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Encyclopedia > Sam Nunn
Sam Nunn
Sam Nunn

In office
November 8, 1972 – January 3, 1997
Preceded by David H. Gambrell
Succeeded by Max Cleland

Born September 8 1938 ( 1938-09-08) (age 69)
Perry, Georgia
Political party Democratic
Spouse Colleen O'Brien Nunn
Religion Christian

Samuel Augustus Nunn, Jr. (born September 8, 1938) is an American businessman and politician. Currently the co-chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the NTI (Nuclear Threat Initiative), a charitable organization working to reduce the global threats from nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, Nunn served for twenty-four years as a United States Senator from Georgia (1972 until 1997) as a member of the Democratic Party. His political experience and strong credentials on national defense reportedly put him into consideration as a potential running mate for Democratic candidate John Kerry in the 2004 Presidential election. Recently, he has commented on the possibility of his running for President of the United States in the 2008 election as an independent candidate.[1] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... David Henry Gambrell (born December 20, 1929) is a politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Joseph Maxwell Cleland (born August 24, 1942) is an American politician from Georgia. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Perry is a city located in Houston County, Georgia. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ... The Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) is a an American public charity founded by Ted Turner and Sam Nunn which exists to strengthen global security by reducing the the spread of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons, and also to reduce the risk that they will actually be used. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... Biological Weapons: Friend or Foe? By Dom Harris There is great debate about whether biological weapons are good or bad, and whether the world should be concerned about their development. ... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Presidential election results map. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Presidential electoral votes by state The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial election for president and vice president of the United States. ... In politics, an independent is a politician who is not affiliated with any political party. ...

Contents

Early life

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He was born in Macon, Georgia and raised in nearby Perry, and already had a family connection with politics, being a grandnephew of the Congressman Carl Vinson. Nunn attended Georgia Tech in 1956,[2] where he was initiated as a brother of Phi Delta Theta. He transferred to Emory University the next year and received his undergraduate degree in 1960.[2] He then received a degree from the Emory University School of Law in 1962.[2] After active duty service in the United States Coast Guard, he served six years in the U.S. Coast Guard Reserve. Macon is a city located in central Georgia, USA. It is among the largest metropolitan areas in Georgia, and the county seat of Bibb County, It lies near the geographic center of Georgia, approximately 75 miles (129 km) south of Atlanta, hence the citys nickname as the Heart of... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Carl Vinson Carl Vinson (November 18, 1883 – June 1, 1981) was a Democratic United States Congressman from Georgia. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France and Singapore. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emory University School of Law is a top-tier U.S. law school, part of Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the United States armed forces a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... The United States Coast Guard Reserve , established in 1939 as a civilian reserve, is the military reserve component of the United States Coast Guard. ...


Nunn is an Eagle Scout and recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award from the Boy Scouts of America.[3][4] In 1989, the Wall Street Journal reported that Nunn had a drunk driving conviction in his youth. The Journal reported this when Nunn opposed the confirmation of ex-Senator John Tower for Secretary of Defense due to Tower's alleged lack of sobriety.[citation needed] Eagle Scout is the highest rank attainable by a Scout in the Boy Scouts of America (BSA), and is also used as a title of a Scout who has achieved this honor. ... The Distinguished Eagle Scout Award, is a special award, awarded only to Eagle Scouts, for distinguished service in his profession or to the community for a period of at least 25 years after earning his Eagle Scout rank. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Drunk driving (drink driving in the UK) or drinking and driving is the act of operating a motor vehicle after having consumed alcohol (i. ... John Tower John Goodwin Tower (September 29, 1925 – April 5, 1991) was the first Republican United States senator from Texas since the Reconstruction after the Civil War. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ...


Political career

Nunn first entered politics as a member of the Georgia House of Representatives in 1968.[2] After defeating David H. Gambrell in the Democratic Primary and Rep. Fletcher Thompson in the general election, he was elected to the United States Senate in 1972. The Georgia House of Representatives is the lower house of the General Assembly (the state legislature) of Georgia. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... David Henry Gambrell (born December 20, 1929) is a politician from the U.S. state of Georgia. ... Standish Fletcher Thompson (born February 5, 1925) is an American lawyer and politician who served as a representative in Congress for the 5th Congressional District of Georgia. ...  Republican holds  Republican pickups  Democratic holds  Democratic pickups The U.S. Senate election, 1972 was an election for the United States Senate coinciding with the landslide re-election of Richard M. Nixon. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During his tenure in the U.S. Senate, Senator Nunn served as chairman of the powerful U.S. Senate Committee on Armed Services and the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations. He also served on the Intelligence and Small Business Committees. His legislative achievements include the landmark Department of Defense Reorganization Act, drafted with the late Senator Barry Goldwater, and the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program,[3] which provides assistance to Russia and the former Soviet republics for securing and destroying their excess nuclear, biological and chemical weapons. To date, the Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction program has deactivated more than 5,900 nuclear warheads. He was supposedly a top choice to be Secretary of Defense or State in 1992 and 1996 and in a prospective Gore cabinet in 2000. The Committee on Armed Services is a committee of the United States Senate empowered with legislative oversight of the nations military, including the Department of Defense, military research and development, nuclear energy (as pertaining to national security), benefits for members of the military, the Selective Service System and other... The Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations (PSI) of the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs is currently chaired by Senator Norm Coleman (R-MN), with Carl Levin (D-MI) as a ranking member. ... A small business may be defined as a business with a small number of employees. ... The Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense Reorganization Act of 1986 Pub. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... The Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program is a 1991 U.S. law sponsored by Senators Richard Lugar and Sam Nunn. ... The Nunn-Lugar Cooperative Threat Reduction Program is a 1991 U.S. law sponsored by Senators Richard Lugar and Sam Nunn. ... A B61 nuclear bomb in various stages of assembly; the nuclear warhead is the bullet-shaped silver cannister in the middle-left of the photograph. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense, concerned with the armed services and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ...


Overall, Nunn was a moderately-conservative Democrat[5] who often broke with his party on a host of social and economic issues. He strongly opposed the budget bill of 1993, which included provisions to raise taxes in order to reduce the deficit. He was also vehement in his opposition to President Clinton's proposal to allow homosexuals to serve openly in the military.[6][7] He voted in favor of school prayer, capping punitive damage awards, amending the U.S. Constitution to require a balanced budget, and limiting death penalty appeals. On certain issues like abortion, the environment, gun control, and affirmative action, Nunn took a more moderate line. He consistently voted in favor of increased immigration.[8] In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ... A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... Order: 42nd President Term of Office: January 20, 1993–January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas Date of death: Place of death: First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic Vice... Since its coinage, the word homosexuality has acquired multiple meanings. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... From a Keynesian point of view, a balanced budget in the public sector is achieved when the government has enough fiscal discipline to be able to equate the revenues with expenditure over the business cycles. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... Affirmative action refers to policies intended to promote access to education or employment aimed at a historically socio-politically non-dominant group (typically, minorities or women). ...


Post-Congressional Public Service

In addition to his work with NTI, Senator Nunn has continued his service in the public policy arena as a distinguished professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech and as chairman of the board of the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. Nunn also is a retired partner in the law firm of King & Spalding. He is an Advisory Board member for the Partnership for a Secure America, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to recreating the bipartisan center in American national security and foreign policy. Public policy is a course of action or inaction chosen by public authorities to address a problem. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France and Singapore. ... The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) is a Washington, D.C.-based foreign policy think tank. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... -1... The Partnership for a Secure America (PSA) is a not-for-profit organization dedicated to recreating the bipartisan center in American national security and foreign policy. ...


He is a board member of the following publicly held corporations: Chevron Corporation, The Coca-Cola Company, Dell Computer Corporation, General Electric Company. Chevron Corporation (NYSE: CVX) is one of the worlds largest global energy companies. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Dell, Inc. ... “GE” redirects here. ...


In 2005, Nunn teamed up with former Senator Fred Thompson to promote a new film, Last Best Chance, on the dangers of excess nuclear weapons and materials. The film aired on HBO in October of 2005. He gave a full presentation outlining his goals at the Commonwealth Club of California. In the broadcast, subtle comparisons are made between Nunn's career as elder statesman and that of Jimmy Carter, noting that they are both from Georgia and both were farmers before launching their political careers, but the broadcast does not go so far as to overtly compare them with the founding fathers. This article is about the actor/politician. ... Last Best Chance is a docu-drama starring Fred Thompson, who plays the president of the United States. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... The Commonwealth Club of California is a non-profit, non-partisan educational organization based in Northern California. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... “Founders” redirects here. ...


He is married to the former Colleen O'Brien and has two children, Michelle and Brian.


Possible 2008 presidential campaign

On August 3, 2007, Nunn confirmed that he has had discussions with New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg about the current political climate. He also stated that he hasn't ruled out the possibility of declaring his own candidacy in the 2008 presidential election as an independent. However, Nunn indicated that he would decline any offers to run for Vice President by saying, "The only thing I would consider would be running for the big office." [9] On August 19, Nunn said he would not decide on a presidential bid until after the 2008 primary season, once the major parties have produced de facto nominees.[10] is the 215th day of the year (216th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... For a list of the Dutch Director-Generals who governed New Amsterdam (as New York City was called when it was a Dutch-run settlement) between 1624 and 1664, see: Director-General of New Netherland. ... Michael Rubens Bloomberg (born 14 February 1942) is an American businessman, philanthropist, and the founder of Bloomberg L.P., currently serving as the Mayor of New York City. ... ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... De facto is a Latin expression that means in fact or in practice. It is commonly used as opposed to de jure (meaning by law) when referring to matters of law or governance or technique (such as standards), that are found in the common experience as created or developed without...


References

  1. ^ Towery, Matt. "As Insider First Reported, Sam Nunn's Being Court For Independent Bid - And Now He Confirms Interest", InsiderAdvantage Georgia. 
  2. ^ a b c d "A Conversation With Sam Nunn", Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine Online, Georgia Tech Alumni Association, Spring 1990. Retrieved on 2007-03-06. 
  3. ^ a b Townley, Alvin (2006-12-26). Legacy of Honor: The Values and Influence of America's Eagle Scouts. New York: St. Martin's Press, pp. 121–122. ISBN 0-312-36653-1. Retrieved on 2006-12-29. 
  4. ^ Distinguished Eagle Scouts. Troop & Pack 179. Retrieved on 2006-03-02.
  5. ^ http://www.bookrags.com/Sam_Nunn
  6. ^ "A Retreat on Gay Soldiers", New York Times, 1993-09-19. Retrieved on 2007-03-10. 
  7. ^ Kasindorf, Martin. "Nunn Offers Compromise on Military's Gay Ban", The Tech, 1993-03-30. Retrieved on 2007-03-10. 
  8. ^ http://profiles.numbersusa.com/improfile.php3?DistSend=GA&VIPID=207
  9. ^ http://www.Townhall.com/news/politics-elections/2007/08/03/nunn_seeks_independent_candidate
  10. ^ Galloway, Jim (07-08-19), "Former Sen. Sam Nunn Weighs Run for White House", Atlanta Journal-Constitution, <http://www.ajc.com/news/content/news/stories/2007/08/18/nunn_0819_1.html#>

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Front page of The Tech, issue of January 18, 2006 The Tech, first published in 1881, is the oldest and largest campus newspaper at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ...

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original works written by or about:
Preceded by
David H. Gambrell
United States Senator (Class 2) from Georgia
19721997
Served alongside: Herman E. Talmadge, Mack F. Mattingly, Wyche Fowler, Jr., Paul Coverdell
Succeeded by
Max Cleland
Preceded by
Barry Goldwater
Arizona
Chairman of Senate Armed Services Commmittee
1987–1995
Succeeded by
Strom Thurmond
South Carolina
Persondata
NAME Nunn, Sam
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION
DATE OF BIRTH September 08 1938 ( 1938-09-08) (age 69)
PLACE OF BIRTH Perry, Georgia
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Sam Nunn (b. 1938) (973 words)
Samuel Augustus Nunn was born on September 8, 1938, and reared in the small town of Perry, in middle Georgia.
Nunn believed that the swing vote in America would respond well to the moderate message of the DLC, which is widely credited with creating the "New Democrat" agenda on which Bill Clinton was elected U.S. president in 1992.
Nunn sponsored legislation in 1989 that encouraged greater citizen participation in the service of the country by offering educational benefits, including federal loans and scholarships, in return for up to two years of public service in a "civilian service corps" or in the military.
Sam Nunn Summary (1898 words)
Born in Perry, Georgia, on September 25, 1938, Sam Nunn was the son of Samuel A. and Elizabeth (Canon) Nunn.
Sam and his older sister were raised in a strict Protestant atmosphere which brought them to Perry's Methodist Church regularly, under the influence of their mother Elizabeth Nunn, who survived her husband into her 80s, still living in the family home in Perry in 1986.
Nunn is an Eagle Scout and recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award from the Boy Scouts of America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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