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Encyclopedia > Saint William of York

Saint William of York, (d. 1154) also known as William FitzHerbert, William I FitzHerbert and William of Thwayt, was an English bishop and Archbishop of York. H William, a native of York, is said to have been the nephew of King Stephen and great-grandson of William the Conqueror. William became a priest, and rose rapidly through the ecclesiastical hierarchy until he was elected by a majority of the Chapter as Archbishop of York in 1142. His main rival for the position was Henry Murdac, a Cistercian monk. Theobald of Bec, the Archbishop of Canterbury, refused to recognise William's election due to allegations of simony (the acquisition of church positions by bribery) and of interference by King Stephen. In 1143, Pope Anastasius IV said that William would be confirmedf in office if he was able to refute the allegations by oath from himself and the Dean of York. A papal legate subsequently found William innocent, and consecrated him as archbishop. Events King Stephen of England dies at Dover, and is succeeded by his adopted son Henry Plantagenet who becomes King Henry II of England, aged 21. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq... It has been suggested that Valid Bishops be merged into this article or section. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Stephen (1096 – October 25, 1154), the last Norman King of England, reigned from 1135 to 1154, when he was succeeded by his cousin Henry II, the first of the Angevin or Plantagenet Kings. ... William I ( 1027 – September 9, 1087), was King of England from 1066 to 1087. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Events End of the reign of Emperor Sutoku, emperor of Japan Emperor Konoe ascends to the throne of Japan Henry the Lion becomes Duke of Saxony Births Farid od-Din Mohammad ebn Ebrahim Attar, Persian mystical poet (died 1220) Hugh III, Duke of Burgundy (died 1192) Bornin1142, a GameFAQs user... Henry Murdac, abbot of Fountains Abbey (1144-1147) and archbishop of York (1147-1153), was a native of Yorkshire, but descended from a wealthy family from Compton Murdac (now Compton Verney), in Warwickshire. ... Cistercians coat of arms The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Theobald (died April 18, 1161) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1138 to 1161. ... Arms of the see of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior clergyman of the established Church of England and symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Simony is the ecclesiastical crime and personal sin of paying for offices or positions in the hierarchy of a church, named after Simon Magus, who appears in the Acts of the Apostles 8:18-24. ... Events Manuel I Comnenus becomes Byzantine Emperor. ... Anastasius IV, né Corrado di Suburra or della Suburra (d. ...


As Archbishop, William undertook a number of significant reforms, and became quite popular with the people of York. His position became unstable, however, with the rise to power of Pope Eugene III, a Cistercian. English Cistercians renewed their attacks on him, and when William travelled to Rome to obtain his pallium (which he had not received earlier from Cardinal Hincmar), he was suspended from office for an alleged irregularity in the appointment of the Bishop of Durham, his subordinate. It was possibly the influence of Saint Bernard that had led to William's suspension, and William was required to obtain an in-person refutation of the old charges by the Dean of York, who had now become the Bishop of Durham. William took up residence with one of his friends, the King of Sicily. His suspension prompted his supporters in England to attack and destroy an abbey led by Henry Murdac, an act which allowed William's enemies to successfully call for his suspension to become a permanent removal from office. Murdac became Archbishop in his place. The Blessed Eugene III, né Bernardo Pignatelli (d. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location within Province of Rome in the Region of Lazio Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Mayor of Rome Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (Fontaines, near Dijon, 1090 – August 21, 1153 in Clairvaux) was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian monastic order. ... The following is a list of monarchs of Naples and Sicily: See also: List of Counts of Apulia and Calabria Hauteville Counts of Sicily, 1071-1130 Roger I 1071-1101 Simon 1101-1105 Roger II 1105-1130 Hauteville Kings of Sicily, 1130-1198 Roger II 1130-1154 William I 1154...


William returned to England, devoting himself to prayers in Winchester. After the death of both Pope Eugene and Henry Murdac, however, he successfully appealed to the new Pope, Anastasius IV, for the restoration of his position. According to legend, on his return to York, his crossed the River Tweed in a triumphal procession; due to the adulating crowds following him, the bridge collapsed, yet no one was killed. Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close Arms of Winchester City Council Winchester is a city in southern England, and the administrative capital of the county of Hampshire, with a population of around 35,000. ... Anastasius IV, né Corrado di Suburra or della Suburra (d. ... There are other rivers with this name: see Tweed River The River Tweed at Abbotsford, near Melrose The River Tweed at Coldstream The River Tweed (156 kilometres or 97 miles long) flows primarily through the Borders region of Scotland. ...


Only a short time—often reported to have been only 30 days—after returning to power, however, William died. His death was unexpected enough that some have claimed he was poisoned, although no proof of this has been presented. He is buried in York Minster and was regarded as a martyr. Miracles were reported at his tomb. He was canonized in 1227 by Pope Honorius III. The skull and crossbones symbol traditionally used to label a poisonous substance. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Events Henry III of England declares himself of age and assumes power Births September 30 - Pope Nicholas IV Deaths March 18 - Pope Honorius III (b. ... Honorius III, né Cencio Savelli (Rome, 1148 – March 18, 1227 in Rome), was Pope from 1216 to 1227. ...


His feast day is June 8, although his cult (veneration) is largely local to York. Traditioanl iconography and windows often depict William's crossing of the Tweed; some iconography shows him crossing in a boat. William's coat of arms traditionally depict seven mascles (lozenges). June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... A pullover with a lozenge pattern A lozenge is a parallelogram which usually has two corners pointing up and down that are farther apart than the corners pointing sideways. ...


A St. William's College exists in York, next to the Cathedral. The college was established between 1465 and 1467 with the permission of King Edward IV as the home for chancery priests of the Cathedral. [1] Events July 13 - Battle of Montlhéry Troops of King Louis XI of France fight inconclusively against an army of the great nobles organized as the League of the Public Weal. ... Events October 29 - Battle of Brusthem: Charles the Bold defeats Liege Beginning of the Sengoku Period in Japan. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ...


External links

  • Information on St. William's College, York, and iconography of William
  • Information on St. William
  • [*Information of St. William from Catholic Forum
Religious Posts
Preceded by:
Thurstan
Archbishop of York
1143–1147
Succeeded by:
Henry Murdac
Preceded by:
Henry Murdac
Archbishop of York (2nd Enthronement)
1153–1154
Succeeded by:
Roger de Pont L'Evêque

H Thurstan, or Turstin (d. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Henry Murdac, abbot of Fountains Abbey (1144-1147) and archbishop of York (1147-1153), was a native of Yorkshire, but descended from a wealthy family from Compton Murdac (now Compton Verney), in Warwickshire. ... Henry Murdac, abbot of Fountains Abbey (1144-1147) and archbishop of York (1147-1153), was a native of Yorkshire, but descended from a wealthy family from Compton Murdac (now Compton Verney), in Warwickshire. ... Arms of the Archbishop of York The Archbishop of York, Primate of England, is the metropolitan bishop of the Province of York, and is the junior of the two archbishops of the Church of England, after the Archbishop of Canterbury. ... Roger de Pont LEvêque was a contemporary of Thomas Becket. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Patron Saints Index: Saint William of York (249 words)
His selection was challenged by reformers, especially a group of Cistercians, and William was accused of simony, sexual misconduct, and being unduly influenced by his connections to the royal court.
William, however, retired to Winchester, and became a monk, noted for his austerities and active prayer life.
In 1154, in the reign of Pope Anastasius IV, William was called from his seclusion, and again ordained archbishop of York; he died a month later.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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