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Encyclopedia > Saint symbology

Saint symbology was important to people who couldn't read because they can figure out what symbols mean.

Cross of Lorraine
Cross of Lorraine

The Catholic Church has used symbols from its very beginnings. Each saint has a story and a reason why he or she led an exemplary life. Symbols have been used to tell these stories throughout the history of the Church. A number of Christian saints are traditionally represented by a symbol or icon affiliated with their life, in order to identify them; this practice, known as iconography, was particularly intended so that the illiterate could recognize a scene. These symbols are not necessarily universal to all traditions of Christianity that might venerate a given saint. Cross of Lorraine uploaded from the French Version, under GNU File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Cross of Lorraine uploaded from the French Version, under GNU File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are usually depicted as having halos. ... Iconography usually refers to the design or creation of images and more specifically to the historical study of art which aims at the identification, description and the interpretation of the content of images. ...


The lives of most saints are far removed from an ordinary worshipper’s life. The use of a symbol with a statue, or icon, of a saint reminds people who is being shown and of their story. Iconography usually refers to the design or creation of images and more specifically to the historical study of art which aims at the identification, description and the interpretation of the content of images. ...


The following is a list of some of those symbols.


The list

Contents

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Top of pageSee alsoExternal links

A

St. Agatha
Saint Symbol
Acathius crown of thorns
Agatha tongs or shears, veil, bells, two breasts on a plate
Agnes lamb
Ambrose bees, beehive, dove, ox,pen
Andrew transverse cross
Anne, grandmother of Jesus door,book, red robe and green mantle
Anthony the Great bell, pig
Anthony of Padua Infant Jesus, bread, book, lily
Augustine of Hippo dove, child, shell, pen

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1256x2752, 132 KB) Description: Title: de: Hl. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1256x2752, 132 KB) Description: Title: de: Hl. ... Saint Acacius (also known as Acacius) was bishop of Melitene in the third century. ... Jesus Carrying the Cross as portrayed by El Greco - Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1580 In Christianity, the Crown of Thorns, one of the instruments of the Passion, was the woven chaplet of thorn branches worn by Jesus before his crucifixion. ... Saint Agatha (died AD 251) is a Christian saint. ... Tongs used for cooking or serving food Tongs are gripping and lifting tools, of which there are many forms adapted to their specific use. ... A small pair of shears A pair of shears is any scissors-type tool of relatively large size. ... The muslim niqab is an example of a type of veil. ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... okay that is all ... St. ... It has been suggested that Lambing be merged into this article or section. ... Saint Ambrose, Latin Sanctus Ambrosius, Italian SantAmbrogio (circa 340 - April 4, 397), bishop of Milan, was one of the most eminent fathers of the Christian church in the 4th century. ... Families Andrenidae Anthophoridae Apidae Colletidae Ctenoplectridae Halictidae Heterogynaidae Megachilidae Melittidae Oxaeidae Sphecidae Stenotritidae This article is about the insect. ... The term Beehive can refer to several different things: Beehive (beekeeping) is a human-provided structure in which bees are induced to live and raise their young. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Pigeons and doves are some 300 species of near passerine birds in the order Columbiformes. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to a surface, paper. ... Saint Andrew (Greek: Ανδρέας, Andreas, manly, brave), called in the Orthodox tradition Protocletos, or the First-called, is a Christian Apostle and the younger brother of Saint Peter. ... Patriarchal cross Websters 1913 dictionary defines the patriarchial cross as a cross, the shaft of which is intersected by two transverse beams, the upper one being the smaller. ... This article is about the mother of the Virgin Mary. ... The front door of a house is often decorated to appear inviting. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... The Virgin and Child with St. ... Saint Anthony the Great, Father of all Monks Saint Anthony the Great ( 251 - 356), Christian saint, also known as Saint Anthony of Egypt, Saint Anthony of the Desert, Saint Anthony the Anchorite, and The Father of All Monks was a leader among the Desert Fathers, who were Christian monks in... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... This article is about the pig genus. ... Saint Anthony of Padua, also venerated as Saint Anthony of Lisbon (Santo António de Lisboa), particularly in Portugal (August 15, 1195 – June 13, 1231), is a Catholic saint who was born in Lisbon, Portugal, as Fernando de Bulhões (pron. ... This article is about the figure known by both Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ. For other usages, see Jesus (disambiguation). ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... lily is the best name in the whole wide world. ... St. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Pigeons and doves are some 300 species of near passerine birds in the order Columbiformes. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ... Various seashells The hard, rigid outer covering of certain animals is called a shell. ... A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to a surface, paper. ...

B

Saint Symbol
Barbara tower, ciborium, cannon
Bartholomew knife
Benedict broken cup, raven, bell, crosier, bush
Bernard of Clairvaux pen, bees, instruments of the Passion
Bernardine of Siena tablet or sun inscribed with IHS
Blaise wax, taper (candle), iron comb
Bonaventure communion, ciborium, cardinal's hat
Boniface oak, ax, book, fox, scourge,fountain, raven, sword
Bridget of Sweden book, pilgrim's staff
Brigid of Kildare cow

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2448x3264, 1141 KB) Summary IHS, a Christogram on a gravestone in Warriston Cemetery, Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2448x3264, 1141 KB) Summary IHS, a Christogram on a gravestone in Warriston Cemetery, Edinburgh, Scotland. ... A Christogram is a monogram or combination of letters which forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, and is traditionally used as a Christian symbol. ... St. ... The Eiffel Tower Fire-observation watchtower in Kostroma, Russia. ... A Ciborium is a container, used in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and related Churches rituals to store Holy Communion. ... A small cannon on a carriage, Bucharest. ... Michelangelos The Last Judgement shows Saint Bartholomew holding the knife of his martyrdom and his flayed skin. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Saint Benedict of Nursia (c. ... Chalice For other uses, see Chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ... Species See text. ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286 A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and some Lutheran prelates. ... // Look up bush in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Bernard of Clairvaux, illustrated in A Short History of Monks and Monasteries by Alfred Wesley Wishart, 1900 Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, abbot and theologian (born 1090, at Fontaines, near Dijon, France; died at Clairvaux, August 21, 1153), is considered a Saint by the Anglican and Roman Catholic Churches, and is... A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to a surface, paper. ... Families Andrenidae Apidae Colletidae Halictidae Megachilidae Melittidae Stenotritidae Bee collecting pollen Bees are flying insects, closely related to wasps and ants. ... This article describes the biblical Passion. ... Saint Bernardino of Siena (sometimes Bernardine) (September 8, 1380 – May 20, 1444) was an Italian preacher, Franciscan missionary and Christian saint. ... A Christogram is a monogram or combination of letters which forms an abbreviation for the name of Jesus Christ, and is traditionally used as a Christian symbol. ... Saint Blaise can refer to: A saint, see Blaise Saint-Blaise is the name or part of the name of several communes in France Saint-Blaise, in the Alpes-Maritimes Saint-Blaise, in the Haute-Savoie Saint-Blaise-du-Buis, commune in the Is re Saint-Blaise-la-Roche, commune... Wax has traditionally referred to a substance that is secreted by bees (beeswax) and used by them in constructing their honeycombs. ... A collection of lit candles on ornate candlesticks A close-up image of a candle showing the wick and the various regions of the flame. ... Carding Llama hair Carding is the processing of brushing raw or washed fibers to prepare them as textiles. ... Saint Bonaventura, John of Fidanza, Franciscan theologian, was born in 1221 at Bagnarea in Tuscany. ... For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist (or Communion or The Lords Supper etc. ... A Ciborium is a container, used in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and related Churches rituals to store Holy Communion. ... The term red hat when used within the Roman Catholic Church refers to the appointment of a Cardinal, a senior Prince of the Church who is a member of the electoral college that chooses the Pope. ... For the Roman general of this name, see Bonifacius. ... Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus, and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... Ax may refer to: Emanuel Ax, a modern concert pianist Ax, a 87th Precinct story written in 1964 by Ed McBain (Evan Hunter) Ax, a WWE World Tag-Team Champion professional wrestler An alternative spelling of axe A fictional Animorphs character Ax, Aximili-Esgarrouth-Isthils nickname See also: AX... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... A fox is a member of any of 27 species of small omnivorous canids. ... A scourge (from the Italian scoriada, ultimately from the Latin excoriare = to flay and corium = skin) is a whip or lash, especially a multi-tong type used in order to inflict severe corporal punishment or self-mortification on the back. ... The worlds highest fountain: King Fahds Fountain in Jeddah Three traditional fountain features: a low jet, a pair of raised basins, and sculpture with a water theme, here hippocamps (Villa Borghese, Rome) A traditional fountain is an arrangement where water issues from a source (Latin fons), fills a... Species See text. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Saint Birgitta, also known as St. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... The pilgrims staff is a walking stick used by pilgrims to the shrine of Santiago de Compostella is Spain. ... Saint Brigid of Ireland Saint Brigid of Ireland (Bridget, Bridgit, Brigit; in English St. ... COW is an acronym for a number of things: Can of worms The COW programming language, an esoteric programming language. ...

C

The college shield of St. Catharine's College, Cambridge, prominently depicting a Catherine wheel.
The college shield of St. Catharine's College, Cambridge, prominently depicting a Catherine wheel.
Saint Symbol
Catherine wheel
Catherine of Ricci ring, crown, crucifix
Catherine of Siena stigmata, cross, ring, lily
Cecilia organ
Charles Borromeo communion
Christopher giant, torrent, tree or branch, Carrying the Child Jesus on shoulder
Clare of Assisi monstrance
Clement anchor, fish, Mariner's Cross
Corbinian saddled bear
Cosmas and Damian a phial, box of ointment
Cyriacus deacon's vestments

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x1000, 116 KB)Note, there are improved versions of this image; An improved version of this image, (not embossed) An improved version of this image, (embossed) This image Improvements over Image:catz_crest. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (800x1000, 116 KB)Note, there are improved versions of this image; An improved version of this image, (not embossed) An improved version of this image, (embossed) This image Improvements over Image:catz_crest. ... Full name Collegium sive aula D. Catharinæ in Universitate Cantabrigiensi Motto   For the wheel! (unofficial) Named after St Catharine of Alexandria Previous names Katharine Hall (1473-1860) Established 1473 Sister College(s) Worcester College Master (From 1st January, 2007) Prof. ... Saint Catherine of Alexandria, known as Saint Catherine of the Wheel, is an apocryphal figure claimed to have been a noted scholar in the early 4th Century who, at the age of only 18, is said to have visited the Emperor Maximinus II and to have convinced him of the... Also called: pinwheel. ... St. ... A finger ring is a metal band worn as an ornament around a finger; it is the most common current meaning of the word ring. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... A crucifix amidst the cornfields near Mureck in rural Styria, Austria A handheld crucifix A crucifix in front of the Holy Spirit Church in KoÅ¡ice, Slovakia A crucifix is a cross with a representation of Jesuss body, or corpus. ... Saint Catherine of Siena (born in Siena, Italy, March 25, 1347; died in Rome, April 29, 1380) was a Dominican Tertiary or lay-affiliate of the Dominican Order. ... Francis of Assisi, an early stigmatic. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees A famous khachkar at Goshavank (Notice the cross). ... A finger ring is a metal band worn as an ornament around a finger; it is the most common current meaning of the word ring. ... lily is the best name in the whole wide world. ... Saint Cecilia Saint Cecilia in the Catholic Church the patron saint of music and of the blind. ... Organ in Katharinenkirche, Frankfurt am Main, Germany Modern style pipe organ at the concert hall of Aletheia University in Matou, Taiwan The organ is a keyboard instrument with one or more manuals, and usually a pedalboard. ... Saint Charles Borromeo (Italian: ) (October 2, 1538 – November 4, 1584) was an Italian saint and cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist (or Communion or The Lords Supper etc. ... For other uses, see Saint Christopher (disambiguation). ... Look up giant in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Torrent in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The coniferous Coast Redwood, the tallest tree species on earth. ... Jacopo Bellinis Madonna and Child Blessing depicts the infant Jesus in the act of blessing the viewer The Child Jesus is a religious symbol based on the activities of Jesus as an infant up to the age of twelve that recurs throughout history, starting from around the third or... Saint Clare of Assisi, born Chiara Offreduccio, (July 16, 1193–August 11, 1253) was one of the first followers of Francis of Assisi and founded the Order of Poor Ladies to organize the women who chose to take the Franciscan vow of poverty and celibacy. ... Categories: Stub | Roman Catholic Sacraments and Other Practices ... Saint Clement I, the bishop of Rome also called Clement of Rome and Clemens Romanus, was either the third or fourth pope, before or after Anacletus. ... A stocked ships anchor. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are typically cold-blooded; covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees For other uses, see Cross (disambiguation). ... Arms of Pope Benedict XVI, with Corbinians Bear. ... Genera Ailuropoda Helarctos Melursus Ursus Tremarctos Arctodus (extinct) A bear is a large mammal in the family Ursidae of the order Carnivora. ... The Beheading of Cosmas and Damian, by Fra Angelico The Shrine in St. ... An ointment is a viscous semisolid preparation used topically on a variety of body surfaces. ... Personal Life A Roman nobleman, Cyriacus converted to Christianity during his adult life and renounced his material wealth, giving it away to the poor. ... Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religions, especially the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Lutheran and Anglican Churches. ...

D

Saint Symbol
Daniel lion
Denis head in hands
David of Wales harp
Dorothy of Caesarea flowers
Dominic rosary, star

Image File history File links Mariner's_Cross. ... Image File history File links Mariner's_Cross. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees For other uses, see Cross (disambiguation). ... Daniel (Hebrew: דָּנִיֵּאל; transliterated as Daniyyel in Standard Hebrew and Dāniyyêl in Tiberian Hebrew, Arabic: Danyel, دانيال) is the name of at least three people from the Hebrew Bible: A Jewish exile in Babylon, the subject of the Book of Daniel and the most well-known of the three Daniels. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Felis leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae and one of four big cats in the genus Panthera. ... Saint Denis, also known as Denise, Dionysius, or Dennis is a Christian saint, bishop of Paris, martyr, and a patron saint of France. ... Beheading. ... Saint David (c. ... For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ... Saint Dorothea is a single name for two separate virgin martyrs. ... Wildflowers A flower is the reproductive organ of those plants classified as angiosperms ( flowering plants; Division Magnoliophyta). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... This article is about the astronomical object. ...

E

Bread
Bread
Saint Symbol
Edmund the Martyr quiver of arrows
Elijah cave
Elizabeth of Hungary alms, flowers, bread, the poor, pitcher
Emilianus monk on horseback
Elizabeth of Portugal crown
Erasmus windlass
Eustace hunting clothes, stag, bull, crucifix, horn, oven

Sourdough bread. ... Sourdough bread. ... Edmund the Martyr (circa 840 – November 20, 869 or 870) was a King of East Anglia. ... A quiver is a container for arrows, crossbow bolts or darts, such as those shot from a bow, crossbow or blowgun. ... Elijah (אֱלִיָּהוּ Whose/my God is the Lord, Standard Hebrew Eliyyáhu, Tiberian Hebrew ʾĔliyyāhû), also Elias (NT Greek Ἠλίας), is a prophet of the Hebrew Bible or Old Testament. ... Lechuguilla Cave, New Mexico This article is about natural caves; for artificial caves used as dwellings, such as those in north China, see yaodong. ... Elisabeth of Hungary St. ... Alms Bag taken from some Tapestry in Orleans, Fifteenth Century. ... Wildflowers A flower is the reproductive organ of those plants classified as angiosperms ( flowering plants; Division Magnoliophyta). ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Look up Poor in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... San Millán of Yuso Saint Emilianus, also known as Aemilianus, Aemilian, Millán of la Cogolla or de la Gogolla, Emiliano, and Emilian of Cucullatus, is a Spanish saint. ... A monk is a person who practices religious asceticism, the conditioning of mind and body in favor of the spirit. ... Elizabeth of Aragon (1271–1336) was queen consort of Portugal and a Saint of the Roman Catholic Church. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... Saint Erasmus of Formiae (died AD 303), also known as Saint Elmo, is the patron saint of sailors. ... A windlass is an apparatus for moving a heavy weight. ... On a wing of the Paumgartner Altarpiece, Albrecht Dürer painted Lukas Paumgartner with the banner of his patron St Eustace, in the contemporary armor of a landsknecht. ... Hunter and Huntress redirect here. ... Genera About 15 in 4 subfamilies. ... Look up bull in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A crucifix amidst the cornfields near Mureck in rural Styria, Austria A handheld crucifix A crucifix in front of the Holy Spirit Church in Košice, Slovakia A crucifix is a cross with a representation of Jesuss body, or corpus. ... Horn may refer to: horn (anatomy), a hollow, pointed projection of the skin of various animals Horn, Austria horn (diacritic), a diacritic mark used to indicate that a normally rounded vowel such as o or u is to be pronounced unrounded horn (instrument) horn, a slang term for any wind... Oven depicted in a painting by Millet An oven is an enclosed compartment for heating, baking or drying. ...

F

Saint Symbol
Francis of Assisi wolf,birds, fish,skull, stigmata
Francis Xavier crucifix, bell, vessel

Saint Francis of Assisi (born in Assisi, Italy, ca. ... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... For other meanings of bird, see bird (disambiguation). ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are typically cold-blooded; covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... It has been suggested that temporal fenestra be merged into this article or section. ... Francis of Assisi, an early stigmatic. ... Not to be confused with St. ... A crucifix amidst the cornfields near Mureck in rural Styria, Austria A handheld crucifix A crucifix in front of the Holy Spirit Church in Košice, Slovakia A crucifix is a cross with a representation of Jesuss body, or corpus. ... A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... Vessel can refer to any of the following: Objects Vessel (French vaissel, from a rare Latin vascellum, diminuitive of vas, vase, or urn), a word of somewhat wide application for many objects, the meaning common to them being capacity to hold or contain something. ...

G

Saint Symbol
Gabriel trumpet, scroll stating “Ave Maria Gratia Plena”
Genevieve bread, keys, herd, cattle
George dragon
Gertrude of Nivelles crown, taper, lily,mouse
Giles Benedictine habit, hind
Gregory the Great tiara, crosier, dove

Image File history File links SVH06_2. ... Image File history File links SVH06_2. ... Saint George versus the dragon St. ... Gabriel delivering the Annunciation. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the horn, trombone, euphonium and tuba. ... Scroll can have different meanings: A scroll is a roll of parchment, papyrus, or paper which has been drawn or written upon. ... In Roman Catholicism, Saint Genevieve (Nanterre near Paris, ca 419/422 - Paris 512) is the patron of Paris. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... --80. ... A herd of Wildebeest A gaggle of Canada geese For other uses, see Herd (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle (often called cows in vernacular and contemporary usage, or kye as the Scots plural of cou) are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... Saint-George is a municipality with 695 inhabitants (as of 2003) in the district of Aubonne in the canton of Vaud, Switzerland. ... Chinese dragon, color engraving on wood, Chinese school, 19th Century The dragon is a mythical creature typically depicted as a large and powerful serpent or other reptile with magical or spiritual qualities. ... Saint Gertrude of Nivelles (626 - March 17, 659) was abbess of the Benedictine monastery of Nivelles, in present-day Belgium. ... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... In cymbal making, taper refers to the gradual change in thickness from the bell to the rim of the cymbal. ... lily is the best name in the whole wide world. ... Feral mouse A mouse (plural mice) is a mammal that belongs to one of numerous species of small rodents. ... Saint Giles (640?-720?) (Latin: Ægidius, French: Gilles, Italian: Egidio) was a 7th-8th century Christian hermit saint. ... St. ... The word Hind can refer to: A female deer, usually the red deer. ... Saint Gregory redirects here. ... Beauty pageant tiara A tiara (from Persian تاره tara borrowed by Latin as tiara) is a form of crown. ... Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286 A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and some Lutheran prelates. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Pigeons and doves are some 300 species of near passerine birds in the order Columbiformes. ...

H

Saint Symbol
Helena cross
Hippolytus of Rome papal tiara
Hippolytus the soldier military garb, horse's harness

st Helena was a great gal she was really great ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees A famous khachkar at Goshavank (Notice the cross). ... In Greek mythology, Hippolytus was a son of Theseus and either Antiope or Hippolyte. ... The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a symbol of the Roman Catholic papacy. ... Hippolytus the soldier was a third century officer in the Roman army. ... US Marine Corps MARPAT uniform Military uniforms comprises standardised dress worn by members of the armed forces of various nations. ... Tack is any of the various accessories worn by horses in the course of their use as domesticated animals. ...

I

A "fiddleback" chasuble from the church of Saint Gertrude in Maarheeze in the Netherlands
A "fiddleback" chasuble from the church of Saint Gertrude in Maarheeze in the Netherlands
Saint Symbol
Ignatius of Loyola Eucharist, chasuble, book
Isidore bees, pen

Made it myself This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Made it myself This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Ignatius of Loyola Saint Ignatius of Loyola (December 24, 1491? – July 31, 1556), baptized Íñigo López de Loyola, was the founder of the Society of Jesus, a Roman Catholic religious order commonly known as the Jesuits that was established to strengthen the Church, initially against Protestantism. ... For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist (or Communion or The Lords Supper etc. ... A fifteenth-century chasuble The chasuble is the outermost liturgical vestment worn by clergy for the celebration of the Eucharist in Western-tradition Christian Churches that use full vestments, primarily the Roman Catholic Church, high church congregations in the Anglican Church, and by some clergy in the United Methodist Church. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... It has been suggested that Isidro be merged into this article or section. ... Families Andrenidae Anthophoridae Apidae Colletidae Ctenoplectridae Halictidae Heterogynaidae Megachilidae Melittidae Oxaeidae Sphecidae Stenotritidae This article is about the insect. ... A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to a surface, paper. ...

J

Seal of the Society of Jesus
Seal of the Society of Jesus
Lily
Lily
Saint Symbol
James, son of Zebedee pilgrim's staff, scallop shell, key, sword
James, son of Alphaeus / James the Just square rule, halberd, club, saw
Jerome lion cardinal clothes, cross, skull, books and writing material
Joan of Arc shield, Cross of Lorraine
Joanna lamb
John Berchmans Rule of Saint Ignatius, cross, rosary
John Chrysostom bees, dove, pen
John of God alms, heart, crown of thorns
John the Baptist lamb, head on a platter, animal skin
John the Evangelist eagle, chalice, kettle, armor
Joseph, spouse of Mary Infant Jesus, lily, rod, plane,carpenter's square
Jude sword, square rule, club, ship
Justin Martyr ax, sword

Image File history File links Societasiesuseal. ... Image File history File links Societasiesuseal. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1800x1343, 220 KB) Photo of Lilium candidum at VanDusen Botanical Garden, taken July 2005 by User:Stan Shebs File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Madonna lily Saint... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1800x1343, 220 KB) Photo of Lilium candidum at VanDusen Botanical Garden, taken July 2005 by User:Stan Shebs File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Madonna lily Saint... For people and places called Saint James, see the diambiguation page. ... The pilgrims staff is a walking stick used by pilgrims to the shrine of Santiago de Compostella is Spain. ... Genera See text. ... Look up key in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... James, son of Alphaeus was one of the Twelve Apostles. ... Saint James the Just (יעקב Holder of the heel; supplanter; Standard Hebrew YaÊ¿aqov, Tiberian Hebrew Yaʿăqōḇ), also called James Adelphos, James of Jerusalem, or the Brother of the Lord[1] and sometimes identified with James the Lesser, (died AD 62) was an important figure in Early Christianity. ... In carpentry, a square or set square is a guide for establishing right angles (ninety-degree angles), usually made of metal and in the shape of a right triangle. ... Swedish halberds from the 16th century This article is about the weapon. ... A club is generally an association of people united by a common interest or goal, as opposed to any natural ties of kinship. ... Look up saw, SAW in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Saint-Jérôme, Quebec is a town in Quebec, near Mirabel, about 40 kilometers (25 miles) northwest of Montreal along Autoroute des Laurentides. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Felis leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae and one of four big cats in the genus Panthera. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees A famous khachkar at Goshavank (Notice the cross). ... It has been suggested that temporal fenestra be merged into this article or section. ... [1]#redirect Book ... Joan of Arc (French: Jeanne dArc) (January 6, 1412 - May 30, 1431), known as the Maid of Orléans (French: la pucelle dOrléans), is a national heroine of France and saint of the Catholic Church. ... A shield is a protective device, meant to intercept attacks. ... Cross of Lorraine The Cross of Lorraine, ‡, is a heraldic cross, the double cross, consists of a vertical line, crossed by two smaller horizontal bars. ... Joanna was one of the women associated with the ministry of Jesus of Nazarath, often considered to be one of the disciples. ... It has been suggested that Lambing be merged into this article or section. ... St. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees A famous khachkar at Goshavank (Notice the cross). ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ... Families Andrenidae Anthophoridae Apidae Colletidae Ctenoplectridae Halictidae Heterogynaidae Megachilidae Melittidae Oxaeidae Sphecidae Stenotritidae This article is about the insect. ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Pigeons and doves are some 300 species of near passerine birds in the order Columbiformes. ... A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to a surface, paper. ... John of God (originally Juan Ciudad and otherwise called Juan de Dios) (1495 - 1550) was a Spanish monk and saint. ... Alms Bag taken from some Tapestry in Orleans, Fifteenth Century. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Jesus Carrying the Cross as portrayed by El Greco - Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1580 In Christianity, the Crown of Thorns, one of the instruments of the Passion, was the woven chaplet of thorn branches worn by Jesus before his crucifixion. ... John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. ... It has been suggested that Lambing be merged into this article or section. ... Beheading. ... Modern leather-making tools Leather is a material created through the tanning of hides, pelts and skins of animals, primarily cows. ... Categories: Saints | Ancient Roman Christianity | Christianity-related stubs ... Genera Several, see below. ... Chalice For other uses, see Chalice A chalice (from Latin calix, cup) is a goblet intended to hold drink. ... A kettle is a kitchenware piece. ... Armor or armour (see spelling differences) is protective clothing intended to defend its wearer from intentional harm in combat and military engagements, typically associated with soldiers. ... For other uses, see Saint Joseph (disambiguation). ... This article is about the figure known by both Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ. For other usages, see Jesus (disambiguation). ... lily is the best name in the whole wide world. ... Look up pole, polar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Japanese plane in use A plane is a tool for shaping wood. ... In carpentry, a square or set square is a guide for establishing right angles (ninety-degree angles), usually made of metal and in the shape of a right triangle. ... For other uses, see Saint Jude (disambiguation). ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In carpentry, a square or set square is a guide for establishing right angles (ninety-degree angles), usually made of metal and in the shape of a right triangle. ... A club is generally an association of people united by a common interest or goal, as opposed to any natural ties of kinship. ... Italian ship-rigged vessel Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large, sea-going watercraft. ... Saint Justin Martyr (c. ... Ax may refer to: Emanuel Ax, a modern concert pianist Ax, a 87th Precinct story written in 1964 by Ed McBain (Evan Hunter) Ax, a WWE World Tag-Team Champion professional wrestler An alternative spelling of axe A fictional Animorphs character Ax, Aximili-Esgarrouth-Isthils nickname See also: AX... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

K

Saint Symbol
Knut of Denmark Nordic king with royal insignia, dagger, lance or arrow.

the death of Canute the Holy, by Christian Albrecht von Benzon Canute IV, (approximately 1043 — 1086), also known as Canute the Saint and Canute the Holy, was King of Denmark from 1080 until 1086. ...

L

Saint Symbol
Lawrence cross, book of the Gospels, gridiron, palm frond, purse of money
Leander of Seville pen
Leonard of Noblac lock, chain, manacles or fetters
Liborius pebbles, peacock
Louis IX of France crown of thorns, nails
Lucy cord, eyes on a dish, lamp
Luke ox, book, brush, palette

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x987, 286 KB) Old bracelets This image shows a pair of old bracelets. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x987, 286 KB) Old bracelets This image shows a pair of old bracelets. ... Hiatts Speedcuffs in holster, as used by UK police A model wearing handcuffs, waist chain, and thumbcuffs Old handcuffs Handcuffs are restraints designed to secure an individuals wrists close together. ... Saint Lawrence (225 – 258) (Latin Laurentius, laurelled) was one of the seven deacons of Rome who were martyred under the persecution of Roman Emperor Valerian in 258. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees A famous khachkar at Goshavank (Notice the cross). ... This illustrated page is from the Rossano Gospels one of the oldest extant Gospel Books. ... Gridiron can mean many different things: This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Saint Leander of Seville (Cartagena, ca 534 - Seville, March 13, 600 or 601), the brother of the encyclopedist, Isidore of Seville, was the Catholic bishop of Seville who was instrumental in effecting the conversion to Catholicism of Reccared the Visigothic king of Spain. ... A ballpoint pen A pen is a writing instrument which applies ink to a surface, paper. ... Leonard of Noblac or Leonard of Limoges ( - 559) was a Frankish noble in the court of Clovis I. He was converted to Christianity along with the king, by Saint Remigius (Saint Rémy), Bishop of Reims. ... The word lock came from Anglo-Saxon loca = a secure enclosure. Currently lock has several meanings: A lock (device) is a mechanical fastening device which may be used on a door, vehicle, safe, or other container. ... Look up chain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Hiatts Speedcuffs in holster, as used by UK police A model wearing handcuffs, waist chain, and thumbcuffs Old handcuffs Handcuffs are restraints designed to secure an individuals wrists close together. ... Fetters in use Fetters, shackles or leg irons are a kind of physical restraint used on the feet or ankles. ... Liborius was of a noble family of Gaul, he joined the priesthood, and was ordained (the second or third) Bishop of Le Mans. ... Born Perri Alette McKissack November 6, 1966 80s dance-pop singer Pebbles began her career as a backup singer and song writer for groups like Con Funk Shun and Sister Sledge. ... Peacock re-directs here; for alternate uses see Peacock (disambiguation). ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215 – August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ... Jesus Carrying the Cross as portrayed by El Greco - Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1580 In Christianity, the Crown of Thorns, one of the instruments of the Passion, was the woven chaplet of thorn branches worn by Jesus before his crucifixion. ... The word nail has several meanings: In anatomy, a nail is a hard covering to the tip of fingers or toes In engineering, a nail is a metal pin-shaped object used to hold things together This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... Saint Lucy of Syracuse, also known as Saint Lucia, Santa Lucia, or Saint Lukia, (traditional dates 283-304) was a rich young Christian martyr who is venerated as a Saint by Catholic and Orthodox Christians. ... Look up Cord on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Cord has several meanings: String or Rope Cord Automobile Vibrating cord A measurement of the volume of firewood A power cord or extension cable In electronics, a cable Cord, a former American car marque founded by Errett Lobban Cord. ... Download high resolution version (720x1040, 77 KB)Saint Lucy, Domenico Beccafumi, The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Lamp can be: A portable light fixture such as a table lamp or reading lamp (common usage) Lamp (electrical component), a replacable component that produces light, such as: Incandescent light bulb, also known as an incandescent lamp Fluorescent lamp Gas discharge lamp Arc lamp Signal lamp, a device used for... Luke the Evangelist (Greek Λουκας Loukas) is said by tradition to be the author of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, the third and fifth books of the New Testament. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... Different styles of paintbrushes The term brush refers to a variety of devices mainly with bristles, wire or other filament of any possible material used mainly for cleaning, grooming hair, painting, deburring and other kinds of surface finishing, but also for many other purposes like (but not limited to) seals... An artists palette A palette is: A thin board that a painter holds and mixes colour pigments on. ...

M

Saint Symbol
Margaret dragon in chains
Mark winged lion, book
Martha holy water sprinkler, dragon
Martin of Tours goose
Mary Magdalene jar of ointment
Matilda purse, alms
Matthew winged man, purse, lance
Maurus scales, spade, crutch
Michael scales, banner, sword, dragon
Monica girdle, tears

Image File history File linksMetadata Shovel_black. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Shovel_black. ... Rusty spade small spade for clay soil; the other one for sandy soil and loamy soil A spade is a tool fit for digging, or something resembling that. ... Margaret, with her palm of martyrdom, escapes the dragon Saint Margaret, also known as Margaret of Antioch, virgin and martyr, was formerly celebrated by the Roman Catholic Church on July 20. ... Chinese dragon, color engraving on wood, Chinese school, 19th Century The dragon is a mythical creature typically depicted as a large and powerful serpent or other reptile with magical or spiritual qualities. ... Mark the Evangelist (1st century) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Mark, drawing much of his material from Peter. ... Binomial name Panthera leo (Linnaeus, 1758) Synonyms Felis leo (Linnaeus, 1758) The lion (Panthera leo) is a mammal of the family Felidae and one of four big cats in the genus Panthera. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... Martha (Judæo-Aramaic מַרְתָּא Martâ The lady, French Sainte Marthe) is a biblical figure of whom no historical facts outside of it are known. ... An aspergillum (or aspergill) is a tool used to sprinkle holy water. ... Chinese dragon, color engraving on wood, Chinese school, 19th Century The dragon is a mythical creature typically depicted as a large and powerful serpent or other reptile with magical or spiritual qualities. ... Statue of Saint Martin cutting his cloak in two. ... Genera see text Goose (plural geese) is the general English name for a considerable number of birds, belonging to the familyAnatidae. ... The penitent Mary Magdalen, a much reproduced composition by Titian. ... An ointment is a viscous semisolid preparation used topically on a variety of body surfaces. ... Matilda of Ringelheim (892 – March 14, 968) was the wife of Henry I the Fowler, King of the East Franks. ... Purses, such as this one by Burberry, are fashion accessories with a function. ... Alms Bag taken from some Tapestry in Orleans, Fifteenth Century. ... Matthew the Evangelist (מתי Gift of the LORD, Standard Hebrew and Tiberian Hebrew Mattay; Septuagint Greek Ματθαιος, Matthaios) is traditionally believed to be the author of the Gospel of Matthew. ... The Annunciation - the Angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus (El Greco, 1575) An angel is a supernatural being found in many religions. ... Purses, such as this one by Burberry, are fashion accessories with a function. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... Saint Maurus was the first disciple of St. ... A weighing scale (usually just scale in common usage) is a device for measuring the weight of an object. ... Rusty spade small spade for clay soil; the other one for sandy soil and loamy soil A spade is a tool fit for digging, or something resembling that. ... A knee support crutch A typical forearm crutch Crutches are medical tools used in the event that ones leg or legs may be injured or unable to support weight. ... Guido Renis archangel Michael (in the Capuchin church of Sta. ... A weighing scale (usually just scale in common usage) is a device for measuring the weight of an object. ... A banner is a flag or other piece of cloth bearing a symbol, logo, slogan or other message. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Chinese dragon, color engraving on wood, Chinese school, 19th Century The dragon is a mythical creature typically depicted as a large and powerful serpent or other reptile with magical or spiritual qualities. ... Saint Monica of Hippo (333 - 387) is a Christian saint and mother of Saint Augustine. ... A girdle is a piece of womens underwear that replaced the corset in popularity and usage. ... Also see: Tears (song) by X Japan, or Tears (film) by Im Sang-soo. ...

N

Saint Symbol
Nicholas three purses or balls, anchor, boat, child

Tradition symbol of pawnbrokers--three connected balls This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Tradition symbol of pawnbrokers--three connected balls This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... A pawnbroker offers monetary loans in exchange for an item of value to the given pawn broker. ... Saint Nicholas (Greek: , Nikolaos, victory of the people) is the common name for Saint Nicholas, Bishop of Myra, who had a reputation for secret gift-giving, but is now commonly identified with Santa Claus. ... A pawnbroker offers monetary loans in exchange for an item of value to the given pawn broker. ... A stocked ships anchor. ... A boat is a craft or vessel designed to float on, and provide transport over, water. ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ...

O

Saint Symbol
Oda of Scotland depicted wearing a long blue gown with one shoulder bare; usually carries a staff or a book; always shown with a magpie on her hand and a crown under her feet

Saint Oda (c. ...

P

Baptismal font in Magdeburg Cathedral, Germany.
Baptismal font in Magdeburg Cathedral, Germany.
Saint Symbol
Pantaleon nailed hands
Patrick cross, harp, serpent, baptismal font, demons, shamrock
Paul sword, book or scroll, horse
Peter keys, boat, rooster
Philip the Apostle column
Philip Neri lily
Philomena anchor

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1162x1049, 301 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1162x1049, 301 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... View of Magdeburg with the cathedral on the right The Cathedral of Magdeburg, officially called the Cathedral of Saints Catherine and Maurice (known as Magdeburger Dom in German) was the first Gothic cathedral in Germany and with a height of 99,25 and 100. ... Saint Pantaleon (Panteleimon), counted in the West among the late-medieval Fourteen Holy Helpers and in the East as one of the Holy Unmercenary Healers, was a martyr of Nicomedia in Bithynia during the Diocletian persecution of 303 AD. According to the martyrologies, Pantaleon was the son of a rich... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Saint Patrick (Latin: ) was a Christian missionary and is regarded as the patron saint of Ireland along with Brigid of Kildare and Columba. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees A famous khachkar at Goshavank (Notice the cross). ... For other uses, see Harp (disambiguation). ... Serpent is a word of Latin origin (serpens, serpentis) which is ultimately derived from the Sanskrit term serp, that is normally substituted for snake in a specifically mythic or religious context, in order to distinguish such creatures from the field of biology. ... Baptismal font in Magdeburg Cathedral, Germany A baptismal font is an article of church furniture used for the baptism of children and adults. ... The demon Satan In folklore, mythology, and religion, a demon is a supernatural being that is generally described as an evil spirit, but is also depicted to be good in some instances. ... The Shamrock The shamrock, an unofficial symbol of Ireland and Boston, Massachusetts, is a three-leaved young white clover, sometimes (rarely nowadays) Trifolium repens (white clover, known in Irish as seamair bhán) but more usually today Trifolium dubium (lesser clover, Irish: seamair bhuí). However, other three leafed plants such... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... Scroll can have different meanings: A scroll is a roll of parchment, papyrus, or paper which has been drawn or written upon. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Saint Peter, also known as Simon ben Jonah/BarJonah, Simon Peter, Cephas and Kepha — original name Simon or Simeon (Acts 15:14) — was one of the Twelve Apostles whom Jesus chose as his original disciples. ... --80. ... A boat is a craft or vessel designed to float on, and provide transport over, water. ... A rooster or cock is a male chicken, the female being a hen. ... Philip was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... Deconstructing a Roman pillar. ... Philip Romolo Neri (Filippo de Neri; called, Apostle of Rome), (July 21, 1515 - May 26, 1595), was an Italian churchman, noted for founding a society of secular priests called the Congregation of the Oratory. He was was born at Florence, the youngest child of Francesco Neri, a lawyer, and his... lily is the best name in the whole wide world. ... Saint Philomena is an alleged 4th century saint and martyr of the Roman Catholic Church. ... A stocked ships anchor. ...

Q

Saint Symbol
Quentin Seven-pointed star

Places called Saint-Quentin include: Saint-Quentin, Aisne, Picardie, France Saint-Quentin, New Brunswick, Canada Saint-Quentin is part of the name of several places, including: Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, a new town and communauté dagglomération in the French département of Yvelines Saint-Quentin is part of... Acute heptagram Obtuse heptagram Acute and obtuse heptagrams inscribed within a heptagon. ...

R

Angel holding the sun at the Bordeaux cathedral
Angel holding the sun at the Bordeaux cathedral
Saint Symbol
Raphael fish
Rita of Casica roses, roses and figs,crucifix, thorn, sometimes with a wound in her forehead
Roch angel, dog, bread
Rose of Lima crown of thorns, anchor, city

Image File history File links Ange. ... Image File history File links Ange. ... The Archangel Raphael Raphael (Standard Hebrew רפאל, God has healed, God Heals, God, Please Heal, and many other combinations of the two words, Arabic: Israfil, اسرافيل) is the name of an archangel of Judaism and Christianity, who performs all manner of healing. ... A giant grouper at the Georgia Aquarium Fish are aquatic vertebrates that are typically cold-blooded; covered with scales, and equipped with two sets of paired fins and several unpaired fins. ... Saint Rita of Cascia Saint Rita (1381 – May 22, 1457) was born at Roccaporena near Cascia in the Diocese of Spoleto (Spoleto), Italy. ... Species Between 100 and 150, see list A rose is a flowering shrub of the genus Rosa, and the flower of this shrub. ... Species About 800, including: Ficus altissima Ficus americana Ficus aurea Ficus benghalensis- Indian Banyan Ficus benjamina- Weeping Fig Ficus broadwayi Ficus carica- Common Fig Ficus citrifolia Ficus coronata Ficus drupacea Ficus elastica Ficus godeffroyi Ficus grenadensis Ficus hartii Ficus lyrata Ficus macbrideii Ficus macrophylla- Moreton Bay Fig Ficus microcarpa- Chinese... A crucifix amidst the cornfields near Mureck in rural Styria, Austria A handheld crucifix A crucifix in front of the Holy Spirit Church in Košice, Slovakia A crucifix is a cross with a representation of Jesuss body, or corpus. ... Thorn, a sharp structure or growth on plants. ... Saint Roch (Latin: Rochus; Italian: Rocco; Spanish: Roque; c. ... The Annunciation - the Angel Gabriel announces to Mary that she will bear Jesus (El Greco, 1575) An angel is a supernatural being found in many religions. ... Trinomial name Canis lupus familiaris The dog Canis lupus is a type of canine, a mammal in the order Carnivora. ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Saint Rose of Lima, (20 April 1586 - 30 August 1617), the first Catholic saint of The Americas, was born in Lima, Peru. ... Jesus Carrying the Cross as portrayed by El Greco - Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1580 In Christianity, the Crown of Thorns, one of the instruments of the Passion, was the woven chaplet of thorn branches worn by Jesus before his crucifixion. ... A stocked ships anchor. ... The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ...

S

Saint Symbol
Sebastian arrows, crown
Simon crossed oars, saw

This article is about St. ... Team Orange Arrows Formula One car at the 2000 United States Grand Prix The Arrows Racing Team team was founded in 1977, by Italian financier Franco Ambrosio (A), Alan Rees (R), Jackie Oliver (O), Dave Wass (W) and Tony Southgate (S) when Rees, Oliver, Wass and Southgate left the Shadow... A crown is a symbolic form of headgear worn by a monarch or by a god, for whom the crown is traditionally one of the symbols of power and legitimacy (See Regalia for a broader treatment). ... The apostle Simon, called Simon the Zealot in Luke 6:15 and Acts 1:13; and Simon Kananaios (Simon signifying שמעון hearkening; listening, Standard Hebrew , Tiberian Hebrew ), was one of the most obscure among the apostles of Jesus; little is recorded of him aside from his name. ... An oar is an implement used for water-borne propulsion. ... Look up saw, SAW in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

T

Neo-Gothic "solar" monstrance at the hermitage church of Warfhuizen.
Neo-Gothic "solar" monstrance at the hermitage church of Warfhuizen.
Saint Symbol
Teresa of Avila heart, arrow, book
Theodore crocodile
Therese of Lisieux roses entwining a crucifix
Thomas Aquinas chalice monstrance, dove, ox
Thomas the Apostle lance, axe
Thomas More tamed camel

made it myself This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... made it myself This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ... A hermitage is the retreat of a hermit. ... Warfhuizen (Gronings: Waarfhoezen) is a village in Groningen, a province in the extreme North of the Netherlands. ... Saint Teresa of Avila (known in religion as Teresa de Jesús, baptised as Teresa de Cepeda y Ahumada) was a Spanish Roman Catholic mystic and monastic reformer; born at Avila (53 miles north-west of Madrid), Old Castile, March 28, 1515; died at Alba de Tormes October 15, 1582. ... The heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Japanese arrow (ya) and head // Weapon An arrow is a pointed projectile that is shot with a bow. ... A chained book in the Bodleian Library at Oxford University A Chinese bamboo book, in a collection at the University of California, Riverside. ... Theodore the Studite ( ca. ... Genera Mecistops Crocodylus Osteolaemus See full taxonomy. ... Saint Thérèse de Lisieux (January 2, 1873 - September 30, 1897), or more properly Sainte Thérèse de lEnfant-Jésus (Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus), born Marie-Françoise-Thérèse Martin, was a Roman Catholic nun who was canonised as a... Species Between 100 and 150, see list A rose is a flowering shrub of the genus Rosa, and the flower of this shrub. ... A crucifix amidst the cornfields near Mureck in rural Styria, Austria A handheld crucifix A crucifix in front of the Holy Spirit Church in KoÅ¡ice, Slovakia A crucifix is a cross with a representation of Jesuss body, or corpus. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225 - March 7, 1274) was a Catholic philosopher and theologian in the scholastic tradition, who gave birth to the Thomistic school of philosophy, which was long the primary philosophical approach of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Categories: Stub | Roman Catholic Sacraments and Other Practices ... Subfamilies see article text Feral Rock Pigeon beside Weiming Lake, Peking University Pigeons and doves are some 300 species of near passerine birds in the order Columbiformes. ... Binomial name Bos taurus Linnaeus, 1758 Cattle are domesticated ungulates, a member of the subfamily Bovinae of the family Bovidae. ... Thomas was one of the 12 apostles of Jesus. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... Axe For other uses, see Axe (disambiguation). ... Portrait of Sir Thomas More, by Hans Holbein the Younger (1527). ...

U

Saint Symbol
Urban portrayed in art after his beheading, with the papal tiara near him

The Papal Tiara, also known as the Triple Tiara, or in Latin as the Triregnum, and in Italian as the Triregno, is the three-tiered jewelled papal crown, supposedly of Byzantine and Persian origin, that is a symbol of the Roman Catholic papacy. ...

V

A traditional biretta
A traditional biretta
Saint Symbol
Victor of Marseilles windmill
Vincent de Paul children
Vincent Ferrer pulpit, cardinal's hat, trumpet, captives
Vitus cross

Biretta File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Biretta File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Saint Victor of Marseilles (died ca. ... Spanish windmills at La Mancha A windmill is an engine powered by the wind to produce energy, often contained in a large building as in traditional post mills, smock mills and tower mills. ... Saint Vincent de Paul (April 24, 1580 – September 27, 1660) was born at Pouy, Landes, Gascony, France to a peasant family. ... A male Caucasian toddler child A child (plural: children) is a young human. ... Saint Vincent Ferrer, (In Valencian Sant Vicent Ferrer) (23 January 1350 – April 5, 1419) was a Valencian Dominican missionary; born in Valencia, Kingdom of Valencia (modern day Spain). ... For other uses of Ambo, see Ambo, Ethiopia, Kom Ombo, ambulance Ambo (band). ... The term red hat when used within the Roman Catholic Church refers to the appointment of a Cardinal, a senior Prince of the Church who is a member of the electoral college that chooses the Pope. ... The trumpet is the highest brass instrument in register, above the horn, trombone, euphonium and tuba. ... A hostage is a person (sometimes another entity) which is held by a captor (often a criminal abductor) in order to compel another party (relative, employer, government. ... Vitus is a Latin given name meaning lively. ... A Greek cross (all arms of equal length) above a saltire, a cross rotated by 45 degrees A famous khachkar at Goshavank (Notice the cross). ...

W

Pastoral Crook of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286
Pastoral Crook of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286
Saint Symbol
William of Montevergine wolf and pastoral crook

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1223x2395, 1309 KB) Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen 1260-1286, from Limoges, middle of the 13th century. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1223x2395, 1309 KB) Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen 1260-1286, from Limoges, middle of the 13th century. ... William of Montevergine or William of Vercelli ( ) ( ) (1085 – 25 June 1142) was a Christian hermit and the founder of the Congregation of Montevergine, or “Williamites”. // Life He was born into a noble family of Vercelli in north-west Italy and brought up by a relation after the death of his... Wolf Wolf Man Mount Wolf Wolf Prizes Wolf Spider Wolf 424 Wolf 359 Wolf Point Wolf-herring Frank Wolf Friedrich Wolf Friedrich August Wolf Hugo Wolf Johannes Wolf Julius Wolf Max Franz Joseph Cornelius Wolf Maximilian Wolf Rudolf Wolf Thomas Wolf As Name Wolf Breidenbach Wolf Hirshorn Other The call... Crosiere of arcbishop Heinrich of Finstingen, 1260-1286 A crosier (crozier, pastoral staff) is the stylized staff of office carried by high-ranking Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Anglican and some Lutheran prelates. ...

X

Saint Symbol
Francis Xavier crab with a cross

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Y

Mitre of Bishop Sztojkovics, Hungary, ca. 1860, stolen in 1989
Mitre of Bishop Sztojkovics, Hungary, ca. 1860, stolen in 1989
Saint Symbol
Yrieix Bishop's Mitre

Liturgical Headdress: Mitre of Bishop Sztojkovics, Viennese Master, circa 1860, silver thread embossed embroidery, gems, enamel. ... Liturgical Headdress: Mitre of Bishop Sztojkovics, Viennese Master, circa 1860, silver thread embossed embroidery, gems, enamel. ... Saint-Yrieix is part of the name of several communes in France: Saint-Yrieix-la-Montagne, in the Creuse département Saint-Yrieix-la-Perche, in the Haute-Vienne département Saint-Yrieix-le-Déjalat, in the Corrèze département Saint-Yrieix-les-Bois, in the Creuse d... Bishops Mitre is a mountain located on the northern coast of Labrador in the Kaumajet Mountains. ...

Z

Saint Symbol
Zachary Making peace with King Luitprand. Sometimes he may have an olive branch and a dove over him

Pope Zachary (in Greek : Zacharias), pope (741-752), from a Greek family of Calabria, appears to have been on intimate terms with Gregory III, whom he succeeded (November 741). ... Liutprand was the king of the Lombards from 712 to 744 and is chiefly remembered for his Donation of Sutri, in 728, and his long reign which brought him into conflicts, mostly successful, with most of Italy at some time or other. ...

Notes

See also

. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... In Catholicism, a Doctor of the Church (Lat. ... List of Christians: People sometimes define Christianity in mutually exclusive ways. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... A martyrology is a catalogue or list of martyrs, or, more exactly, of saints, arranged in the order of their anniversaries. ... Iconography usually refers to the design or creation of images and more specifically to the historical study of art which aims at the identification, description and the interpretation of the content of images. ... Christian symbolism is the use of actions or objects to represent the truths of the Christian faith, either as a reminder of those truths or as a way of spiritually connecting with the underlying truth or act. ...

References

The Orthodox Church in America (OCA) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church, led by Metropolitan Herman. ...

External links

Saints Portal

 
 

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