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Encyclopedia > Salmon P. Chase
Salmon Portland Chase
Salmon Portland Chase
Chief Justice of the United States
Term of office December 15, 1864May 7, 1873
Preceded by Roger B. Taney
Succeeded by Morrison Waite
Date of birth January 13, 1808
Place of birth Cornish, New Hampshire
Date of death May 7, 1873
Place of death New York, New York

Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, Governor of Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. Chase articulated the "slave power conspiracy" thesis well before Lincoln did, and he coined the slogan, "Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men" . He devoted his enormous energies to the destruction of what he considered the Slave Power, that is the conspiracy of slave owners to seize control of the federal government and block the progress of liberty. Salmon Chase. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee) (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States from 1836 until his death in 1864. ... Morrison Remick Waite served as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Cornish is a town located in Sullivan County, New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 46th 24,239 km² 110 km 305 km 3. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... Nickname: The Big Apple Motto: Official website: City of New York Location [[Image:|250px|250px|Location of City of New York, New York]] Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln+ Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  The American... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... The presidential seal was first used by president Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... The Slave Power was the term used in the Northern United States in the period 1840-1865 to describe the political power of the slaveholding class in the South. ...

Contents


Biography

Early life

Chase was born in Cornish, New Hampshire, and lost his father when he was nine years old. He was raised by his uncle, Philander Chase, an Episcopal bishop. He studied in the common schools of Windsor, Vermont, Worthington, Ohio, and at the Cincinnati College, and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1826, studied under U.S. Attorney General William Wirt and was admitted to the bar in 1829. Cornish is a town located in Sullivan County, New Hampshire. ... Philander Chase (December 14, 1775 - September 20, 1852) was an Episcopal bishop and founder and first president of Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio in 1824. ... The Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul in Washington DC is the National Cathedral of the Episcopal Church in the United States of America. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Windsor, Vermont Windsor is a town located in Windsor County, Vermont. ... Worthington is a city located in Franklin County, Ohio. ... The University of Cincinnati is located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Alberto Gonzales, current Attorney General of the United States The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... William Wirt (November 8, 1772 – February 18, 1834) was an American author and statesman who is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. ... A bar association is a professional body of lawyers who, in some jurisdictions, are responsible for the regulation of the legal profession. ...


Entry into politics

After this, in 1830, he moved to Cincinnati, Ohio. Here he soon gained a position of prominence at the bar, and published an annotated edition, which long remained standard, of the laws of Ohio. At a time when public opinion in Cincinnati was largely dominated by Southern business connections, Chase, influenced probably by James G. Birney, associated himself after about 1836 with the anti-slavery movement, and became recognized as the leader of the political reformers as opposed to the Garrisonian abolitionist movement. Nickname: The Queen City Official website: http://www. ... Southern United States. ... James Gillespie Birney (February 4, 1792–November 25, 1857) was an American presidential candidate for the Liberty Party in the 1840 and 1844 elections. ... The history of slavery in the United States began soon after Europeans first settled in the area (and so even before the founding of the United States), and officially ended with the ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment in 1865. ... This poster depicting the horrific conditions on slave ships was influential in mobilizing public opinion against slavery in the United Kingdom and the United States. ...


From his defense of escaped slaves seized in Ohio for rendition to slavery (under the Fugitive Slave Law of 1793) he was dubbed the Attorney General for Fugitive Slaves. His argument in the famous Jones v. Van Zandt case testing the constitutionality of fugitive slave laws before the U.S. Supreme Court attracted particular attention (though in this as in other cases of the kind the judgment was against him, and John Van Zandt's conviction upheld). In brief, he contended that slavery was local, not national, that it could exist only by virtue of positive state law, that the federal government was not empowered by the Constitution to create slavery anywhere, and that when a slave leaves the jurisdiction of a state he ceases to be a slave, because he continues to be a man and leaves behind him the law which made him a slave. The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... The 1793 Fugitive Slave Law was written in response to a conflict between Pennsylvania and Virginia. ... The Fugitive Slave Law of the United States may refer to one of two laws of the same name: Fugitive Slave Law of 1793 Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the highest judicial body in the U.S.. As the highest court, it provides the leadership of the judicial branch of the U.S. federal government. ... The only known possible image of John Van Zandt is a drawing of John Van Trompe from Uncle Toms Cabin, whose basis is believed to be Van Zandt. ... State law, in the United States, is the law of each separate U.S. state, as passed by the state legislature and signed into law by the state governor. ... The U.S. Constitution, adopted in 1789 by a constitutional convention, sets down the basic framework of American government in its seven articles. ... In law, jurisdiction refers to the aspect of a any unique legal authority as being localized within boundaries. ...


Elected as a Whig to the Cincinnati City Council in 1840, he abandoned that party only the next year, and for seven years was the undisputed leader of the Liberty Party in Ohio. He was remarkably skillful in drafting platforms and addresses, and it was he who prepared the national Liberty platform of 1843 and the Liberty address of 1845. Realizing in time that a third party movement could not succeed, he took the lead during the campaign of 1848 in combining the Liberty party with the Barnburners, or Van Buren Democrats of New York to form the Free Soilers. Whig Party banner from 1848 with candidates Zachary Taylor and Millard Fillmore. ... The Liberty Party was a political party in the United States during the mid-19th century. ... In any two-party system of politics, a third party is a party other than the two dominant ones. ... The Barnburners were a liberal faction of the New York state United States Democratic Party in the mid 19th century. ... Official language(s) None, English de facto Capital Albany Largest city New York City Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 27th 141,205 km² 455 km 530 km 13. ...


The Free Soil movement

In 1849, Chase was elected to the United States Senate from Ohio on the Free Soil Party ticket, and in 1855 he was elected governor of Ohio. He drafted the famous Free-Soil platform, and it was largely through his influence that Van Buren was nominated for the presidency. His object, however, was not to establish a permanent new party organization, but to bring pressure to bear upon Northern Democrats to force them to adopt a policy opposed to the further extension of slavery. Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 355 km 355 km 8. ... The Free Soil Party was a short-lived political party in the United States organized in 1848 that petered out by about 1852. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


During his service in the Senate (1849-1855) he was pre-eminently the champion of anti-slavery in that body, and no one spoke more ably than he did against the Compromise Measures of 1850 and the Kansas-Nebraska Bill of 1854. The Kansas-Nebraska legislation, and the subsequent troubles in Kansas, having convinced him of the futility of trying to influence the Democrats, he assumed the leadership in the North-west of the movement to form a new party to oppose the extension of slavery. The Appeal of the Independent Democrats in Congress to the People of the United States, written by Chase and Giddings, and published in the New York Times of January 24, 1854, may be regarded as the earliest draft of the Republican party creed. He was the first Republican governor of Ohio, serving from 1855 to 1859. This article is about the abolition of slavery. ... Henry Clay takes the floor of the Old Senate Chamber; Millard Fillmore presides as Calhoun and Webster look on. ... The Kansas–Nebraska Act was an Act of Congress in 1854 organizing the remaining territory within the Louisiana Purchase for settlement before its admission to the Union. ... Official language(s) None Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 15th 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² 211 mi; 340 km 400 mi; 645 km 0. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... January 24 is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


Chase sought the Republican nomination for president in 1860; at the Party convention, he got 49 votes on the first ballot and afterwards threw his support to Abraham Lincoln. Although, with the exception of Seward, he was the most prominent Republican in the country, and had done more against slavery than any other Republican, he failed to secure the nomination partly because his views on the question of protection were not orthodox from a Republican point of view, and partly because the old line Whig element could not forgive his previous coalition with the Democrats. He was elected as a Republican to the U.S. Senate in 1860; took his seat March 4, 1861, but resigned two days later to become Secretary of the Treasury under Lincoln. He was member of the Peace Convention of 1861 held in Washington, D.C., in an effort to devise means to prevent the impending war. The Republican Party was established in 1854 by a coalition of former Whigs, Northern Democrats, and Free-Soilers who opposed the expansion of slavery and held a Hamiltonian vision for modernizing the United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... William H. Seward William Henry Seward (May 16, 1801 – October 10, 1872) was United States Secretary of State under Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. ... March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (64th in leap years). ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Prior to the beginning of fighting between Americans in 1861, there took place a meeting at Washington, D. C. of many of the most influential Americans in the United States. ... Nickname: the District Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Official website: http://www. ...


Secretary of the Treasury

As secretary of the treasury in President Lincoln's cabinet from 1861 to 1864, during the first three years of the Civil War, he rendered services of the greatest value. That period of crisis witnessed two great changes in American financial policy, the establishment of a national banking system and the issue of a legal tender paper currency. The former was Chase's own particular measure. He suggested the idea, worked out all of the important principles and many of the details, and induced the Congress to accept them. The success of that system alone warrants his being placed in the first rank of American financiers. It not only secured an immediate market for government bonds, but it also provided a permanent uniform national currency, which, though inelastic, is absolutely stable. The issue of legal tenders, the greatest financial blunder of the war, was made contrary to his wishes, although he did not, as he perhaps ought to have done, push his opposition to the point of resigning. Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln+ Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  The American... Congress in Joint Session. ...


The first U.S. federal currency was printed in 1862, during Chase's tenure as Secretary of the Treasury, thus it was his responsibility to design the notes. In an effort to further his political career, his own face appeared on a variety of U.S. paper currency. Most recently, in order to honor the man who introduced the modern system of banknotes, Chase was on the $10,000 bill, printed from 1928 to 1946 (this bill is no longer in circulation). 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... A £20 Ulster Bank banknote. ... Today, the currency of the United States, the U.S. dollar, is printed in bills in denominations of $1, $2, $5, $10, $20, $50, and $100. ...

Obverse of $10,000 bill featuring Salmon P. Chase
Obverse of $10,000 bill featuring Salmon P. Chase

From http://www. ... From http://www. ...

Supreme Court career

Perhaps Chase's chief defect as a statesman was an insatiable desire for supreme office. It was partly this ambition, and also temperamental differences from the president, which led him to retire from the cabinet in June 1864. Shortly after Chase resigned as Treasury Secretary, Lincoln nominated him for the Supreme Court. Chase then served as Chief Justice of the United States to succeed Roger B. Taney, holding that position from 1864 until his death in 1873. The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee) (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States from 1836 until his death in 1864. ...


In his capacity as Chief Justice, Chase presided at the impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson in 1868. Among his most important decisions while on the court were Texas v. White (7 Wallace, 700), 1869, in which he asserted that the Constitution provided for an indestructible union, composed of indestructible states, Veazie Bank v. Fenno (8 Wallace, 533), 1869, in defense of that part of the banking legislation of the Civil War which imposed a tax of 10 percent on state banknotes, and Hepburn v. Griswold (8 Wallace, 603), 1869, which declared certain parts of the legal tender acts to be unconstitutional. When the legal tender decision was reversed after the appointment of new judges, in 1871 and 1872 (Legal Tender Cases, 12 Wallace, 457), Chase prepared a very able dissenting opinion. For other people named Andrew Johnson, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Texas v. ... Supreme court case, where Salmon P. Chase declared his own issuance of greenbacks to be unconstitutional. ...


Toward the end of his life he gradually drifted back toward his old Democratic position, and made an unsuccessful effort to secure the nomination of the Democratic party for the presidency in 1872. He also helped to found the Liberal Republican Party in 1872, unsuccessfully seeking its presidential nomination. He died in New York City in 1873, and was interred in Oak Hill Cemetery in Washington, D.C. and later reinterred in Spring Grove Cemetery, Cincinnati, Ohio. The Liberal Republican Party of the United States was a political party formed in 1872 to oppose the administration of then-President Ulysses S. Grant. ... Nickname: The Big Apple Motto: Official website: City of New York Location [[Image:|250px|250px|Location of City of New York, New York]] Location in the state of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R... Spring Grove Cemetery and Arboretum (733 acres) is a notable, nonprofit garden cemetery and arboretum located at 4521 Spring Grove Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Nickname: The Queen City Official website: http://www. ...


The Chase National Bank, a predecessor of Chase Manhattan Bank was named for him, though he had no personal affiliation with it. The Chase Manhattan Bank was formed by the merger of the Chase National Bank and the Bank of the Manhattan Company in 1955. ...


Chase's daughter, Kate, was a notable socialite in her own right as the Civil War "Belle of Washington", acting as her father's official hostess and unofficial campaign manager. [1] Her November 12, 1863 marriage to the textile magnate Rhode Island politician William Sprague did not flourish. After her father's death, the marriage deteriorated further with Sprague's marital infidelities, alcoholism, and constant belittling of Chase's spending habits, while Chase in turn had an affair with Roscoe Conkling. They divorced in 1882, and Chase later died in poverty in 1899. Kate Chase, in 1873 Katherine Jane Chase (August 13, 1840 – July 31, 1899), was the daughter of famous Ohio politician Salmon P. Chase. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Abraham Lincoln+ Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee Strength 2,213,363 1,064,200 Casualties KIA: 110,100 Total dead: 359,500 Wounded: 275,200 KIA: 74,500 Total dead: 198,500 Wounded: 137,000+  The American... This article is the current U.S. Collaboration of the Week. ... William Sprague, (also known as William IV or William Sprague IV) (September 12, 1830–September 11, 1915) was governor of of the U.S. state of Rhode Island from 1860-1863, and U.S. Senator from 1863-1875. ... Roscoe Conkling (October 30, 1829–April 18, 1888) was a United States politician from New York. ...


See also

The origins of the American Civil War lay in the complex issues of political party politics, disagreements over the scope of state and federal power, slavery, expansionism, sectionalism, economics and culture of the Antebellum Period. ... Chase County (standard abbreviation: CS) is a county located in the state of Kansas. ...

References

Secondary sources

  • Blue, Frederick J. Salmon P. Chase: A Life in Politics (1987)
  • Friedman, Leon. "Salmon P. Chase" in The Justices of the United States Supreme Court: Their Lives and Major Opinions. Volume 2. (1997) pp 552-67.
  • Foner, Eric. Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men: The Ideology of the Republican Party before the Civil War (1970)
  • Goodwin, Doris Kearns. Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln (2005) on Lincoln's cabinet.
  • Hendrick, Burton J. Lincoln's War Cabinet (1946)
  • Niven, John. Salmon P. Chase: A Biography (1995).
  • Richardson, Heather Cox. The Greatest Nation of the Earth: Republican Economic Policies during the Civil War (1997)
  • This article incorporates facts obtained from the public domain Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. This article incorporates text from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica, a publication in the public domain.

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The 11th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

Primary sources

  • Niven, John, et al eds. ed. The Salmon P. Chase Papers Volume: 2, 1823-57 (1993) vol 1-5 have coverage to 1873
  • Niven, John, et al eds. ed. The Salmon P. Chase Papers Volume: 3, 1858-63 (1993)
  • Donald, David ed. Inside Lincoln's Cabinet: The Civil War Diaries of Salmon P. Chase (1954)

External links

Preceded by:
William Allen
United States Senator (Class 3) from Ohio
1849–1855
Succeeded by:
George E. Pugh
Preceded by:
William Medill
Governor of Ohio
1856–1860
Succeeded by:
William Dennison
Preceded by:
George E. Pugh
United States Senator (Class 3) from Ohio
1861
Succeeded by:
John Sherman
Preceded by:
John Adams Dix
United States Secretary of the Treasury
1861–1864
Succeeded by:
William P. Fessenden
Preceded by:
Roger B. Taney
Chief Justice of the United States
December 15, 1864May 7, 1873
Succeeded by:
Morrison Waite
United States Secretaries of the Treasury Seal of the United States Department of the Treasury
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William Allen ( December 27, 1803 - July 11, 1879) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio and Governor of Ohio. ... Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... George Ellis Pugh (November 28, 1822 - July 19, 1876) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... William Medill (1802 or 1803 - September 2, 1865) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Ohio Governors Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... George Ellis Pugh (November 28, 1822 - July 19, 1876) was a Democratic politician from Ohio. ... Ohio was admitted to the Union on March 1, 1803. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... John Adams Dix (July 24, 1798–April 21, 1879) was an American politician. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... Hon. ... Roger Brooke Taney (TAW-nee) (March 17, 1777 – October 12, 1864) was the fifth Chief Justice of the United States from 1836 until his death in 1864. ... The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch of the government of the United States, and presides over the Supreme Court of the United States. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ... 1873 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calaber). ... Morrison Remick Waite served as the Chief Justice of the United States. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... Seal of the United States Department of the Treasury. ... 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Lot Myrick Morrill (May 13, 1813–January 10, 1883) was an American statesman who served as Governor of Maine, and in the United States Senate and as Secretary of the Treasury. ... John Sherman John Sherman (May 10, 1823–October 22, 1900) was a Senator from Ohio and a member of the United States Cabinet. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles James Folger (April 16, 1818–September 4, American politician, jurist and U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. ... Walter Quintin Gresham (March 17, 1832–May 28, 1895) was an American statesman and jurist. ... Hugh McCulloch (December 7, 1808 - May 24, 1895) was an American statesman who served two non-consecutive terms as U.S. Treasury Secretary. ... Daniel Manning (May 16, 1831–December 24, 1887) was an American businessman and politician. ... Charles Stebbins Fairchild (April 30, 1842–November 24, American businessman and politician. ... William Windom (May 10, 1827–January 29, 1891) was an American politician. ... Charles Foster Charles Foster (April 12, 1828–January 9, 1904) was a U.S. Republican politician from Ohio. ... John G. Carlisle (September 5, 1834 - July 31, 1910) was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party during the last quarter of the 19th century. ... Lyman Judson Gage (June 28, 1836–January 26, 1927) was an American financier and Presidential Cabinet officer. ... Leslie Mortimer Shaw (November 2, 1848–March 28, 1932) was an American businessman, lawyer and politician. ... G.B. Cortelyou George Bruce Cortelyou (July 26, 1862–October 23, 1940) was an American Presidential Cabinet secretary of the early 20th century. ... Franklin MacVeagh (November 22, 1837–July 6, 1934) was an American banker and Treasury Secretary. ... William Gibbs McAdoo (October 31, 1863–February 1, 1941) was a U.S. Senator and United States Secretary of the Treasury. ... Carter Glass Carter Glass (January 4, 1858–May 28, 1946) was an American politician from Virginia, who served many years in Congress, as well as U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under Woodrow Wilson. ... David Franklin Houston (February 17, 1866–September 2, 1940) was an American academic, businessman and politician. ... Formal portrait of Mellon Andrew William Mellon (March 24, 1855–August 27, 1937) was an American banker, industrialist, philanthropist, art collector and Secretary of the Treasury from March 4, 1921 until February 12, 1932. ... Ogden Livingston Mills (August 23, 1884–October 11, 1937) was an American businessman and politician. ... William Hartman Woodin (1868 - 1934) was a U.S. industrialist. ... Morgenthaus signature, as used on American currency Henry Morgenthau, Jr. ... Frederick Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890–September 8, 1953) served the United States in all three branches of government. ... John Wesley Snyder (June 21, 1895–October 8, 1985) was an American businessman and Cabinet Secretary. ... George Magoffin Humphrey (March 8, 1890–January 20, 1970) was an American lawyer, businessman and Cabinet secretary. ... Robert Bernard Anderson (June 4, 1910–August 14, 1989) was a U.S. administrator and businessman. ... Clarence Douglas Dillon (Geneva August 21, 1909 - January 10, 2003) son of Clarence and Ann (Douglass) Dillon, was US Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary to France (1953-1957) and 57th secretary of the United States Department of the Treasury (1961-1965). ... Henry Hammill Fowler (September 5, 1908–January 3, 2000) was an American lawyer and politician. ... Joseph Walker Barr (January 17, 1918–February 23, 1996) was an American businessman and politician. ... For the American historian, see David M. Kennedy (historian). ... Connallys signature, as used on American currency John Bowden Connally, Jr. ... Shultz in his official D.O.L. portrait. ... William Edward Simon (November 27, 1927–June 3, 2000) became the 63rd Secretary of the Treasury on May 8, 1974, during the Nixon administration. ... Blumenthal, on the cover of Time magazine Blumenthals signature, as used on American currency Werner Michael Blumenthal (born January 3, 1926) served as United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Jimmy Carter from 1977-1979. ... George William Miller (born March 9, 1925) served as the 65th United States Secretary of the Treasury under President Carter from August 6, 1979 to January 20, 1981. ... Donald Regan Donald Thomas Regan (December 21, 1918 – June 10, 2003) was the 66th United States Secretary of the Treasury, from 1981 to 1985, and Chief of Staff from 1985 to 1987 in the Reagan administration, where he advocated supply-side economics and tax cuts to create jobs and stimulate... James Addison Baker III (born April 28, 1930), American politician and diplomat, was Chief of Staff in President Ronald Reagans first administration, United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1985 to 1988 in the second Reagan administration, and Secretary of State in the administration of President George H. W... Nicholas F. Brady Nicholas Frederick Brady (born April 11, 1930, in New York City) was United States Secretary of the Treasury under Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H. W. Bush, and is also known for articulating the Brady Plan in March 1989. ... Lloyd Bentsen Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Robert E. Rubin Robert Edward Rubin (born August 29, 1938) is an American financier, businessman, and politican who served as the 70th United States Secretary of the Treasury for a period spanning both the first and second Clinton Administrations. ... Larry Summers Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, politician, and academic. ... Paul H. ONeill Paul Henry ONeill (born December 4, 1935) served as the 72nd United States Secretary of the Treasury under President George W. Bush. ... John W. Snow John William Snow, Ph. ...

Chief Justices of the United States of America Seal of the United States Supreme Court
Jay | Rutledge | Ellsworth | Marshall | Taney | Chase | Waite | Fuller | White
Taft | Hughes | Stone | Vinson | Warren | Burger | Rehnquist | Roberts
The Chase Court Seal of the U.S. Supreme Court
1864–1865: J.M. Wayne | J. Catron | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | N. Clifford | N.H. Swayne | S.F. Miller | D. Davis | S.J. Field
1865–1867: J.M. Wayne | S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | N. Clifford | N.H. Swayne | S.F. Miller | D. Davis | S.J. Field
1867–1870: S. Nelson | R.C. Grier | N. Clifford | N.H. Swayne | S.F. Miller | D. Davis | S.J. Field
1870–1872: S. Nelson | N. Clifford | N.H. Swayne | S.F. Miller | D. Davis | S.J. Field | Wm. Strong | J.P. Bradley
1873: N. Clifford | N.H. Swayne | S.F. Miller | D. Davis | S.J. Field | Wm. Strong | J.P. Bradley | W. Hunt

 
 

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