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Encyclopedia > Saint Swithun

St. Swithun (or Swithin) (died 2 July 862) was an early English bishop, now best known for the popular British weather lore proverb that if it rains on St. Swithun's day, 15 July, it will rain for 40 days and 40 nights. July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... Events Rurik gained control of Novgorod. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... A bishop is an ordained member of the Christian clergy who, in certain Christian churches, holds a position of authority. ... Cumulus humilis indicates a good day ahead. ... A proverb (from the Latin proverbium) is a pithy saying which gained credence through widespread or frequent use. ... July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ...

St Swithun's day if thou dost rain
For forty days it will remain
St Swithun's day if thou be fair
For forty days 'twill rain na mair

Swithun was buried out of doors, rather than in the cathedral, apparently at his own request, so that the "sweet rain of heaven" could fall on his grave. In 971 it was decided to move his body to a new indoor shrine, and it is said that the ceremony was delayed by 40 days of torrential rain, a sign of Swithun's displeasure at the move. Events Births Deaths Culen of Scotland Categories: 971 ...

Contents


Life

St. Swithun was bishop of Winchester in 852. Therefore, there are strong links with churches throughout the south of England, especially in Hampshire. An example is the church in Headbourne Worthy to the north of Winchester, probably not a very notable church but its setting is superb: it is surrounded on three sides by a creek that flows from a spring in the village. The Lych gate on the south is also a bridge over the creek, which is unusual. Arms of the Bishop of Winchester The diocese of Winchester is one of the oldest and most important in England. ... Events Boris I Michael succeeds the duumvirate of Malamir and Presian as monarch of Bulgaria. ... This article is about the Christian buildings of worship. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... Hampshire (abbr. ... A lych gate (from Old English lic, corpse) is a gateway covered with a roof, found at the entrance to a church yard. ...


Swithun is scarcely mentioned in any document of his own time. His death is entered in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle under the year 861; and his signature is appended to several charters in Kemble's Codex diplomaticus. Of these charters three belong to 833, 838, 860-862. In the first the saint signs as Swithunus presbyter regis Egberti, in the second as Swithunus diaconus, and in the third as Swithunus episcopus This means that if the second charter is genuine, the first must be wrong, and it is so marked in Kemble. More than a hundred years later, when Dunstan and Ethelwold of Winchester were inaugurating their church reform, St Swithun was adopted as patron of the restored church at Winchester, formerly dedicated to St Peter and St Paul. His body was transferred from its almost forgotten grave to Ethelwolds new basilica on 15th July 971, and according to contemporary writers, numerous miracles preceded and followed the move. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of annals narrating the history of the English and their settlement in Britain. ... Events Carloman revolts against his father Louis the German. ... Kemble is a village in Gloucestershire, England a family of actors; see Kemble (family) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Events End of the reign of caliph Al-Mamun Nimmyo succeeds Junna as emperor of Japan Creation of Great Moravia Births Deaths October 10 - al-Mamun, Abbasid caliph of Baghdad Categories: 833 ... Events At Hingston Down, Egbert of Wessex beats the Danish and the West Welsh. ... Events First attack on Constantinople by Swedish Vikings (the Rus, see Varangians). ... Events Rurik gained control of Novgorod. ... Dunstan is also a village in Northumberland, and a lake in New Zealand Dunstan shoeing the Devils hoof, as illustrated by George Cruikshank Dunstan (909–May 19, 988) was an Archbishop of Canterbury (961–980) who was later canonized as a saint. ... Winchester is a city in southern England, with a population of around 40,000 within a 3 mile radius of its centre. ... According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. ... An early portrait of the Apostle Paul. ... (Redirected from 15th July) July 15 is the 196th day (197th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 169 days remaining. ... Events Births Deaths Culen of Scotland Categories: 971 ...


Swithun's best known miracle was his restoration on a bridge of a basket of eggs that workmen had maliciously broken.


Legend

The revival of St Swithun's fame gave rise to a mass of legendary literature. The so-called Vitae Swithuni of Lantfred and Wuistan, written about A.D. 1000, hardly contain any biographical fact; all that has in later years passed for authentic detail of St Swithun's life is extracted from a biography ascribed to Gotzelin, a monk who came over to England with Hermann, bishop of Salisbury from 1058 to 1078. From this writer we learn that St Swithun was born in the reign of Egbert of Wessex, and was ordained priest by Helmstan, bishop of Winchester (838c. 852). His fame reached the king's ears, and he appointed him tutor of his son Adulphus (Ethelwulf) and considered him one of his chief friends. // Events World Population 300 million. ... Salisbury (pronounced Solsbree or Sauls-bree) is a small cathedral city in Wiltshire, England. ... Events March 17 - King Lulach I of Scotland is killed in battle against his cousin and rival Malcolm Canmore, who later becomes King of Scotland as Malcolm III of Scotland. ... Events Romanesque church begun at Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain Anselm of Canterbury becomes abbot of Le Bec William the Conqueror ordered the White Tower to be built Births Deaths Categories: 1078 ... Egbert (also Ecgbehrt or Ecgbert) (c. ... Events At Hingston Down, Egbert of Wessex beats the Danish and the West Welsh. ... Events Boris I Michael succeeds the duumvirate of Malamir and Presian as monarch of Bulgaria. ... Ethelwulf was the elder son of King Egbert of Wessex. ...


Under Ethelwulf Swithun was appointed bishop of Winchester, to which see he was consecrated by Archbishop Ceolnoth. In his new office he was known for his piety and his zeal in building new churches or restoring old ones. At his request Ethelwulf gave the tenth of his royal lands to the Church. Swithun made his diocesan journeys on foot; when he gave a banquet he invited the poor and not the rich. He died on 2 July 862, and gave orders that he was not to be buried within the church, but outside in a vile and unworthy place. See: Signing Exact English Visual perception Episcopal see Holy See This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Ceolnoth (d. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ...


William of Malmesbury adds that, if Bishop Alhstan of Sherborne was Ethelwulf's minister for temporal matters, St Swithun was the minister for spiritual matters. The same writer recorded the bishop's prayer that his burial might be ubi et pedibus praetereuntium et stillicidiis cox alto rorantibus esset obnoxius. This expression has been taken as indicating that the well-known weather myth about St Swithun was already well-known in the 12th century. However, this is uncertain. William of Malmesbury (c. ... See also: Sherborne, Gloucestershire Sherborne is an affluent market town in north west Dorset, England, situated on the River Yeo and A30 road, on the edge of the Blackmore Vale six miles east of Yeovil. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ...


James Raine suggested that the legend was derived from the tremendous downpour of rain that occurred, according to the Durham chroniclers, on St Swithuns day, 1315. Another theory, more plausible, although without proof, traces it to a heavy shower by which, on the day of his move to the new shrine, the saint marked his displeasure towards those who were removing his remains. This story, however, cannot be traced further back than the 17th or 18th century at most. Also, is at variance with the 10th century writers, who all agreed that the move took place in accordance with the saint's desire expressed in a vision. Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city and main settlement of the City of Durham district of County Durham in North East England. ... Events August 13 - Louis X of France marries Clemence dAnjou. ...


More probable is John Earle's suggestion that the legend today comes from a pagan or possibly prehistoric day of augury. In France, Saint Medard (June 8) and Saint Gervase and Saint Protais (June 19) are credited with an influence on the weather almost identical with that attributed to St Swithun in England. In Flanders, there is St Godelieve (July 6) and in Germany the Seven Sleepers' Day (June 27). Of other stories connected with St Swithun the two most famous are those of the Winchester egg-woman and Queen Emma's ordeal. The former is to be found in Gotzelin's life (c. 1100), the latter in Thomas Rudborne's Historia major (15th century), a work which is also responsible for the not improbable legend that Swithun accompanied Alfred on his visit to Rome in 856. John Earle (c. ... Paganism (from Latin paganus) and Heathenry are catch-all terms which have come to connote a broad set of spiritual/religious beliefs and practices of a natural religion, as opposed to the Abrahamic religions. ... Omens or portents are signs encountered fortuitously that are believed to foretell the future. ... Saint Medardus (French Médard; c. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... Saints Gervasius and Protasius (also Gervase and Protase, and in French Gervais and Protais) were Christian martyrs, probably of the 2nd century. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... Flanders (Flemish, Fleming) (Dutch: Vlaanderen (Vlaams, Vlaming)) has two main designations: a geographical region in the north of Belgium, corresponding to the Flemish Region, a consituent part of the federal Belgian state. ... July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... In Christian mythology, the Seven Sleepers of Ephesus is a folktale concerning a number of fictional people who for a time were venerated as saints. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... Events William II of England dies in a hunting accident - Henry I becomes King of England King Henry I proclaims the Charter of Liberties, one of the first examples of a constitution. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... City motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus – SPQR (The Senate and the People of Rome) Founded 21 April 753 BC mythical, 1st millennium BC Region Latium Mayor Walter Veltroni (Left-Wing Democrats) Area  - City Proper  1285 km² Population  - City (2004)  - Metropolitan  - Density (city proper) 2,553,873 almost 4,300,000 1. ... Events Ethelbald usurps the throne of Wessex from his father Ethelwulf Earthquake in Corinth, Greece, kills an estimated 45,000 Bardas becomes regent for the Byzantine Emperor Michael III Ordono I of Asturias said to have begun the repopulation of the town of León Births Deaths February 4 - Rabanus...


Contemporary references

English folk singer Billy Bragg released a song entitled St. Swithin's Day on his 1984 E.P. Brewing up with Billy Bragg. Stephen William Bragg (born December 20, 1957), known as Billy Bragg, is a British musician known for his blend of folk, punk-rock, and protest music. ...


British television series Doctor in the House is set at the fictional teaching hospital St Swithin's. Doctor in the House was a British television comedy series produced by London Weekend Television from 1969-1970. ...


St. Swithin's Day is a comic book written by Grant Morrison and drawn by Paul Grist. Cover of collected edition from Trident Comics. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Grant Morrison (January 31, 1960 - ) is a comic book writer and artist born in Glasgow, Scotland. ... Paul Grist (born 1960 in Sheffield, England) is a British comic book writer and artist, noted for his hard-boiled police series Kane and his unorthodox superhero series Jack Staff. ...


In a popular television show, The Simpsons, Bart mentions Saint Swithun's day in a play he wrote in Episode 1F22: Bart of Darkness. The Simpsons is an American animated sitcom created by Matt Groening. ... Bart of Darkness is the first episode of season six of The Simpsons. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclop√¶dia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication in the public domain.

Encyclopædia Britannica, the 11th edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ...

See also

Cumulus humilis indicates a good day ahead. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Saint Swithun - definition of Saint Swithun in Encyclopedia (234 words)
Swithun (or Swithin) (died 2 July, 862) was an early English bishop, now best known for the popular British weather lore proverb that if it rains on St. Swithun's day, 15 July, it will rain for 40 days and 40 nights.
Swithun was buried out of doors, rather than in the cathedral, apparently at his own request, so that the "sweet rain of heaven" could fall on his grave.
Swithun's best known miracle was his restoration on a bridge of a basket of eggs that workmen had maliciously broken.
Saints of July 15 (3887 words)
Abbot Saint Haruch was regionary bishop in Werden (Benedictines).
Saint Swithun was educated at the Old Abbey, Winchester, and was ordained (it is uncertain whether or not he was a monk).
Vladimir was the grandson of Saint Olga, an early convert to Christianity among the Scandinavian rulers of the province of Kiev, and the illegitimate son of Grand Duke Sviastoslav and his mistress, Malushka.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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