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Encyclopedia > Sam Brownback
Sam Brownback
Sam Brownback

Incumbent
Assumed office 
November 7, 1996
Serving with Pat Roberts
Preceded by Sheila Frahm
Succeeded by Incumbent (2011)

Born September 12, 1956 (1956-09-12) (age 51)
Parker, Kansas
Political party Republican
Spouse Mary Brownback
Alma mater Kansas State University
Religion Roman Catholic

Samuel Dale Brownback (b. September 12, 1956) is the senior United States senator from the U.S. state of Kansas. During 2007, he was a candidate in the 2008 Presidential election. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 473 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2400 × 3040 pixel, file size: 997 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Charles Patrick Pat Roberts (born April 20, 1936) is a United States Senator from Kansas. ... Sen. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Parker is a city located in Linn County, Kansas. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... GOP redirects here. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A car from 1956 Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ...

Contents

Personal life

Sam Brownback was born in Garnett, Kansas to Nancy and Robert Brownback.[1] He was raised in a farming family in Parker, Kansas; his ancestors settled in Kansas after leaving Pennsylvania following the Civil War.[2] Brownback was state president of Future Farmers of America, and was its national vice president from 1976 to 1977.[3] While at Kansas State University, he was elected student body president and was a member of Alpha Gamma Rho.[citation needed] He received his J.D. from the University of Kansas in 1982. Garnett is a city located in Anderson County, Kansas. ... Parker is a city located in Linn County, Kansas. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... FFA was originally an acronym for Future Farmers of America, but in 1988 the association, in an effort to broaden its potential membership beyond youth working in modern American agriculture changed the name of the organization from Future Farmers of America to National FFA Organization and simply referred to as... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... Alpha Gamma Rho (ΑΓΡ) is a social-professional fraternity in the United States, with over 65 university chapters. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years... The University of Kansas (often referred to as KU or just Kansas) is an institution of higher learning in Lawrence, Kansas. ...


After college, Brownback spent approximately a year working as a broadcaster; he hosted a weekly half-hour show.[2][4] Note: broadcasting is also the old term for hand sowing. ...


He is married to the former Mary Stauffer, whose family owned and sold a successful media company in 1995.[5] They have five children, including an adopted son and daughter. One of his daughters, Jenna, was adopted from China when she was two years old. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Religious views

Brownback told Rolling Stone that he had moved from mainline Protestantism to evangelicalism before his 2002 conversion to Catholicism, and that in 1994 he became involved with The Fellowship, a conservative Christian U.S. political organization. Raised as a Methodist, Brownback later joined a nondenominational evangelical church, and in 2002, he converted to Catholicism. He joined the Church through Opus Dei priest Father C. John McCloskey in Washington DC.[6][7] Brownback himself, however, is not a member of the Opus Dei organization.[8] This article is about the magazine. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      As a... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Christian Right, is a broad label applied to a number of political and religious movements with particularly conservative and right wing views. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      As a... For other uses, see Opus Dei (disambiguation). ... C. John McCloskey, III is a Catholic priest of Opus Dei. ...


Brownback was a cosponsor of the Constitution Restoration Act, which would have limited the power of federal courts to rule on church/state issues. Brownback told Rolling Stone that he chairs the Senate Values Action Team, an off-the-record weekly meeting of representatives from religious conservative organizations. The Constitution Restoration Act of 2005 (originally of 2004) was filed on March 3, 2005 by Senator Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Congressman Robert Aderholt (R-AL). ...


Early career

Brownback was an attorney in Manhattan, Kansas[2] before becoming the Kansas secretary of agriculture in 1986. In 1990, he was accepted into the White House Fellow program and detailed to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative from 1990 to 1991. Brownback then returned to Kansas to resume his position as secretary of agriculture and remained in that position until 1993. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1994, and next ran in the 1996 special Senatorial election to replace Bob Dole, who had resigned his Senate seat during his presidential campaign, beating appointed Republican Sheila Frahm. Riley County Courthouse, Manhattan Manhattan is a town located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of the Kansas River and Big Blue River. ... The White House Fellows program was established by American President Lyndon B. Johnson in October 1964. ... The Office of the United States Trade Representative, or USTR, is an arm of the executive branch of the United States government that falls within the Executive Office of the President. ... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Sen. ...


Senate career

Brownback defeated U.S. Senator Sheila Frahm, who had been appointed to fill the seat of U.S. Senator Bob Dole in 1996, when Dole resigned in the middle of his term to campaign for president. In the general election, he defeated Democrat Jill Docking and was elected to a full term in the Senate in 1998. He won a five person re-election in the 2004 Senate election with 69% of the vote, defeating his Democratic challenger, Lee Jones, a former Washington, D.C. lobbyist. Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Sen. ... § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Robert Blackwell Docking, (October 9, 1925–October 8, 1983), was an American politician who served as the Governor of Kansas from 1967 until 1975. ... Results -- light red represents Republican holds, dark red Republican pickups, light blue Democratic holds, dark blue Democratic pickups. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Lobbying is the practice of private advocacy with the goal of influencing a governing body, in order to ensure that an individuals or organizations point of view is represented in the government. ...


Brownback is a member of the Judiciary Committee, the Senate Appropriations Committee (where he chaired the Subcommittee on District of Columbia when the Republicans were in the majority), the Joint Economic Committee, and the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission. He is the current Chairman of the Helsinki Commission, which monitors compliance with international agreements reached in cooperation with Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe. The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Appropriations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... ... The Joint Economic Committee is one of only four joint committees of the U.S. Congress. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ... The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) is an international organization for security. ...


Brownback had announced that he would not run for reelection in 2010, in accordance with his support of term limits for members of Congress.[3] A term limit is a provision of a constitution, statute, or bylaw which limits the number of terms a person may serve in a particular elected office. ...


In 2000, Brownback and Congressman Chris Smith led the effort to enact the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA).[9] President Clinton signed the legislation in October 2000. According to Christianity Today, the stronger enforcement increased the number of U.S. federal trafficking cases eightfold in the five years after enactment.[10] Christopher Henry Smith (born March 4, 1953, in Rahway, New Jersey) is an American Republican Party politician, who is a member of the United States House of Representatives for the 4th District of New Jersey (map). ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Christianity Today is an Evangelical Christian periodical based in Carol Stream, Illinois. ... For other uses, see Human trafficking (disambiguation). ...


In 2001 Brownback submitted S.1465[107], which authorized Presidential waivers for foreign aid to Pakistan. S.1465[107] passed by a unanimous unrecorded vote of Senators present. The Pakistani Government utilized the U.S. Foreign Aide, when received from the U.S. Government, in an attempt to bribe Mujahideen and Taliban Militants inside that country. Taliban Commanders and Mujahideen Commander Nek Mohammed openly admitted that they intended to use the foreign aide money to repay loans, which they had received from al Qaeda.


As of August 12, 2007, in the 110th Session of Congress, Brownback has missed 123 votes due to campaigning (39.7 percent) — surpassed by Tim Johnson (D) of South Dakota who due to a critical illness has missed 100% of the votes of the 110th Session, and John McCain (R) of Arizona with 149 votes missed due to campaigning (48.1 percent).[11] is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... Timothy Peter Johnson (born December 28, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from South Dakota, and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ...


As of 8-21-2007, Brownback has an approval rating of 47%, with 45% disapproving.[4]


Positions

Health care

Brownback supports a bill that will introduce price transparency to the U.S. health care industry,[12] as well as a bill which would require the disclosure of Medicare payment rate information.[13] In economics, a market is transparent if much is known by many about: what products and/or services are available at what price and where. ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... President Johnson signing the Medicare amendment. ...


On December 16, 2006, Brownback gave an interview to the Christian Post, stating: "We can get to this goal of eliminating deaths by cancer in 10 years."[14] The Christian Post is a pan-denominational, Evangelical-leaning Christian newspaper based in Washington, D.C.. It is an operating division of The Christian Post Company - a multimedia firm whose principal member productions include digital publications ( www. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ...


Immigration

Brownback has a "D" career grade from Americans for Better Immigration, which indicates higher immigration levels.[clarify][15] Brownback was cosponsor of a 2005 bill of Ted Kennedy and John McCain's which would have created a legal path to citizenship for millions of illegal immigrants already present.[16] He has been criticized by Tom Tancredo for his support for Kennedy and McCain's latest immigration reform bill. Tancredo called him "an extreme opponent of getting tough on illegal immigration."[17] Brownback responded that politicians "must protect our borders, enforce the law, provide legal means for people to work in the United States, and fix a broken system."[17] On June 26, 2007, Brownback voted in favor of S. 1639, the Bush-Kennedy Immigration Amnesty Act of 2007 (officially "A bill to provide for comprehensive immigration reform and for other purposes.[18]").[19] Brownback supports increasing legal immigrants & build a fence on Mexican border and the reform bill "if enforced" He voted YES on giving Guest Workers a path to citizenship. [20] Brownback has a voting record tending toward higher immigration levels.[21] The senator switched his vote on cloture voting "Nay" on June 28, 2007, after previously voting for cloture. [22] Brownback has said that he supports immigration reform because the Bible says to welcome the stranger.[23] NumbersUSA is an immigration reduction organization whose intent is to reduce United States annual immigration to pre-1965 levels, but without the country of origin quotas that were in place during this period. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Illegal alien and Illegal aliens redirect here. ... Thomas Gerard Tancredo (born December 20, 1945) is an American politician and member of the Republican Party. ... Illegal alien and Illegal aliens redirect here. ...


Tax reform

In December 2005, Brownback advocated using Washington, DC as a "laboratory" for a flat tax. He stated, "that making D.C. a test case would, with limited potential for negative impact, provide valuable data about the effects of a flat tax that would prove helpful in determining whether it should be applied nationwide."[24] Some residents of the District believe that the proposed system of taxation would seem to only further what many believe to be the District's taxation without representation. DC mayor Anthony A. Williams said "Leaving aside the merits of this proposal, we continue to resist any efforts on the part of any member of Congress to impose rules and regulations on the people of the District."[25] He was rated 100% by the US COC, indicating a pro-business voting record. He voted YES on Balanced-budget constitutional amendment, supports reduction of money spending in federal budget and was rated 100% by CATO, indicating a pro-free trade voting record. He supports two-year limit on welfare benefits. [20] A flat tax, also called a proportional tax, is a system that taxes all entities in a class (typically either citizens or corporations) at the same rate (as a proportion on income), as opposed to a graduated, or progressive, scheme. ... No taxation without representation was a rallying cry for advocates of American independence from Great Britain in the eighteenth century. ... Anthony Allen Tony Williams (born July 28, 1951, in Los Angeles, California) is a United States politician who served as the fifth elected mayor of the District of Columbia from 1999 to 2007. ...


Iraq

Brownback has stated that he opposed Bush's 2007 troop surge in Iraq and the Democratic Party's strategy of timed withdrawal: “The New Way Forward” redirects here. ...

It does mean that there must be bipartisan agreement for our military commitment on Iraq. We cannot fight a war with the support of only one political party. And it does mean that the parties in Iraq — Sunni, Shi’a and Kurds — must get to a political agreement, to a political equilibrium. I think most people agree that a cut and run strategy does not serve our interest at all, nor those of the world, nor those of the region, nor those of the Iraqi people. So I invite my colleagues, all around, particularly on the other side of the aisle, to indicate what level of commitment they can support."[26] Sunni Muslims are the largest denomination of Islam. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Languages Kurdish Religions Predominantly Sunni Muslim also some Shia, Yazidism, Yarsan, Judaism, Christianity Related ethnic groups other Iranian peoples (Talysh Baluch Gilak Bakhtiari Persians) The Kurds are an ethnic group who consider themselves to be indigenous to a region often referred to as Kurdistan, an area which includes adjacent parts... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Senator Sam Brownback, U.S. Senate floor speech, January 16, 2007'' is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

In May 2007 Brownback stated, "We have not lost war; we can win by pulling together" He voted YES on authorizing use of military force against Iraq, voted NO on requiring on-budget funding for Iraq, not emergency funding and voted NO on redeploying troops out of Iraq by July 2007. [20]


On June 7, 2007, Brownback voted against the Habeas Corpus Restoration Act of 2007 when that bill came up for a vote in the Senate Judiciary Committee, on which Brownback sits.[27] (The bill was passed out of the committee by a vote of 11 to 8.[28]) The bill aims to restore habeas corpus rights revoked by the Military Commissions Act of 2006. [29] is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A bill, provisionally called the Habeas Corpus Restoration Act of 2007, S. 185, passed the United States Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday, June 7, 2007. ... For other uses, see Habeas corpus (disambiguation). ... President George W. Bush signs into law S. 3930, the Military Commissions Act of 2006, during a ceremony on October 17, 2006 in the East Room of the White House. ...


Darfur

Brownback visited refugee camps in Sudan in 2004 and returned to write a resolution labeling the Darfur conflict as genocide, and has been active on attempting to increase U.S. efforts to resolve the situation short of military intervention.[30] He is an endorser of the Genocide Intervention Network, which called him a "champion of Darfur" in its Darfur scorecard, primarily for his early advocacy of the Darfur Peace and Accountability Act.[31] Combatants JEM factions NRF alliance Janjaweed SLM (Minnawi)  Sudan African Union Mission in Sudan (AMIS) United Nations African Union Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) Commanders Ibrahim Khalil Ahmed Diraige Omar al-Bashir Minni Minnawi Luke Aprezi Strength N/A N/A 7,000 The Darfur conflict is a crisis in the... For other uses, see Genocide (disambiguation). ... The Genocide Intervention Network (or GI-Net) is a non-profit organization that envisions a world in which the global community is willing and able to protect civilians from genocidal violence. ... The Darfur Peace and Accountability Act (H.R. 3127/S. 1462) or DPAA asks the United States government to expand the African Union peacekeeping force in the Darfur conflict (AMIS) and give the force a stronger mandate, including more generous logistical support. ...


Israel and the Palestinians

In October 2007, Brownback announced his support for a plan designed by Benny Elon, chairman of Israel's rightwing nationalist NU - NRP party.[5] Elon's positions include dismantling the Palestinian National Authority and refusing a two-state solution. Instead, Judea and Samaria will be annexed by Israel in their entirety, despite the fact that their their non-Jewish inhabitants will not gain citizenship in either Israel or a Palestinian state.[citation needed] Instead, they would be granted citizenship in neighbouring Jordan. Elon argues that this would complete the 1948 Palestinian exodus begun in the 1948 war. An article in Forward quotes Elon's spokesman, Uri Bank, as saying about the plan that it "is the completion of the transfer of [the Palestinian] population that began in 1948".[6] The Elon Peace Plan is a solution for the Arab-Israeli conflict proposed in 2002 by Rabbi Binyamin Elon, who was the Israeli tourism minister at the time he put forward his proposal. ... Binyamin Benny Elon (1954-) is a Member of Knesset. ... National Union (Hebrew: Haihud HaLeumi האיחוד הלאומי) is an Israeli right-wing party list (סיעה) formed from the merger of three parties: Moledet (homeland), Tkuma (revival) and Renewed National Religious Zionist party. The three parties still operate somewhat independently, but run as one party list in Israeli elections. ... Mafdal party logo The National Religious Party (Hebrew: Mafdal, מפדל) is an Israeli political party representing the religious Zionist movement. ... “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... The two-state solution is the name for a class of proposed resolutions of the long-running Arab-Israeli conflict now explicitly backed by the Israeli and United States governments. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into West Bank. ... For other uses of Palestinian, see Definitions of Palestine and Palestinian. ... “Citizen” redirects here. ... For the Palestinian annual commemorative day, see Nakba Day. ... Combatants  Israel Haganah Irgun Lehi Palmach Foreign Volunteers Egypt, Syria, Transjordan,  Lebanon, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Holy War Army, Arab Liberation Army Commanders Yaakov Dori, Yigael Yadin John Bagot Glubb, Abd al-Qadir al-Husayni, Hasan Salama, Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, Ahmed Ali al-Mwawi Strength  Israel: 29,677 initially rising... Look up Forward in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Intelligent design

In a May 3, 2007 debate among the 10 candidates for the 2008 Republican Presidential nomination, Brownback was one of three who indicated that he did not believe in evolution.[32] Instead, Brownback favors teaching intelligent design in public school science classes via the Teach the Controversy approach: is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The 2008 Republican Presidential Debates are political debates before the 2008 Republican Primaries. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... For other uses, see Intelligent design (disambiguation). ... Teach the Controversy is the name of a Discovery Institute intelligent design campaign to promote intelligent design creationism while discrediting evolution in United States public high school science courses. ...

There's intelligence involved in the overall of creation. . .I don't think we're really at the point of teaching this in the classroom. I think what we passed in the U.S. Senate in 2002 [the Santorum Amendment] is really what we should be doing, and that is that you teach the controversy, you teach what is fact is fact, and what is theory is theory, and you move from that proceedings, rather than from teaching some sort of different thought. And this, I really think that's the area we should concentrate on at the present time, is teaching the controversy.[33]

Senator Sam Brownback, Larry King Live, CNN, August 23, 2005''

He has been closely allied to the Discovery Institute, hub of the intelligent design movement, and has argued extensively on their behalf during Discovery Institute intelligent design campaigns such as the Santorum Amendment, Teach the Controversy, and the denial of tenure to Institute Fellow and design proponent Guillermo Gonzalez.[34][35] The Discovery Institute is a think tank based in Seattle, Washington best known for its advocacy of intelligent design and its Teach the Controversy campaign to teach creationist beliefs in United States public high school science courses. ... The intelligent design movement is a neo-creationist religious campaign that calls for broad social, academic and political changes derived from the concept of intelligent design. ... Discovery Institute intelligent design campaigns are a series of related public relations campaigns conducted by the Discovery Institute which seek to promote intelligent design while discrediting evolutionary biology, which the Institute terms Darwinism. ... The Santorum Amendment was an amendment to the 2001 education funding bill which became known as the No Child Left Behind Act, proposed by former Republican United States Senator Rick Santorum from Pennsylvania, which promotes the teaching of intelligent design while questioning the academic standing of evolution in U.S... For other uses, see Guillermo Gonzalez. ...


Abortion

He is pro-life in all cases, believing in the right to abortion only in cases where it is necessary to save the life of the mother.[36] Brownback has stated, "I see it as the lead moral issue of our day, just like slavery was the lead moral issue 150 years ago."[37] On May 3, 2007, when asked his opinion of repealing Roe v. Wade, Brownback said, "It would be a glorious day of human liberty and freedom."[38] This article is about the social movement. ... May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ...


Brownback also stated he "could support a pro-choice nominee" to the presidency, because "this is a big coalition party."[39] His voting record is rated 0% by NARAL, since he has voted 100% pro-life. Brownback has stated that he supports a human life amendment or federal legislation ending abortion.[citation needed] NARAL Pro-Choice America (pronounced Nay-ral) is a United States group that favors the right to legal abortions and engages in political action to oppose restrictions on what it portrays as womens right to abort. ...


Stem cell research

Brownback supports adult stem cell research and cord blood stem cells. Brownback appeared with three children adopted from in vitro fertilization clinics to coincide with a Senate debate over the Cord Blood Stem Cell Act of 2005 to show his support for the bill and adult stem cell research. The Religious Freedom Coalition refers to children conceived through the adopted in vitro process as "snowflake children."[40] The term, as proponents explain, is an extension of the idea that the embryos are "frozen and unique," and in that way are similar to snowflakes.[40] Brownback supports the use of cord blood stem cell research for research and treatment, instead of embryonic stem cells[20] Stem cell division and differentiation. ... Umbilical cord blood is human blood from the placenta and umbilical cord that is rich in hematopoietic stem cells. ... In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a technique in which egg cells are fertilized outside the mothers body in cases where conception is difficult or impossible through normal intercourse. ... Snowflake children is a term used by organizations that promote the adoption of embryos left over from in vitro fertilization to describe children that result, where the childrens parents were not the original cell donors. ... Look up snowflake in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Death penalty

Brownback said in an interview, "I am not a supporter of a death penalty, other than in cases where we cannot protect the society and have other lives at stake."[41] In a speech on the Senate Judiciary Committee, he questioned the current use of the death penalty as potentially incongruent with the notion of a "culture of life", and suggesting for its employment in a more limited fashion.[42] He voted YES on making federal death penalty appeals harder and voted NO on maintaining right of habeas corpus in Death Penalty Appeals.[20] The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... The phrase culture of life is a rhetorical term arising from Roman Catholic doctrine, used frequently by Republicans in United States politics. ... For other uses, see Habeas corpus (disambiguation). ...


Environment

The conservative organization Republicans for Environmental Protection gave Brownback a grade of 29 percent for the 109th United States Congress, during which he cast what REP qualified as pro-environment votes on two of seven critical issues. REP criticized Brownback for supporting oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and in “sensitive marine waters” in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, as well as for opposing measures designed to increase “efficiency and renewable-resource programs to improve energy security, lower costs, and reduce energy related environmental impacts.”[43] The environmental group League of Conservation Voters rated Brownback at 15 percent for the 109th Congress, citing his lack of support for low-income energy assistance, his lack of support for environmental and natural resources stewardship funding, and his tendency to vote in favor of offshore oil drilling and drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.[44] Republicans for Environmental Protection (or REP America), is a national organization of Republican voters formed in 1995 with the stated purpose of educating and advocating environmental issues and supporting efforts to conserve natural resources and protect human and environmental health. ... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Ninth United States Congress was a meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives. ... An oil well is a laymans term for any perforation through the Earths surface designed to find and release both petroleum oil and gas hydrocarbons. ... The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) covers 19,049,236 acres (79,318 km²) in northeastern Alaska, in the North Slope region. ... Gulf of Mexico in 3D perspective. ... The League of Conservation Voters is an American environmentalist lobby. ... Offshore drilling typically refers to the act of extracting resources, primarily oil, in an ocean or lake. ...


He voted "yes" on reducing funds for road-building in national forests and was rated 0% by the LCV, indicating anti-environment votes according to that organization. He voted NO on including oil and gas smokestacks in mercury regulations.[20] LCV can stand for: League of Conservation Voters Customer lifetime value Lincolnville, Maine (Amtrak station code) This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Other issues

On September 27, 2006, Brownback introduced a bill called the Truth in Video Game Rating Act (S.3935), which would regulate the rating system of computer and video games. is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Truth in Video Game Rating Act (S.3935) is a bill introduced by Senator Sam Brownback on September 27, 2006. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ...


On June 15, 2006, Bush signed into law the Broadcast Decency Enforcement Act of 2005 sponsored by Brownback, a former broadcaster himself. The new law stiffens the penalties for each violation of the Act. The Federal Communications Commission will be able to impose fines in the amount of $325,000 for each violation by each station, which violates decency standards. The legislation raises the fine by tenfold.[45][46] is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bill Number S. 193 is a telecommunications bill designed to govern broadcast media. ... FCC redirects here. ... A dictionary definition of Indecent not conforming with accepted standards of behaviour or morality. ...

Where I think we're really lost is we're segregating science and faith. And they ask and answer different questions. Science asks how, and faith asks why. And I think we'd be so much richer, and in societies in the past in Western civilization they did this a lot more, if you had the interaction of the two, of faith and science.

—Sam Brownback, [41]

On September 3, 1997, Meredith O'Rourke, an employee of Kansas firm Triad Management Services, was deposed by the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs regarding her activities and observations while providing services for the company relative to fund raising and advertising for Brownback. In her deposition, she states that campaign management for Brownback's campaign had provided Triad with a list of current donors, specifically those who had "maxed out" on the federal contribution limit of $2,100. The deposition claims that Triad circumvented existing campaign finance laws by channeling donations through Triad, and also bypassed the campaign law with Triad running 'issue ads' during Brownback's first campaign for the Senate.[47][48] is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Deposition is a word used in many fields to describe different processes: In law, deposition is the taking of testimony outside of court. ...


He has said he does not believe there is an inherent right to privacy in the U.S. Constitution. He has, however, expressed disapproval of George W. Bush's assertions on the legality of the NSA wiretapping program.[49] Brownback voted "yes" on maintaining current gun laws: guns sold without trigger locks. He opposes gun control.[20] The right to privacy is a purported human right and an element of various legal traditions which may restrain both government and private party action. ... Page I of the Constitution of the United States of America Page II of the United States Constitution Page III of the United States Constitution Page IV of the United States Constitution The Syng inkstand, with which the Constitution was signed The Constitution of the United States is the supreme... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The NSA warrantless surveillance controversy is a dispute questioning the power of the president to authorize the NSA to conduct electronic surveillance secretly and without court authorization. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ...


He does not believe in evolution and supports idea of teaching intelligence project theory. He was given a 27% rating by the NEA, supporters of teacher's unions.[20] Brownback is a lead sponsor of the International Marriage Broker Regulation Act of 2005 and frequently speaks out against the mail-order bride industry.[50] This article is about evolution in biology. ... Mail-order bride is a label applied to a woman who publishes her intent to marry someone from another - usually more developed - country. ...


Brownback introduced into the Senate a resolution (Senate Joint Resolution 37) calling for the United States to apologize for past mistreatment of Native Americans.[citation needed] Brownback worked with Congressman John Lewis to help win placement of the African American Museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C..[citation needed] This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... For other persons named John Lewis, see John Lewis (disambiguation). ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Facing east across the Mall with ones back towards the Lincoln Memorial. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Brownback is a supporter of a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage and voted against the federal expansion of hate crimes to include sexual orientation.[51] He has taken no position on adoption of children by gay families.[52] Amend redirects here. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... A Jewish cemetery in France after being defaced by Neo-Nazis. ... Sexual orientation refers to the direction of an individuals sexuality, usually conceived of as classifiable according to the sex or gender of the persons whom the individual finds sexually attractive. ... For other uses, see Adoption (disambiguation). ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ...


Brownback's voting record on civil rights was rated 20% by the ACLU. He voted "yes" on ending special funding for minority and women-owned business and "yes" on recommending a Constitutional ban on flag desecration.[20] He was rated 25% by CURE, indicating anti-rehabilitation crime votes. He voted "yes" on increasing penalties for drug offenses and voted "yes" on more penalties for gun and drug violations.[20] The American Civil Liberties Union, or ACLU, is a non_governmental organization devoted to defending civil rights and civil liberties in the United States. ...


Brownback voted "no" on banning chemical weapons.[20] Brownback voted "yes" on reauthorizing the PATRIOT Act and voted "yes" on extending the PATRIOT Act's wiretap provision.[20] In May 2007, Brownback stated, "Iran is the lead sponsor of terrorism around the world." He supports talks with Iran, but no diplomatic relations.[20] In the United States, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which President George W. Bush signed into law... It has been suggested that Voice logging be merged into this article or section. ...


2008 Presidential campaign

On December 4, 2006, Brownback formed an exploratory committee, thus taking the first steps toward candidacy. He announced his Presidential bid as of December 5, 2006 on his website.[53] His expressed views position him in the social conservative wing of the Republican party. He has also stressed his fiscal conservatism. "I am an economic, a fiscal, a social and a compassionate conservative," he said in December 2006.[54] On January 20, 2007, in Topeka, Brownback announced that he was running for President in 2008.[55] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... In the election politics of the United States, an exploratory committee is an organization established to help determine whether a potential candidate should run for an elected office. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Fiscal conservatism (also known as economic liberalism) is a term used in the United States to refer to economic and political policy that advocates restraint of government taxation, government expenditures and deficits, and government debt. ... Definition Compassionate conservatism is a political philosophy that was invented by Marvin Olasky, who went on to memorialize it in his 2000 book Compassionate Conservatism: What it is, What it Does, and How it Can Transform America, and Myron Magnet of the Manhattan Institute. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ...


On February 22, 2007, a poll conducted by Rasmussen Reports held that three percent of likely primary voters would support Brownback.[56] is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Rasmussen Reports is an American public opinion polling firm. ...


Brownback's close advisors for his presidential bid, as listed by the Washington Post,[57] are David Kensinger, a political consultant who is a former executive director of GOPAC and former Brownback chief of staff; Rob Wasinger, Brownback's chief of staff in 2005; and Paul Wilson, a media consultant with Wilson Grand Communications. Also listed as "playing a key role" was Tom Monaghan, founder of Domino's Pizza. Also mentioned as a member of Brownback's exploratory committee was Bowie Kuhn, former Major League Baseball commissioner, before his death on March 15, 2007.[58] A conservative Catholic, Brownback enjoys support among the religious right, and focuses his campaign towards this element of society. ... GOPAC is a Republican political action committee (PAC), calling itself the premier training organization for Republican candidates for elected office. ... Thomas Stephen Tom Monaghan (born March 25, 1937 in Ann Arbor, Michigan) is an entrepreneur and Catholic philanthropist who founded Dominos Pizza in 1960. ... World locations Dominos Pizza, Inc. ... Bowie Kent Kuhn (born October 28, 1926 in Takoma Park, Maryland) was commissioner of Major League Baseball from February 4, 1969 to September 30, 1984. ... The Commissioner of Baseball is the chief executive of Major League Baseball. ...


On August 11, 2007, Brownback finished third in the Ames Iowa straw poll with 15.3% of all votes cast. Fundraising and visits to his website declined dramatically after this event, as many supporters had predicted Brownback would do much better,[citation needed] and speculation began that the candidate was considering withdrawing from the campaign. This sentiment increased after his lackluster performance in the GOP presidential debate of September 5, broadcast from New Hampshire by Fox News Channel.[59] is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Logo for the 2007 Ames Straw Poll The Ames Straw Poll is a straw poll that takes place in Ames, Iowa, on a Saturday in August of years in an election cycle in which the Republican presidential nomination seems to be undecided (that is, in years without an incumbent Republican... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... Fox News redirects here. ...


Brownback was endorsed by Frank Pavone, Jack Willke, Alveda King, Stephen McEveety, Norma McCorvey, Thomas S. Monaghan, Michael W. Smith, Angela Baraquio Grey and Stephen Baldwin. [60] Brownback also won support from fellow Kansas lawmakers Senator Pat Roberts and Rep. Todd Tiahrt.[61] Father Frank A. Pavone is an American Roman Catholic priest, and pro-life activist. ... Dr. Alveda C. King-Tookes is the niece of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Stephen McEveety has over 30 years experience in senior positions in the film, motion picture, and entertainment businesses. ... Norma McCorvey, aka Jane Roe Norma Leah McCorvey (née Nelson born September 22, 1947 in Simmesport, Louisiana) is best known as Jane Roe in the landmark Roe v. ... Thomas Stephen Tom Monaghan (born March 25, 1937 in Ann Arbor, Michigan) is an entrepreneur and Catholic philanthropist who founded Dominos Pizza in 1960. ... // Michael Whitaker Smith (born October 7, 1957, to Paul and Barbara Smith in Kenova, West Virginia), often nicknamed Smitty, is a Christian singer, songwriter, guitarist, and keyboardist. ... Angela Perez Baraquio (aka Angela Baraquio Grey) was born on June 1, 1976 in Honolulu, Hawaii. ... Stephen Andrew Baldwin is an absolute walleper and he kills kangaroo puppies for a living. ... Charles Patrick Pat Roberts (born April 20, 1936) is a United States Senator from Kansas. ... Todd Tiahrt (born June 15, 1951), American politician, has been a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives since 1995, representing the Fourth Congressional District of Kansas. ...


Brownback had stated that if he came in lower than fourth place in the Iowa Caucuses, he would drop out of the Presidential campaign;[62] Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ...


Brownback dropped out of the 2008 presidential race on Thursday, October 18, 2007 citing "lack of funds". He also commented, "I wouldn’t debate immigration in the middle of an election cycle."[63] Brownback formally announced his decision on October 19.[64] He later endorsed John McCain for president.[65] is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ...


References

  1. ^ http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~battle/senators/brownback.htm
  2. ^ a b c Brownback Presidential Campaign reprint of Weekly Standard article Eastland, Terry, Mr. Compassionate Conservative, The Weekly Standard, Volume 011, Issue 44, August 7, 2006
  3. ^ Future Farmers of America: Prominent Former Members
  4. ^ Kapochunas, Rachel. Brownback, Set to Launch GOP White House Bid, Will Fight from the Right, CQPolitics.com January 18, 2007
  5. ^ The New York Times Archives, "Media Concern Adds 12 Stauffer Papers", Published: June 16, 1995
  6. ^ rollingstone.com
  7. ^ http://www.slate.com/id/2069194
  8. ^ WashingtonPost
  9. ^ Library of Congress: Thomas. House Resolution 3244. Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000
  10. ^ Alford, Deann. "Free at Last", Christianity Today, February 21, 2007
  11. ^ Washington Post."Missed Votes", August 12, 2007
  12. ^ PR Newswire: Senators and Hospital Groups Support New GPO Transparency Initiative, July 12, 2005
  13. ^ U.S. Senator Sam Brownback press release: Brownback Introduces Medicare Payment Rate Disclosure Act, April 7, 2006
  14. ^ Associated Press. "Brownback Addresses Christian Radio Members, Touts FDA Move", The Christian Post, 2006-12-16. Retrieved on 2007-05-12. 
  15. ^ http://grades.betterimmigration.com/testgrades.php3?District=KS&VIPID=317
  16. ^ Democrats are flocking to McCain's immigration bill. Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  17. ^ a b Tom Tancredo: Sam Brownback 'Miserable' on Illegal Immigration. Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  18. ^ http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d110:s.01639:
  19. ^ http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=110&session=1&vote=00228
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Sam Brownback On the Issues. ontheissues.org. Retrieved on 2007-09-01.
  21. ^ http://grades.betterimmigration.com/testgrades.php3?District=KS&VIPID=317
  22. ^ http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=110&session=1&vote=00235
  23. ^ http://thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com/2007/10/28/on-the-road-a-week-with-values-voters/
  24. ^ The New York Sun: D.C. May Be Flat Tax Laboratory, November 30, 2005
  25. ^ DCist: A Flat Tax for the District?, December 2, 2005
  26. ^ Senator Sam Brownback office, Brownback on Iraq and Troop Surge, Calls for bipartisanship, diplomatic efforts, January 17, 2007, Washington, D.C.
  27. ^ Countdown with Keith Olbermann, June 7, 2007.
  28. ^ http://www.thenation.com/blogs/campaignmatters?bid=45&pid=203303
  29. ^ According to an Associated Press report by reporter Laurie Kellman,Kellman, Laurie. "Bush Veto Expected for Stem Cell Bill", Associated Press, 2006-07-18. Retrieved on 2006-08-23. (English) 
  30. ^ The Washington Post: Policy Adrift on Darfur, page A25, December 27, 2005.
  31. ^ DarfurScores.org: Champions of Darfur, operated by the Genocide Intervention Network, site accessed 21 August 2006
  32. ^ Evolution Important Question, But Debate Left Us No Wiser Kathleen Parker. Real Clear Politics, May 10, 2007.
  33. ^ Intelligent Design in American Classrooms? CNN Larry King Live, August 23, 2005.
  34. ^ Evolution Opponents on the Offensive in Senate, House Government Affairs Program, American Geological Institute.
  35. ^ Breaking News: U.S. Senator Expresses Alarm Over Denial of Tenure to Gonzalez at Iowa State Discovery Institute, EvolutionNews.org, May 22, 2007.
  36. ^ http://www.ontheissues.org/Senate/Sam_Brownback.htm
  37. ^ Pulliam, Sarah. "Q&A: Sam Brownback", Christianity Today, October 18, 2007.
  38. ^ "California Republican debate transcript", MSNBC, May 3, 2007.
  39. ^ California Republican debate transcript, May 3, 2007
  40. ^ a b LEGISLATIVE UPDATE — WEEK ENDING May 27, 2005; STEM CELLS AND SNOWFLAKE BABIES. Religious Freedom Coalition (27 May 2005). Retrieved on 2006-08-29.
  41. ^ a b Interview with Senator Sam Brownback, David Shankbone, Wikinews, October 11, 2007.
  42. ^ Sentencing Law and Policy (Blog by Douglas A. Berman): Senator Brownback questions death penalty and culture of life, February 3, 2006
  43. ^ Republicans for Environmental Protection 2006 Scorecard
  44. ^ LCV 2006 Scorecard
  45. ^ Combs, Roberta. Christian Coalition of America, Washington Weekly Review, June 17, 2006
  46. ^ Bill Number S. 193. Broadcast Decency Enforcement Act of 2005 (Introduced in Senate) from Congressional THOMAS DB. Retrieved on April 11, 2005.
  47. ^ O'Rourke Deposition:[1] September 3, 1997
  48. ^ http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/special/campfin/stories/cf121297.htm
  49. ^ The Washington Post: David S. Broder: Bucking Bush on Spying, February 9, 2006
  50. ^ Vatican Radio: Mail Order Nightmares [2]
  51. ^ http://www.vote-smart.org/voting_category.php?can_id=21952
  52. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5s3HoZS2g0
  53. ^ "Favorite of religious right moves toward White House bid" by Associated Press. CNN, December 4, 2006.
  54. ^ forbes
  55. ^ Brownback to Move on Presidential Bid. ABC News (Jan 6, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  56. ^ news.yahoo.com
  57. ^ "Sam Brownback's Inner Circle" by Chris Cillizza. Washington Post.com, December 5, 2006.
  58. ^ Matt Stearns & David Goldstein, Wichita Eagle, Sam Brownback forms exploratory committee, December 5, 2006
  59. ^ Wangsness, Lisa. "Romney trounces GOP field in Iowa straw poll", The Boston Globe, 2007-08-12. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  60. ^ Actor Stephen Baldwin to endorse Brownback
  61. ^ http://thehill.com/endorsements-2008.html
  62. ^ Washington Wire."Fourth Place or Bust, Says Brownback", Wall Street Journal, October 10, 2007.
  63. ^ http://www.kansascity.com/news/politics/story/325073.html
  64. ^ Republican Sam Brownback ends White House run Dallas Morning News October 19, 2007. Retrieved October 20, 2007
  65. ^ http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,308960,00.html

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External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sam Brownback
Official sites
Biographies, topic pages and databases
Media coverage
United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jim Slattery
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kansas's 2nd congressional district

1995 – 1996
Succeeded by
Jim Ryun
United States Senate
Preceded by
Sheila Frahm
United States Senator (Class 3) from Kansas
1996 – present
Served alongside: Nancy Landon Kassebaum, Pat Roberts
Incumbent

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sam Brownback - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1049 words)
Brownback is married to the former Mary Stauffer, heiress to a Topeka newspaper fortune.
Brownback is an outspoken, socially conservative politician, joining staunch senate conservatives such as Rick Santorum, Pat Roberts and Tom Coburn on issues of social legislation.
Brownback is also trying to introduce price transparency to the US health care industry [6], as well as a bill which would require the disclosure of Medicare payment rate information [7].
Sam Brownback - dKosopedia (395 words)
Kansas Republican Senator Sam Brownback holds a degree in Agricultural Economics from Kansas State University and a law degree from the University of Kansas.
Brownback has all but declared his candidacy for 2008, a race in which he seeks to carry the standard for the Christian Right as one of the Senate's most outspoken opponents of abortion and gay rights.
Brownback proudly admits to his participation in a "behind-the-scenes" religious organization, called The Fellowship or The Family, that considers politicians it favors appointed by God; organizes said politicians into off-the-record cells to study government-by-Bible; and looks to history's strongmen from across the spectrum -- Lenin, Pol Pot, and yes, Hitler -- for leadership lessons.
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