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Encyclopedia > Salomé

Salomé, like Dismas, or the various names of the Three Magi, is a name given to a character in the Bible whose name is not given in the Bible itself. The name "Salomé" is preserved in the Jewish Antiquities of Josephus. Saint Dismas (sometimes spelled Dysmas) is the apocryphal name given to one of the thieves who was crucified alongside Christ according to the Gospel of Luke 23:39-43: And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him, saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us. ... Magi (Μάγοι) were Zoroastrian astrologer-priests from ancient Persia. ... A Bible handwritten in Latin, on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ... Antiquities of the Jews was a work published by the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus in the year A.D. 93. ... Josephus, also known as Flavius Josephus (c. ...

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Salomé with the Head of John the Baptist by Titian, painted circa 1515 (Galleria Doria Pamphilj, Rome)
Contents

2.1 Painting
2.2 Oscar Wilde's Salomé
2.3 Opera
2.4 Films
Salomé, by Titian The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Salomé, by Titian The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Titian. ...

Biblical character

Salomé was the step-daughter of Herod Antipas, and danced before Herod and her mother Herodias at the occasion of Herod's birthday, and by doing so caused the death of John the Baptist. The New Testament suggests that Salomé caused John to be executed because of his complaints that Herod's marriage to Herodias was adulterous; and that Herodias put her up to the demand that John be executed, something the king was initially reluctant to do. According to Mark 6:21-29: Herod Antipas (born 20 BC) was an ancient leader (Tetrarch) of Galilee and Peraea. ... Herodias was a Jewish princess famous for her beauty and love affairs, daughter of Aristobulus III of Judea. ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptiser) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... The New Testament, sometimes called the Greek Scriptures, is the name given to the part of the Christian Bible that was written after the birth of Jesus. ... Adultery is generally defined as consensual sexual intercourse by a married person with someone other than their lawful spouse. ... The Gospel of Mark is the second in the familiar sequence of the New Testament Gospels, as they were established by Jerome and appear in many but not all early manuscripts of complete gospels, and as they are commonly printed. ...

And when a convenient day was come, that Herod on his birthday made a supper to his lords, high captains, and chief estates of Galilee; And when the daughter of the said Herodias came in, and danced, and pleased Herod and them that sat with him, the king said unto the damsel, Ask of me whatsoever thou wilt, and I will give it thee. And he sware unto her, Whatsoever thou shalt ask of me, I will give it thee, unto the half of my kingdom. And she went forth, and said unto her mother, What shall I ask? And she said, The head of John the Baptist.
And she came in straightway with haste unto the king, and asked, saying, I will that thou give me by and by in a charger the head of John the Baptist. And the king was exceeding sorry; yet for his oath's sake, and for their sakes which sat with him, he would not reject her. And immediately the king sent an executioner, and commanded his head to be brought: and he went and beheaded him in the prison, and brought his head in a charger, and gave it to the damsel: and the damsel gave it to her mother. And when his disciples heard of it, they came and took up his corpse, and laid it in a tomb. (KJV)

This Salomé is probably not the same Salomé who is said to be a witness to the Crucifixion of Jesus in Mark 15:40. (see Salome (disciple)) Galilee (Hebrew hagalil הגליל, Arabic al-jaleel الجليل), meaning circuit, is a large area located in what is currently northern Israel (Tzafon), traditionally divided into three parts: Upper Galilee, Lower Galilee and Western Galilee. ... The King James Version (KJV) is an English translation of the Holy Bible, commissioned for the benefit of the Church of England at the behest of King James I of England. ... Religious depictions of the crucifixion of Jesus typically show him supported by nails through the palms. ... Jesus, also known as Jesus Christ, is the central figure in Christianity. ... The early Christian Gospel of Thomas found at Nag Hammadi mentions among the disciples of Jesus (the Greek expression apostles does not appear) two women, Salome (Hebrew, shalom, peace) and Mary Magdalene (referred to simply as Mary). Mainstream Christian writers withhold the name disciple from Salome, and translate her position...


Salomé in the arts

Painting

This Biblical story has long been a favourite of painters, since it offers a chance to depict oriental splendour, semi-nude women, and exotic scenery under the guise of a Biblical subject. Painters who have done notable representations of Salomé include Titian and Gustave Moreau. The Mona Lisa is perhaps the best-known artistic painting in the Western world. ... Orientalism is the study of Near and Far Eastern societies and cultures by Westerners. ... The word nude may refer to: The state of nudity. ... Titian. ... Orpheus by Gustave Moreau (1865) Gustave Moreau (April 6, 1826 - April 18, 1898) was a French Symbolist painter. ...

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"The Peacock Skirt", illustration by Aubrey Beardsley for Oscar Wilde's play Salomé

The Peacock Skirt, by Aubrey Beardsley (1892) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Peacock Skirt, by Aubrey Beardsley (1892) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Aubrey Beardsley Aubrey Vincent Beardsley (August 21, 1872, Brighton, England - March 16, 1898, France) was an influential English artist, illustrator, and author. ... Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. ...

Oscar Wilde's Salomé

Main article: Salomé (play) Salomé, originally written in French in 1891 and translated into English, is a tragedy by the Irish-born playwright Oscar Wilde. ...


This story was made the subject of a play by Oscar Wilde that premiered in Paris in 1896. In Wilde's play, Salomé takes a perverse fancy for John the Baptist, and causes him to be executed when John spurns her affections. In the finale, Salomé takes up John's severed head and kisses it. Because British law forbade the depiction of Bible characters on stage, Wilde wrote the play originally in French, and then produced an English translation. Wilde, unfortunately, struggled with his French, and the play was proofread and corrected by Marcel Schwob. A play (noun) is a common form of literature, usually consisting chiefly of dialog between characters, and usually intended for performance rather than reading. ... Oscar Wilde Oscar Fingal OFlahertie Wills Wilde (October 16, 1854 – November 30, 1900) was an Anglo-Irish playwright, novelist, poet, and short story writer. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptiser) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Opera

Main article: Salome (opera) Salome is a German opera by Richard Strauss. ...


The Wilde play (in German translation) was turned into an opera by Richard Strauss, part of the standard operatic repertoire and is now better known than the Wilde play itself. The opera Salome, which premiered in Dresden in 1905, is famous for the Dance of the seven veils.Salome means peace The foyer of Charles Garniers Opéra, Paris, opened 1875 Opera is an art form consisting of a dramatic stage performance set to music. ... Richard Strauss (June 11, 1864 – September 8, 1949) was a German composer of the late Romantic era, particularly noted for his tone poems and operas. ... Famous operas arranged by composer. ... Salome is a German opera by Richard Strauss. ... Brühls Terrace and the Frauenkirche Dresden [ˈdreːsdn̩] (Sorbian/Lusatian Drježdźany), the capital city of the German federal state of Saxony, is situated in a valley on the river Elbe. ... 1905 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In several areas of Western culture, the Dance of the Seven Veils by Salomé is one of the elaborations on the historical and biblical tale of the execution of John the Baptist. ...


Films

Wilde's Salomé has at least twice been made into a film: a 1923 silent film starring Alla Nazimova in the title role (see Salomé (1923 movie)) and a 1998 Ken Russell play-within-a-film treatment, Salomé's Last Dance, which also includes Wilde and Lord Alfred Douglas as characters. Alla Nazimova, born May 22, 1879 - died July 13, 1945, was a Ukrainian born stage and film actress, scriptwriter, and producer. ... Salomé is a 1923 film which tells the story from the Bible of how Salomé seduces her stepfather/uncle, King Herod, with a dance, in order to gain the head of John the Baptist. ... Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927) is a controversial British film director, particularly known for his films about famous composers. ... Lord Alfred Bruce Douglas (born October 22, 1870; died March 20, 1945) was the third son of John Sholto Douglas, 9th Marquess of Queensberry, and the former Sibyl Montgomery. ...


Carlos Saura made a film of Salomé in 2002. 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

This list of names for the Biblical nameless compiles names given in Jewish or Christian mythology for characters who are unnamed in the Bible itself. ...

 
 

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