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Encyclopedia > Salt Lake City, Utah
City of Salt Lake City
Downtown Salt Lake City
Nickname: Crossroads of the West, SLC
Location of Salt Lake City in Salt Lake County, Utah
Location of Salt Lake City in Salt Lake County, Utah
Coordinates: 40°45′0″N 111°53′0″W / 40.75, -111.88333
Country United States of America
State Utah
County Salt Lake
Government
 - Mayor Rocky Anderson--Ralph Becker, the Mayor Elect, will take office in January 2008.
Area
 - City 110.4 sq mi (285.9 km²)
 - Land 109.1 sq mi (282.5 km²)
 - Water 1.3 sq mi (3.3 km²)
Elevation 4,226 ft (1,288 m)
Population (2000)
 - City 178,858
 - Density 1,666.1/sq mi (643.3/km²)
 - Metro 1,018,826
Time zone Mountain (UTC-7)
 - Summer (DST) Mountain (UTC-6)
Area code(s) 801/385
FIPS code 49-67000GR2
GNIS feature ID 1454997GR3
Website: http://www.slcgov.com

Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. The name of the city is often shortened to Salt Lake, or its initials, S.L.C. It was originally known as Great Salt Lake City. Two ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS Salt Lake City, in honor of the city in Utah which has served successively as the capital of the Provisional State of Deseret, the Territory of Utah, and the 45th state. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1456x1004, 1982 KB) Summary Salt Lake City, UT USA Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Central business district. ... EXAMPLE:Laughbox,Blondie,BamBam,Pinkie,etc. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1170x800, 70 KB) Locator maps U.S. cities derived from PD state maps by different users from en. ... This list of countries, arranged alphabetically, gives an overview of countries of the world. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The political units and divisions of the United States include: The 50 states... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This is a list of counties in Utah. ... Salt Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Ross C. Rocky Anderson (born September 9, 1951) is the current mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Ralph Becker is the name of: Becker, Ralph Elihu (1907-1994), U.S. ambassador to Honduras from 1976-1977 Becker, Ralph, Utah House Minority Leader Category: ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... Elevation histogram of the surface of the Earth – approximately 71% of the Earths surface is covered with water. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... For other uses, see City (disambiguation). ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Timezone and TimeZone redirect here. ... Mountain Standard Time (MST) is UTC-7, Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is UTC-6 The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-7) during the shortest days of autumn and winter, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... Although DST is common in Europe and North America, most of the worlds people do not use it. ... Mountain Standard Time (MST) is UTC-7, Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) is UTC-6 The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC-7) during the shortest days of autumn and winter, and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time... −12 | −11 | −10 | −9:30 | −9 | −8 | −7 | −6 | −5 | −4 | −3:30 | −3 | −2:30 | −2 | −1 | −0:25 | UTC (0) | +0:20 | +0:30 | +1 | +2 | +3 | +3:30 | +4 | +4:30 | +4:51 | +5 | +5:30 | +5:40 | +5:45 | +6 | +6:30 | +7 | +7:20 | +7... The 801 area code, soon to be overlaid with the new 385 area code, covers the metropolitan Salt Lake City, Utah area, commonly referred to as the Wasatch Front. ... Federal Information Processing Standards (FIPS) are publicly announced standards developed by the U.S. Federal government for use by all (non-military) government agencies and by government contractors. ... GNIS (The Geographic Names Information System) contains name and locative information about almost two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its Territories. ... Not to be confused with capitol. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Salt Lake City has a population of 178,858 as of 2006.[1] The Salt Lake City metropolitan area spans Salt Lake, Summit and Tooele counties, and has a total estimated population of 1,018,826. Salt Lake City is further situated in a larger urban area known as the Wasatch Front, and until 2003 the Ogden-Clearfield metro area within it was considered part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area.[2] The total estimated population of the Wasatch Front is approximately 2,150,000. Summit County is a county located in the state of Utah, occupying a rugged and mountainous area. ... Tooele County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Wasatch Front is an urban area in the U.S. state of Utah. ...


The city was founded in 1847 by a group of Mormon pioneers led by their prophet, Brigham Young, who fled hostility and violence in the midwest. The headquarters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the L.D.S. or Mormon Church) is located in Salt Lake City. A statue commemorating the Mormon pioneers The Mormon pioneers were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, also known as Latter-day Saints, who migrated across the United States from the midwest to the Salt Lake Valley in what is today the U.S. state of... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Mining booms and the construction of the first transcontinental railroad initially brought economic growth, and the city became nicknamed the Crossroads of the West. In the 21st century the city has developed a strong outdoor recreation tourism industry (skiing and biking), become the industrial banking center of the U.S,[3] and served as host to the 2002 Winter Olympics. This article is about mineral extractions. ... This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An industrial loan company (ILC) or industrial bank is a financial institution in the United States that lends money, and may be owned by non-financial institutions. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ...

Contents

History

Main article: History of Salt Lake City

Before Mormon settlement, the Shoshone, Ute, and Paiute had dwelled in the Salt Lake Valley for thousands of years. However, these tribes dwelt only on a temporary basis near streams emptying from Canyons into the Salt Lake Valley. The first Caucasian in the Salt Lake area is believed to be the explorer Jim Bridger in 1825, although other Caucasians had been in Utah earlier, some as far north as the nearby Utah Valley. U.S. Army officer John C. Frémont surveyed the Great Salt Lake and the Salt Lake Valley in 1843 and 1845.[4] The Donner party, a group of ill-fated pioneers, had traveled through the Great Salt Lake Valley in August 1846. Salt Lake City Temple under construction // Prehistory Originally, the Salt Lake Valley was inhabited by the Shoshone, Paiute, Goshute and Ute Native American tribes. ... This article is about the Native American tribe. ... The Utes (; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ... “Piute” redirects here. ... Jim Bridger Jim Bridger (right) is honored along with Pony Express founder Alexander Majors (left) and Kansas City founder John Calvin McCoy at Pioneer Square in Westport in Kansas City. ... John Charles Frémont (January 21, 1813 – July 13, 1890), was an American military officer, explorer, the first candidate of the Republican Party for the office of President of the United States, and the first presidential candidate of a major party to run on a platform in opposition to slavery. ... The Donner Party Memorial at Donner Memorial State Park. ...

Panorama from South Temple Street taken in 1912
Panorama from South Temple Street taken in 1912

The first Europeans to settle in the valley were the Latter-day Saints on July 24, 1847. They had traveled beyond the boundaries of the United States seeking an isolated area to practice their religion, away from the hostility they had faced in the East. Upon arrival, President of the Church Brigham Young is recorded as stating, "this is the right place," later abbreviated to simply "this is the place," after reportedly seeing the area in a vision. They found the large valley empty of any human settlement. Download high resolution version (1538x377, 193 KB)Panoramic photo of Temple Square taken in 1912. ... Download high resolution version (1538x377, 193 KB)Panoramic photo of Temple Square taken in 1912. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Red shows states east of the Mississippi River, pink shows states not fully eastern or western The U.S. Eastern states are the states east of the Mississippi River. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the President of the Church is generally considered to be the highest office of the church. ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death. ... In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ...


Only four days after arriving in the Salt Lake Valley, Brigham Young designated the site for the Salt Lake Temple, intended to be the third temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, to replace the abandoned Kirtland Temple in Ohio and Nauvoo Temple in Illinois. The Salt Lake Temple is the largest (of more than 120) and best-known temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Kirtland Temple is a registered National Historic Landmark in Kirtland, Ohio, USA, on the eastern edge of the Cleveland metropolitan area. ... See also: Nauvoo Illinois Temple for information about the modern structure rebuilt on the same site. ...


Constructed on Temple Square, in the center of the city, the temple took 40 years to complete, being started in 1853 and dedicated on April 6, 1893. These delays meant that temples in St. George, Logan and Manti were completed before the Salt Lake Temple [5] The temple has become iconic of the city and is the centerpiece of the city (in fact, the southeast corner of Temple Square is the reference point for all addresses in the Salt Lake Valley). This photo of Temple Square, circa 1897, shows that the plot housed the tallest buildings in Salt Lake City at the time, namely the Salt Lake Temple, Tabernacle and Assembly Hall. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Salt Lake City in 1913
Salt Lake City in 1913

The Mormon pioneers organized a new state called Deseret and petitioned for its recognition in 1849. The United States Congress rebuffed the settlers in 1850 and established the Utah Territory, vastly reducing its size. Great Salt Lake City replaced Fillmore as the territorial capital in 1858, and the name was subsequently abbreviated to Salt Lake City. The city's population swelled with an influx of religious converts, making it one of the most populous cities in the American Old West. Download high resolution version (1494x365, 193 KB)Panoramic photo of Salt Lake City downtown taken in 1913. ... Download high resolution version (1494x365, 193 KB)Panoramic photo of Salt Lake City downtown taken in 1913. ... A statue commemorating the Mormon pioneers The Mormon Pioneers were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who migrated across the United States from the midwest to the Salt Lake Valley in what is today the State of Utah. ... The boundaries of the provisional State of Deseret (orange) as proposed in 1849. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The Utah Territory was an organized territory of the United States that existed between 1850 and 1896. ... Fillmore is a city located in Millard County, Utah. ... The cowboy, the quintessential symbol of the American Old West, circa 1887. ...


Disputes with the federal government ensued over the widespread Mormon practice of polygamy. A climax occurred in 1857 when President James Buchanan declared the area in rebellion after Brigham Young refused to step down as governor, beginning the Utah War. A division of the United States Army, commanded by Albert Sidney Johnston, later a general in the army of the Confederate States of America, marched through the city and found that it had been evacuated. This division set up Camp Floyd approximately 40 miles (65 km) southwest of the city. Another military installation, Fort Douglas, was established in 1862 to maintain Union allegiance during the American Civil War. Many area leaders were incarcerated at the territorial prison in Sugar House in the 1880s for violation of anti-polygamy laws. The LDS Church abandoned polygamy in 1890, releasing "The Manifesto," which officially renounced the practice in the church. This paved the way for statehood in 1896, when Salt Lake City became the state capital. Polygamy has been a feature of human culture since earliest history. ... James Buchanan (April 23, 1791 – June 1, 1868) was the 15th president of the United States (1857–1861). ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death. ... Combatants United States Mormon settlers Commanders Albert Sidney Johnston Brigham Young John D. Lee Lot Smith Strength Unknown Unknown Casualties Unknown Unknown The Utah War was a dispute between Mormon settlers in Utah Territory and the United States federal government. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Albert Sidney Johnston Albert Sidney Johnston (February 2, 1803 – April 6, 1862) was a career U.S. Army officer and a Confederate general during the American Civil War. ... Camp Floyd was a short-lived U.S. Army post near Fairfield, Utah. ... Fort Douglas is a fort in Utah, established in 1862 for the purpose of protecting the Overland Mail Route and telegraph lines from attacks from hostile Indians. ... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Obelisk at 2100 South 1100 East in Sugar House Sugar House (also sometimes seen as Sugarhouse) is one of Salt Lake City, Utahs oldest neighborhoods. ... The 1890 Manifesto, sometimes simply called The Manifesto, was a historical statement which officially renounced the practice of polygamy in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the LDS Church; see also Mormon). Signed on by LDS President Wilford Woodruff in September of 1890, the Manifesto was a...


The First Transcontinental Railroad was completed in 1869 at Promontory Summit on the north side of the Great Salt Lake. A railroad was connected to the city from the Transcontinental Railroad in 1870, making travel less burdensome. Mass migration of different groups followed. They found economic opportunities in the booming mining industries. These groups constructed the Greek Orthodox Holy Trinity Cathedral in 1905 and the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Madeleine in 1909. This time period also saw the creation of Salt Lake City's now defunct Red-light district that employed 300 courtesans at its height before being closed down in 1911.[6] This article refers to a railroad built in the United States between Omaha and Sacramento completed in 1869. ... Promontory is a location in Box Elder County, Utah, centered approximately at 41°3707N, 112°3251W, with an elevation of 1494 meters (4902 feet) above sea level. ... Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Utah, is the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere,[1] the fourth-largest terminal lake in the world,[2] and the 33rd largest lake on Earth. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith... Front exterior of the Cathedral The Holy Trinity Cathedral is a Greek Orthodox Church in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Front exterior of the Cathedral The Cathedral of the Madeleine is a Roman Catholic Church in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... For the 2004 album by American rapper Ludacris, see The Red Light District. ... Whore redirects here. ...


During the late 19th and early 20th centuries, an extensive streetcar system was constructed throughout the city with the first streetcar running in 1872 and electrification of the system in 1889. As in the rest of the country, the automobile usurped the streetcar and the last trolley ran in 1945. Rail transit was re-introduced when TRAX, a light rail system, opened in 1999.[7] TRAX Sandy train at the Gallivan Plaza stop in Downtown Salt Lake City TRAX is a two-line light rail system in Utahs Salt Lake Valley, serving Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Murray, Midvale and Sandy. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ...


The city's population began to stagnate during the 20th century as population growth shifted to suburban areas north and south of the city. Few of these areas were annexed to the city, while nearby towns incorporated and expanded themselves. As a result, the population of the surrounding metropolitan area greatly outnumbers that of Salt Lake City. A major concern of recent government officials has been combating inner-city commercial decay. The city lost population from the 1960s through the 1980s, but experienced some recovery in the 1990s. Presently, the city is losing population again (though that of the metro area continues to grow), having lost an estimated 2 percent of its population since the year 2000.[8] “Suburbia” redirects here. ...


The city has experienced significant demographic shifts in recent years.[9] Hispanics now account for approximately 19% of residents and the city has a large gay community.[10] There is also a large Pacific Islander population, mainly made up of Samoans and Tongans; they compose roughly 1% of the population of the Salt Lake Valley area.[11] Hispanic flag, not widely used. ... The sociological construct of a gay community is complex among those that classify themselves as homosexual, ranging from full-embracement to complete and utter rejection of the concept. ... Salt Lake Valley from space. ...


Salt Lake City was selected to host the 2002 Winter Olympics in 1995. The games were plagued with controversy. A bid scandal surfaced in 1998 alleging that bribes had been offered to secure the city for the 2000 games location. During the games, other scandals erupted over contested judging scores and illegal drug use. Despite the controversies, the games were heralded as a financial success, being one of the few in recent history to profit. In preparation major construction projects were initiated. Local freeways were expanded and repaired, and a light rail system was constructed. Olympic venues are now used for local, national, and international sporting events and Olympic athlete training.[12] Tourism has increased since the Olympic games,[13] but business did not pick up immediately following them.[14] The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The 2002 Winter Olympic bid scandal was a scandal involving allegations of bribery to obtain the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... For specific systems, such as the Autobahns of Germany, see list of highway systems with full control of access and no cross traffic. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ...


Salt Lake City hosted the 16th Winter Deaflympic games in 2007, taking place in the venues in Salt Lake City and Park City,[15] and Rotary International has designated the city as the site of their 2007 convention, which will be the largest single gathering since the 2002 Winter Olympics.[16] The U.S. Volleyball Association convention in 2005 drew 39,500 attendees. Park City, Utah Main Street during a parade Looking down Main Street Park City is a city located in Summit County, Utah, United States. ... Rotary International is an organization of service clubs known as Rotary Clubs located all over the world. ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ...


Geography

Salt Lake City from space.
Salt Lake City from space.

Salt Lake City is located at 40°45′N, 111°53′W. The total area is 110.4 square miles (285.9 km²) and has an average elevation of 4,327 feet (1,320 m) above sea level. The lowest point within the boundaries of the city is 4,210 feet near the Jordan River and the Great Salt Lake, and the highest is Grandview Peak, at 9,410 foot (2,868 m).[17] Photo taken by NASA of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Download high resolution version (3200x2400, 2814 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3200x2400, 2814 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Jordan River is a river in Utah in the United States. ...


The city is located in the northeast corner of the Salt Lake Valley surrounded by the Great Salt Lake to the northwest, and the steep Wasatch and Oquirrh mountain ranges, on the eastern and western border respectively. Its encircling mountains contain many narrow glacially and volcanically carved canyons, among them City Creek, Emigration, Millcreek, and Parley's border Salt Lake proper. Salt Lake Valley from space. ... City Creek is a small but historically important mountain stream that flows from City Creek Canyon and across part of Salt Lake City, Utah, and into the Jordan River which empties into the Great Salt Lake. ... Emigration Canyon is a canyon east of Salt Lake City, Utah in the Wasatch Range. ... Parleys Canyon is a canyon located in the U.S. state of Utah. ...


The Great Salt Lake is separated from Salt Lake City by extensive marshlands and mudflats. The metabolic activities of bacteria in Willard Bay (the freshwater portion of the lake) results in a phenomenon known as "lake stink", a scent reminiscent of foul poultry eggs, two to three times per year for a few hours.[18] The Jordan River flows through the city and is a drainage of Utah Lake that empties into the Great Salt Lake. Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Utah, is the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere,[1] the fourth-largest terminal lake in the world,[2] and the 33rd largest lake on Earth. ... Utah Lake and Utah Valley Utah Lake is Utahs , and it is one of the largest naturally occurring fresh-water lakes in the western United States. ...


The highest mountaintop visible from Salt Lake City is Twin Peaks, which reaches 11,489 feet (3502 m).[19] Twin Peaks is located southeast of Salt Lake in the Wasatch Range. The Wasatch Fault is found along the western base of the Wasatch and is considered overdue for an earthquake as large as 7.5. Catastrophic damage is predicted in the event of an earthquake with major damage resulting from the liquefaction of the clay- and sand-based soil and the possible permanent flooding of portions of the city by the Great Salt Lake.[20] There are actually two well-known Twin Peaks of the Wasatch Front in Utah. ... For the county, see Wasatch County, Utah. ... The Wasatch Fault. ... Liquefaction may refer to: Soil liquefaction, the process by which sediments are converted into suspension, as in earthquake liquefaction, quicksand, quick clay, and turbidity currents. ...


The second-highest mountain range are the Oquirrhs, reaching a maximum height of 10,620 feet (3,237 m) at Flat Top. The Traverse Mountains to the south extend to 6,000 feet (1,830 m), nearly connecting the Wasatch and Oquirrh Mountains. The mountains near Salt Lake City are easily visible from the city and have sharp vertical relief caused by massive ancient earthquakes, with a maximum difference of 7,099 feet (2164 m) being achieved with the rise of Twin Peaks from the Salt Lake Valley floor.[19] Oquirrh Mountains forming western border of the Salt Lake Valley The Oquirrh Mountains are a mountain range that run north-south for approximately 30 miles (50 km) to form the west side of Utahs Salt Lake Valley, separating it from Tooele Valley. ... The Traverse Mountains, an anomalous, geologically complex, east-trending range that separates Salt Lake Valley and Utah Valley in the U.S. State of Utah. ...


The Salt Lake Valley floor is the ancient lakebed of Lake Bonneville which existed at the end of the last Ice Age. Several Lake Bonneville shorelines can be distinctly seen on the foothills or benches of nearby mountains . A butte in the Great Salt Lake Desert Lake Bonneville was a prehistoric pluvial lake that covered much of North Americas Great Basin region. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ...


Layout

Plat of Salt Lake City, circa 1870s
Plat of Salt Lake City, circa 1870s

The city, as well as the county, is laid out on a grid plan;[21] Most major streets run very nearly north-south and east-west. There is about a fourteen to fifteen minute of arc variation of the grid from true north.[citation needed] The grid's origin is the southeast corner of Temple Square, the block containing the Salt Lake Temple of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Addresses are coordinates within the system (similarly to latitude and longitude). One hundred units are equal to 1/8th of a mile (200 m), the length of blocks in downtown Salt Lake City.[citation needed] The streets are relatively wide, at the direction of Brigham Young, who wanted them wide enough that a wagon team could turn around without "resorting to profanity." [22] These wide streets and grid pattern were copied in other Mormon towns of the pioneer era throughout the West. Download high resolution version (645x1076, 718 KB) This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... Download high resolution version (645x1076, 718 KB) This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... A contemporary plat map showing the location of a property for sale. ... Salt Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... A simple grid plan road map (Windermere, Florida). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This photo of Temple Square, circa 1897, shows that the plot housed the tallest buildings in Salt Lake City at the time, namely the Salt Lake Temple, Tabernacle and Assembly Hall. ... The Salt Lake Temple is the largest (of more than 120) and best-known temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... Fig. ... This article is about the geographical term. ... Longitude is the east-west geographic coordinate measurement most commonly utilized in cartography and global navigation. ... A wagon (in British English waggon) or dray is a wheeled vehicle, ordinarily with four wheels, usually pulled by an animal, or animals, such as horses, mules or oxen and used for transport of heavy goods. ...


Though confusing to new arrivals and visitors, the grid system actually makes it easier to navigate. For instance, take the address "7289 S 1750 West" -- this is parsed in the same way as other North American addresses, with the building number (7289 South) followed by the street name (1750 West). To go from there to 105 W 5600 South, you would go north and east.


Some streets have names, often added to the numbers assigned on the grid system. Some of these are for convenience (100 East is more commonly known as State Street), or to commemorate a major point of interest (Ensign Vista is near Ensign Peak) or a school (Bengal Way is named after the sports teams of a school which is on that street). The western portion of 300 South was named "Adam Galvez Street" in honor of a local Marine corporal who was killed in Iraq, and can be called by either name, as are streets named after Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King, Jr., and César Chávez. Rosa Louise McCauley Parks (February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African American civil rights activist and seamstress whom the U.S. Congress dubbed the Mother of the Modern-Day Civil Rights Movement. Parks is famous for her refusal on December 1, 1955 to obey bus driver James Blake... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... César Estrada Chávez (March 31, 1927 – April 23, 1993) was a Mexican American farm worker, labor leader, and civil rights activist who co-founded the National Farm Workers Association, which later became the United Farm Workers. ...


There is also an area, on the hills north and east of Temple Square, known as "The Avenues," where north-south streets are given letters of the alphabet, and east-west streets are numbered in 2.5 acre (10,100 m²) blocks, closer than the rest of the Valley.


To make matters more confusing, several major streets change alignment and take a new name. One example is 3300 South. The major roadway jogs south at about 1300 West, to become 3500 South. These exceptions and deviations become more common as one moves away from the city center, and mirrors the waning influence of the Church on the city's layout as time went by and the city grew.


Joseph Smith, founder of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, planned the layout in the "Plat of the City of Zion" (intended as a template for Mormon towns wherever they might be built). In his plan the city was to be developed into 135 10-acre lots. However, the blocks in Salt Lake City became irregular during the late 19th century when the LDS Church lost authority over growth and before the adoption of zoning ordinances in the 1920s. The original 10-acre blocks allowed for large garden plots, and many were supplied with irrigation water from ditches that ran approximately where modern curbs and gutters would be laid. The original water supply was from City Creek. Subsequent development of water resources was from successively more southern streams flowing from the mountains to the east of the city. Some of the old irrigation ditches are still visible in the eastern suburbs, or are still marked on maps, years after they were gone. Joseph Smith redirects here. ... The original plat of the City of Zion (Independence, Missouri). ... City Creek is a small but historically important mountain steam that flows from City Creek Canyon and across part of Salt Lake City, Utah, and into the Jordan River which empties into the Great Salt Lake. ...


Neighborhoods

See also: Buildings and sites of Salt Lake City, Utah - Neighborhoods and areas
Map of modern Salt Lake City and its suburbs.
Map of modern Salt Lake City and its suburbs.

Salt Lake City has many informal neighborhoods. The eastern portion of the city has higher property values than its western counterpart. This is a result of the railroad being built in the western half as well as scenic views from inclined grounds in the eastern portion. Housing is more affordable on the west side, which results in demographic differences. Interstate 15 was also built in a north-south line, further dividing east and west sides of the city. Salt Lake City, Utah is the most ethnically, politically, and religiously diverse city in the state of Utah. ... Download high resolution version (3264x2112, 866 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3264x2112, 866 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Demographics refers to selected population characteristics as used in government, marketing or opinion research, or the demographic profiles used in such research. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 15 “I-15” redirects here. ...


The west side of the city has historically been a working-class neighborhood, but recently the more affordable nature of the area has enticed many professionals to the neighborhood. For example, the small, increasingly trendy Marmalade District on the west side of Capitol Hill, once considered seedy as few as 5–10 years ago, was heavily gentrified and is now thought of as an eclectic and desirable location. During the 1980s, gang activity was also centered in the western neighborhoods of Rose Park, Poplar Grove, and Glendale. View of the Utah State Capitol building looking south down State Street. ... Rose Park is a neighborhood on the west side of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Glendale is a neighborhood on the west side of Salt Lake City, Utah. ...


Sugar House, which is in the near southeast portions of Salt Lake City, has been somewhat gentrified, but does contain some poorer areas. Other parts of Salt Lake City have no real neighborhood name or designator, such as areas south of 1300 South, East of I-15 and west of Sugarhouse. This area has been traditionally associated with the lower middle class. Sugar House area Obelisk at 2100 South 1100 East in Sugar House Sugar House (also sometimes seen as Sugarhouse) is one of Salt Lake City, Utahs oldest neighborhoods. ...


Just northeast of Downtown is The Avenues, a neighborhood outside of the regular grid system on much smaller blocks. This area is a Hisorical District that is nearly entirely residential, and contains many historical Victorian era homes. The Avenues are situated on the upward-sloping bench in the foothills of the Wasatch Range, with the earlier built homes in the lower elevation. The Avenues, along with Federal Heights, just to the east and north of the University of Utah, and the East Bench, south of the University, contain gated communities, large, multi-million dollar houses, and fantastic views of the valley. Many consider this some of the most desirable real estate in the valley. Map of the Avenues. ... For the county, see Wasatch County, Utah. ... Federal Heights is a neighborhood in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... The East Bench of Salt Lake City, Utah is a relatively affluent, and primarily residential, section of Salt Lake City that lies at the base of the Wasatch Range and extends west to approximately 1300 East. ...


Climate

A rare F2 tornado forms in downtown Salt Lake City on August 11, 1999 (orange fireball is substation exploding).
A rare F2 tornado forms in downtown Salt Lake City on August 11, 1999 (orange fireball is substation exploding).[23]
The flood of City Creek in 1983 occurred from snowmelt after record snow fell in nearby mountains the previous winter.
The flood of City Creek in 1983 occurred from snowmelt after record snow fell in nearby mountains the previous winter.

The climate of Salt Lake City is characterized as a semi-arid steppe climate (Köppen Bsk), with four distinct seasons. Both summer and winter are long, with hot, dry summers and cold, snowy winters, and with spring and fall serving as brief but comfortable transition periods. The city receives 16.50 in (419 mm) of precipitation annually.[24] Spring is the wettest season, and another "rainy season" occurs in fall. Snow occurs on average from November 6 to April 18, producing a total average of 62.7 in (159 cm),[25] while the city's watersheds in nearby mountains accumulate averages as high as 500 in (1,270 cm). The period without freezing temperatures usually lasts an average of 167 days, from April 30 to October 15.[26] Flood of City Creek, 1983. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita-Pearson scale, rates a tornados intensity by the damage it inflicts on human-built structures and sometimes on vegetation. ... Avenues neighborhood damage The Salt Lake City Tornado was a very rare tornado that occurred in Salt Lake City, Utah on August 11, 1999, during an unusually strong summer monsoon season. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... City Creek is a small but historically important mountain steam that flows from City Creek Canyon and across part of Salt Lake City, Utah, and into the Jordan River which empties into the Great Salt Lake. ... Semi-arid generally describes regions that receive low annual rainfall (25 to 50 cm /10 to 20 in) and generally have scrub or grass vegetation. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A drainage basin is the area within the drainage basin divide (blue outline), and drains the surface runoff and river discharge (green lines) of a contiguous area. ... In physics and chemistry, freezing is the process whereby a liquid turns to a solid. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the winter months cold fronts typically originate in the Gulf of Alaska and move southeastward into the area. The nearby Great Salt Lake produces lake-effect snow approximately 6 to 8 times per year, some of which can drop excessive snowfalls. The lake-effect also contributes to some rain storms, and it is estimated that about 10% of the annual precipitation in the city can be attributed to the lake effect.[27] During mid-winter, strong areas of high pressure often situate themselves over the Great Basin, leading to strong temperature inversions. This causes air stagnation and thick smog in the valley for several days to weeks at a time and can result in the worst air-pollution levels in the U.S. reducing air quality to unhealthy levels.[28][29] The city has an average of three days annually with low temperatures below 0 °F, with an all-time record low temperature of -30 °F (-34 °C), which occurred on February 9, 1933.[30] The Gulf of Alaska is an arm of the Pacific Ocean defined by the curve of the southern coast of Alaska, stretching from the Alaska Peninsula and Kodiak Island in the west to the Alexander Archipelago in the east, where Glacier Bay and the Inside Passage are found. ... Lake-effect precipitation coming off Lake Erie, as seen by NEXRAD radar. ... Drainage map showing the Great Basin in orange Various Definitions of the Great Basin (NPS) The Great Basin is a large, arid region of the western United States. ... Smoke rising in Lochcarron is stopped by an overlying layer of warmer air. ... -1... It has been suggested that Haze be merged into this article or section. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the spring, most of the storms originate in the Pacific Ocean from the Pineapple Express, bringing in the most moisture of the entire year. Larger and cooler storms in the spring can lead to heavy overnight snowfall. Measurable snow has occurred as late as May 18.[31] This article is about the tropical jet stream. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The summers of the city are marked by hot weather and are mostly dry. The monsoon rises from the Gulf of California from approximately mid-July into September, producing localized severe afternoon thunderstorms. Due to the low daytime humidity, virga, lightning, and microbursts can lead to wildfire problems. During active monsoon periods, widespread thunderstorms carrying excessive precipitation are common. High temperatures of at least 100 °F (38 °C) occur on average five times a year, but always on days with low humidity. The record high temperature is 107 °F (42 °C), which occurred first on July 26, 1960 and again on July 13, 2002.[32] For other uses, see Monsoon (disambiguation). ... The Gulf of California (also known as the Sea of Cortez or Sea of Cortés; locally known in the Spanish language as Mar de Cortés or, much less frequently, Golfo de California) is a body of water that separates the Baja California Peninsula from the Mexican mainland. ... A rolling thundercloud over Enschede, The Netherlands. ... Nimbostratus virga In meteorology, virga is precipitation that falls from a cloud but evaporates before reaching the ground. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... A photograph of the surface curl soon after an intense microburst impacted the surface A microburst is a very localized column of sinking air, producing damaging divergent and straight-line winds at the surface that are similar to but distinguishable from tornadoes which generally have convergent damage. ... is the 207th day of the year (208th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


During October, the Pacific Ocean once again becomes active, bringing in more precipitation, occasionally in the form of the remnants of tropical cyclones. The remnants of Hurricane Olivia helped bring the record monthly precipitation of 7.04 in (179 mm) in September 1982.[33][34] The first measurable snowfall has occurred as early as September 17. Cyclone Catarina, a rare South Atlantic tropical cyclone viewed from the International Space Station on March 26, 2004 Hurricane and Typhoon redirect here. ... Pacific Hurricane Seasons 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 The 1982 Pacific hurricane season officially started May 15, 1982 in the eastern Pacific, and June 1, 1982 in the central Pacific, and lasted until November 30, 1982. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...



Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Record Daily High °F (°C) 63 (17) 69 (21) 78 (26) 89 (32) 99 (37) 104 (40) 107 (42) 106 (41) 100 (38) 89 (32) 75 (24) 69 (21)
Average Daily High °F (°C) 37 (3) 43 (6) 53 (12) 61 (16) 71 (22) 82 (28) 91 (33) 89 (32) 78 (26) 64 (18) 49 (9) 38 (3)
Average Daily Low °F (°C) 21 (-6) 26 (-3) 33 (1) 39 (4) 47 (8) 56 (13) 63 (17) 62 (17) 52 (11) 41 (5) 30 (-1) 22 (-6)
Record Daily Low °F (°C) -22 (-30) -30 (-34) 2 (-17) 14 (-10) 25 (-4) 35 (2) 40 (4) 37 (3) 27 (-3) 16 (-9) -14 (-26) -21 (-29)
Data is for Salt Lake International Airport




Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Record Precipitation in. 3.23 4.89 3.97 4.90 4.76 3.84 2.57 3.66 7.04 3.91 3.34 4.37
Average Precipitation in. 1.37 1.33 1.91 2.02 2.09 0.77 0.72 0.76 1.33 1.57 1.40 1.23
Average Snowfall in. 13.6 9.9 9.1 4.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 1.3 7.0 12.0
Record Snowfall in. 50.3 32.1 41.9 26.4 7.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 4.0 20.4 33.3 35.2
Data is for Salt Lake International Airport



Demographics

Salt Lake City's racial demographics against those of Utah:
Utah Salt Lake City Ethnicity
85.3% 79.20% White
0.8% 1.89% Black
1.3% 1.34% Native American
1.7% 3.62% Asian
0.7% 1.89% Pacific Islander
N/A 8.52% Other race
2.1% 3.54% Two or more races
9.0% 18.85% Hispanic

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there are 181,743 people (up from 159,936 in 1990), 71,461 households, and 39,803 families residing in the city. This amounts to 8.1% of Utah's population, 20.2% of Salt Lake County's population, and 13.6% of the Salt Lake metropolitan population. Salt Lake City proper covers 14.2% of Salt Lake County. Salt Lake City is more densely populated than the surrounding metro area with a population density of 643.3/km² (1,666.1/mi²). There are 77,054 housing units at an average density of 272.7/km² (706.4/mi²). This article does not cite its references or sources. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... The United States Census Bureau uses the federal governments definitions of race when performing a census. ... Hispanics in the United States, or Hispanic Americans, are American citizens or residents of Hispanic ethnicity who identify themselves as having Hispanic Cultural heritage. ... Image:1870 census Lindauer Weber 01. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Salt Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ...


The Salt Lake City-Ogden metropolitan area, which included Salt Lake, Davis, and Weber counties, had a population of 1,333,914 in 2000, a 24.4% increase over the 1990 figure of 1,072,227. Since the 2000 Census, the Census Bureau has added Summit and Tooele counties to the Salt Lake City metropolitan area, but removed Davis and Weber counties and designated them as the separate Ogden-Clearfield metropolitan area. Together with the Provo-Orem metropolitan area, which lies to the south, a roughly continuous urban corridor along the Wasatch Front is formed, which has a combined population of well over 2 million. Ogden sign over Washington Boulevard at the Ogden River; toward downtown Ogden is the county seat of Weber County,GR6 Utah, United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Salt Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Davis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Weber County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah, occupying a stretch of the Wasatch Front, part of the eastern shores of Great Salt Lake, and much of the rugged Wasatch Mountains. ... 2000 US Census logo The Twenty-Second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13. ... The U.S. Census is mandated by the United States Constitution. ... Summit County is a county located in the state of Utah, occupying a rugged and mountainous area. ... Tooele County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Ogden sign over Washington Boulevard at the Ogden River; toward downtown Ogden is the county seat of Weber County,GR6 Utah, United States. ... Clearfield is a city located in Davis County, Utah. ... Provo is a city in Utah and the county seat of Utah County, located about 35 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... Orem is an incorporated city in the north-central part of the state of Utah in Utah County. ... The Wasatch Front is an urban area in the U.S. state of Utah. ...


There are 71,461 households, out of which 27.0% have children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.1% are married couples living together, 10.2% have a female householder with no husband present, and 44.3% are nonfamilies. Of the 71,461 households, 3,904 were reported to be unmarried partner households: 3,047 heterosexual, 458 same-sex male, and 399 same-sex female. 33.2% of all households are made up of individuals, and 9.7% have someone living alone who is 65 years of age or older. The average household size is 2.48, and the average family size is 3.24. Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ...


In the city the population is spread out with:

  • 23.6% under the age of 18
  • 15.2% from 18 to 24
  • 33.4% from 25 to 44
  • 16.7% from 45 to 64
  • 11.0% who are 65 years of age or older

The median age is 30 years. For every 100 females there are 102.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there are 101.2 males. The median income for a household in the city is $36,944, and the median income for a family is $45,140. Males have a median income of $31,511 versus $26,403 for females. The per capita income for the city is $20,752. 15.3% of the population and 10.4% of families are below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 18.7% of those under the age of 18 and 8.5% of those 65 and older are living below the poverty line. Income, generally defined, is the money that is received as a result of the normal business activities of an individual or a business. ... The household is the basic unit of analysis in many microeconomic and government models. ... The per capita income for a group of people may be defined as their total personal income, divided by the total population. ... Map of countries showing percentage of population who have an income below the national poverty line The poverty line is the level of income below which one cannot afford to purchase all the resources one requires to live. ...

Historical Population
Year Population
1860 8,236
1870 12,854
1880 20,768
1890 44,843
1900 53,531
1910 92,777
1920 116,110
1930 140,267
1940 149,934
1950 182,121
1960 189,454
1970 175,885
1980 163,034
1990 159,936
2000 181,743
2006 178,858

Large family sizes and low housing vacancy rates, which have inflated housing costs along the Wasatch Front, have led to one out of every six residents living below the poverty line. The Wasatch Front is an urban area in the U.S. state of Utah. ...


Less than 50% of Salt Lake City's residents are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This is a much lower proportion than in Utah's more rural municipalities; altogether, LDS members make up about 62% of Utah's population.[35]


The Rose Park and Glendale sections are predominantly Spanish-speaking with Latinos accounting for 60% of public school-children.[36] The Centro Civico Mexicano acts as a community gathering point for the Wasatch Front's estimated 300,000 Latinos,[37] Mexican President Vicente Fox began his U.S. tour in the city in 2006, and the largest supermarket chain of Mexico, Supermercados Gigante, is planning a location, the first in the U.S. outside of California.[38] Bosnian, Sudanese, Afghani, Somali, and Russian refugees have settled in the city under government programs.[39] There is also a large Pacific Islander population, mainly made up of Samoans and Tongans. Many of the Pacific Islanders are members of the LDS Church.[40] Rose Park is a neighborhood on the west side of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Glendale is a neighborhood on the west side of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... This article is about the international language known as Spanish. ... Vicente Fox Quesada (born July 2, 1942) was the President of Mexico from 2000 to 2006. ... Supermercados Gigante is a large supermarket chain in Mexico. ... Anthem SurÅ«d-i MillÄ« Capital (and largest city) Kabul Official languages Pashto, Persian (DarÄ«)1 Government Islamic Republic  -  President Hamid Karzai  -  Vice President Ahmad Zia Massoud  -  Vice President Karim Khalili Independence from the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland   -  Declared August 8, 1919   -  Recognized August 19 1919  Area...


Salt Lake City has been considered one of the top 51 "gay-friendly places to live" in the U.S.[41] The city is home to a large, business savvy, organized, and politically supported gay community. Leaders of the Episcopal Church's Diocese of Utah,[42][43] Utah's largest Jewish congregation, the Salt Lake Kol Ami,[44] and three elected representatives of the city, two members of the state house and one in the senate, all identify as gay. These developments have attracted controversy from socially conservative officials representing other regions of the state. State Senator Chris Buttars of West Jordan publicly denounced Mayor Rocky Anderson for having "attracted the entire gay community to come and live in Salt Lake County" after a Dan Jones poll indicated strong support for allowing domestic partnerships. In the 2004 election, 63% of the city population voted against banning same-sex marriage, in agreement with Mayor Anderson.[45] The Episcopal Church or the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America is the American Church of the Anglican Communion. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Chris Buttars is a Republican state senator for Utah representing senate district 10 (which spans the cities of South Jordan, West Jordan, and Herriman). ... Ross C. Rocky Anderson (born September 9, 1951) is the current mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ...


Economy

Part of Downtown Salt Lake Spring 2006

The modern economy of Salt Lake City is service-oriented. In the past, nearby steel, mining and railroad operations provided a strong source of income with Silver King Coalition Mines, Geneva Steel, Bingham Canyon Mine, and oil refineries. Today the city's major industries are government, trade, transportation, utilities, and professional and business services. The city is known as the "Crossroads of the West" for its central geography in the western United States. As a result, Interstate 15 is a major corridor for freight traffic and the area is host to many regional distribution centers.[citation needed] Part of Downtown Salt Lake 2005 The economy of Salt Lake City, Utah is primarily service-oriented. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 1221 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2816x2112, 1221 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Geneva Steel was a steel mill located in Vineyard, Utah, founded during World War II to enhance national steel output. ... The Bingham Canyon Mine is an open-pit mine extracting a large porphyry copper deposit southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, in the Oquirrh Mountains. ... View of Shell Oil Refinery in Martinez, California. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 15 “I-15” redirects here. ...


Local, state, and federal governments have their largest presence in the city proper itself, and trade, transportation, and utilities also take up a significant portion of employment, with the major employer being the western North America Delta Air Lines hub at Salt Lake City International Airport. Equally significant are the professional and business services, while health services and health educational services also serve as significant areas of employment. Other major employers include the University of Utah, Sinclair Oil Corporation, and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... Salt Lake City International Airport (IATA: SLC, ICAO: KSLC) is a public airport located in western Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... Sinclair Oil is an American petroleum company based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Besides its central offices, the LDS Church owns and operates a profit division, Deseret Management Corporation and its subsidiaries, which are headquartered in the city. Other notable firms headquartered in the city include AlphaGraphics, Sinclair Oil Corporation, Zions Bancorporation, Merrill Lynch Bank USA, UBS Bank USA, American Express Centurion Bank, GMAC Automotive Bank, Morgan Stanley Bank, Smith's Food and Drug (owned by national grocer Kroger). Notable firms based in the metropolitan area include Arctic Circle Restaurants, Franklin-Covey, and Overstock.com. Metropolitan Salt Lake was also once the headquarters of Kentucky Fried Chicken (the first ever KFC is located in South Salt Lake), American Stores, the Skaggs Companies, and ZCMI, one of the first-ever department stores; it is currently owned by Federated Department Stores. Former ZCMI stores now operate under the Macy's label. Suburban Salt Lake was also the first location for Sears Grand (at the Jordan Landing shopping center in West Jordan). The Deseret Management Corporation is a for-profit management company of assets for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Sinclair Oil is an American petroleum company based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Zions Bancorporation (NASDAQ: ZION) is a member of the S&P 500, a bank holding company headquartered Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Smiths Food and Drug, commonly known as Smiths, is a leading chain of supermarkets in the Intermountain and Southwest regions of the United States. ... Kroger headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Arctic Circle Restaurants is a chain of burger and shake restaurants based in Midvale, Utah. ... The Franklin Covey Company was formed on May 30, 1997 when Franklin Quest acquired the Covey Leadership Center, the firm created by Stephen Covey They are based in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. They are the company who market the Franklin Planner. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... KFC (full name Kentucky Fried Chicken) is a division of Yum! Brands, Inc. ... Columbus Center, South Salt Lake City, Utah South Salt Lake is a city located in Salt Lake County, Utah. ... American Stores was the name of a United States chain of supermarkets. ... The Skaggs Companies were predecessors to many famous United States retailing chains, including Safeway, Albertsons, Osco, and Longs Drug Stores. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The interior of a typical Macys department store. ... Federated Department Stores, Inc. ... This article is about the R. H. Macy & Co. ... Sears Grand Sears Grand is an off-mall race-track style store version of Sears, known for in mall settings. ... An exterior of typical retail stores in Jordan Landing Sears Grand in Jordan Landing Wal-Mart and Sams Club in Jordan Landing Jordan Landing is a master-planned development located in the center of West Jordan, Utah, adjacent to Salt Lake City Municipal 2 Airport, Bangerter Highway, New Bingham... Jordan Landing West Jordan is a city located in Salt Lake County, Utah and part of the Salt Lake City metropolitan area. ...


Since Utah is one of seven states that allow the establishment of commercially-owned industrial banks, the vast majority of industrial banks in the U.S. have established their headquarters in the Salt Lake City area. High-tech firms with a large presence in the suburbs include e-Bay, Unisys, Siebel, Micron, L-3 Communications and 3M. An industrial loan company (ILC) or industrial bank is a financial institution in the United States that lends money, and may be owned by non-financial institutions. ... The title given to this article is incorrect due to technical limitations. ... Unisys Corporation (NYSE: UIS), based in Blue Bell, Pennsylvania, United States, and incorporated in Delaware[3], is a global provider of information technology services and solutions. ... See also: Siebel Systems Siebel, originally Flugzeugbau Halle, was a German aircraft manufacturer. ... L-3 Communications Holdings, Inc. ... 3M Company (NYSE: MMM), formerly Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company until 2002, is an American corporation with a worldwide presence. ...


Other economic activities include tourism, conventions, and major suburban call centers. Tourism has increased since the 2002 Olympic Winter Games,[13] and many hotels and restaurants were built for the events. The convention industry has expanded since the construction of the Salt Palace convention center in the late 1990s, which hosts trade shows and conventions, including the annual Outdoor Retailers meeting and Novell's annual BrainShare convention. Tourist redirects here. ... Metro Toronto Convention Centre, late 2004. ... (Redirected from 2002 Olympic Winter Games) The XIX Olympic Winter Games were held in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The Salt Palace was an indoor arena in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Novell Inc. ...


In 2006, the largest potato producer in Idaho, the United Potato Growers of America, announced that it would re-locate its headquarters to Salt Lake City, citing its need for a large international airport, being that Salt Lake City International is the 18th busiest in the world in terms of combined freight and passengers. The announcement led some members of the Idaho legislature to propose legislation changing the state license plate, which currently reads "Famous Potatoes".[46] Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Largest metro area Boise metropolitan area Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An International airport is an airport where flights from other countries land and/or take off. ... Salt Lake City International Airport (IATA: SLC, ICAO: KSLC) is a public airport located three miles (5 km) west of Salt Lake City, in Salt Lake County, Utah, USA. The airport is a hub for Delta Air Lines. ... The thirty worlds busiest airports by traffic movements are measured by total movements (data provided by Airports Council International). ...


In 2005, it was found the downtown area was experiencing rapid population growth.[47] The number of residential units in the central business district has increased by 80% since 1995, and is forecasted to nearly double in the next decade. The City Creek development of the LDS Church will be adding 300 units in its first phase including the 415 ft. tall City Creek condominium tower,[48] Allen Millo Associates currently has two projects under construction and two more planned,[49] all 200 units have been sold before construction of a seven-story condominium planned by Wood Property,[50] a residential tower is planned for Trolley Square, and this is after the recent completion of the Northgate Apartments and 12-story condominiums at Gateway with two more buildings finished nearby and the Liberty Metro apartments near Library Square. The City Creek condominium tower is a planned residential-building to be erected in the City Creek development in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ...


Office vacancy rates are low in the downtown region. In response, two new large buildings are being constructed. The first is eight stories and located in the Gateway District,[51] while the second will be 22 stories high and is currently under construction on Main Street.[52] In addition, the historic Walker Bank Building is currently undergoing major renovations that will enable it to achieve Class A office space status.[53] Construction of the Gateway District, light rail, and planned commuter rail service have supported the revival of downtown. TRAX Sandy train at the Gallivan Plaza stop in Downtown Salt Lake City TRAX is a two-line light rail system in Utahs Salt Lake Valley, serving Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Murray, Midvale and Sandy. ... FrontRunner is a commuter rail line being built by the Utah Transit Authority (UTA) to serve the Wasatch Front area of Utah. ...


Law and government

City and County Building, seat of city government since 1894. It also served as Utah's first statehouse from 1896 until the current Utah State Capitol was dedicated on October 9, 1916.
City and County Building, seat of city government since 1894. It also served as Utah's first statehouse from 1896 until the current Utah State Capitol was dedicated on October 9, 1916.[54]

Since 1979 Salt Lake City has had a nonpartisan mayor-council form of government. The mayor and the seven councilors are elected to four-year terms. Mayoral elections are held the same year as three of the councilors. The other four councilors are staggered two years from the mayoral. Council seats are defined by geographic population boundaries. Each councilor represents approximately 26,000 citizens. Officials are not subject to term limits. The most recent election was held in 2005. City and County Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. ... City and County Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The Salt Lake City and County Building, seat of city government since 1894 The Salt Lake City and County Building, usually called the City-County Building, is the seat of government for Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Utah State Capitol in 2002 Inside the Utah State Capitol in 2002 The Utah State Capitol is located on Capitol Hill, overlooking downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Non-partisan democracy (also no-party democracy) is a system of representative government or organization such that universal and periodic elections (by secret ballot) take place without reference to political parties or even the speeches, campaigns, nominations, or other apparatus commonly associated with democracy. ... Mayor-Council government is one of two variations of government most commonly used in modern representative municipal governments in the United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the U.K. and its former colonies. ... This article is about constitutional law; for the book by Vince Flynn see Term Limits (book). ...


The city has elected Democratic Party mayoral candidates since the 1970s. Councilors are elected under specific issues and are usually well-known.[citation needed] Labor politics play no significant role. The city has two elected openly gay women and an openly gay man, representing the city in the State House and Senate, respectively.[55] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ...


The separation of church and state was the most heated topic in the days of the Liberal Party and People's Party of Utah, when many candidates would be LDS Bishops and Mark Twain referred to Brigham Young as "the only monarch in America." This tension is still reflected today with the Bridging the Religious Divide campaign.[56] This campaign was initiated when some city residents complained that the Utah political establishment was unfair in its dealings with non-LDS residents by giving the LDS Church preferential treatment, while LDS residents perceived a growing anti-Mormon bias in city politics. Constantines Conversion, depicting the conversion of Emperor Constantine the Great to Christianity, by Peter Paul Rubens. ... The Liberal Party believed the economic future of Utah Territory lay in mining, and Utah miners—typically non-Mormon—were key Liberal Party voters. ... The Peoples Party was a political party in Utah Territory during the late 1800s. ... Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 – April 21, 1910),[1] better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, lecturer and writer. ... An anti-Mormon political cartoon from the late nineteenth century. ...


The city's political demographics are liberal and Democratic. This stands in stark contrast to the majority of Utah where Republican and conservative views generally dominate. Modern liberalism in the United States is a form of liberalism that began in the United States in the last years of the 19th century and the early years of the 20th century. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ...

Elected officials of Salt Lake City as of 2004
Official Position Term ends
Rocky Anderson (D) Mayor 2007
City Council members
Carlton Christensen 1st district 2009
Van Blair Turner 2nd district 2011
Eric Jergensen 3rd district 2009
Luke Garrott 4th district 2011
Jill Remington Love 5th district 2009
JT Martin 6th district 2011
Søren Simonsen 7th district 2009

The current mayor is Ross C. "Rocky" Anderson. Ralph Becker was elected the new mayor on November 6, 2007, beating conservative Dave Buhler in a landslide vote.[57] Ross C. Rocky Anderson (born September 9, 1951) is the current mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Ross C. Rocky Anderson (born 1951) is the current mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Ralph Becker (born May 30, ????) is an American politician who is currently serving as the Minority Leader of the Utah State House of Representatives. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


The city is home to several non-governmental think-tanks and advocacy groups such as the conservative Sutherland Institute, the gay-rights group Equality Utah, and the quality-growth advocates Envision Utah. Salt Lake hosted many foreign dignitaries during the 2002 Winter Olympics, and in 2006 the President of Mexico began his U.S. tour in the city and Israel's ambassador to the United States opened a cultural center.[58] President George W. Bush visited in 2005 and again in 2006 for national veterans' conventions, both visits of which were protested by Mayor Rocky Anderson. Other political leaders such as Howard Dean and Harry Reid gave speeches in the city in 2005. The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The President of the United Mexican States is the head of state of Mexico. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ...

See also: List of mayors of Salt Lake City

This is a list of mayors of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Salt Lake City was incorporated on January 6, 1851. ...

Education

The Salt Lake City Public Library. The American Library Association called it the best in the U.S. in 2006.
The Salt Lake City Public Library. The American Library Association called it the best in the U.S. in 2006.

In 1847 pioneer Jane Dillworth held the first classes in her tent for the children of the first LDS families. In the last part of the 1800s, there was much controversy over how children in the area should be educated. LDS and non-LDS could not agree on the level of religious influence in schools. Today, many LDS youths in grades 9 through 12 attend some form of religious instruction, referred to as seminary. Education has always been a priority in the Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1587 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Salt Lake City, Utah Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1587 KB) Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Salt Lake City, Utah Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ... For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ...


Because of high birth rates and large classrooms, Utah spends less per student than any other state yet simultaneously spends more per capita than any state with the exception of Alaska. Money is always a challenge, and many businesses donate to support schools. Several districts have set up foundations to raise money. Recently, money was approved for the reconstruction of more than half of the elementary schools and one of the middle schools in the Salt Lake City School District, which serves most of Salt Lake City proper. There are twenty-three elementary schools, five middle schools, three high schools (Highland, East, and West, with the former South High being converted to the South City campus of the Salt Lake Community College), and an alternative high school (Horizonte) located within the school district. In addition, Highland has recently been selected as the site for the charter school Salt Lake School for the Performing Arts (SPA), while Salt Lake City proper also holds many Catholic schools, including Judge Memorial High School. Rowland Hall-St. Mark's School is the area's premier independent school. For other uses, see Alaska (disambiguation). ... The Salt Lake City School District is among the oldest public school districts in Utah. ... South High School was a high school located in Salt Lake City, Utah, which operated from 1931 to 1988. ... Salt Lake Community College, often abbreviated SLCC and referred to locally as Slick, is the largest two-year community college in Utah. ... Founded in 1880, Rowland Hall-St. ... An independent school is a school which is not dependent upon national or local government for financing its operation and is instead operated by tuition charges, gifts, and perhaps the investment yield of an endowment. ...


The Salt Lake City Public Library system consists of the main library downtown, and five branches in various neighborhoods. The main library, designed by renowned architect Moshe Safdie, opened in 2003. In 2006, the Salt Lake City Public Library was named "Library of the Year" by the American Library Association[59]. The Salt Lake City Pubic Library is a system of free public libraries in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Moshe Safdie, C.C., B.Arch. ... ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ...


Postsecondary educational options in Salt Lake City include the University of Utah, Westminster College, Salt Lake Community College, BYU Salt Lake Center, and LDS Business College. There are also many trade and technical schools such as the Utah College of Massage Therapy. The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... Westminster College, Salt Lake City, or simply Westminster College is a four year accredited liberal arts college located in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. It also offers four graduate programs. ... Salt Lake Community College, often abbreviated SLCC and referred to locally as Slick, is the largest two-year community college in Utah. ... Brigham Young University, often referred to as BYU (or in colloquial speech simply the Y), is the flagship university of the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormon). ... LDS Business College (LDSBC) is a two-year college in Salt Lake City, Utah, focused on training students in business and industry. ...

See also: Salt Lake County - Education

Salt Lake County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ...

Culture

Arts

Gateway District, where the Clark Planetarium is located.
Gateway District, where the Clark Planetarium is located.

The Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Utah Museum of Natural History, and the Museum of Church History and Art are some of the museums located in Salt Lake City. Other museums include the Utah State Historical Society, Daughters of Utah Pioneer Memorial Museum, Fort Douglas Military Museum, and the Social Hall Heritage Museum. Clark Planetarium at the Gateway Mall houses an IMAX theater. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1761 KB) Summary Photograph by Apollomelos. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1761 KB) Summary Photograph by Apollomelos. ... Looking down Rio Grande Street (which goes directly through the mall) The Gateway District is a large open air retail, residential and office complex in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Clark Planetarium Exterior with superimposed nebula. ... Looking down Rio Grande Street (which goes directly through the mall) The Gateway District is a large open air retail, residential and office complex in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... IMAX theatre at the Melbourne Museum complex, Australia BFI London IMAX by night IMAX dome in Guayaquil, Ecuador IMAX Theater in SM Mall of Asia, Philippines IMAX (short for Image Maximum) is a film format created by Canadas IMAX Corporation that has the capacity to display images of far...


Salt Lake City provides many venues for both professional and amateur theatre. The city attracts many traveling Broadway and off-Broadway performances. Local professional acting companies include the Pioneer Theatre Company, Salt Lake Acting Company, and Plan-B Theatre Company. The Off Broadway Theatre, located in Salt Lake's historic Clift Building, features comedy plays and Utah's longest running improv comedy troupe, Laughing Stock. For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Off-Broadway plays or musicals are performed in New York City in smaller theatres than Broadway, but larger than Off-Off-Broadway, productions. ... For other uses, see Laughing stock (disambiguation) Laughing Stock was Talk Talks fifth and final album, released in 1991. ...


Salt Lake City is the home of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir, founded in 1847. The Choir's weekly program, called Music and the Spoken Word, is the longest-running continuous network broadcast in the world.[60] Salt Lake City is also the home to the Utah Symphony Orchestra, which was founded in 1940 by Maurice Abravanel and has become widely renowned. The orchestra's original home was the Salt Lake Tabernacle, but since the 1990s has performed at Abravanel Hall in the western downtown area. Salt Lake City area is also home to the award winning choir, The Salt Lake Children's Choir. The Choir was established in 1979 and is directed by Ralph B. Woodward. The Mormon Tabernacle Choir is a large choir sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons). ... The Mormon Tabernacle Choir performing in the Salt Lake Tabernacle, which is the historic broadcasting location of Music and the Spoken Word. ... The Utah Symphony Orchestra is a symphony orchestra located in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Maurice Abravanel, (January 6, 1903 – September 22, 1993), was a Greek-born Swiss conductor. ... The Salt Lake Tabernacle, also known as the Mormon Tabernacle, is located in Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah along with the Salt Lake Assembly Hall and Salt Lake Temple. ... Abravanel Hall is a concert hall in Salt Lake City, Utah that is home to the Utah Symphony and Opera, and is part of the Salt Lake County Center for the Arts. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The city also has a local music scene dominated by blues, rock and roll, punk, and emo groups. There are also many clubs which offer musical venues. Popular groups or persons who started in the Wasatch Front area or were raised and influenced by it include The Used, Shedaisy, Meg and Dia, The Almost, and The Summer Obsession. In 2004 over 200 bands submitted tracks for a compilation by a local music zine, SLUG ("Salt Lake Underground"). The 18-year-old free monthly zine trimmed the submissions to 59 selections featuring diverse music types such as hip-hop, jazz, jazz-rock, punk, and a variety of rock and roll. The University of Utah is home to two highly-ranked dance departments, the Ballet Department and the Department of Modern Dance. Professional dance companies in Salt Lake City include Ballet West, Rire Woodbury, and Repertory Dance Theatre. Blues music redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Punk rock is an anti-establishment music movement beginning around 1976 (although precursors can be found several years earlier), exemplified and popularised by The Ramones, the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned. ... Look up emo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Used its an alternative rock band from Orem, Utah. ... SHeDAISY is an American country music group composed of three Osborn sisters: Kristyn Robyn (b. ... This article is in need of improvement. ... The Almost is an alternative rock band, from Tampa Bay, Florida, most notable for being the side project of Underoath drummer/vocalist Aaron Gillespie. ... The Summer Obsession is a pop punk band from Jacksonville, Florida, United States. ... A zine—an abbreviation of the word fanzine, and originating from the word magazine[1][2]—is most commonly a small circulation, non-commercial publication of original or appropriated texts and images. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Jazz fusion (or jazz-rock fusion or fusion) is a musical genre that merges elements of jazz with other styles of music, particularly pop, rock, folk, reggae, funk, metal, country, R&B, hip hop, electronic music and world music. ... Born April 25th, 1915 in Salt Lake City, Utah, Virginia Tanner began her formal dance training at the University of Utah. ... Ballet West, Salt Lake City, Utah was founded in 1963 by Glenn Walker Wallace, who served as its first president. ... Born April 25th, 1915 in Salt Lake City, Utah, Virginia Tanner began her formal dance training at the University of Utah. ...


Many films, music videos, commercials, and TV shows have been recorded in the Salt Lake metropolitan area. They include: SLC Punk!, Touched By An Angel, Everwood, Big Love, Dawn of the Dead, Drive Me Crazy, High School Musical, High School Musical 2, Unaccompanied Minors, Dumb and Dumber, Independence Day, Poolhall Junkies, The Brown Bunny, The World's Fastest Indian, The Way of the Gun, Carnival of Souls, The Amazing Race 8, and The Postal Service's "Such Great Heights". In 2006 it was revealed that Dan Brown, the author of The DaVinci Code, was in the city studying the symbols on the Salt Lake LDS Temple and the Salt Lake Masonic Temple, among other historical buildings, for inclusion in an upcoming book. SLC Punk! (1998) is an independent film directed by James Merendino; SLC is an acronym for Salt Lake City. ... This section contains a list of trivia items. ... Everwood was a prime time television drama which aired in the United States on The WB. The series is set in the fictional small town of Everwood, Colorado. ... For other uses, see Big Love (disambiguation). ... For the remake, see Dawn of the Dead (2004 film) For the song by Schoolyard Heroes, see The Funeral Sciences Dawn of the Dead (also known as George A. Romeros Dawn of the Dead & Zombi internationally) is a 1978 American independent zombie horror film. ... Drive Me Crazy is a teen-oriented romantic comedy based on the novel How I Created My Perfect Prom Date by Todd Strasser. ... For other uses, see High School Musical (disambiguation). ... For the soundtrack, see High School Musical 2 (soundtrack). ... Unaccompanied Minors (also called: Grounded: Unaccompanied Minors) is a 2006 film directed by Paul Feig and starring Lewis Black, Wilmer Valderrama, Tyler James Williams, Dyllan Christopher, Brett Kelly, Gina Mantegna, and Quinn Shephard. ... Dumb and Dumber is a comedy film starring Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels, released in 1994. ... For other uses, see Independence Day (disambiguation). ... Poolhall Junkies (2003) is a feature film written and directed by Mars Callahan. ... The Brown Bunny is an independent film by actor/director Vincent Gallo about a motorcycle racer on a cross-country drive who is haunted by the memories of his former lover. ... The Worlds Fastest Indian (2005), is a film based on the legendary speed bike racer from New Zealand named Burt Munro. ... The Way of the Gun is a 2000 film, directed by Christopher McQuarrie and starring Ryan Phillippe and Benicio Del Toro as two reckless and brutal gunfighters who kidnap a woman (Juliette Lewis) who is carrying the child of a powerful mobster, hoping to obtain a huge cash payoff. ... Carnival of Souls is a horror cult film released in 1962. ... The Amazing Race 8 (titled The Amazing Race: Family Edition) was the eighth installment of the popular reality television show, The Amazing Race. ... This article is about the band. ... Such Great Heights was released January 21, 2003 by The Postal Service under the Sub Pop Records label. ... This article is about the writer. ... The Da Vinci Code book cover The Da Vinci Code is a novel written by American author Dan Brown and published in 2003 by Random House (ISBN 0385504209). ... Wikimedia Commons has multimedia related to: Temple Square Salt Lake Temple is the centerpiece of the 10-acre Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Completed in 1927, and located in the South Temple Historic District of Salt Lake City, Utah, the Salt Lake Masonic Temple, is the seat of Masonic government in Utah, and is Salt Lake City’s best example of Egyptian Revival Architecture. ...


Events

The Olympic flame burns at Rice-Eccles Stadium. Salt Lake City hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics.
The Olympic flame burns at Rice-Eccles Stadium. Salt Lake City hosted the 2002 Winter Olympics.

Although the city is often stereotyped as a predominantly LDS city, it is culturally and religiously diverse. The city is the location of many cultural activities,[61] Mormon and otherwise. A major state holiday is Pioneer Day, July 24, the anniversary of the Mormon pioneers' entry into the Salt Lake Valley. It is celebrated each year with a week's worth of activities, including a children's parade, a horse parade, the featured Days of '47 Parade (one of the largest parades in the United States), a rodeo, and a large fireworks show at Liberty Park. Download high resolution version (700x1034, 126 KB)Caption: Salt Lake City, UT (Feb. ... Download high resolution version (700x1034, 126 KB)Caption: Salt Lake City, UT (Feb. ... Pioneer Day (also called the Day of Deliverance[1]) is a holiday celebrated on July 24 in the U.S. state of Utah, with some celebrations in regions of surrounding states originally settled by Mormon pioneers. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A statue commemorating the Mormon pioneers The Mormon Pioneers were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who migrated across the United States from the midwest to the Salt Lake Valley in what is today the State of Utah. ... The Days of 47 Parade is an annual parade presented by The Days of 47, Inc. ...


Salt Lake City has a significant gay population, and the second-largest parade in the city is a gay pride parade, part of the annual Utah Pride Festival held every June.[10] 2004 Gay Pride Parade in São Paulo, Brazil. ... Salt Lake City Library during Pride Festival The Utah Pride Celebration is a five-day festival held in downtown Salt Lake City in June, celebrating Utahs diversity and gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgendered populations. ...


First Night on New Year's Eve, a celebration emphasizing family-friendly entertainment and activities held at Rice-Eccles Stadium at the University of Utah, culminates with a fireworks display at midnight. Rice-Eccles Stadium is the football stadium for the University of Utah Utes, located on the universitys campus in Salt Lake City, Utah. ...


The Greek Festival, held the weekend after Labor Day, celebrates Utah's Greek heritage and is located at the downtown Greek Orthodox Church. The 3-day event includes Greek music, dance groups, Cathedral tours, booths and a large buffet. Attendance ranges from 35,000 - 50,000.


The Utah Arts Festival has been held annually since 1977 with an average attendance of 80,000. About 130 booths are available for visual artists and there are five performance venues for musicians.[62]


Salt Lake City also hosts portions of the Sundance Film Festival. The festival, which is held each year, brings many cultural icons, movie stars, celebrities, and thousands of film buffs to see the largest independent film festival in the United States. However, the main location of the event is in nearby Park City. The Sundance Film Festival is a film festival in the United States, and ranks alongside the Cannes, France, Venice, Italy, Berlin, Germany, and Toronto, Canada festivals as one of the most prestigious in the world. ... Park City, Utah Main Street during a parade Looking down Main Street Park City is a city located in Summit County, Utah, United States. ...


Beginning in 2004, Salt Lake City has been the host of the international Salt Lake City Marathon. In 2006 Real Madrid and many of the nation's best cyclist had engagements.[63] Logo for the Salt Lake City Marathon The Salt Lake City Marathon is an annual marathon foot-race run entirely within Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Real Madrid Club de Fútbol is a Spanish sports club most widely known for its professional football team based in Madrid. ...


Salt Lake City has begun to host it's own events in the last few years, most notably the Friday Night Flicks, free movies in the City's parks, as well as the Mayor's health and fitness awareness program, Salt Lake City Gets Fit.


Salt Lake City was host to the 2002 Winter Olympics. At the time of the 2002 Olympics, Salt Lake City was the most populated area to hold a Winter Olympic games. The event put Salt Lake City in the international spotlight and is regarded by many as being one of the most successful winter olympics ever.[64] The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ...


At Dream Theater's Salt Lake City show, Governor Jon Huntsman, Jr. signed a proclamation making July 30th, 2007 "Dream Theater Day" in the state of Utah. Dream Theater is an American progressive metal band comprising James LaBrie, John Petrucci, Jordan Rudess, John Myung, and Mike Portnoy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... July 30 is the 211th day (212th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 154 days remaining. ...


Media

See also: List of Salt Lake City media and Salt Lake City in film

Salt Lake City has many diverse media outlets. Most of the major television and radio stations are based in or near the city. The Salt Lake City metropolitan area is ranked as the 31st largest radio[65] and 36th largest television[66] market in the United States. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Salt Lake City Weekly is a free alternative weekly tabloid-paged newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... // The Salt Lake City, Utah area includes many diverse media outlets, not only found within the official city boundaries, but also in the greater Wasatch Front urban area. ... The following is a list of films which are set in or around Salt Lake City, Utah. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ...


Print media include two major daily newspapers, The Salt Lake Tribune and the Deseret Morning News, and the alternative weekly, Salt Lake City Weekly. Other more specialized publications include Nuestro Mundo of the Spanish-speaking community and QSaltLake and The Pillar for the LBGT community. There are many local magazines, such as Utah Homes & Garden (quarterly), Salt Lake Magazine (a bimonthly lifestyle magazine), [2] Wasatch Woman Magazine (a bimonthly magazine spotlighting the successes of local women), and [3] Salt Lake Underground (SLUG)], an alternative underground music magazine. Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune (ISSN 0746-3502) is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ... The Salt Lake City Weekly is a free alternative weekly tabloid-paged newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... QSaltLake is a gay and lesbian newspaper printed twice monthly in Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S. It contains local, national and world news, an extensive opinion section, arts and entertainment, a bar guide and classifieds. ... The Pillar is an LGBT publication in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ...


KSL-TV is one of Utah's oldest television stations. KSL has downtown studios at "Broadcast House" in the Triad Center office complex. Most other television stations had until recently moved out of the downtown core and relocated in the suburbs. However, KUTV was recently given a Redevelopment Agency (RDA) grant, and moved its studios to Main Street. Its news desk overlooks the street, with a large window behind the anchor desk. KSL-TV (Channel 5) is an NBC affiliate in Salt Lake City, Utah that broadcasts locally in analog on VHF channel 5 and in digital on UHF channel 38. ... KUTV is the CBS owned and operated station serving the greater Salt Lake City, Utah metro area. ...


Because television and radio stations serve a larger area (usually the entire state of Utah, as well as parts of western Wyoming, southern Idaho, parts of Montana, and eastern Nevada), ratings returns tend to be higher than those in similar-sized cities. Some Salt Lake radio stations are carried on broadcast translator networks throughout the state. Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Largest metro area Boise metropolitan area Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44° 21′ N to 49° N  - Longitude 104° 2′ W to 116° 3′ W Population  Ranked... This article is about the U.S. State of Nevada. ... In broadcasting, a translator is an FM radio station or a TV station which acts as a full-duplex repeater. ...


Salt Lake City has become a case of market saturation on the FM dial; one cannot go through more than about two frequencies on an FM radio tuner before encountering another broadcasting station. A variety of companies, most notably Millcreek Broadcasting and Simmons Media, have constructed broadcast towers on Humpy Peak in the Uinta Mountains to the east. These towers allow frequencies allocated to nearby mountain communities to be boosted by smaller, low-powered FM transmitters along the Wasatch Front. In economics, market saturation is a term used to describe a situation in which a product has become diffused (distributed) within a market; the actual level of saturation can depend on consumer purchasing power; as well as competition, prices, and technology. ... FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... Categories: Stub | Consumer electronics ... The Simmons Media Group is a media company based in the United States. ... A Yagi-Uda beam antenna Short Wave Curtain Antenna (Moosbrunn, Austria) A building rooftop supporting numerous dish and sectored mobile telecommunications antennas (Doncaster, Victoria, Australia) An antenna is a transducer designed to transmit or receive radio waves which are a class of electromagnetic waves. ... This view of Kings Peak and the Henrys Fork Basin shows the cliff bands and basins typical throughout the Uintas. ...


Sites of interest and city architecture

Temple Square in 1897.
Temple Square in 1897.
The Olympic Cauldron Park at Rice-Eccles Stadium.
The Olympic Cauldron Park at Rice-Eccles Stadium.

As Salt Lake City is the headquarters for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), there are many historic and actual LDS sites around the city. The largest is Temple Square, which includes the Salt Lake Temple and visitors’ centers that are open to the public, free of charge. Temple Square also includes the historic Tabernacle, home of the world-famous Mormon Tabernacle Choir. The modern LDS Conference Center is across the street to the north. The Family History Library, the largest genealogical library in the world, is located just west of Temple Square. It is run by the LDS Church and is open to the public and free of charge. Salt Lake City, Utah is the most ethnically, politically, and religiously diverse city in the state of Utah. ... This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Salt Lake City Pubic Library is a system of free public libraries in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1712 × 2288 pixel, file size: 763 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 448 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1712 × 2288 pixel, file size: 763 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The cauldron from the 2002 Winter Olympics with Rice-Eccles Stadium in the background. ... Rice-Eccles Stadium is the football stadium for the University of Utah Utes, located on the universitys campus in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... This photo of Temple Square, circa 1897, shows that the plot housed the tallest buildings in Salt Lake City at the time, namely the Salt Lake Temple, Tabernacle and Assembly Hall. ... The Salt Lake Temple is the largest (of more than 120) and best-known temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Salt Lake Tabernacle, also known as the Mormon Tabernacle, is located in Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah along with the Salt Lake Assembly Hall and Salt Lake Temple. ... The Mormon Tabernacle Choir is a large choir sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons). ... View of Conference Center spire taken from south of the Center on North Temple St. ... LDS Genealogy Library in Salt Lake City The Family History Library (FHL) is a genealogical research facility provided and operated by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormon Church or LDS Church). ...


In 2004, the Salt Lake City main library received an Institute Honor Award for Architecture by the American Institute of Architects.[67] and features a distinctive, unique architectural style. The roof of the building serves as a viewpoint for the Salt Lake Valley. The library was featured prominently in the premier issue of architectureUTAH magazine. The Utah State Capitol Building offers marble floors and a dome similar to that of the building that houses the U.S. Congress. Other notable historical buildings include the Thomas Kearns Mansion (now the Governor's Mansion), City and County Building, built in 1894, the Kearns Building on Main Street and the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Madeleine, built in 1909. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. ... Utah State Capitol in 2002 Inside the Utah State Capitol in 2002 The Utah State Capitol is located on Capitol Hill, overlooking downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Thomas Kearns (April 11, 1862 - October 18, 1918) was a United States Senator from Utah. ... The Salt Lake City and County Building, seat of city government since 1894 The Salt Lake City and County Building, usually called the City-County Building, is the seat of government for Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Front exterior of the Cathedral The Cathedral of the Madeleine is a Roman Catholic Church in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ...


Near the mouth of Emigration Canyon lies This Is The Place Heritage Park, which re-creates typical 19th century LDS pioneer life. Hogle Zoo is located across the street from the park. The city’s largest public park, at over 100 acres, Liberty Park features a lake with an island in the middle and the Tracy Aviary. The park is home to a large number of birds, both wild and in the aviary. Red Butte Garden and Arboretum, located in the foothills of Salt Lake features many different exhibits and also hosts many musical concerts. The Bonneville Shoreline Trail is a popular hiking and biking nature trail which spans ninety miles through the foothills of the Wasatch Front. The This Is The Place Heritage Park is located on the east side of Salt Lake City. ... The Hogle Zoo is a zoo located in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The Red Butte Garden and Arboretum (50 acres) is a botanical garden and arboretum operated by the University of Utah, outside Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. It is open year-round to the public. ... Foothills are geographically defined as gradual increases in hilly areas at the base of a mountain range. ... The Wasatch Front is an urban area in the U.S. state of Utah. ...


Tourism to the city has increased as a result of the 2002 Winter Olympics held in Salt Lake. The former Olympic venues are very popular attractions for many visitors. The Olympic Cauldron Park, located at Rice-Eccles Stadium, features the Olympic Cauldron from the games, a visitor's center, and the Hoberman Arch. The Olympic Legacy Plaza, located at the Gateway District, features a dancing fountain which is also set to music. The Utah Olympic Park, located near Park City, features the Olympic ski jumps, as well as bobsleigh, luge, and skeleton runs. Today, the Olympic Park is used for year-round training and competitions. Visitors to the park can watch the various events that occur and even ride a bobsled. The Utah Olympic Oval, located in nearby Kearns, was home to the speed skating events and is now open to the public. Other popular Olympic venues include Soldier Hollow, located southeast of Salt Lake near Heber City. The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The cauldron from the 2002 Winter Olympics with Rice-Eccles Stadium in the background. ... Rice-Eccles Stadium is the football stadium for the University of Utah Utes, located on the universitys campus in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The Olympic Flame at the Athens 2004 Summer Olympics The Olympic Flame, Olympic Fire, Olympic Torch, Olympic Light, Olympic Eye, and Olympic Sun is a symbol of the Olympic Games. ... Hoberman Arch lit in the evening. ... Looking down Rio Grande Street (which goes directly through the mall) The Gateway District is a large open air retail, residential and office complex in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... The Utah Olympic Park is located north of Park City, Utah and east of Salt Lake City. ... Ski jumping is a winter sport in which skiers go down a hill with a take-off ramp (the jump), attempting to go as far as possible. ... Historic bobteam from Davos around 1910 Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from an article revision dated 2006-02-04, and may not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Icon of Luge at the 2006 Winter Olympics A luge is small one- or two-person sled on which one sleds supine and feet-first. ... United States Air Force Major Brady Canfield, 2003 U.S. skeleton champion, shows his takeoff form. ... Utah Olympic Oval The Utah Olympic Oval is located southwest of Salt Lake City in the township of Kearns. ... Kearns is a census-designated place located in Salt Lake County, Utah. ... Speed skating, or long track speedskating, long track speed skating, is an Olympic sport where competitors are timed while crossing a set distance. ... Heber Valley with Deer Creek Reservoir Heber is a city in Wasatch County, Utah, United States. ...


Salt Lake City is in close proximity to several world-class ski and summer resorts, including Park City Mountain Resort, Deer Valley, and Snowbird. The resorts cater to millions of visitors each year and offer year-round activities. Park City Mountain Resort is a ski resort in Park City, Utah. ... Deer Valley is an alpine ski area in the Wasatch Range. ... Inside the Snowbird Cliff Lodge Snowbird is a year-round ski and summer resort located in the U.S. state of Utah on the eastern border of the Salt Lake City suburb of Sandy in the Little Cottonwood Canyon of the Wasatch mountain range in the Rocky Mountains. ...


Salt Lake City is also home to a few major shopping centers. Trolley Square , which is currently under renovation prompted by the February 12, 2007 shooting, is an indoor and outdoor mall with many independent art boutiques, restaurants, and national retailers. The buildings housing the shops are renovated trolley barns with cobblestone streets. The Gateway District, an outdoor shopping mall, is the city’s newest major shopping center and has many national restaurants, clothing retailers, a movie theater, the Clark Planetarium, the Discovery Gateway, a music venue called The Depot, and the Olympic Legacy Plaza. Historic Trolley Square Trolley Square is an enclosed shopping center in a historic setting, along 500 South in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Candlelight vigil at the Salt Lake City Public Library for victims of the Trolley Square shooting. ... Looking down Rio Grande Street (which goes directly through the mall) The Gateway District is a large open air retail, residential and office complex in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Clark Planetarium Exterior with superimposed nebula. ... Discovery Gateway, formerly The Childrens Museum of Utah, is an interactive, hands-on discovery center located in downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. ...


On October 3, 2006, the LDS Church, who owns the ZCMI Center Mall and Crossroads Mall, both on Main Street, announced plans to demolish the malls, a skyscraper, and several other buildings to make way for the $1 billion City Creek Center redevelopment. It will combine several new office and residential buildings (one of which will be the third-tallest building in the city) around an outdoor shopping center featuring a stream, fountain, and other outdoor amenities, and is expected to be completed in 2011.[68] Sugar House is a neighborhood with a small town main street shopping area and numerous old parks. Sugar House Park is the second largest park in the city, and is host to frequent outdoor events and the primary Fourth of July fireworks in the city. is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Photograph of an entrance to the ZCMI Center Mall in downtown Salt Lake City. ... The City Creek Center is a $1 billion shopping center development under construction near Temple Square in the heart of downtown Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Sugar House area Obelisk at 2100 South 1100 East in Sugar House Sugar House (also sometimes seen as Sugarhouse) is one of Salt Lake City, Utahs oldest neighborhoods. ... Aerial view of Sugarhouse Park from Google Earth. ... Fourth of July redirects here. ...


Other attractions in or within close proximity to Salt Lake City include the Golden Spike National Historic Site (where the world's first transcontinental railroad was joined), the Lagoon Amusement Park, the Great Salt Lake, the Bonneville Salt Flats, Gardner Historic Village, one of the largest dinosaur museums in the U.S. at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, and the world’s largest man-made excavation at Bingham Canyon Mine. Golden Spike National Historic Site is a U.S. National Historic Site located at Promontory Summit, north of the Great Salt Lake in Utah. ... A transcontinental railroad is a railway that crosses a continent, typically from sea to sea. Terminals are at or connected to different oceans. ... lagoon, please see Lagoon (disambiguation). ... Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Utah, is the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere,[1] the fourth-largest terminal lake in the world,[2] and the 33rd largest lake on Earth. ... Bonneville Salt Flats The Bonneville Salt Flats are a 121 km² (47 mi²) salt flat in northwestern Utah. ... Lehi is a city located in Utah County, Utah. ... The Bingham Canyon Mine is an open-pit mine extracting a large porphyry copper deposit southwest of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA, in the Oquirrh Mountains. ...


Sports and recreation

Winter sports, such as skiing and snowboarding, are popular activities in the Wasatch Mountains east of Salt Lake City. Eight ski resorts lie within 50 miles (80 km) of the city. Alta, Brighton, Solitude, and Snowbird are located in Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons to the southeast, Deer Valley, The Canyons, and Park City Resort are located to the east, near Park City in Summit County, and Sundance is located to the southeast in Utah County. The ski resorts see frequent storms that deposit light, dry snow due to a phenomenon known as the lake effect, where storms amplified by the warm waters of the Great Salt Lake precipitate in the Wasatch Mountains. Alta and Deer Valley only allow skiing, while the others allow both skiing and snowboarding. The popularity of the ski resorts has increased nearly 29% since the 2002 Winter Olympics.[69] A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ... Cross-country skiing (skating style) in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. ... Snowboarder in a half-pipe Snowboarder riding off cornice Snowboarding contributes greatly to the economies of ski resorts Snowboarding is a sport that involves descending a snow-covered slope on a snowboard that is attached to ones feet using a boot/binding interface. ... The Wasatch Range (also seen as Wasatch Mountains and Wahsatch Range) is a mountain range that stretches from southern Idaho and Wyoming south through central Utah in the Western United States. ... Alta Ski Area, one of the worlds premier ski resorts, is located in the Wasatch Mountains just east of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... View from the resort Brighton Ski Resort is a ski area located in Big Cottonwood Canyon near Salt Lake City, Utah. ... For other uses, see Solitude (disambiguation). ... Looking down on Snowbird ski resorts lodges in mid-June Snowbird is a locale based in Little Cottonwood Canyon in the Wasatch Range of the Rocky Mountains in Utah. ... Big Cottonwood Canyon is a canyon in the Wasatch Range roughly 25 miles southeast of Salt Lake City in the U.S. state of Utah. ... The quality of this article or section may be compromised by peacock terms. You can help Wikipedia by removing peacock terms. ... Deer Valley is an alpine ski area in the Wasatch Range. ... The Canyons Ski resort is one of three alpine ski resorts located in Park City, UT. It is currently owned by the American Skiing Company. ... Park City Ski Resort Park City Ski Resort is a premiere skiing destination in Utah. ... Park City, Utah Main Street during a parade Looking down Main Street Park City is a city located in Summit County, Utah, United States. ... Summit County is a county located in the state of Utah, occupying a rugged and mountainous area. ... For the North American Indian ceremony, see Sun Dance sundance channel is an independent film network in the United States owned by Viacom, Robert Redford, and NBC Universal. ... Utah County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Lake-effect precipitation coming off the Great Lakes, as seen from NEXRAD. Lake effect snow, which can be a type of snowsquall, is produced in the winter when cold, artic dry winds move across long expanses of warmer lake water, picking up water vapor which freezes and is deposited on... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ...


Most of the ski resorts also offer summer activities. The mountains surrounding Salt Lake City are very popular for hiking, camping, rock climbing, mountain biking, and other related outdoor activities. In addition, the many small reservoirs and rivers in the Wasatch Mountains are popular for boating, fishing, and other water-related activities. Salt Lake City is the primary jumping-off point for exploring the national parks and monuments and rugged terrain of the southern half of the state, as it contains the only international airport in the state. Two hikers in the Mount Hood National Forest Eagle Creek hiking Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... Car camping is camping in a tent, but nearby the car for easier access and for supply storage. ... Climbers on Valkyrie at the Roaches. ... Mountain biker riding in the Arizona desert. ... // Boating, the leisurely activity of traveling by boat typically refers to the recreational use of boats whether power boats, sail boats, or yachts (large vessels), focused on the travel itself, as well as sports activities, such as fishing or waterskiing. ... Fishing is the activity of hunting for fish by hooking, trapping, or gathering. ...


Salt Lake City is home to the NBA team Utah Jazz, which plays at EnergySolutions Arena, and Real Salt Lake of Major League Soccer that began play in 2005 and currently plays at Rice-Eccles Stadium at the University of Utah. An as-of-yet unnamed soccer-specific stadium for Real Salt Lake has been approved for the suburb of Sandy and will finish construction by the 2008 season after undergoing nearly 2 years of funding difficulties.[70] Salt Lake City also received an Arena Football League team known as the Utah Blaze in 2006, who were popular in their first season in Utah, recording the highest average attendance in the league.[71] It is also the home of the Salt Lake Bees minor league baseball team, a Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Triple A affiliate that plays in the Pacific Coast League. Nearby West Valley City has the Utah Grizzlies of the ECHL. The new ABA league has twice attempted to expand into the city, first with the Utah Snowbears in the 2004-05 season (which folded after reaching the quarterfinals of the playoffs) and later with the Salt Lake Dream (who folded before ever playing a game). The Continental Basketball Association (CBA) also attempted an expansion with the Utah Eagles, who folded halfway through the 2006-07 season. The Utah Starzz of the WNBA were once located within the city, but moved to San Antonio and became the Silver Stars. NBA redirects here. ... The Utah Jazz is a professional basketball team based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The EnergySolutions Arena is an indoor arena in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States owned by Larry H. Miller. ... Year founded 2004 League Major League Soccer Nickname RSL, Real, Red & Blue Army Stadium Rice-Eccles Stadium Salt Lake City, UT Coach Jason Kreis, 2007— Owner SCP Worldwide First Game MetroStars 0–0 Real Salt Lake (Giants Stadium; April 2, 2005) Largest Win Real Salt Lake 3–0 FC Dallas... Major League Soccer (MLS) is a professional soccer league with teams in the United States and Canada. ... Rice-Eccles Stadium is the football stadium for the University of Utah Utes, located on the universitys campus in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... Sandy Stadium is a multi-use stadium in Sandy, Utah, United States that is currently under construction. ... Columbus Crew Stadium opened in 1999 as the first of a growing number of American stadiums built for soccer Soccer-specific stadium (SSS) is a term used mainly in the United States and Canada. ... A view of the Wasatch Mountains from a Sandy neighborhood. ... The Arena Football League (AFL) was founded in 1987 as an American football indoor league. ... Conference American Division Western Year founded 2006 Home arena EnergySolutions Arena City, State Salt Lake City, Utah Head Coach Danny White ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles none Wild Card berths 2: 2006 & 2007 The Utah Blaze is an Arena Football League team based in Salt Lake City... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Class-Level Triple-A Minor League affiliations Pacific Coast League (1994-Present) Pacific Conference - North Division Major League affiliation Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2001-Present) Minnesota Twins (1994-2000) Name Salt Lake Bees (2006-Present) Salt Lake Stingers (2002-2005) Salt Lake Buzz (1994-2001) Ballpark Franklin Covey Field... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... The Pacific Coast League (PCL) is a minor league baseball league operating in the West and Midwest of the United States. ... West Valley City seal West Valley City is a city in Salt Lake County in the state of Utah. ... The Utah Grizzlies are an ice hockey team in the ECHL. They play in West Valley City, Utah, USA at the E Center. ... The ECHL (formerly the East Coast Hockey League) is a professional ice hockey league based in Princeton, New Jersey, with teams scattered across the United States and Canada, generally regarded as a tier below the American Hockey League. ... For the league that began in 1999, see American Basketball Association (2000-). The American Basketball Association (ABA) was a professional basketball league founded in 1967, and eventually merged, in part, with the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The Utah Snowbears were a basketball team in the revived American Basketball Association based in Salt Lake City, Utah for the 2004-2005 season. ... The Salt Lake Dream is an American Basketball Association (ABA) team in Salt Lake City. ... The Continental Basketball Association (CBA) is a professional mens basketball league in the United States. ... The Utah Eagles are a team of the Continental Basketball Association scheduled to begin play in 2006. ... The San Antonio Silver Stars are a team in the Womens National Basketball Association. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... San Antonio redirects here. ... The San Antonio Silver Stars is a team in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) based in San Antonio, Texas. ...


Because Utah lacks a professional football team of its own, college football is very popular in the state. The University of Utah and Brigham Young University both maintain large and faithful followings in the city, and rivalries are intense during the annual game between the two universities. This is sometimes referred to as the Holy War, despite the fact that Utah is a secular university. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church) and is THE university in Utah. ... Few rivalries in collegiate athletics can match the passion and intensity of the rivalry between the University of Utah and Brigham Young University (BYU). Through the years, the enmity between these two schools has become so deep that fans of either side are rarely willing to concede even the slightest... The Holy War is a college football rivalry game played between the University of Utah Utes and the Brigham Young University Cougars. ...


Transportation

Transportation in Salt Lake City consits of a wide variety of public transportation. ...

Roads

Utah State Capitol Building. State Street begins at the structure.
Utah State Capitol Building. State Street begins at the structure.

There are four major freeways located within Salt Lake City. Interstate 15 runs north-south just west of downtown, while Interstate 80 enters near the airport and briefly merges with I-15 west of downtown before heading east through residential neighborhoods into Parley's Canyon. Utah State Route 201 (the 2100 South Freeway, as it's locally known) runs east-west along the border with West Valley City; and Interstate 215, a beltway, traverses the city's northwest and west neighborhoods and encircles the city's southern suburbs. SR-201, I-15, and I-80 bisect one another at the "spaghetti bowl" just south of the city in neighboring South Salt Lake. Salt Lake City from behind the Utah Capitol Building - photographer Sean Breazeal (Talshiarr) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Salt Lake City from behind the Utah Capitol Building - photographer Sean Breazeal (Talshiarr) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 15 “I-15” redirects here. ... Interstate 80 (abbreviated I-80) is the second-longest Interstate Highway in the United States. ... Parleys Canyon is a canyon located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Utah State Route 201 is a freeway/expressway located in Salt Lake County. ... West Valley City seal West Valley City is a city in Salt Lake County in the state of Utah. ... Interstate 215 (abbreviated I-215) in Utah, also called the Belt Route, is a 29-mile bypass interstate in metropolitan Salt Lake City. ... Columbus Center, South Salt Lake City, Utah South Salt Lake is a city located in Salt Lake County, Utah. ...


An additional freeway, known as the Mountain View Corridor, which is part of the Legacy Highway system, is proposed to reduce growing congestion and accommodate rapidly-growing population along the west side of the Salt Lake Valley, with construction set to begin as early as 2008 and completion after 2015. The first portion of the Legacy Highway system, known as Legacy Parkway, has begun construction as of November 2006 and will connect into I-215 just north of the city borders by 2008. This highway is expected to significantly reduce congestion on I-15 into Davis County. Utah State Route 154 (Bangerter Highway) is an expressway that provides access to the rapidly growing western and southern cities of the Salt Lake Valley, beginning at Salt Lake City International Airport. U.S. Highway 89 enters from Davis County parallel to I-15 before heading southeast into downtown. In downtown, U.S. 89 becomes State Street and extends south as the main surface street through the center of the city. Both S.R. 154 and U.S. 89 connect to I-15 at the far south end of the valley. The Mountain View Corridor is a proposed freeway project that would run along the west side of Salt Lake County and into northwest Utah County. ... Legacy Highway is the name of a freeway in Utah that is planned to ultimately run from Brigham City in the north down the western side of the Wasatch Front to Nephi in the south. ... Salt Lake Valley from space. ... Legacy Highway is the name of a freeway in Utah that is planned to ultimately run from Brigham City in the north down the western side of the Wasatch Front to Nephi in the south. ... Interstate 215 (abbreviated I-215) in Utah, also called the Belt Route, is a 29-mile bypass interstate in metropolitan Salt Lake City. ... Interstate 15, or I-15, is a north-south interstate highway in the western United States, traveling through the states of Montana, Idaho, Utah, Arizona, Nevada, and California. ... Davis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Bangerter Highway, or Utah State Route 154, named after former Utah Governor Norman H. Bangerter, is an expressway running north to south beginning at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Salt Lake City International Airport (IATA: SLC, ICAO: KSLC) is a public airport located in western Salt Lake City, Utah. ... United States Highway 89 is a north-south United States highway with two branches. ...


Public transportation

TRAX on Main Street. The light rail system connects the city to its southern suburbs.
TRAX on Main Street. The light rail system connects the city to its southern suburbs.

Salt Lake City's mass transit service is operated by the Utah Transit Authority (UTA) and includes light rail and bus routes (with the addition of commuter rail in 2008). The 19-mile light rail system, called TRAX, consists of two lines originating downtown, one heading south to Sandy and the other splitting east to the University of Utah. Daily ridership averages 42,500 (as of the first quarter of 2007),[72] significantly above original projections, and is the eleventh-most ridden light rail system in the country, but also the fifth-most ridden system by mile. TRAX began service on December 4, 1999, and the University Line opened in 2001 and was extended in 2003 to its current terminus at the University Medical Center. Both lines begin at the EnergySolutions Arena downtown; the University Line splits east at 400 South. The system has a total of 25 stations (with 14 of them in Salt Lake City proper), with 2 more currently under construction. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 373 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (949 × 1523 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 373 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (949 × 1523 pixel, file size: 1. ... TRAX Sandy train at the Gallivan Plaza stop in Downtown Salt Lake City TRAX is a two-line light rail system in Utahs Salt Lake Valley, serving Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Murray, Midvale and Sandy. ... Bangkok Skytrain. ... UTA bus at a stop The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) operates a public transportation system throughout the Wasatch Front of Utah. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... TRAX Sandy train at the Gallivan Plaza stop in Downtown Salt Lake City TRAX is a two-line light rail system in Utahs Salt Lake Valley, serving Salt Lake City, South Salt Lake, Murray, Midvale and Sandy. ... A view of the Wasatch Mountains from a Sandy neighborhood. ... The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. ... The following is a list of all light rail systems in the United States, ranked by ridership. ... The following is a list of all light rail systems in the United States, ranked by ridership. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... The EnergySolutions Arena is an indoor arena in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States owned by Larry H. Miller. ...


The Salt Lake City Intermodal Hub, near the Gateway District, was opened in 2005. The purpose of the Intermodal Hub is to serve as a central station for national, commuter, and light rail as well as national and local bus services. It is currently occupied by Greyhound; Amtrak is expected to be a future tenant, as well. An extension of the TRAX line from the EnergySolutions Arena through the Gateway District to the Intermodal Hub is currently under construction with completion expected in April 2008. This will approximately coincide with the launch of FrontRunner, a commuter rail line extending from the Intermodal Hub north through Davis County and Weber County to Pleasant View. Looking down Rio Grande Street (which goes directly through the mall) The Gateway District is a large open air retail, residential and office complex in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest inter-city common carrier of passengers by bus in North America , serving 2,200 destinations in the United States. ... The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... FrontRunner is a commuter rail line being built by the Utah Transit Authority (UTA) to serve the Wasatch Front area of Utah. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... Davis County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Weber County is a county located in the U.S. state of Utah, occupying a stretch of the Wasatch Front, part of the eastern shores of Great Salt Lake, and much of the rugged Wasatch Mountains. ... Pleasant View is a city located in Weber County, Utah. ...


Future TRAX lines to other Salt Lake City suburbs, as well as to the airport, are also planned. A sales tax hike for road improvements, light rail, and commuter rail was approved on November 7, 2006.[73] In addition, $500 million in federal funding has been approved for all four of the planned TRAX extensions in addition to an extension of FrontRunner south to Provo. The letter of intent signed with the Federal Transit Administration will allow all of these projects to begin construction soon, some as early as 2008.[74] It is expected that all of these projects will be complete by 2014.[75] is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Provo is a city in Utah and the county seat of Utah County, located about 35 miles south of Salt Lake City along the Wasatch Front. ... The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) within the U.S. Department of Transportation provides financial and technical assistance to the local transit systems. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... 2014 (MMXIV) will be a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


UTA also operates an extensive bus system that extends throughout the Wasatch Front from Brigham City in the north to Santaquin in the south and as far west as Grantsville. UTA also operates routes to the ski resorts in Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons during the ski season (typically November to April). The Wasatch Front is an urban area in the U.S. state of Utah. ... Brigham City is a city in Box Elder County, Utah, United States. ... Santaquin is a city located in Utah County, Utah. ... Grantsville is a city located in Tooele County, Utah. ... Big Cottonwood Canyon is a canyon in the Wasatch Range roughly 25 miles southeast of Salt Lake City in the U.S. state of Utah. ... The quality of this article or section may be compromised by peacock terms. You can help Wikipedia by removing peacock terms. ...


Amtrak, the national passenger rail system, provides service to Salt Lake City, operating its California Zephyr daily in both directions between Chicago and Emeryville, California across the bay from San Francisco. Greyhound Bus Lines serves Salt Lake City as well, providing access north-to-south through Utah along the I-15 corridor. Salt Lake City International Airport is located 7 mi (11 km) west of downtown. Delta Air Lines operates its second largest and fastest growing hub at the Salt Lake International airport serving over 110 non-stop destinations. These include several to Mexico and western Canada and will include a flight to Paris beginning in June 2008. The airport is served by 4 UTA bus routes, and plans are in the works for a future light rail route. Salt Lake City International Airport is one of the closest to its city's center in the country. Ute Cab, City Cab, and Yellow Cab are the major taxi services. The high-speed Acela Express in West Windsor, New Jersey. ... Other information Code SLC Traffic Passengers (2006) 26,580 0. ... Two California Zephyr express trains meet at a railroad siding (Grizzly) in Garfield County, Colorado beside the Colorado River on March 21, 1949. ... Union Station is a Chicago train station that opened in 1925, replacing an earlier 1881 station, and is now the only intercity rail terminal in Chicago. ... The city of Emeryville highlighted within Alameda County Emeryville is a small city located in Alameda County, California, in the United States. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Greyhound Lines is the largest intercity common carrier of passengers by bus in North America, serving 2200 destinations in the United States. ... Salt Lake City International Airport (IATA: SLC, ICAO: KSLC) is a public airport located in western Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Delta Air Lines, Inc. ... The original Yellow Cab Company based in Chicago, Illinois is one of the largest taxicab companies still in existence. ... For specific countries see Taxicabs around the world. ...


Sister cities

Salt Lake City has several sister cities,[76] including: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm Town twinning or sister cities is a concept whereby towns or cities from geographically and politically distinct areas are paired, with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Ukraine. ... Map of Ukraine (blue) with Chernivtsi highlighted (red). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Republic_of_China. ... Keelung (基隆 Pinyin: Jīlóng, Wade-Giles: Chi-lung) is a county-level city of Taiwan Province, Republic of China. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Bolivia. ... Oruro is a city in Bolivia with a population of about 248 000 (2000), located about equidistant between La Paz and Sucre at approx. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Philippines. ... Nickname: Map of Metro Manila showing the location of Quezon City Coordinates: 14°38 N, 121°2 E Country Philippines Region National Capital Region Districts 1st to 4th districts of Quezon City Barangays 142 Incorporated (town) October 12, 1939 (as Balintawak) Incorporated (city) October 12, 1939 Government  - Mayor Feliciano Sonny... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... For other uses, see Turin (disambiguation). ...

Notable residents

Ross C. Rocky Anderson (born September 9, 1951) is the current mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Robert Foster Bob Bennett (born September 18, 1933) is a Republican United States Senator from Utah. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Craig Bolerjack is an American sportscaster. ... Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the fifteenth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Jon M. Huntsman Hall at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania Jon Meade Huntsman, Sr. ... Jon M. Huntsman Hall at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania Jon Meade Huntsman, Sr. ... Huntsman Corporation is the worlds largest privately held chemical company, founded in 1970 by Jon Huntsman. ... Claude Rex Nowell aka Corky King was born November 2, 1944, in Salt Lake City, Utah, is the founder of Summum, a 501(c)(3), philosophical and religious organization that practices a modern form of Mummification. ... For other uses of Summum, see Summum (disambiguation). ... George Ouzounian,[1] better known by his screen name Maddox, is an American writer, humorist, satirist and magazine columnist of Armenian descent, who rose to prominence through the success of his satirical rant website named The Best Page in the Universe. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Look up humorist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... A webmaster is a person responsible for designing, developing, marketing, or maintaining Web site(s). ... A comic book artist at work. ... Kaycee Stroh (born on May 29, 1984 in Salt Lake City, Utah) is an American actress, singer and dancer and model, best known for her roles in the hit Disney Channel Original Movie, High School Musical and its sequel, High School Musical 2. ... For other uses, see High School Musical (disambiguation). ... For the soundtrack, see High School Musical 2 (soundtrack). ... Ruth Todd is the Lead Female Anchor for KTVX ABC 4 in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Anne Wingate, born in 1943 as Martha Anne Guice,[1] is a mystery writer currently living in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Ryne Andrew Sanborn (pronounced as Rine) was born on February 3, 1989 in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... For other uses, see High School Musical (disambiguation). ... For the soundtrack, see High School Musical 2 (soundtrack). ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Cytherea (born September 27, 1981, in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States) is an American pornographic actress and model who is best known for her long-distance female ejaculation, or squirting, attained during orgasm. ... This article is about the actress. ...

See also

The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, and with the theme slogan Light The Fire Within, were celebrated in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Great Salt Lake, located in the northern part of the U.S. state of Utah, is the largest salt lake in the Western Hemisphere,[1] the fourth-largest terminal lake in the world,[2] and the 33rd largest lake on Earth. ... The Utah Jazz is a professional basketball team based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Year founded 2004 League Major League Soccer Nickname RSL, Real, Red & Blue Army Stadium Rice-Eccles Stadium Salt Lake City, UT Coach Jason Kreis, 2007— Owner SCP Worldwide First Game MetroStars 0–0 Real Salt Lake (Giants Stadium; April 2, 2005) Largest Win Real Salt Lake 3–0 FC Dallas... A person who lives in or comes from Salt Lake City, Utah is known as a Salt Laker. ... Avenues neighborhood damage The Salt Lake City Tornado was a very rare tornado that occurred in Salt Lake City, Utah on August 11, 1999, during an unusually strong summer monsoon season. ... Candlelight vigil at the Salt Lake City Public Library for victims of the Trolley Square shooting. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... This photo of Temple Square, circa 1897, shows that the plot housed the tallest buildings in Salt Lake City at the time, namely the Salt Lake Temple, Tabernacle and Assembly Hall. ... Two ships of the United States Navy have borne the name USS Salt Lake City, in honor of the city in Utah which has served successively as the capital of the Provisional State of Deseret, the Territory of Utah, and the 45th state. ...

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  48. ^ City Creek housing data. Downtown Rising (2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  49. ^ Allen Millo housing. Allen Millo Associates (2005). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  50. ^ Metro Condominiums. Wood Property Development, LC (2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  51. ^ Anderton, Dave. "Office space hard to find", Deseret Morning News, 2006-06-29. Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  52. ^ Hamilton Partners: Location Overview Hamilton Partners (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  53. ^ Projects: Walker Tower Downtown Rising (2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-23. Downtown Rising Web Site
  54. ^ Official Utah State Capitol history page
  55. ^ Roche, Lisa Riley. "State's first gay senator is sworn in", Deseret Morning News, 2005-02-08. Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  56. ^ Stack, Peggy Fletcher. "Mormons, non-Mormons clear the air", The Salt Lake Tribune.
  57. ^ Deseret Morning News - Becker wins Salt Lake helm by a landslide.
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  67. ^ http://www.aia.org/gallery_template.cfm?pagename=art%5Fsaltlakecitypubliclibrary American Institute of Architects Institute Honor Award
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  69. ^ Mike Gorrell. "Utah's ski industry chalks up another record year for visitors", The Salt Lake Tribune, 2006-05-16. 
  70. ^ Salt Lake County plays ball, OKs a deal with Real. Leigh Dethman, Deseret Morning News.
  71. ^ Blaze burn bright with optimism
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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Department of Labor is a Cabinet department of the United States government responsible for occupational safety, wage and hour standards, unemployment insurance benefits, re-employment services, and some economic statistics. ... The Bureau of Labor Statistics was founded in 1884 by President Chester A. Arthur. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The FDIC logo The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is a United States government corporation created by the Glass-Steagall Act of 1933. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune (ISSN 0746-3502) is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune (ISSN 0746-3502) is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Weather Service (NWS) is one of the six scientific agencies that make up the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the United States government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Hydrometeorological Prediction Center is one of several Service Centers under the umbrella of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), operating under the control of the National Weather Service, which in turn is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) of the U.S. government. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune (ISSN 0746-3502) is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Deseret Morning News is a newspaper published in Salt Lake City, Utah, and Utahs oldest continually published daily newspaper. ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune (ISSN 0746-3502) is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ...

References

  • Alexander, Thomas G. (2001). Grace & Grandeur: A History of Salt Lake City. Heritage Media Corp. ISBN 1-886483-60-4. 
  • Thomas G. Alexander and James B. Allen (1984). Mormons & Gentiles: A History of Salt Lake City. Pruett Publishing Co. ISBN 0-87108-664-6. 
  • Bagley, Will (2004). World Book Encyclopedia, S-Sn, World Book Inc, 76-76a. ISBN 0-7166-0104-4. 
  • McCormick, John S. (2000). The Gathering Place: An Illustrated History of Salt Lake City. Signature Books. ISBN 1-56085-132-5. 
  • Rainey, Virginia (2004). Insiders' Guide: Salt Lake City, 4th, Globe Pequot Press. ISBN 0-7627-2836-1. 
  • Stober, Daniel (2004). Utah Street Names. Retrieved 2004.
  • McCarthy, Terry. "The New Utah", Time.com, February 03, 2002. 
  • Area Information - Salt Lake City's Climate (1991). slcgov.com. Retrieved March 2005.
  • Area Information - Employment (2002). slcgov.com. Retrieved March 2005.
  • Area Information - FAQ (2005). slcgov.com. Retrieved March 2005.
  • Cities and Counties of Utah Census Brief (May 2001). Retrieved April 15, 2005 (PDF file).
  • Comparative Climatic Data Publication - Data Tables. NOAA National Data Centers - NOAA Satellites and Information. Retrieved November 2004.
  • Salt Lake City History (2004). slcgov.com. Retrieved September 2004.
  • Salt Lake City (2005). Encarta Encyclopedia. Retrieved March 2005.
  • The Official Site of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Official Website of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. Retrieved May 2006.
  • Tullidge, Edward W. (1886), History of Salt Lake City, Salt Lake City: Star Printing Co., pp. 140–44, <http://books.google.com/books?id=fNkBAAAAMAAJ>.

World Book Encyclopedia is, according to its publisher in the United States, the number-one selling print encyclopedia in the world. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Utah Portal
Latter-day Saints Portal

Coordinates: 40.7547° N 111.892622° W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Utah. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1065x800, 99 KB) Summary Christus statue on Temple Square, Salt Lake City, Utah Taken by Ricardo630 in August 2005 Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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The city's population, as of the 2000 Census, was 181,743.
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