sam Rayburn High School in Pasadena, Texas, also bears his name and houses the desk he used as Speaker of the House.
  • The Sam Rayburn Independent School District was named for him in 1964.
  • A documentary tentatively titled "Rayburn: Mr. Speaker" is currently in production from filmmaker Reed Penney, according to a report by the Texas A&M University-Commerce campus newspaper The East Texan.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... USS Sam Rayburn (SSBN/MTS-635), a James Madison-class ballistic missile submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Speaker of the House of Representatives Sam Rayburn. ... Sam Rayburn Reservoir is a reservoir in the United States located in Southeast Texas, 70 miles (130 km) north of Beaumont. ... Red counties show the core of East Texas; pink and red counties may or may not be included in East Texas, and thus their inclusion varies from source to source. ... Sam Rayburn High School is a public high school located in Pasadena, Texas with a ZIP code of 77502. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Texas. ... Sam Rayburn Independent School District is a public school district based in the community of Ivanhoe, Texas (USA). ... Texas A&M University-Commerce Texas A&M University-Commerce began as East Texas Normal College in 1889 when founder William Leonidas Mayo opened the doors to a one-building campus in Cooper, TX. His creed, which continues today, was ceaseless industry, fearless investigation, unfettered thought, and unselfish service to...

Portrayals

Portrayed by Pat Hingle in LBJ: The Early Years (1987, TV). Played by James Gammon in Truman (1995, TV). Pat Hingle (born July 19, 1924) is an American actor. ... James Gammon (born April 20, 1940 in Newman, Illinois) is an American actor. ...


Bibliography

  • Robert A. Caro, The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Path to Power (1982).
  • Anthony Champagne and Floyd F. Ewing, "RAYBURN, SAMUEL TALIAFERRO (1882-1961)." Handbook of Texas Online (2005) online version
  • Anthony Champagne, Congressman Sam Rayburn (Rutgers University Press, 1984).
  • Anthony Champagne, Sam Rayburn: A Bio-Bibliography (Greenwood, 1988).
  • C. Dwight Dorough, Mr. Sam (1962).
  • Lewis L. Gould and Nancy Beck Young, "The Speaker and the Presidents: Sam Rayburn, the White House, and the Legislative Process, 1941–1961" in Raymond W. Smock and Susan W. Hammond, eds. Masters of the House: Congressional Leadership Over Two Centuries (1998). online version
  • D. B. Hardeman and Donald C. Bacon, Rayburn: A Biography (Austin: Texas Monthly Press, 1987).
  • Alfred Steinberg, Sam Rayburn (Hawthorn, 1975

External links

Preceded by
Rosser Thomas
Member of the Texas House of Representatives
from District 34 (Bonham)

1909–1913
Succeeded by
Robert R. Williams
Preceded by
John Wesley Marshall
Speaker of the Texas House of Representatives
1911–1913
Succeeded by
Chester H. Terrell
Preceded by
Choice B. Randell
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Texas's 4th congressional district

1913–1961
Succeeded by
Ray Roberts
Preceded by
Arthur G. DeWalt
Democratic Caucus Chairman of the United States House of Representatives
1923-1925
Succeeded by
Henry T. Rainey
Preceded by
William B. Bankhead
Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
September 16, 1940January 3, 1943;
January 6, 1943January 3, 1947
Succeeded by
Joseph W. Martin, Jr.
Preceded by
Joseph W. Martin, Jr.
Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
January 3, 1949January 3, 1953
Succeeded by
Joseph W. Martin, Jr.
Preceded by
Joseph W. Martin, Jr.
Speaker of the United States House of Representatives
January 5, 1955January 3, 1959;
January 7, 1959November 16, 1961
Succeeded by
John W. McCormack

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sam Rayburn (1038 words)
Rayburn's congressional career spanned the particularly accelerated legislative activity that occurred during the administrations of Woodrow Wilson, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Harry S. Truman; Rayburn was a participant in the passage of most of the significant legislation of the first half of the twentieth century.
Rayburn became a close political ally of the powerful Texas congressman John Nance Garner and in 1932 served as Garner's campaign manager in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination.
Sam" was awarded the $10,000 Collier's award for distinguished service to the nation, and this award became the basis of an endowment for establishing and maintaining the Sam Rayburn Library at Bonham.
Sam Rayburn Summary (1263 words)
Sam Rayburn was born in Roane County, Tenn., on Jan. 6, 1882, the eighth of 11 children.
Sam", as he was widely known, served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives for 17 years, and is widely regarded as the most effective Speaker of the House in American history.
Rayburn died of cancer in 1961 at the age of 79, and shortly afterwards was given the Congressional Gold Medal.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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