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Encyclopedia > Sales Pitch

Sales Pitch is a science fiction short story by Philip K. Dick. First published in Future Science Fiction magazine, June 1954. The premise of omni-present, intrusive and even aggressive advertising and marketing is as relevant as ever. In the end of the story, the character is driven mad by a robot who can forcefully market himself, and refuses to take no for an answer. The subject was of concern to Dick, and features in his early works such as The Man Who Japed. Dick was ahead of his time, advertising was still considered relatively innocous in the 1950's. A more subtle extrapolation of the idea is seen in J. G. Ballard's The Subliminal Man, written nearly 10 years later. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Philip K. Dick Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982), often known by his initials PKD, or by the pen name Richard Phillips, was an American science fiction writer and novelist who changed the genre profoundly. ... 1954 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Generally speaking, advertising is the paid promotion of goods, services, companies and ideas by an identified sponsor. ... Traditionally, Marketing has been a term applied to the craft of linking the producers (or potential producers) of a product or service with customers, both existing and potential. ... The Man Who Japed is a science-fiction novel written by Philip K. Dick, first published in 1956. ... James Graham Ballard (born November 18, 1930 in Shanghai) is a British novelist. ...


In 1978, Dick said of the story: Events January January 1 - The Copyright Act of 1976 takes effect, making sweeping changes to United States copyright law. ...


"When this story first appeared, the fans detested it. I read it over, perplexed by their hostility, and could see why: it is a superdowner story, and relentlessly so. Could I rewrite it, I would have it end differently. I would have the man and the robot, i.e. the fasrad, form a partnership at the end and become friends. The logic of paranoia of this story should be deconstructed into its opposite; Y, the human-against-robot theme, should have been resolved into null-Y, human-and-robot-against-the-universe. I really deplore the ending. So when you read the story, try to imagine it as it ought to have been written. The fasrad says, 'Sir, I am here to help you. The hell with my sales pitch. Let's be together forever.' Yes, but then I would have been criticized for a false upbeat ending, I guess. Still, the ending is not good. The fans were right."


 
 

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