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Encyclopedia > Saint Sarah
Saint Sarah
Born 1st century, Egypt
Died 1st century, France
Major shrine France
Feast August 19
Controversy Not officially recognized by the Roman Church
Saints Portal
Saints Portal

Saint Sarah is a patron saint venerated by the Roma (Gypsy) people. She is also known as Sara-la-Kali (Sara the black) (See McDowell, 1970, p.p. 38-57 for general information on Sarah, Roma and the Carmague). The center of her cult is Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer, a place of pilgrimage for Roma in the Camargue, in southern France, where legend identifies her as the servant of the two saints Mary commemorated in the town. An alternative legend has her as a pagan of noble birth and being converted to the faith of Abraham. Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ... Shortcut: WP:-( Vandalism is indisputable bad-faith addition, deletion, or change to content, made in a deliberate attempt to compromise the integrity of the encyclopedia. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Veneration is a religious symbolic act giving honor to someone by honoring an image of that person, particularly applied to saints. ... The Roma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rom, sometimes Rroma, and Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies in English, and as Tsigany in most of Europe. ... Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer (lit. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Shoreline of the Étang de Vaccarès For other uses, see Camargue (disambiguation). ...

Contents

Tradition

Interior of the shrine of Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer.
Interior of the shrine of Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer.

In the traditional account, Saint Sarah was a native of Upper Egypt; after the Crucifixion of Jesus, Mary Salome, Mary Jacobe, and Mary Magdalene were cast adrift in a boat that arrived off the coast of what is now France "a sort of fortress named Oppdium-Râ", and the location was known as Notre-Dam-de-Ratis (Râ becoming Ratis, or boat)(Droit, 1961, 19); the name being changed to Notre-Dame-del-la-Mer, and then Le Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer in 1838. Some say that the boat arrived in AD 42, and they were accompanied by Saint Joseph of Arimathea and the Holy Grail. Sarah was the black Egyptian servant of Mary Salome and Mary Jacobe according to some, servant to Mary Magdalene according to others. Saint Sarah's feast day is 19th August. In France the official day of her pilgrimage is 24th May. Her statue is carried down to the sea on this day to reenact her arrival in France. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, where the condemned was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross and left to hang until dead. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Mary Jacobe was the wife of Cleofas, the mother of apostles Saint James the Less, and possibly sister of Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... The penitent Mary Magdalen, a much reproduced composition by Titian. ... This article is about the year 42. ... Joseph of Arimathea, according to the Gospels, was the man who donated his own prepared tomb for the burial of Jesus after his crucifixion. ... For historical artifacts associated with the cup of the Last Supper, see Holy Chalice. ... (Redirected from 19th August) August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


History

Though the tradition of the Marys and company coming to France is quite old (it appears in the 13th century Golden Legend, for instance), Sarah first appears in The Legend of the Saintes-Maries (1521) by Vincent Philippon. However, there are many different opinions as to who Saint Sarah is. In some, she is tied with the Maries as an Egyptian servant; in others, with the Roma. She is called Sarah-la-Kali (Black Sarah), a moniker that brings together two strands of this tradition. When the Maries' boat arrived at the shore where the village now stands, she taunted the three saints in the boat, and one of the Maries climbed out of the boat and stood on the rough waters, inviting Sarah to walk out to her. Sarah attempted this but floundered and nearly drowned. One of the Maries lifted her up and carried her to safety. The Golden Legend by Jacobus de Voragine is a collection of fanciful hagiographies, lives of the saints, that became a late mediæval best seller. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther in the papal bull Decet Romanum Pontificem. ...


Droit explains that Sarah and the two Maries stayed to found a Christian community, building an altar to the Virgin themselves, which was excavated in 1448 on the orders of King René of Provence (Droit, 1961, 19) René (born again, or reborn, in French language) is a very common given name in French-speaking countries. ... Coat of arms of Provence Provence (Provençal Occitan: Provença in classical norm or Prouvènço in Mistralian norm) is a former Roman province and is now a region of southeastern France, located on the Mediterranean Sea adjacent to the Italian border. ...


Records of Saint Sarah's veneration are not found before 1800s. Veneration is a religious symbolic act giving honor to someone by honoring an image of that person, particularly applied to saints. ... Beginning of the Napoleonic Wars (1805 - 1815). ...


Possible influences

It is interesting to note that Sarah-la-Kali (Black Sarah) is identified with the Indian goddess Kali (aka Bhadrakali, Uma, Durga, and Syama") (Fonseca, 1995, 106-107). Though it was traditionally believed that the Roma came from Egypt, it is now believed that they came from India around the 9th century. According to Lee: Statue of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture For the 1934 film, see, see The Goddess (1934 film). ... This article is about the Hindu goddess Kali. ...

if we compare the ceremonies with those performed in France at the shrine of Sainte Sara (called Sara e Kali in Romani), we become aware that the worship of Kali/Durga/Sara has been transferred to a Christian figure... in France, to a non-existent "sainte" called Sara, who is actually part of the Kali/Durga/Sara worship among certain groups in India. (Lee, 2001, 210)

That is, Saint Sarah is local and Christianized manifestation of Kali. Weyrauch notes that:

The ceremony in Saintes-Maries closely parallels the annual processions in India, the country in which the Romani originated, when statues of the Indian goddess Durga, also named Kali, are immersed into water. Durga, the consort of Shiva, usually represented with a black face, is the goddess of creation, sickness and death. (Weyrauch, 2001, 262)

According to Franz de Ville (Tziganes, Brussels 1956), Sarah was Roma:

One of our people who received the first Revelation was Sara the Kali. She was of noble birth and was chief of her tribe on the banks of the Rhône. She knew the secrets that had been transmitted to her....The Rom at that period practiced a polytheistic religion, and once a year they took out on their shoulders the statue of Ishtari (Astarte) and went into the sea to receive benediction there. One day Sara had visions which informed her that the Saints who had been present at the death of Jesus would come, and that she must help them. Sara saw them arrive in a boat. The sea was rough, and the boat threatened to founder. Mary Salome threw her cloak on the waves and, using it as a raft, Sarah floated towards the Saints and helped them reach land by praying. The Rhônes course. ... Ishtar is the Assyrian and Babylonian counterpart to the Sumerian Inanna and to the cognate northwest Semitic goddess Astarte. ... ‘Ashtart, commonly known as Astarte (also Hebrew or Phoenician עשתרת, Ugaritic ‘ttrt (also ‘Attart or ‘Athtart), Akkadian dAs_tar_tú (also Astartu), Greek Αστάρτη (Astártê)), was a major northwest_Semitic goddess, cognate in name, origin, and functions with...

According to tradition, among the people on the boat were Mary Salome, wife of Zebedee and mother of the Apostles John and James; Mary Jacobe and her maid Sarah; Lazarus and his sisters Mary Magdalene and Martha; Saint Maximin; and Saint Sidonius. The early Christian Gospel of Thomas found at Nag Hammadi mentions among the disciples of Jesus (the Greek expression apostles does not appear) two women, Salome (Hebrew, shalom, peace) and Mary Magdalene (referred to simply as Mary). Mainstream Christian writers withhold the name disciple from Salome, and translate her position... Zebedee (zibhdi, the gift of God; Zebedaios) is a name used in several contexts: In the Bible, Zebedee was a Hebrew fisherman, the husband of Salome, and the father of James and John, two of the Apostles of Jesus Zebedee was a character in the popular BBC childrens programme... John the Apostle (Hebrew: Johanan ;Greek Ιωάννης, see names of John) was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. ... Saint James, son of Zebedee (d. ... Mary of Clopas (Greek: Maria he tou Klopa) was one of various Marys named in the New Testament. ... Resurrection of Lazarus by Juan de Flandes, around 1500 For other uses, see Lazarus (disambiguation). ... The penitent Mary Magdalen, a much reproduced composition by Titian. ... Mary anoints Jesus in Bethany in this icon. ... Saint Maximin (born at Silly near Poitiers; — Poitiers 12 September 346[1]) was the fifth bishop of Trier, according to the list provided by the dioceses website, taking his seat in 341/342[2] an opponent of Arianism[3] at the courts of Constantine II and Constans, who harboured...


In fiction

  • According to the Dan Brown's novel The Da Vinci Code (Which is considered heretical by orthodox Christianity) a Saint Sarah was the child of Mary Magdalene and Jesus. The book places Sarah's mother Mary as being the symbolic Holy Grail, or the vessel holding Jesus's blood (which would be the child of Christ), and claims that Mary fled to Egypt following the Crucifixion to give birth to her child. She then traveled to Southern France and her daughter married into the ancestors of the Merovingian dynasty.
  • The statue of Saint Sarah makes an appearance in Tony Gatlif's 1993 film Latcho Drom ('Safe Journey') where she is carried to the sea, and her landing is re-enacted.

This article is about the novel. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... For historical artifacts associated with the cup of the Last Supper, see Holy Chalice. ... There are other articles with similar names; see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... Tony Gatlif (born September 10, 1948, Algiers, Algeria) is a French film director who also works as a scriptwriter, actor, and producer. ...

References

  • Droit, Michel. (1963). Carmague. Ernest and Adair Heimann (trans.). London: George Allen and Unwin
  • Fonseca, Isabel. (1996). Bury Me Standing: The Gypsies and Their Journey. New York: Knopf.
  • Kinsley, David R. (1988). Hindu Goddesses: Visions of the Divine Feminine in the Hindu Religious Tradition.' Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • Lee, Ronald. (2001). "The Rom-Vlach Gypsies and the Kris-Romani." In Walter O. Weyrauch (ed.) Gypsy Law: Romani Legal Traditions and Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press.
  • McDowell, Bart. (1970). Gypsies: Wanderers of the World.' Washington: National Geographic Society.
  • Weyrauch, Walter. (2001). "Oral Legal Traditions of Gypsies." In Walter O. Weyrauch (ed.) Gypsy Law: Romani Legal Traditions and Culture. Berkeley: University of California Press.

External links

  • http://www.saintesaradekali.com
  • The Gypsy Pilgrimage at Les-Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer
  • Queen of the Gypsies at the Wayback Machine
  • Shrine of Sainte Sara la Kali
  • http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/saintm73.htm
  • http://www.catholic-forum.com/SAINTS/saints1k.htm
  • http://www.stpatricksguild.com/browse.cfm/4,8547.htm
  • http://www.catholic-forum.com/SAINTS/saints1k.htm
  • http://www.copticchurch.net/synaxarium/8_25.html
  • http://www.stathanasius.miss.on.coptorthodox.ca/Saints_Stories/St_Sarah_Nun.htm
  • http://www.armchairfrance.com/armchairuzesMarch2004.htm
  • http://www.st-mary-magdalene.org/newpage4.htm
  • http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/saints0n.htm
  • http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0309697/
  • http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0107376/
  • http://romove.radio.cz/en/clanek/18906
  • http://www.heiligenlexikon.de/BiographienS/Sara-la-Kali.html

  Results from FactBites:
 
CNN.com - Bishops seek saint for Internet - Feb. 1, 2003 (724 words)
Saint Isadore of Seville, left, Saint Clare of Assisi and Archangel Gabriel are in the running to be the patron saint of the Internet.
But finding a viable candidate shouldn't be difficult among the thousands of saints – at least 465 more, thanks to Pope John Paul II, who has canonized more people during his quarter century in power than were named in the 400 years before him.
The center's interactive saint exhibit, which lists more than 1,500 names and biographies, is one of the top tourist draws, Fletcher said.
Saint Sarah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (739 words)
Sarah was the fl Egyptian servant of Mary Salome and Mary Jacobe according to some, servant to Mary Magdalene according to others.
Sarah was decanonized by the Catholic Church, and some speculate that this due to her race, gender or ethnicity.
Records of Saint Sarah's veneration are not found before 1800s, though this could be due to her being the patron of the Roma.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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