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Encyclopedia > Sam Houston
Sam Houston
Sam Houston

In office
October 1, 1827 – April 16, 1829
Lieutenant William Hall
Preceded by William Carroll
Succeeded by William Hall

In office
October 22, 1836 – December 10, 1838
Preceded by David G. Burnet
Succeeded by Mirabeau B. Lamar

In office
December 13, 1841 – December 9, 1844
Preceded by Mirabeau B. Lamar
Succeeded by Anson Jones

In office
December 12, 1859 – March 18, 1861
Lieutenant Edward Clark
Preceded by Hardin Richard Runnels
Succeeded by Edward Clark

Born March 2, 1793(1793-03-02)
Rockbridge County, Virginia
Died July 26, 1863 (aged 70)
Huntsville, Texas
Spouse Eliza Allen

Tiana Rogers Gentry Image File history File links Size of this preview: 461 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (568 × 739 pixel, file size: 110 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://hdl. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe 1829 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Lieutenant Governor of Tennessee is the Speaker of the Tennessee State Senate and first in line in the succession to the office of Governor of Tennessee in the event of the death, resignation, or removal from office through impeachment and conviction of the Governor. ... William Hall (February 11, 1775–October 7, 1856) was the Governor of the state of Tennessee from April to October of 1829. ... William Carroll (1788–1844) was Governor of Tennessee from 1821 to 1827 and again from 1829 to 1835. ... William Hall (February 11, 1775–October 7, 1856) was the Governor of the state of Tennessee from April to October of 1829. ... Categories: | | ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Categories: | | ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Anson Jones (January 20, 1798 – January 9, 1858) was a doctor, businessman, congressman, and the last president of the Republic of Texas, sometimes called the Architect of Annexation. ... In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. ... Hardin Richard Runnels (August 30, 1820–December 25, 1873) was a U.S. political figure. ... This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Rockbridge County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 66 Foot Tall Statue of Sam Houston in Huntsville, Texas. ...


Margaret Moffette Lea Margaret Moffette Lea (April 11, 1819 in Marion, Alabama (Perry County) - December 3, 1867, in Independence, Texas) was the daughter of Temple Lea and Nancy Moffett. ...

Religion Baptist

Samuel Houston (March 2, 1793July 26, 1863) was a 19th century American statesman, politician, and soldier. Born in Timber Ridge, just north of Lexington in Rockbridge County, Virginia, in the Shenandoah Valley, Houston was a key figure in the history of Texas, including periods as President of the Republic of Texas, Senator for Texas after it joined the United States, and finally as governor. Although a slaveowner and opponent of abolitionism, he refused, because of his unionist convictions, to swear loyalty to the Confederacy when Texas seceded from the Union, bringing his governorship to an end. To avoid bloodshed, he refused an offer of an army to put down the rebellion, and instead retired to Huntsville, Texas, where he died before the end of the Civil War. Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Timber Ridge is a mountain ridge of the Ridge-and-valley Appalachians straddling the U.S. states of Virginia and West Virginia. ... Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Rockbridge County is a county located in the U.S. state — officially, Commonwealth — of Virginia. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Canoeing on the Shenandoah River near Winchester, VA. The Shenandoah Valley region of western Virginia, from Winchester to Staunton, is bounded by the Blue Ridge mountains to the East and the Allegheny mountains to the West. ... For other uses, see Texas (disambiguation). ... For the latter day independence movement surrounding Texas, see Republic of Texas (group). ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Slave redirects here. ... This article is about slavery. ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ... The Union was a name used by many to refer to the Northern states during the American Civil War. ... 66 Foot Tall Statue of Sam Houston in Huntsville, Texas. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


His earlier life included encouraging emigration to Tennessee, time spent with the Cherokee Nation (into which he was adopted and later married into), military service in the War of 1812, and subsequent successful involvement in Tennessee politics. Houston is the only person in U.S. history to have been the governor of two different states, Tennessee and Texas, although others were governors of multiple American colonies. This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... This page contains special characters. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Pre-Colonial America For details, see the main Pre-Colonial America article. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Betsy Ross purportedly sewed the first American flag with 13 stars and 13 stripes representing each of the 13 colonies. ...


A fight with a Congressman, followed by a high profile trial, led to his emigration to Mexican Texas, where he soon became a leader of the Texas Revolution. He supported annexation by the United States rather than seeking long term independence and expansion for Texas. The city of Houston was named after him during this period. Houston's reputation survived his death: posthumous commemoration has included a memorial museum, a U.S. Army base, a national forest, a historical park, a university, and the largest statue of an American figure. Look up trial in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Combatants Texas Mexico Commanders Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Antonio López de Santa Anna Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength c. ... Republic of Texas The Texas Annexation of 1845 was the voluntary annexation of the Republic of Texas by the United States of America as Texas, the 28th state. ... Houston redirects here. ... Fort Sam Houston is a U.S. Army post in San Antonio, Texas. ... The Sam Houston National Forest is off Interstate 45 and U.S. Highway 59 about forty miles north of Houston. ... Sam Houston State University, (known as SHSU and Sam, for short) founded in 1879, is a public university located in Huntsville, Texas. ...

Contents

Biography

Birthplace Marker in Rockbridge County, Virginia
Birthplace Marker in Rockbridge County, Virginia

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2000x1500, 901 KB) Photograph of the historical place marker for Sam Houstons birthplace in Virginia. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2000x1500, 901 KB) Photograph of the historical place marker for Sam Houstons birthplace in Virginia. ...

Early life

Sam Houston was born on his family's plantation near Timber Ridge Church, outside Lexington, Virginia in Rockbridge County, to Major Samuel Houston and Elizabeth Paxton. He was one of nine children. His father was a member of Morgan's Rifle Brigade during the American Revolutionary War. Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Rockbridge County is a county located in the state of Virginia. ... The 11th Virginia Regiment was raised on September 16, 1776 at Williamsburg, Virginia from Daniel Morgans Independent Rifle Company for service with the (U.S.) Continental Army. ... This article is about military actions only. ...


Receiving only a basic education, he immigrated with his family to Maryville, Tennessee following the death of his father in 1807. His mother then took the family to live on Baker Creek, Tennessee. He ran away from home in 1809 and resided for a time with the Cherokee tribe of Chief Oolooteka on Hiwassee Island. He was adopted into the Cherokee Nation and given the name Colonneh or "the Raven".[1] He returned to Maryville in 1812 at the age of 19 and founded a one-room schoolhouse. This was the first school ever built in Tennessee, which had become a state in 1796. Maryville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee, 20 miles south of Knoxville. ... This page contains special characters. ... A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the United States, although four states use the official title commonwealth. The separate state governments and the federal government share sovereignty, in that an American is a citizen both of the federal entity and of his or...


War of 1812

Houston was struck by a Creek arrow at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend.
Houston was struck by a Creek arrow at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend.

In 1812 Houston enlisted into the 7th Regiment of Infantry to fight the British in the War of 1812. By December of that year, he had risen from private to third lieutenant. At the Battle of Horseshoe Bend in March 1814 he was wounded by a Creek arrow. His wound was bandaged, and he rejoined the fight. When Andrew Jackson called on volunteers to dislodge a group of Red Sticks (Creek Indians) from their breastworks (fortifications), Houston volunteered, but during the assault was struck by a bullet in the shoulder and arm. Houston became close to Jackson, even joining Jackson's Masonic lodge, Cumberland Lodge No. 8, in 1817. Following his recovery he was assigned as an Indian agent to the Cherokees. He left the army in March 1818. Diorama of the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (from the Horseshow Bend National Park Museum). ... Diorama of the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (from the Horseshow Bend National Park Museum). ... The Creeks are an American Indian people originally from the southeastern United States, also known by their original name Muscogee (or Muskogee), the name they use to identify themselves today. ... Combatants Creek Indians Red Sticks United States Cherokee Creek allies Commanders Menawa Andrew Jackson Strength 1,000 Red Stick Creek about 2,000 infantry 700 mounted infantry 600 Cherokee and Lower Creeks Casualties 800 49 killed 154 wounded // Although having nothing to do with the British or Canadians, the battle... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ... Lieutenant is a military, naval, paramilitary, fire service or police officer rank. ... Combatants Creek Indians Red Sticks United States Cherokee Creek allies Commanders Menawa Andrew Jackson Strength 1,000 Red Stick Creek about 2,000 infantry 700 mounted infantry 600 Cherokee and Lower Creeks Casualties 800 49 killed 154 wounded // Although having nothing to do with the British or Canadians, the battle... An arrow is a pointed projectile that is shot with a bow. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Red Sticks is the English term for a faction of Creek Indians (known as mvskoke in the language). ... Breastwork may mean: A form of temporary fortification Breastwork (fortification). ... American Square & Compasses Freemasonry is a worldwide fraternal organization. ...


Tennessee politics

Following six months of study at the office of Judge James Trimble he passed the Nashville bar exam, after which he opened a legal practice in Lebanon, Tennessee.[2] He was made attorney general of the Nashville district in late 1818 and was also given a command in the state militia. In 1822 he was elected to the House of Representatives for Tennessee, where he was a staunch supporter of fellow Tennessean and Democrat Andrew Jackson and was widely considered to be Jackson's political protégé though their treatment of Indians differed greatly. He was a congressman from 1823 to 1827. He was re-elected in 1824. In 1827 he declined to run for re-election to Congress and instead ran for, and won, the office of governor of Tennessee, defeating the former governor, William Carroll. He planned to stand for re-election in 1828, but resigned after marrying eighteen year old Eliza Allen. The marriage was forced by Eliza's father, Colonel John Allen, and never blossomed into a relationship. Houston and Eliza separated shortly after the marriage, for reasons Houston refused to discuss to the end of his life, and divorced in 1837, after he became President of Texas. Lebanon is a city in Wilson County, Tennessee, in the United States. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... William Carroll (1788–1844) was Governor of Tennessee from 1821 to 1827 and again from 1829 to 1835. ... John Allen was the first president of the University of South Florida, from 1960 to 1970. ...

Sam Houston
Sam Houston

He spent time among the Cherokee, married a Cherokee widow named Tiana Rogers Gentry, and set up a trading post (Wigwam Neosho near Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation), apparently drinking heavily the entire time. During this time he was interviewed by Alexis De Tocqueville. His alleged drunkenness and abandonment of his office and wife caused a rift with his mentor Andrew Jackson, which would not be healed for several years. PD image from http://www. ... PD image from http://www. ... A trading post is a place where trading of goods takes place. ... Fort Gibson is a town located in Oklahoma. ... Tocqueville redirects here. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


Controversy and trial

On a trip to New York and Washington, D.C. on business, Houston became embroiled in a fight with an anti-Jacksonian Congressman. While Houston was in Washington in April 1832, Congressman William Stanbery of Ohio made accusations about Houston in a speech on the floor of Congress. Stanbery was attacking Jackson through Houston and accused Houston of being in league with John Von Fossen and Congressman Robert S. Rose. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


The three men bid on the supplying of rations to Indians who were being forcibly removed because of Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830. Stanbery, now carrying two pistols and a dirk, refused to answer Houston's letters; infuriated, Houston later confronted Stanbery on Pennsylvania Avenue as he left Mrs. Queen's boardinghouse and proceeded to beat him with a hickory cane. Stanbery did manage to draw one of his pistols, place it at Houston's chest and pull the trigger—the gun misfired. The Indian Removal Act, part of a U.S. government policy known as Indian Removal, was signed into law by President Andrew Jackson on May 28, 1830. ... Pennsylvania Avenue street sign, 2004. ...


On April 17 Congress ordered the arrest of Houston, who pleaded self-defense, and hired Francis Scott Key as his lawyer. Houston was found guilty in the high profile trial, but thanks to high placed friends (among them James K. Polk), he was only lightly reprimanded. Stanbery then filed charges against Houston in civil court. Judge William Cranch found Houston liable and fined him $500, a fine he never paid before leaving the country. Maryland Historical Society plaque marking the birthplace of Francis Scott Key Fort McHenry looking towards the position of the British ships (with the Francis Scott Key Bridge in the distance on the upper left) Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779 – January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, author, and amateur... This article is about the U.S. President. ... Categories: People stubs | Judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the DC Circuit | U.S. Supreme Court Reporters of Decisions | 1769 births | 1855 deaths ...


Texas

1963 stamp issued by the USPS to commemorate Sam Houston.
1963 stamp issued by the USPS to commemorate Sam Houston.

The publicity surrounding the trial resurrected Houston's political reputation, and he left the Cherokee and his wife, Diana Rodgers, also known as Tiana Rodgers, to enter Mexican Texas in December 1832. Houston had asked his wife, Tiana, to accompany him to Texas, but she wanted to settle down and preferred to stay at the log cabin and trading post. Tiana later remarried a man named Sam McGrady, but died of pneumonia in 1838. Houston did not remarry until after her death. After reaching Mexican Texas he was immediately swept up in the politics of the Mexican state. There has been speculation over the years that Houston went to Texas at the behest of President Andrew Jackson to seek the annexation of the territory for the United States. Image File history File links Wiki_samhouston. ... Image File history File links Wiki_samhouston. ... USPS and Usps redirect here. ... The province of Coahuila and Texas in 1833, showing the major land grants Mexican Texas is the given name by Texas history scholars to the period between 1821 and 1836, when Texas was governed by Mexico. ... The province of Coahuila and Texas in 1833, showing the major land grants Mexican Texas is the given name by Texas history scholars to the period between 1821 and 1836, when Texas was governed by Mexico. ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ...


Houston attended the Convention of 1833 as representative for Nacogdoches and emerged as a supporter of William Harris Wharton and his brother who supported complete independence from Mexico, the more radical stance of those represented. He also attended the Consultation of 1835. He was made a Major General, of the Texas Army in November 1835, then Commander-in-Chief in March 1836 at the convention which met at Washington-on-the-Brazos to declare Texan Independence. He negotiated a settlement with the Cherokee in February 1836. The Convention of 1833 was a gathering of politicans and leaders of the state of Coahuila y Tejas (then part of Mexico) in San Felipe on April 1, 1833. ... Nacogdoches (pronounced ) is a city in Nacogdoches County, Texas, in the United States. ... William Harris Wharton (April 27, 1802–March 14, 1839) was an early colonist and political leader and orator in Texas. ... Insignia of a United States Air Force Major General German Generalmajor Insignia Major General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... Categories: Texas stub | Texas history | Texas state parks ...


Republic of Texas

Following the Texas Declaration of Independence on March 2, 1836, Houston joined his volunteer army at Gonzales, but was soon forced to retreat in the face of the forces of Mexican General and dictator Antonio López de Santa Anna, whose army killed all those at The Alamo Mission during the Battle of the Alamo on March 6. The Texas Declaration of Independence was the formal declaration of independence of the Republic of Texas from Mexico in the Texas Revolution. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Volunteer (disambiguation). ... Gonzales is a city located in Gonzales County, Texas. ... Antonio de Padua María Severino López de Santa Anna y Pérez de Lebrón (February 21, 1794 – June 21, 1876), often known as Santa Anna, was a Mexican political leader who greatly influenced early Mexican and Spanish politics and government, first fighting against the independence from Spain... The Alamo (San Antonio de Valero Mission) is a former mission and fortress compound, now a museum, in San Antonio, Texas. ... Combatants Republic of Mexico Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas Commanders Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón William Travis† Jim Bowie† Davy Crockett† Strength 6,000 in attack (1,800 in assault-see below) 183 to 250 Casualties 650 killed 974 injured 180 killed The...

Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto.
Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto.

At the Battle of San Jacinto on April 21, 1836, however, Houston surprised Santa Anna and the Mexican forces during their afternoon siesta. Badly beaten, Santa Anna was forced to sign the Treaty of Velasco, granting Texas independence. Although Houston stayed on briefly for negotiations, he returned to the United States for treatment of a wound to his ankle. Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto Detail from painting (completed 1898) by Harry Arthur McArdle (1836-1908) that hangs in the Texas Capitol building. ... Sam Houston at the Battle of San Jacinto Detail from painting (completed 1898) by Harry Arthur McArdle (1836-1908) that hangs in the Texas Capitol building. ... Combatants Mexico Republic of Texas Commanders Antonio López de Santa Anna{POW} Manuel Fernandez Castrillon† Juan Almonte{POW} Sam Houston{wounded} Strength about 1,400 800 Casualties 630 killed, 208 wounded, 730 captured 9 killed, 26 wounded For other battles of the same name, see San Jacinto. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Houston was twice elected president of the Republic of Texas (the first time on September 5, 1836). He served from October 22, 1836, to December 10, 1838, and again from December 12, 1841 to December 9, 1844. On December 20, 1837, Houston presided over the convention of Freemasons that formed the Grand Lodge of the Republic of Texas, now the Grand Lodge of Texas. For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... For the latter day independence movement surrounding Texas, see Republic of Texas (group). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... | Jöns Jakob Berzelius, discoverer of protein 1838 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Freemasons redirects here. ... The Grand Lodge of Texas, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons is the main governing body of Ancient Freemasonry in the State of Texas, being solely of the Ancients tradition and descending from the Ancient Grand Lodge of England, founded in 1751. ...


He put down the Cordova Rebellion of 1838 and while initially seeking annexation by the U.S. he dropped that hope during his first term. In his second term, he strove for financial prudence and worked to make peace with the Indians and avoid war with Mexico, following the two invasions of 1842. He had to act over the Regulator-Moderator War of 1844 and sent in the militia. Ceremonies during the annexation of Hawaii. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Lebanese Kataeb militia The term Militia is commonly used today to refer to a military force composed of ordinary [1] citizens to provide defense, emergency, law enforcement, or paramilitary service, and those engaged in such activity, without being paid a regular salary or committed to a fixed term of service. ...


Settlement of Houston

The settlement of Houston was founded in August 1836 by brothers J.K. Allen and A.C. Allen and named in Houston's honor and served as capital. Gail Borden helped lay out Houston's streets. Houston redirects here. ... For other persons named John Allen, see John Allen (disambiguation). ... Augustus Chapman Allen is one of the two Allen Brothers who founded the City of Houston, Texas. ... Gail Borden (1801-1874) Patent RE2103 for Improvements in Condensing Milk Gail Borden, Jr. ...


The city of Houston served as the capital until President Mirabeau Lamar signed a measure moving the capital to Austin on January 14, 1839. Between his presidential terms (the constitution did not allow a president to serve consecutive terms), he was a representative in the Texas House of Representatives for San Augustine. He was a major critic of President Mirabeau Lamar, who advocated continuing independence of Texas and its extension to the Pacific Ocean. Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 - December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas. ... Austin is the capital of the U.S. state of Texas and the seat of Travis County. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1839 (MDCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... San Augustine is a town located in San Augustine County, Texas. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 - December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas. ...


Marriage

On May 9, 1840, in Marion, Alabama, Houston married Margaret Moffette Lea, with whom he had eight children. He was 47 and she was 21. Margaret acted as a tempering influence on Houston. Although the Houstons had numerous houses, only one was kept continuously, Cedar Point, on Trinity Bay from ca. 1840 through 1863. is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1840 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Marion is a city located in Perry County, Alabama. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Margaret Moffette Lea (April 11, 1819 in Marion, Alabama (Perry County) - December 3, 1867, in Independence, Texas) was the daughter of Temple Lea and Nancy Moffett. ... Trinity Bay is the northeast portion of Galveston Bay, bordered by Chambers and Harris counties. ...


U.S. Senator

Sam Houston as a U.S. senator.
Sam Houston as a U.S. senator.

After the annexation of Texas by the United States in 1845, he was elected to the U.S. Senate along with Thomas Jefferson Rusk. Houston served there from February 21, 1846, until March 4, 1859. He was a Senator during the Mexican-American War, when the U.S. acquired from Mexico vast new territory in the Southwest. Image File history File links Painting of Sam Houston located in Sam Houston Memorial Museum in Huntsville, Texas. ... Image File history File links Painting of Sam Houston located in Sam Houston Memorial Museum in Huntsville, Texas. ... Republic of Texas The Texas Annexation of 1845 was the voluntary annexation of the Republic of Texas by the United States of America as Texas, the 28th state. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Thomas Jefferson Rusk Thomas Jefferson Rusk December 5,1803 - July 29,1857; was a U.S. political figure and a Senator from Texas from 1846 until his suicide. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ...


Throughout his term in the Senate, Houston spoke out against the growing sectionalism of the country, and blamed the extremists of both the North and South, saying: "Whatever is calculated to weaken or impair the strength of [the] Union, — whether originating at the North or the South, — whether arising from the incendiary violence of abolitionists, or from the coalition of nullifiers, will never meet with my unqualified approval." Sectionalism is a tendency among sections of a country to develop a distinct identity based on ethnicity, customs, laws, language, economics, or culture. ... This article is about slavery. ... The Nullification Crisis was a sectional crisis during the presidency of Andrew Jackson that arose when the state of South Carolina attempted to nullify a federal law passed by the United States Congress. ...


Houston supported the Oregon Bill in 1848, which was opposed by many Southerners. In his passionate speech in support of the Compromise of 1850, Houston said "A nation divided against itself cannot stand". Eight years later, Abraham Lincoln would express a similar sentiment. Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Houston opposed the Kansas-Nebraska Act in 1854, and correctly predicted that it would cause a sectional rift in the country that would eventually lead to war: "…what fields of blood, what scenes of horror, what mighty cities in smoke and ruins — it is brother murdering brother… I see my beloved South go down in the unequal contest, in a sea of blood and smoking ruin." He was only one of two Southern senators (the other being John Bell of Tennessee) to vote against the Kansas-Nebraska Act. He was considered a potential candidate for president. But, despite the fact that he was a slave-owner, his strong Unionism and opposition to the extension of slavery alienated the Texas legislature and other southern States. This 1856 map shows slave states (grey), free states (red), and US territories (green) with Kansas in center (white). ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Texas Senate in session The Texas Legislature is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Texas. ...


Governor of Texas

Bust of Houston by Elisabet Ney.
Bust of Houston by Elisabet Ney.

He twice ran for governor of Texas, unsuccessfully in 1857 and successfully against Hardin R. Runnels in 1859 as a Unionist, making him the only person in U.S. history to be the governor of two different states. Despite Houston's being a slave owner and against abolition, he opposed the secession of Texas from the Union. In 1860, he offered the following prediction: "Let me tell you what is coming. After the sacrifice of countless millions of treasure and hundreds of thousands of lives you may win Southern independence, but I doubt it. The North is determined to preserve this Union."[3] Image File history File links Sam_Houston_by_Elizabeth_Ney. ... Image File history File links Sam_Houston_by_Elizabeth_Ney. ... Elizabet Ney portrait by Friedrich Kaulbach, 1860. ... For other uses, see Secession (disambiguation). ...


Despite Houston's wishes, Texas seceded from the United States on February 1, 1861, and joined the Confederate States of America on March 2, 1861. This act was soon branded illegal by Houston, but the Texas legislature nevertheless upheld the legitimacy of secession. The political forces that brought about Texas's secession also were powerful enough to replace the state's Unionist governor. Houston chose not to resist, stating that, "I love Texas too well to bring civil strife and bloodshed upon her. To avert this calamity, I shall make no endeavor to maintain my authority as Chief Executive of this State, except by the peaceful exercise of my functions...." He was evicted from his office on March 16, 1861, for refusing to take an oath of loyalty to the Confederacy, writing, is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia...

"Fellow-Citizens, in the name of your rights and liberties, which I believe have been trampled upon, I refuse to take this oath. In the name of the nationality of Texas, which has been betrayed by the Convention, I refuse to take this oath. In the name of the Constitution of Texas, I refuse to take this oath. In the name of my own conscience and manhood, which this Convention would degrade by dragging me before it, to pander to the malice of my enemies....I refuse to take this oath."

He was replaced by Lieutenant Governor Edward Clark. To avoid more bloodshed in Texas, Houston turned down U.S. Col. Frederick W. Lander's offer from President Abraham Lincoln of 50,000 troops to prevent Texas's secession, stating in his response, "Allow me to most respectfully decline any such assistance of the United States Government." This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. ... Frederick West Lander (1821 - 1862) was a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War. ... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ...


Final years

Sam Houston's grave in Huntsville, Texas.
Sam Houston's grave in Huntsville, Texas.

In 1854, Houston, having earlier made a profession of Christian faith, was baptized by the Baptist minister, Rufus C. Burleson, who was later the president of Baylor University, then Baylor College. At the time Burleson was the pastor of the Independence, Texas, Baptist Church in Washington County, which Houston and his wife attended. Houston was also a close friend of another Baylor president and Burleson's predecessor as pastor at the Independence church, the Reverend George Washington Baines, maternal great-grandfather of Lyndon B. Johnson. Download high resolution version (848x872, 119 KB)Sam Houstons grave in Huntsville, Texas. ... Download high resolution version (848x872, 119 KB)Sam Houstons grave in Huntsville, Texas. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... {{Infobox_University |image_name = 135px-Baylor_seal. ... Founded in 1835 in Washington County, Texas, Independence is located twelve miles northeast of Brenham, Texas, and is the original location of Baylor University. ... Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Texas. ... George Washington Baines, Sr. ... LBJ redirects here. ...


In 1862, Houston returned to Huntsville, Texas, and rented the Steamboat House; the hills in Huntsville reminded him of his boyhood home near Maryville, Tennessee. His health deteriorated quickly over the next few months as he developed a persistent cough. In mid-July, Houston was struck with a severe chill which progressed into pneumonia. Despite the efforts of Drs. Markham and Kittrell, on July 26, 1863, at 6:16 p.m, Houston died quietly in his Steamboat House with his wife Margaret by his side. His last recorded words were "Texas. Texas. Margaret". The inscription on his tomb reads: 66 Foot Tall Statue of Sam Houston in Huntsville, Texas. ... This article is about human pneumonia. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

A Brave Soldier. A Fearless Statesman.
A Great Orator — A Pure Patriot.
A Faithful Friend, A Loyal Citizen.
A Devoted Husband and Father.
A Consistent Christian — An Honest Man.

While Sam Houston is buried in Huntsville, Texas, his wife Margaret Lea is buried in the City of Independence, Texas.


Monuments and museums

70 Foot Tall Statue of Sam Houston in Huntsville, Texas.
  • The Sam Houston Wayside near Lexington, Virginia, is a 38,000-pound piece of Texas pink granite commemorating Houston's birthplace.
  • The Sam Houston Schoolhouse in Maryville, Tennessee, is Tennessee's oldest schoolhouse. In addition to the schoolhouse there is a museum on the grounds.
  • Many cities in the U.S. have a street, school, or park named for Houston.
  • The Sam Houston Coliseum in Houston, Texas, is named after Houston. The Beatles performed there in 1965.
  • There is a mural depicting Sam Houston on a gas tank near State Hwy 225 in Houston. [2]
  • Sam Houston Elementary School in Lebanon, TN.

Image File history File linksMetadata Sam_Houston_Huntsville_Statue. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Sam_Houston_Huntsville_Statue. ... 66 Foot Tall Statue of Sam Houston in Huntsville, Texas. ... 66 Foot Tall Statue of Sam Houston in Huntsville, Texas. ... Sam Houston State University, (known as SHSU and Sam, for short) founded in 1879, is a public university located in Huntsville, Texas. ... Interstate 45 (I-45) is an Interstate Highway located entirely within the U.S. state of Texas. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Hermann Park is one of Houstons finest and most-visited public parks. ... Houston redirects here. ... Lexington is an independent city within the confines of Rockbridge County in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... For other uses, see granite (disambiguation). ... Maryville is a city located in Blount County, Tennessee, 20 miles south of Knoxville. ... USS Sam Houston (SSBN-609), a Ethan Allen-class submarine, was the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for the President of the Republic of Texas. ... The Ethan Allen class of fleet ballistic missile submarine was an evolutionary development from the George Washington class. ... The Sam Houston National Forest is off Interstate 45 and U.S. Highway 59 about forty miles north of Houston. ... The Sam Houston Regional Library and Research Center is located outside of Liberty, Texas, 41 mi northeast of Houston, Texas. ... Liberty is the county seat of Liberty CountyGR6 located in the U.S. state of Texas within the Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown metropolitan area. ... Fort Sam Houston is a U.S. Army post in San Antonio, Texas. ... San Antonio redirects here. ... The National Statuary Hall Collection in the United States Capitol is comprised of statues donated by individual states to honor persons notable in their history. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...

Children

By Margaret Lea

  1. Sam Houston, Jr., 1843-1894
  2. Nancy Elizabeth, 1846-1920
  3. Margaret Lea, 1848-1906
  4. Mary William, 1850-1931
  5. Antoinette Power, 1852-1932
  6. Andrew Jackson Houston, 1854-1941
  7. William Rogers Houston, 1858-1891
  8. Temple Lea Houston, 1860-1905

Andrew Jackson Houston, (June 21, 1854 - June 26, 1941), was an American politician. ... Temple Lea Houston, born August 12, 1860, was the last-born child of Texas Revolutionary Samuel Houston. ...

Popular culture

Houston has been a character in a number of movies. His life story was portrayed in "Man of Conquest", made in 1939, an excellent picture with three Academy Award nominations, and starring Richard Dix. The best known is probably "The First Texan," in which he was played by Joel McCrea. Richard Boone played Houston in the 1960 movie The Alamo. In the 1986 CBS TV movie Gone to Texas: The Sam Houston Story, he was played by Sam Elliott. He makes a brief appearance in the 1987 television movie Alamo: Thirteen Days to Glory, portrayed by Lorne Greene. In the 2004 film, "The Alamo", Houston was portrayed by Dennis Quaid. A famous painting of the wounded Houston accepting the surrender of Santa Anna (Surrender of Santa Anna, by William H. Huddle) is recreated in the film. Houston also appears in a few alternative history novels, including The Difference Engine by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling, in which he appears attempting to gain support from the French in his campaign to restore Texas's independence, and in 1812: The Rivers of War, by Eric Flint, in which he distinguishes himself at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend during the War of 1812 and is not seriously wounded. Sent to Washington, D.C., by General Andrew Jackson, he arrives in time to rally fleeing American forces and repels the British invasion of Washington. He later leads an expedition to reinforce Jackson and fights at the Battle of New Orleans. Flint, in his Afterword, refers to the novel "as an alternate biography of Sam Houston." Joel Albert McCrea, (November 5, 1905 - October 20, 1990) was an American film actor. ... For the African-American jazz musician, see Richard Bently Boone. ... The Alamo was released in 1960 by United Artists, starring John Wayne as Davy Crockett, Richard Widmark as Jim Bowie and Laurence Harvey as William B. Travis, and featuring Frankie Avalon, Chill Wills, Patrick Wayne, Linda Cristal, Joseph Calleia as Juan Seguin, Ruben Padilla as Santa Anna, Richard Boone as... Gone to Texas, often abbreviated G.T.T. or GTT, was a phrase used by Americans immigrating to Texas in the 19th century[1] often to escape debt[2], especially in the South and Midwest. ... Samuel Pack Elliott (born August 9, 1944) is an American film and television actor. ... Lorne Greene in his role as Ben Cartwright in Bonanza Lorne Greene as Commander Adama in Battlestar Galactica Lorne Greene O.C., LL.D. (February 12, 1915 – September 11, 1987) was a Canadian actor best known for two iconic roles on American television. ... Dennis William Quaid (born April 9, 1954) is an American actor. ... Alternative history or alternate history develops out of historiography to identify historical points of view that have been ignored, overlooked, or unseeable. ... The Difference Engine is an alternate history novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling. ... Eric Flint (born California, USA, 1947) is an American science fiction and fantasy author and editor. ... Combatants Creek Indians Red Sticks United States Cherokee Creek allies Commanders Menawa Andrew Jackson Strength 1,000 Red Stick Creek about 2,000 infantry 700 mounted infantry 600 Cherokee and Lower Creeks Casualties 800 49 killed 154 wounded // Although having nothing to do with the British or Canadians, the battle... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Andrew Jackson (disambiguation). ... For other uses of the name, see Battle of New Orleans (disambiguation). ...


Notes

  1. ^ Samuel Houston from the Handbook of Texas Online
  2. ^ Lebanon, Tennessee: A Tour of Our City (PDF). Lebanon/Wilson County Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved on February 5, 2007.
  3. ^ James, Marquis. The Raven. Dunwoody, Georgia: Norman S. Berg, Publisher, by arrangement with Bobbs-Merrill Co., 1929.. Retrieved on March 5, 2007.

The Handbook of Texas (ISBN 0-87611-151-7) is a comprehensive encyclopedia of Texas geography, history, and historical persons published jointly by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) and the General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

References

The following are reference sources (alphabetical by author):

  • Andrew Jackson-His Life and Times; Brands, H.W.; Doubleday; ISBN 0-385-50738-0.
  • The Texas Revolution; Brinkley, William, Texas A&M Press: ISBN 0-87611-041-3.
  • Sword of San Jacinto, Marshall De Bruhl, Random House: ISBN 0-394-57623-3.
  • Sam Houston, Haley, James L., University of Oklahoma Press: ISBN 0-8061-3644-8.
  • The Raven: A Biography of Sam Houston; James, Marquis; University of Texas Press: ISBN 0-292-77040-5.
  • The Eagle and the Raven; Michener, James A., State House Press: ISBN 0-938349-57-0.

James L. Haley is an American author and historian who has written several book on Texas history. ...

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
(none)
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Tennessee's 7th congressional district

March 4, 1823March 3, 1827
Succeeded by
John Bell
Preceded by
William Carroll
Governor of Tennessee
1827–1829
Succeeded by
William Hall
Preceded by
David G. Burnet
(ad interim)
President of the Republic of Texas
1836–1838
Succeeded by
Mirabeau B. Lamar
Preceded by
Mirabeau B. Lamar
President of the Republic of Texas
1841–1844
Succeeded by
Anson Jones
Preceded by
None
United States Senator (Class 2) from Texas
February 21, 1846March 3, 1859
Served alongside: Thomas J. Rusk, J. Pinckney Henderson and Matthias Ward
Succeeded by
John Hemphill
Preceded by
Hardin R. Runnels
Governor of Texas
1859–1861
Succeeded by
Edward Clark
The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Handbook of Texas (ISBN 0-87611-151-7) is a comprehensive encyclopedia of Texas geography, history, and historical persons published jointly by the Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) and the General Libraries at the University of Texas at Austin. ... These are tables of congressional delegations from Tennessee to the United States Senate and United States House of Representatives. ... The current boundaries of Tennessees 7th District The 7th Congressional District of Tennessee is a congressional district in Tennessee. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1823 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1827 (MDCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... John Bell (also known as The Great Apostate) (February 15, 1797–September 10, 1869) was a U.S. politician, attorney, and plantation owner. ... William Carroll (1788–1844) was Governor of Tennessee from 1821 to 1827 and again from 1829 to 1835. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... William Hall (February 11, 1775–October 7, 1856) was the Governor of the state of Tennessee from April to October of 1829. ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Categories: | | ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Categories: | | ... Anson Jones (January 20, 1798 – January 9, 1858) was a doctor, businessman, congressman, and the last president of the Republic of Texas, sometimes called the Architect of Annexation. ... Texas was admitted to the Union on December 29 1845. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Thomas Jefferson Rusk Thomas Jefferson Rusk December 5,1803 - July 29,1857; was a U.S. political figure and a Senator from Texas from 1846 until his suicide. ... James Pinckney Henderson (1808–1858) was a lawyer, politician, soldier, and first governor of Texas. ... Matthias Ward (October 13, 1805 - October 5, 1861) was a lawyer and United States Senator from Texas. ... John Hemphill John Hemphill (December 18, 1803–January 3, 1862) was Chief Justice of the Texas Supreme Court, a United States Senator, and a veteran of wars with Native Americans. ... Hardin Richard Runnels (August 30, 1820–December 25, 1873) was a U.S. political figure. ... In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. ... This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. ... Texas was admitted to the Union on December 29 1845. ... Thomas Jefferson Rusk Thomas Jefferson Rusk December 5,1803 - July 29,1857; was a U.S. political figure and a Senator from Texas from 1846 until his suicide. ... James Pinckney Henderson (1808–1858) was a lawyer, politician, soldier, and first governor of Texas. ... Matthias Ward (October 13, 1805 - October 5, 1861) was a lawyer and United States Senator from Texas. ... Louis T. Wigfall Louis Trezevant Wigfall (April 21, 1816 – February 18, 1874) was an American politician from Texas and a general during the American Civil War. ... James Winright Flanagan (September 5, 1805– September 19, 1887) was an American merchant, lawyer, and farmer from Henderson, Texas. ... Samuel Bell Maxey (March 30, 1825– August 16, 1895) was an American soldier, lawyer, and politician from Paris, Texas. ... John Henninger Reagan (October 8, 1818 – March 6, 1905), was a leading 19th century American politician from the U.S. state of Texas. ... Horace Chilton (December 29, 1853 - January 12, 1932) was a printer, lawyer, and United States Senator from Texas. ... Roger Quarles Mills (March 30, 1832–September 2, 1911) was an American politician. ... Charles Allen Culberson (June 10, 1855–March 19, 1925) was a U.S. political figure. ... Earle Bradford Mayfield (April 12, 1881 Overton, Texas — June 23, 1964 Tyler, Texas) was a lawyer and politician from Overton, Texas who served in both the Texas State Senate and United States Senate. ... Thomas Terry Connally (born August 19, 1877 near Hewitt, McLennan County, Texas; died October 28, 1963 in Washington, DC) was an American politician, who represented Texas in both the US Senate and the House of Representatives. ... Texas politician Price Daniel Marion Price Daniel, Sr. ... Texas Senator William Blakley William Arvis Dollar Bill Blakley (November 17, 1898 – January 5, 1976) was an American senator and businessman from the State of Texas. ... Texas politician Ralph Yarborough Ralph Webster Yarborough (June 8, 1903 – January 27, 1996) was a Texas Democratic politician who served in the United States Senate (1957 until 1971) and was a leader of the progressive or liberal wing of the Democratic Party in Texas in his many races for statewide... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Bob Krueger Robert Charles Krueger (born September 19, 1935), American politician, is a former U.S. Representative and U.S. Senator from Texas, a former U.S. Ambassador, and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Kathryn Ann Bailey Hutchison, usually known as Kay Bailey Hutchison (born July 22, 1943, in Galveston, Texas), is the senior United States Senator from Texas. ... For other persons of the same name, see John Hemphill. ... Morgan Calvin Hamilton (February 25, 1809– November 21, 1893) was an American merchant and politician from Texas. ... Richard Coke (March 13, 1829–May 14, 1897) was an American lawyer, farmer, and statesman from Waco, Texas. ... Horace Chilton (December 29, 1853 - January 12, 1932) was a printer, lawyer, and United States Senator from Texas. ... Joseph Weldon Bailey (1862 - 1929) was a U.S. lawyer and political figure. ... Rienze Melville Johnston (September 9, 1849–February 28, 1926) was an American newspaperman and Democratic Party politician from Houston, Texas. ... John Morris Sheppard (May 28, 1875 - April 9, 1941) was a United States Congressman and a Senaor from Texas. ... Andrew Jackson Houston, (June 21, 1854 - June 26, 1941), was an American politician. ... Wilbert Lee Pappy ODaniel (March 11, 1890 - May 11, 1969) was a radio personality and a politician from Texas. ... LBJ redirects here. ... Texas Senator William Blakley William Arvis Dollar Bill Blakley (November 17, 1898 – January 5, 1976) was an American senator and businessman from the State of Texas. ... John Tower John Goodwin Tower (September 29, 1925 – April 5, 1991) was the first Republican United States senator from Texas since the Reconstruction after the Civil War. ... William Philip Phil Gramm (born July 8, 1942, in Fort Benning, Georgia) served as a Democratic Congressman (1978–1983), a Republican Congressman (1983–1985) and a Republican Senator from Texas (1985–2002). ... John Cornyn III (born February 2, 1952) is the junior United States Senator from Texas. ... Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... John Sevier (pronounced severe) (23 September 1745 – 25 September 1815) served four years (1785–1789) as the only governor of the State of Franklin and twelve years (1796–1801 and 1803–1809) as governor of Tennessee, and as a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1811 until his death. ... Archibald Roane (1760 - 1819) was the second Governor of Tennessee, serving from 1801 to 1803. ... John Sevier (pronounced severe) (23 September 1745 – 25 September 1815) served four years (1785–1789) as the only governor of the State of Franklin and twelve years (1796–1801 and 1803–1809) as governor of Tennessee, and as a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1811 until his death. ... Willie Blount (April 18, 1768 - September 10, 1835) served as Governor of Tennessee from 1809 to 1815. ... Joseph McMinn (1758 - 1824) was governor of Tennessee from 1815 to 1821. ... William Carroll (1788–1844) was Governor of Tennessee from 1821 to 1827 and again from 1829 to 1835. ... William Hall (February 11, 1775–October 7, 1856) was the Governor of the state of Tennessee from April to October of 1829. ... William Carroll (1788–1844) was Governor of Tennessee from 1821 to 1827 and again from 1829 to 1835. ... Newton Cannon (May 22, 1781–September 16, 1841) was Governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1835 to 1839. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... James Chamberlain Jones (April 20, 1809–October 29, 1859) was governor of Tennessee from 1841 to 1845, and a United States Senator from that state from 1851 to 1857. ... Aaron Venable Brown (August 15, 1795 _ March 8, 1859) was Governor of Tennessee from 1845 to 1847. ... Neill Smith Brown (April 18, 1810 - January 30, 1886) was governor of Tennessee from 1847 to 1849. ... William Trousdale (September 23, 1790 - March 27, 1872) was Governor of Tennessee from 1849 to 1851. ... William Bowen Campbell (February 1, 1807 - August 19, 1867) was governor of Tennessee from 1851 to 1853. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Isham Green Harris (February 10, 1818 – July 8, 1897) was an American politician. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Edward Hazzard East, commonly known as E. H. East (October 1, 1830 – November 12, 1904) served as Secretary of State for the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1862-1865, having been appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... William Gannaway Brownlow William Gannaway Brownlow (August 29, 1805 – April 29, 1877) was Governor of Tennessee from 1865 to 1869 and a Senator from Tennessee from 1869 to 1875. ... Dewitt Clinton Senter (1834-1898) was governor of Tennessee from 1869 to 1871. ... John Calvin Brown (January 6, 1827 – August 17, 1889) was a Confederate general during the American Civil War and the governor of Tennessee from 1871 to 1875. ... James Davis Porter, Jr. ... Albert Smith Marks (1836–1891) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1879 to 1881. ... Alvin Hawkins (December 2, 1821–April 27, 1905) was governor of Tennessee from 1881 to 1883. ... William Brimage Bate (October 7, 1826– March 9, 1905) was governor of Tennessee fron 1883 to 1887 and subsequently United States Senator from Tennessee from 1887 until his death. ... Robert Love Taylor (July 31, 1850–March 31, 1912) was a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1879 to 1881, Governor of Tennessee from 1887 to 1891 and from 1897 to 1899, and subsequently a United States Senator from that state from 1907 until his death. ... John Price Buchanan (1847–1930) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1891 to 1893. ... Peter Turney (1827–1903) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1893 to 1897. ... Robert Love Taylor (July 31, 1850–March 31, 1912) was a U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1879 to 1881, Governor of Tennessee from 1887 to 1891 and from 1897 to 1899, and subsequently a United States Senator from that state from 1907 until his death. ... Benton McMillin (September 11, 1845 _ January 8, 1933) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1899 to 1903. ... James Beriah Frazier (October 18, 1856–March 28, 1937) was Governor of Tennessee from 1903 to 1905 and subsequently a United States Senator from Tennessee from 1905 to 1911. ... John Isaac Cox (1857–1946) was Governor of Tennessee from 1905 to 1907. ... Malcolm Rice Patterson (June 7, 1861–March 8, 1935) was the governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1907 to 1911. ... Ben Walter Hooper (1870–1957) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1911 to 1915. ... Thomas Clark Rye (1863–1953) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1915 to 1919. ... Albert Houston Roberts (July 4, 1868–June 25, 1946) was Governor of Tennessee from 1919 to 1921. ... Alfred Alexander Taylor (August 6, 1848 _ November 25, 1931) was Governor of Tennessee from 1921 to 1923. ... Austin Peay IV (June 1, 1876–October 2, 1927) was governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1923 until his death. ... Henry Hollis Horton (1866 – 1934) was Governor of Tennessee from 1927 to 1933. ... Harry Hill McAlister (1875–1959) was Governor of Tennessee from 1933 to 1937. ... Gordon Weaver Browning (November 22, 1895–May 23, 1976) was an American politician who represented Tennessee in the United States Congress and was later Governor of Tennessee from 1937 to 1939 and again from 1949 to 1953. ... William Prentice Cooper (1895 - 1969) was an American politician who was Governor of Tennessee from 1939 to 1945. ... Jim Nance McCord (March 17, 1879 - September 2, 1968) was Governor of Tennessee from 1945 to 1949. ... Gordon Weaver Browning (November 22, 1895–May 23, 1976) was an American politician who represented Tennessee in the United States Congress and was later Governor of Tennessee from 1937 to 1939 and again from 1949 to 1953. ... Frank Goad Clement (June 2, 1920–November 4, 1969) served as governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1953 to 1959 and again from 1963 to 1967. ... Earl Buford Ellington (June 27, 1907 - April 3, 1972), a native of Mississippi, was Governor of Tennessee from 1959 to 1963 and again from 1967 until 1971. ... Frank Goad Clement (June 2, 1920–November 4, 1969) served as governor of the U.S. state of Tennessee from 1953 to 1959 and again from 1963 to 1967. ... Earl Buford Ellington (June 27, 1907 - April 3, 1972), a native of Mississippi, was Governor of Tennessee from 1959 to 1963 and again from 1967 until 1971. ... Bryant Winfield Culberson Dunn (born July 1, 1927) was governor of Tennessee from 1971 to 1975. ... Ray Blanton Leonard Ray Blanton (April 10, 1930–November 22, 1996) was the 44th governor of Tennessee from 1975 to 1979. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ... Ned McWherter Ned Ray McWherter (born October 15, 1930) is an American politician who served as the 46th Governor of Tennessee from 1987 to 1995. ... Donald Kenneth Sundquist (born March 15, 1936) was Governor of Tennessee from 1995 to 2003. ... Philip Norman Phil Bredesen (born November 21, 1943) is the 48th Governor of Tennessee, having served since 2003. ... Categories: | | ... David G. Burnet David Gouverneur Burnet (April 14, 1788 - 1870) was the president of the interim government of the Republic of Texas during 1836. ... Mirabeau Buonaparte Lamar (August 16, 1798 – December 19, 1859) was the third president of the Republic of Texas, following David G. Burnet (1836 as interim president) and Sam Houston. ... Anson Jones (January 20, 1798 – January 9, 1858) was a doctor, businessman, congressman, and the last president of the Republic of Texas, sometimes called the Architect of Annexation. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Texas. ... In politics, Governor of Texas is the title given to the chief executive of the state of Texas. ... James Pinckney Henderson (1808–1858) was a lawyer, politician, soldier, and first governor of Texas. ... George Tyler Wood (1795 - 1858) was a U.S. political figure. ... Peter Hansborough Bell is the 3rd Governor of Texas from 1849 to 1853. ... James Wilson Henderson is the 4th Governor of Texas from November 1853 to December 1853. ... Elisha Marshall Pease (January 3, 1812 – August 26, 1883) was a U.S. politician from the 1830s through the 1870s. ... Hardin Richard Runnels (August 30, 1820–December 25, 1873) was a U.S. political figure. ... This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. ... Francis Richard Lubbock (October 16, 1815–June 22, 1905) was a governor of Texas during the American Civil War. ... Pendleton Murrah (1824–1865) was a governor of Texas during the American Civil War. ... This page is about a former politician; see Andrew Hamilton (disambiguation) for other meanings. ... James Webb Throckmorton - Governor of Texas Handbook of Texas Article This politics-related article is a stub. ... Elisha Marshall Pease (January 3, 1812 – August 26, 1883) was a U.S. politician from the 1830s through the 1870s. ... Edmund Jackson Davis (October 2, 1827– February 7, 1883) was an American lawyer and politician from Texas. ... Richard Coke (March 13, 1829–May 14, 1897) was an American lawyer, farmer, and statesman from Waco, Texas. ... Richard Bennett Hubbard, Jr. ... Oran Milo Roberts (1815–1898), was Governor of Texas from January 21, 1879 to January 16, 1883. ... Lawrence Sullivan Ross (Sul Ross) (September 27, 1838 – January 3, 1898) was a Confederate States Army general during the American Civil War. ... James Stephen Jim Hogg (March 24, 1851-March 3, 1906) Born near Rusk, Texas, Hogg was a Texas lawyer and statesman, and the first native to become Governor of Texas. ... Charles Allen Culberson (June 10, 1855–March 19, 1925) was a U.S. political figure. ... Joseph Draper Sayers (September 23, 1841 — May 15, 1929) was Governor of Texas from 1899 to 1903. ... Samuel Willis Tucker Lanham (1846–1908), was Governor of Texas from January 20, 1903 to January 15, 1907. ... Thomas Mitchell Campbell Thomas Mitchell Campbell (April 22, 1856–April 1, 1923) was Governor of Texas from 1907 to 1911. ... Oscar Branch Colquitt was governor of Texas from January 17, 1911 to January 19, 1915. ... James Edward Pa Ferguson (August 31, 1871 - September 21, 1944) was a controversial United States politician from the state of Texas. ... William Pettus Hobby (March 26, 1878–June 7, 1964) was the publisher of the Houston Post and the governor of the U.S. state of Texas from 1917 to 1921. ... Patrick Morris Neff (1871–1952) was governor of Texas from 1921 to 1925. ... Miriam Amanda Wallace “Ma” Ferguson (June 13, 1875–June 25, 1961) became the first female Governor of Texas in 1924, and the second female state governor in the United States. ... Daniel James Moody, Jr. ... Ross Shaw Sterling (February 11, 1875–March 25, 1949) was a U.S. political figure. ... Miriam Amanda Wallace “Ma” Ferguson (June 13, 1875–June 25, 1961) became the first female Governor of Texas in 1924, and the second female state governor in the United States. ... Allred (center) with President Franklin D. Roosevelt (left) and Congressman Lyndon B. Johnson on May 12, 1937. ... Wilbert Lee Pappy ODaniel (March 11, 1890 - May 11, 1969) was a radio personality and a politician from Texas. ... Texas politician Coke Stevenson Coke Robert Stevenson (March 20, 1888–June 28, 1975) was a U.S. political figure. ... Beauford Halbert Jester (January 12, 1893–July 11, 1949) was a U.S. political figure. ... Texas governor Allan Shivers Robert Allan Shivers (October 5, 1907 - January 14, 1985) was a politician from the state of Texas. ... Texas politician Price Daniel Marion Price Daniel, Sr. ... John Bowden Connally, Jr. ... Preston Earnest Smith (March 8, 1912–October 18, 2003) was a U.S. politician who served as Governor of Texas from 1969 to 1973. ... Dolph S. Briscoe (born April 23, 1923 in Uvalde, Texas) is a wealthy Uvalde rancher and businessman who was the Democratic Governor of Texas between 1973 and 1979. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Mark Wells White (born March 17, 1940) is an American lawyer, who served as the forty-third Governor of Texas from 1983-1987. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the American politician/teacher, for the Australian-American actress, see Ann Richards (actress). ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... James Richard Perry (b. ... Image File history File links This image, including all photography and graphics used in it, was taken and created by myself, Shem Daimwood. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sam Houston (1793-1863) (495 words)
In Texas, Houston was elected delegate from Nacogdoches to the Convention of 1833 which met at San Felipe.
Houston immediately took control of the Texas forces after the fall of the Alamo and Goliad, and conducted the retreat of the army to the site of the Battle of San Jacinto, where on April 21, 1836, his force defeated Santa Anna and secured Texas long sought independence.
As Governor in 1861, Houston was strongly opposed to the secession of Texas from the Union.
PBS - THE WEST - Sam Houston (585 words)
Houston was born into a military family in Virginia in 1793.
By 1833 Houston was living in Texas for at least part of the year, and seems to have established a permanent residence in Nacogdoches, near the Louisiana border, by 1835.
With the outbreak of the Texas Revolution, Houston was quickly elevated to the command of the ragtag Texas Army.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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