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Encyclopedia > Saint Peter's Basilica
Photograph available under GFDL license. I took this picture myself with a Minolta XD-5 and a 24 f/2.8 Rokkor. The picture has been scanned from a print and digitally edited (framing, color balance). You do not need my permission to reuse it, but you may not claim...
Photograph available under GFDL license. I took this picture myself with a Minolta XD-5 and a 24 f/2.8 Rokkor. The picture has been scanned from a print and digitally edited (framing, color balance). You do not need my permission to reuse it, but you may not claim... Enlarge
Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back

St. Peter's Basilica ( Italian is a Romance language spoken by about 70 million people, most of whom live in Italy. Standard Italian is based on Tuscan dialects and is somewhat intermediate between the languages of Southern Italy and the Gallo-Romance languages of the North. The long-established Tuscan standard has, over the... Italian San Pietro in Vaticano) is a The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. Members generally prefer the term Catholic Church, but this term has multiple meanings (see Catholicism); the term Roman Catholic Church is used in this article to avoid... Catholic The Basilica of St. Francis Xavier, Dyersville, Iowa. This is one of only a handful a basilicas in the United States, and the only one outside a major metropolitan area. The Latin word basilica (derived from Greek basiliké stoà, royal stoa), was originally used to describe a Roman public building... major basilica in The State of the Vatican City ( Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanæ), is a landlocked enclave surrounded by the city of Rome in Italy, and the smallest independent state in the world (both in area and in population). The Vatican is the home of the Pope, and forms the territory of... Vatican City, an enclave of The Roman Colosseum Rome (Italian and Latin Roma) is the capital city of Italy, and of its Lazio region. It is located on the lower Tiber river, near the Mediterranean Sea, at 41°50N, 12°15E. The Vatican City State, a sovereign enclave within Rome, is the seat... Rome. This building is often described as the largest This article is about the Christian buildings of worship. For other uses of the word, see Church (disambiguation). The Memorial Church at Stanford University. A church building is a building used in Christian worship. See also altar, altar rails, confessional, dome, nave, pew, pulpit, sanctuary, lych gate. Etymology The word... church ever built (it covers an area of 23,000 m² and has a capacity of over 60,000) and one of the holiest sites in Christendom. Construction on St. Peter's was begun in Events Leonardo da Vinci completes the Mona Lisa. Hernán Cortés, conquistador, arrives in the New World at Santo Domingo in Hispaniola, age 22. Births April 7: Francis Xavier, Jesuit Saint. Possibly Lady Margaret Lee, sister of the poet Thomas Wyatt and favourite lady-in-waiting to Queen Anne... 1506 and finished in Events September 30 - Nurhaci , chieftain of the Jurchens and founder of the Qing Dynasty dies and is succeeded by his son Hong Taiji. Spanish establish a trading colony on Taiwan. Peter Minuit, director of the New Netherland colony, begins a policy of purchasing Manhattan from the Lenape. Work begins on... 1626.


Tradition says it was built at the place where According to tradition, Peter was crucified upside-down, as shown in this painting by Caravaggio. Saint Peter (died c. 67) was one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus in the New Testament. His original name was Simon (שמעון Hearkening; listening, Standard Hebrew Šimʿon... St. Peter, one of the Alternate meaning: See Apostle (Mormonism) The Christian Apostles were Jewish men chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth (as indicated by the Greek word απόστολος apostolos= messenger), by Jesus to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles, across the... apostles of This article is about the figure known by both Jesus of Nazareth and Jesus Christ. For other usages, see Jesus (disambiguation). This 11th-century portrait is one of many images of Jesus in which a halo with a cross is used. Jesus of Nazareth (b. about 6–4 BC... Jesus and considered the first Pope John Paul II has reigned since 22 Oct 1978. The Pope is the Catholic bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches (note that the name within the communion is simply the one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church). In addition to... pope, was Religious depictions of the crucifixion of Jesus typically show him supported by nails through the palms. Crucifixion is an ancient method of execution, in which the victim was tied or nailed to a large wooden cross (Latin: crux) and left to hang there until dead. It was a common form... crucified and buried. The church hosts the tomb of St. Peter under the main Picture of an altar from the Meyer Encyclopaedia An altar, (Hebrew mizbeah, from a word meaning to slay) is any structure on which sacrifices known as the korbanot or incense offerings are offered for religious purposes. Altars in the Hebrew Bible Altars in the Hebrew Bible were typically made... altar. Other popes are also buried in the basilica, as well as below it.

Contents

History

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Front of Basilica.

The current location is likely the site of the The Circus of Nero in ancient Rome is often confused with the older and larger Circus Maximus. The Circus begun by Caligula and finished by Nero was the site of the first organized, state-sponsored martyrdoms of Christians in 65 CE. Two years later, Saint Peter among many less famous... Circus of Nero in the first century AD. After Constantine. Head of the colossal statue. Musei Capitolini, Rome Flavius Valerius Constantinus (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I or Constantine the Great, was proclaimed Augustus by his troops on July 25, 306 and ruled an ever-growing portion of the Roman Empire to his... Emperor Constantine officially recognized Christianity he started construction in Events Constantine becomes the sole emperor of the Roman Empire. End of the Tetrarchy as the Roman mode of government. St Peters Church, Rome, founded. Eustathius becomes bishop of Antioch Births Deaths December 20 - Philogonus, Patriarch of Antioch Licinius, former Roman Emperor, executed for treason Categories: 324 ... 324 of a great basilica in this exact spot, which had previously been a cemetery for pagans as well as Christians.


In the mid- (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. Events Renaissance affects philosophy, science and art. The New Monarchs come to power in France, England, Portugal and Spain. Rise of... 15th century it was decided that the old basilica should be rebuilt. Nicholas V, né Tomaso Parentucelli (November 15, 1397–March 24, 1455) was pope from March 6, 1447, to March 24, 1455. He was born at Sarzana, Liguria, where his father was a physician. His father died while he was young, but in Florence, Parentucelli became a tutor in the... Pope Nicholas V asked architect Bernardo Gamberelli, better known as Bernardo Rossellino, (c.1410-1464) was a Florentine sculptor and architect. His younger brother was the painter Antonio Rossellino. Giorgio Vasari includes biographies of both Rossellinos in his Lives. Categories: Stub ... Bernardo Rossellino to start adding to the old church. This was abandoned after a short while. In the late (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. Events Renaissance affects philosophy, science and art. The New Monarchs come to power in France, England, Portugal and Spain. Rise of... 15th century Sixtus IV, born Francesco della Rovere (July 21, 1414 - August 12, 1484) was Pope from 1471 to 1484, essentially a Renaissance prince, the Sixtus of the Sistine Chapel where the team of artists he brought together introduced the Early Renaissance to Rome with a masterpiece. (Michelangelos ceiling was added... Pope Sixtus IV had the The Sistine Chapel is a religious chapel and one of the most famous artistic treasures of the Vatican, built between 1475 and 1483, in the time of Pope Sixtus IV della Rovere. The interior of the Sistine Left section of the ceiling, after restoration Left centre section of the ceiling... Sistine Chapel started nearby.


The basilica in itself is an artwork composed of many valuable artistic elements. Construction started under Pope Julius II Julius II, né Giuliano della Rovere (December 5, 1443 - February 21, 1513), was pope from 1503 to 1513. He was the nephew of Sixtus IV. By his uncle, who took him under his special charge, he was educated among the Franciscans, and latterly sent to a convent... Pope Julius II in 1506 and was completed in Events June 2 - First Récollet missionaries arrive at Quebec City, from Rouen, France. June 4 - Forces under the shogun Tokugawa Ieyasu took Osaka Castle in Japan. The second volume of Miguel Cervantes Don Quixote is published. End of the Sengoku Period in Japan. Births January 30 - Thomas Rolfe March... 1615 under Painting of Pope Paul V by Caravaggio Paul V, né Camillo Borghese (Rome, September 17, 1550 - January 28, 1621) was Pope from May 16, 1605 until his death. He was born as Camillo Borghese into the noble Borghese family of Siena which had recently fled to Rome, and ROMANUS appears... Pope Paul V. Donato Bramante Donato Bramante (1444 - March 11, 1514), Italian architect, who introduced the Early Renaissance style to Milan and the High Renaissance style to Rome, where his most famous design was St. Peters Basilica. Bramante was born in a very small place near Urbino, where in the 1460s Francesco... Donato Bramante was to be the first chief architect. Many famous artists worked on the "Fabbrica di San Pietro" (as the complex of building operations were officially called). This page is about the artist. For other references to Michaelangelo, see Michaelangelo (disambiguation). Michelangelo Buonarroti, by Marcello Venusti Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (March 6, 1475 - February 18, 1564*) was a Renaissance painter, sculptor, poet and architect. He is famous for creating the fresco ceiling of the Sistine Chapel... Michelangelo, who served as main architect for a while, designed the dome. After the death of Julius II building was halted until Pope Paul III, (1543) portrait by Titian (Tiziano Vecelli), Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples Paul III, né Alessandro Farnese (February 29, 1468 - November 10, 1549) was pope from 1534 to 1549. He also called the Council of Trent in 1545. Born Alessandro Farnese in Carino, in Tuscany, he came through... Pope Paul III asked Michelangelo to design the rest of the church. After Michelangelo's death his student Giacomo della Porta continued with the unfinished portions of the church. Carlo Maderno became the chief architect later on, and designed the entrance.

Details

Directly to the east of the church is the elliptical Berninis piazza was extended by Mussolinis grand avenue of approach. St. Peters Square, or St. Peters Piazza (Piazza San Pietro), is located directly in front of St. Peters Basilica, in Vatican City, a papal enclave within Rome. The open space before the basilica was redesigned... St. Peter's Square (Piazza San Pietro), built between Events Masuria is devastated during the Deluge when it was raided by Tartars and Poles End of the war started in 1648 between Poland, Ducal Prussia, Russia and Transylvania. The only year the British coin Fifty Shillings was minted. The year in which Adams Grammar School in Shropshire, England was... 1656 and Events January 20 - Poland cedes Kyiv, Smolensk, and eastern Ukraine to Russia in the Treaty of Andrusovo that put a final end to the Deluge, and Poland lost its status as a Central European power. April 27 - The blind, impoverished John Milton sells the copyright of Paradise Lost for £10... 1667, in the center of which is a 25.5 meter tall obelisk. The For the obelisk punctuation mark, see dagger (typography). Cleopatras Needle on the banks of the River Thames in London An obelisk is a tall, thin, four-sided, tapering monument which ends in a pyramidal top. Ancient obelisks were made of a single piece of stone (a monolith). The term... obelisk was moved to its present location in Events January 12 - The Netherlands adopts the Gregorian calendar Beginning of the Eighth War of Religion in France (also known as the War of the Three Henrys) August 8 - John Davis enters Cumberland Sound in quest for the North West Passage. August 17 - Capture of Antwerp by Spanish forces under... 1585 by order of Sixtus V, né Felice Peretti (December 13, 1521 - August 27, 1590) was pope from 1585 to 1590. Born at Grottammare, in Marche. He was reared in poverty; his father was a gardener, and his having been a swineherd in his youth is less than shocking today. At an early age... Pope Sixtus V. The obelisk dates back to the (14th century BC - 13th century BC - 12th century BC - other centuries) (1300s BC - 1290s BC - 1280s BC - 1270s BC - 1260s BC - 1250s BC - 1240s BC - 1230s BC - 1220s BC - 1210s BC - 1200s BC - other decades) (3rd millennium BC - 2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC) Events 1295 BC - End of the... 13th century BC in The Arab Republic of Egypt, commonly known as Egypt, (in Arabic: مصر, romanized Mişr or Maşr, in Egyptian dialect) is a republic mostly located in northeastern Africa. Covering an area of about 1,020,000 km², it includes the Sinai Peninsula (considered part of... Egypt, and was moved to Rome in the (1st century BC - 1st century - 2nd century - other centuries) The 1st century was that century which lasted from 1 to 99. Events Beginning of Christianity Spread of the Roman Empire Masoretes adds vowel pointings to the text of the Tanakh Pompeii and Herculaneum destroyed by eruption of Mount Vesuvius in... 1st century to stand in Map of downtown Rome during the Roman Empire, with Circus Maximus at the lower right corner The Circus Maximus in an ancient arena and mass entertainment venue located in Rome, Italy. Situated in the valley between the Palatine and Aventine Hills, the location was first utilised for public games and... Nero's Circus some 275 yards away. Including the cross on top and the base the obelisk reaches 40m. On top of the obelisk there used to be a large bronze globe allegedly containing the ashes of This article is about Julius Caesar the Roman dictator. For alternative meanings: Julius Caesar (disambiguation). Bust of Julius Caesar Gaius Julius Caesar (Latin: C·IVLIVS·C·F·C·N·CAESAR¹) (July 13, 100 BC–March 15, 44 BC) was a Roman military and political leader whose conquest of Gallia... Julius Caesar, this was removed as the obelisk was erected in St. Peter's Square. There are also two fountains in the square, the south one by Maderno ( Events January - Galileo observes Neptune, but mistakes it for a star and so is not credited with its discovery. February 7 - An Assembly of the Russian Empire elects Mikhail Romanov to be Tsar of Russia, and establishes the Romanov Dynasty. June 29 - Fire destroys Londons Globe Theatre Francesco Andreini... 1613) and the northern one by A self portrait: Bernini is said to have used his own features in the David (below, left) Gian Lorenzo Bernini (Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini) (December 7, 1598 - November 28, 1680), who worked chiefly in Rome, was the pre-eminent baroque artist. Eminent as a sculptor and architect, he was also a... Bernini ( Events January 5 - The Battle of Turckeim August 10 - Building of the Royal Greenwich Observatory began November 11 - Guru Gobind Singh becomes the Tenth Guru of the Sikhs. Cassini discovers Saturns Cassini Division Battle of Fehrbellin Births March 31 - Pope Benedict XIV Emperor Higashiyama of Japan Deaths May 19... 1675).

Download high resolution version (667x950, 142 KB)Dome of St Paters Basilica, Michelangelo, completed 1564 Source: http://www.kfki.hu/~arthp/html/m/michelan/5archite/late/3spietr3.html This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible...
Download high resolution version (667x950, 142 KB)Dome of St Paters Basilica, Michelangelo, completed 1564 Source: http://www.kfki.hu/~arthp/html/m/michelan/5archite/late/3spietr3.html This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible... Enlarge
Michelangelo's dome, the landmark of Rome, completed by Giacomo della Porta, 1590

The dome or For other uses, see cupola (disambiguation) Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome In architecture, a cupola consists of a dome-shaped ornamental structure located on top of a larger roof or dome, often used as a lookout or to admit light and remove stale air. The word comes from... cupola was designed by Michelangelo, who became chief architect in 1546. At the time of his death (1564), the dome was finished as far as the drum, the base on which domes sit. The dome was vaulted between 1585 and 1590 by the architect Giacomo della Porta with the assistance of Domenico Fontana, who was probably the best engineer of the day. Fontana built the lantern the following year, and the ball was placed in 1593.


As built, the double dome is brick, 42.3 metres in interior diameter (almost as large as the The Pantheon, Rome The Pantheon is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to all the gods of the Roman state religion, but has been a Christian church since the 7th century AD. It is the only building from the Greco-Roman world which is completely... Pantheon), rising to 120 metres above the floor. In the early 18th century cracks appeared in the dome, so four iron chains were installed between the two shells to bind it, like the rings that keep a barrel from bursting. (Visitors who climb the spiral stairs between the dome shells can glimpse them.) The four piers of the crossing that support it are each 60 feet (18 meters) across. It is not simply its vast scale (136.57 meters from from the floor of the church to the top of the added cross) that makes it extraordinary. Michelangelo's dome is not a hemisphere, but a parabola: it has a vertical thrust, which is made more emphatic by the bold ribbing that springs from the paired The Corinthian order as used for the portico of the Pantheon, Rome provided a prominent model for Renaissance and later architects, through the medium of engravings. The Corinthian order is one of the Classical orders of Greek and Roman architecture, although it was seldom used in Greek architecture. The other... Corinthian columns, which appear to be part of the drum, but which stand away from it like buttresses, to absorb the outward thrust of the dome's weight. The grand arched openings just visible in the illustration but normally invisible to viewers below, enable access (not to the public) all around the base of the drum; they are dwarfed by the monumental scale of their surroundings. Above, the vaulted dome rises to Fontana's two-stage lantern, capped with a spire.

Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome from the inside By T F Letocha, from http://www.letocha.demon.co.uk/Gallery/html/overview.html This image is not licensed under the GFDL. It is under a non-commercial-use only licence. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current...
Cupola of St Peters Basilica, Rome from the inside By T F Letocha, from http://www.letocha.demon.co.uk/Gallery/html/overview.html This image is not licensed under the GFDL. It is under a non-commercial-use only licence. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current... Enlarge
Inside the cupola

The egg-shaped dome exerts less outward thrust than a lower hemispheric one (like Jules Hardouin-Mansart, marble bust by Jean-Louis Lemoyne: a full-dress Baroque portrait bust demonstrates that the Kings architect is no mere craftsman Jules Hardouin-Mansart (Paris, April 16, 1646 – Marly, France, May 11, 1708) was a French architect whose work is generally considered to be the... Mansart's at The church at the Invalides, with its dome Les Invalides in Paris, France consists of a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement, now containing museums and monuments, all relating to Frances military history, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the buildings... Les Invalides) would have done. The dome conceived by Donato Bramante at the outset in 1503, was planned to be carried out with a single masonry shell, a plan that was discovered not to be feasible. San Gallo came up with the double shell, and Michelangelo improved on it. The piers at the crossing which were the first masonry to be laid, which were intended to support the original dome, were a constant concern, too slender in Bramante's plan, they were redesigned several times as the dome plans evolved.


Other domes around the world built since, are always compared to this one: Saint Joseph's Oratory in This article needs cleanup. Please edit this article to conform to a higher standard of article quality. City motto: Concordia Salus (Salvation through harmony) Location in the province of Quebec Area 500.05 km² (310 mi²) Population  - City (2001)  - Canadian CD Rank  - Canadian Municipal Rank  - Density... Montreal, This article describes the Canadian province. For other usages, see Quebec (disambiguation). Motto: Je me souviens (I remember) Other Canadian provinces and territories Capital Quebec City Largest city Montreal Lieutenant Governor Lise Thibault Premier Jean Charest (PLQ) Area 1,542,056 km² (2nd)  - Land 1,183,128 km²  ... Quebec, This article is about the cathedral in London. For other uses of the term, see St. Pauls Cathedral (disambiguation). St Pauls Cathedral is a cathedral on Ludgate Hill, in the City of London in London, and the seat of the Bishop of London. The present building dates from... St Paul's Cathedral in London — containing the City of London — is the capital of the United Kingdom and of England and a major world city. With over seven million inhabitants (Londoners) in Greater London area, it is amongst the most densely populated areas in Western Europe. Founded as Londinium, the capital of... London, The church at the Invalides, with its dome Les Invalides in Paris, France consists of a complex of buildings in the 7th arrondissement, now containing museums and monuments, all relating to Frances military history, as well as a hospital and a retirement home for war veterans, the buildings... Les Invalides in The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. Paris is the capital city of France, as well as the capital of the Île-de-France région, whose territory encompasses Paris and its suburbs. The city of Paris proper is also a dé... Paris, United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. It is located atop Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The building is characterized by a central dome (inspired as much by St Pauls Cathedral, London, as... United States Capitol in Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Washington, DC, Harrisburg, PA (http://www.pbase.com/yardbird/image/26416677) , and the more literal reproduction at the There is a similarly-named Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace in Honolulu. The Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro in Côte dIvoire was consecrated in 1990. It is the largest Christian church in Africa. Its status as the largest church in the world is currently... Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro, Cote d'Ivoire.

A view across the Tiber River This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this...
A view across the Tiber River This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Enlarge
View of St. Peter's Basilica from Ponte Sant'Angelo

Above the main entrance is the inscription IN HONOREM PRINCIPIS APOST PAVLVS V BVRGHESIVS ROMANVS PONT MAX AN MDCXII PONT VII (In honor of the prince of apostles; Painting of Pope Paul V by Caravaggio Paul V, né Camillo Borghese (Rome, September 17, 1550 - January 28, 1621) was Pope from May 16, 1605 until his death. He was born as Camillo Borghese into the noble Borghese family of Siena which had recently fled to Rome, and ROMANUS appears... Paul V Borghese, pope, in the year 1612 and the seventh year of his pontificate). The façade is 114,69 metres wide and 45,55 m high. On top are statues of Christ, John the Baptist (also called John the Baptizer or John the Dipper) is regarded as a prophet by at least three religions: Christianity, Islam, and Mandaeanism. According to the Gospel of Luke, he was a relative of Jesus. That he was a prophet is asserted by the Gospels of the... John the Baptist, and eleven of the apostles; St. Peter's statue is inside. Two clocks are on either side of the top, the one on the left is electrically operated since 1931 is a common year starting on Thursday. Events January-March January 4 - Female aviator Elly Beinhorn begins her flight to Africa January 6 - Thomas Edison submits his last patent application. January 22 - Sir Isaac Isaacs sworn in as the first Australian-born Governor-General of Australia January 25 - Mohandas... 1931, with its oldest bell dating to Events February 22 - Nicholas IV becomes Pope. June 5 - Battle of Worringen fought over the possession of the duchy of Limburg; won by John I of Brabant. Births Emperor Go-Fushimi of Japan Emperor Go-Daigo of Japan Deaths Categories: 1288 ... 1288.

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The approach to St. Peter's Basilica: Mussolini demolished the spina of medieval housing to create this heroic avenue.

Between the façade and the interior is the Categories: Architectural elements | Stub ... portico. Mainly designed by Maderno, it contains an (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. Historians will sometimes specifically refer to the 18th century as 1715-1789, denoting the period of time between the death... 18th century statue of Statue of Charlemagne in Frankfurt, a Romantic interpretation of his appearance from the 19th century Charlemagne (c. 742 or 747 – January 28, 814) (or Charles the Great, in German Karl der Große, in Latin Carolus Magnus, giving rise to the adjective form Carolingian), was king of the... Charlemagne by Cornacchini to the south, and an Apotheosis of Saint Louis by Charles H. Niehaus In sculpture, an equestrian (from the Latin equus meaning horse) is a statue consisting of a horse with mounted rider. Such statues were frequently (but not exclusively) made out of military leaders of note, and such statesmen who wished to symbolically emphasize... equestrian sculpture of Constantine. Head of the colossal statue. Musei Capitolini, Rome Flavius Valerius Constantinus (February 27, 272–May 22, 337), commonly known as Constantine I or Constantine the Great, was proclaimed Augustus by his troops on July 25, 306 and ruled an ever-growing portion of the Roman Empire to his... Emperor Constantine by Bernini ( Events January 21 – Highwayman Claude Duval is executed in Tyburn, Middlesex April - Pope Clement X is elected. May 2 - The Hudsons Bay Company is formed in England. May 26 - In Dover, Charles II of England and Louis XIV of France secretly sign a treaty ending hostilities between their... 1670) to the north. Entering The southernmost door, designed by Giacomo Manzù, is called the "Door of the Dead". The door in the center is by Antonio Averulino ( Events February 9 - Wars of the Roses: Richard, Duke of York dismissed as Protector February 23 - Johannes Gutenberg prints the first Bible on a printing press May 22 - Wars of the Roses: First Battle of St Albans - Richard, Duke of York and his ally, Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick defeat... 1455), and preserved from the previous basilica.


The northernmost door is the "Holy Door" in bronze by Vico Consorti (1902-1997) is a sculptor who built the bronze Holy Door in St. Peters Basilica in 1950. Categories: Stub ... Vico Consorti ( Events January January 5 - US Senator Estes Kefauver introduces a resolution calling for examination of organized crime in the USA January 6 - The United Kingdom recognizes the Peoples Republic of China. The Republic of China severs diplomatic relations with Britain in response. January 9 - The Israeli government recognizes the... 1950), which is by tradition only opened for great celebrations such as The concept of the Jubilee is a special year of remission of sins and universal pardon. In the Bible, a Jubilee year is mentioned to occur every fifty years, in which slaves and prisoners would be freed, debts would be forgiven and the mercies of God would be particularly manifest... Jubilee years. Above it are inscriptions. The top reads PAVLVS V PONT MAX ANNO XIII, the one just above the door reads GREGORIVS XIII PONT MAX. In between are white slabs commemorating the most recent openings:

IOANNES PAVLVS II P.M.
PORTAM SANCTAM
ANNO IVBILAEI MCMLXXV
A PAVLO PP VI
RESERVATAM ET CLAVSAM
APERVIT ET CLAVSIT
ANNO IVB HVMANE REDEMP
MCMLXXXIII – MCMLXXIV

IOANNES PAVLVS II P.M.
ITERVM PORTAM SANCTAM
APERVIT ET CLAVSIT
ANNO MAGNI IVBILAEI
AB INCARNATIONE DOMINI
MM-MMI

PAVLVS VI PONT MAX
HVIVS PATRIARCALIS
VATICANAE BASILICAE
PORTAM SANCTAM
APERVIT ET CLAVSIT
ANNO IVBILAEI MCMLXXV

In the jubilee year of human redemption 1983-4, Official papal image of John Paul II. His Holiness Pope John Paul II, né Karol Józef Wojtyła (born May 18, 1920 in Wadowice, Poland), is the current Pope — the Bishop of Rome and head of the Roman Catholic Church. He was elected on October 16, 1978... John Paul II, the In the Roman Republic, the Pontifex Maximus was the head of the Roman religion. He was the most important of the Pontifices (plural of Pontifex), which were positions in the main sacred college (Collegium Pontificum), which was directed by the Pontifex Maximus. Other members of this priesthood included the Rex... Pontifex Maximus, opened and closed again the holy door closed and set apart by Paul VI in 1976. John Paul II, the Pontifex Maximus, again opened and closed the holy door in the year of the great jubilee, the 2000th-2001st from the incarnation of the Lord. Paul VI, the Pontifex Maximus, opened and closed the holy door of this patriarchal Vatican basilica in the jubilee year of 1975

Interior

Saint Peters Basilica by Giovanni Paolo Panini (1691-1765) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version...
Saint Peters Basilica by Giovanni Paolo Panini (1691-1765) This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version... Enlarge
St. Peter's Basilica, from entrance, by Categories: Stub | 1691 births | 1765 deaths | Italian painters ... Giovanni Paolo Pannini

Walking along the right aisle of the basilica, there are several noteworthy monuments and memorials. The first is Michelangelo's Pietà, located immediately to the right of the entrance. After an incident in 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. Events January January 2 - the Pierre Hotel Heist - Six men rob the safety deposit boxes of the Pierre Hotel in New York City. Loot is at least $4 million January 5 - President of the United States Richard Nixon orders the... 1972 when an individual damaged it with an Ax music is a style of popular music which orginated in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The word comes from a ritual greeting that means good vibration and is used in the Candombl and Umbanda religions. The term ax began life as an insult, intended to point out the perceived pretentiousness of... axe, the sculpture was placed behind protective glass. Up the aisle is the A sarcophagus is a stone container for a coffin or body. The word comes from Greek sarkophagos (σαρκοφαγος), which means eater of flesh. Herodotus believed, erroneously, that sarcophagi (the Latin plural) were carved from a special kind of rock that consumed... sarcophagus of Christina (1626-1689) or Kristina, later known as Maria Christina Alexandra and sometime Count Dohna, was Queen of Sweden from 1632 to 1654, was the daughter of King Gustavus Adolphus of Sweden. As the heiress presumptive she succeeded her father to the throne of Sweden upon his death at the... Christina of Sweden, who abdicated in Events April 5 - Signing of the Treaty of Westminster, ending the First Anglo-Dutch War. June 3 - Louis XIV of France crowned at Rheims June 6 - Charles X succedes his cousin Christina to the Swedish throne. After her abdication on June 5, Christina now the former reigning queen of a... 1654 in order to convert to Catholicism. Further up are the monuments of popes Pius XI (born Achille Ratti May 31, 1857 - Rome, February 10, 1939) was Pope from February 6, 1922 until February 10, 1939. Pope Pius XI Crowned He issued the encyclical Quas Primas establishing the feast of Christ the King. The main idea here is that the Catholic religion, beliefs, morality... Pius XI and The Venerable Pius XII, born Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Eugenio Pacelli (Rome, March 2, 1876 - October 9, 1958) served as the Pope from March 2, 1939 to 1958. He was the only pope to exercise his Extraordinary (Solemn) Magisterium (that is, to claim Papal Infallibility) in the 20th century when he... Pius XII, as well as the altar of This article is about St. Sebastian. See also Sebastian (disambiguation). St Sebastian, by Mantegna St Sebastian was a Christian saint and martyr, who died under the persecution of Christians by the Roman emperor Diocletian in the third century. According to his apocryphal Acts, attributed to St Ambrose of Milan, he... St Sebastian. Even further up is the Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, which is open during religious services only. Inside it is a tabernacle on the altar resembling Donato Bramante Donato Bramante (1444 - March 11, 1514), Italian architect, who introduced the Early Renaissance style to Milan and the High Renaissance style to Rome, where his most famous design was St. Peters Basilica. Bramante was born in a very small place near Urbino, where in the 1460s Francesco... Bramante's Tempietto at San Pietro in Montorio. Bernini sculpted this gilded bronze tabernacle in Events February 19 - England and the Netherlands sign the Treaty of Westminster. A provision of the agreement transfers the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam to England, which renamed it New York May 21 - John Sobieski is elected by the nobility to be the King of Poland. June 6 - Shivaji is... 1674. The two kneeling angels were added later. Further still are the monuments of popes Pope Gregory XIII (1502-1585) Gregory XIII, né Ugo Buoncampagno (January 7, 1502 – April 10, 1585) was pope (1572 – 1585). He was born Ugo Buoncampagno in Bologna, where he studied law and graduated in 1530. Afterwards, he taught jurisprudence for some years, Alexander Farnese, Reginald Pole and Charles... Gregory XIII (completed in Events February 16 - Louis XV of France attains his majority Births February 24 - John Burgoyne, British general. March 31 - King Frederick V of Denmark April 30 - Mathurin Jacques Brisson, French zoologist and natural philosopher (died 1806) June 5 - Adam Smith, Scottish economist (baptized this day, exact date of birth unknown... 1723 by Carlo Rusconi) and Gregory XIV, born Niccolò Sfondrato (February 11, 1535 - October 16, 1591) was Pope from December 5, 1590 - October 16, 1591. He was born at Somma, near Milan, in the highest stratum of Milanese society, but was known for his modest lifestyle and stringent piety. His mother, a Visconti, died in... Gregory XIV.


In the northwestern corner of the nave sits the statue of St. Peter Enthroned, attributed to late (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages. Events Fourth through eighth crusades... 13th century sculptor Arnolfo di Lapo, also known as Arnolfo di Cambio, (1232 or 1245 - 1310) was a Florentine architect and sculptor. His architectural work includes designing the Duomo in Florence (1294), the church of Santa Croce in Florence and the cathedral in Orvieto, Italy. His sculpture includes: Monument to Cardinal Annibaldi (1276... Arnolfo di Cambio (with some scholars dating it back to the ( 4th century - 5th century - 6th century - other centuries) Events Rome sacked by Visigoths in 410. Attila the Hun conquers large parts of Europe, threatens to attack Rome in 452 Vandals conquer Carthage in 439, sack Rome in 455 At some point after 440, the Anglo-Saxons settle in Britain. The... 5th century). The foot of the statue is eroded due to centuries of pilgrims kissing it. Along the floor of the nave are markers with the comparative lengths of other churches, starting from the entrance (not an original detail). Along the pilasters are niches housing 39 statues of various saints.


Walking down the left aisle there is the Altar of Transfiguration. Walking down towards the entrance are the monuments to Leo XI, born Alessandro Ottaviano de Medici (2 June 1535—27 April 1605), was pope from April 1, 1605 to April 27 of the same year. He was born into the powerful Medici family of Florence: his mother, Francesca Salviati, was a daughter of Giacomo Salviati and Lucrezia Medici... Leo XI and Innocent XI, né Benedetto Odescalchi (May 16, 1611 - August 12, 1689) was pope from 1676 to 1689. He was born at Como in 1611, studied law at Rome and Naples, held successively the ofices of protonotary, president of the apostolic chamber, commissary of the Marco di Roma, and governor of... Innocent XI followed by the Chapel of the Immaculate Virgin Mary. After that come the monuments to Pope Pius X (1903-1914), pictured in 1904, wearing the 1834 Triple Tiara of Pope Gregory XVI Saint Pius X, né Giuseppe Melchiorre Sarto, (2 June 1835 - 20 August 1914) was Pope from 1903 to 1914, succeeding Pope Leo XIII. He was the first pope since the Counter-Reformation Pope... Pius X and Innocent VIII, né Giovanni Battista Cibo (1432 – July 25, 1492), pope from 1484 to 1492, was born at Genoa, and was the son of Aran Cibo who under Calixtus III had been a senator at Rome. His early years were spent at the Neapolitan court, and subsequently he went... Innocent VIII, then the monuments to The Blessed John XXIII wearing a Papal Tiara Angelo Roncalli was born in Sotto il Monte (province of Bergamo), Italy on November 25, 1881. The fourth in a family of fourteen, his family worked as sharecroppers, a striking contrast to the royally born Eugenio Pacelli, Johns predecessor as pope... John XXIII and Pope Benedict XV Benedict XV, né Giacomo della Chiesa (November 21, 1854-January 22, 1922), was Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from 1914 to 1922; he succeeded Pope Saint Pius X. He was born in Genoa, Italy, of a noble family. He acquired a doctorate of law in 1875... Benedict XV, and the Chapel of the Presentation of the Blessed Virgin. After that comes the Monument to the royal Stuarts, Rome The Monument to the Royal Stuarts is a memorial in St. Peters Basilica, in the Vatican in Rome. It commemorates the last three members of the Royal House of Stuart: James Francis Edward Stuart, his elder son Charles Edward Stuart, and his younger... Monument to the Royal Stuarts, directly opposite the one to Queen Christina. Symmetrically, the two monarchs who gave up their thrones for their Catholic means universal or whole. Early Christians used the term to refer to the whole undivided Church. Accordingly, all Christians lay claim to the term, including Protestants, who often do not capitalize it. The Church fathers and the historic creeds used it to distinguish the mainstream body of orthodox Christian... Catholic faith in the (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. During this period, the power of England and the United Provinces increased; while that of Spain and Portugal declined. Similarly, the power... 17th century, are honored side by side in the most important church in Catholicism. Finally, right before the end of the church, is the Baptistry.


The right transept contains three altars, of Wenceslas (or Wenceslaus; Czech: Václav; German: Wenzel), styled Wenceslas I, Duke of Bohemia (b. 907, d. 935 or 929 – see death controversy below) was the son of Vratislav I, Duke of Bohemia. His father was raised in a Christian milieu through his father, Borivojs, who was a... St Wenceslas, St. Processo and St. Martiniano, and St. Erasmus. The left transept also contains three altars, that of St. Peter's Crucifixion, Saint Joseph, also referred to as Joseph the Betrothed and as Joseph of Nazareth, was the foster-father of Jesus, according to the New Testament (Matthew 1:16; Luke 3:23). Not much is known of Joseph except that he was of the House of David and lived in the... St. Joseph and Thomas was one of the 12 apostles of Jesus. In the synoptic gospels and Acts this unnamed Twin (Thomas simply means twin in Aramaic) is listed among the other apostles, but nothing else is written about him in the synoptic gospels, an extraordinary silence, if Thomas were actually the brother... St. Thomas. West of the left transept is the monument to Alexander VII, né Fabio Chigi (February 13, 1599 - May 22, 1667) was pope from April 7, 1655 until his death in 1667. Born Fabio Chigi in Siena, a member of the illustrious banking family and a great-nephew of Pope Paul V, he was privately tutored and eventually received doctorates... Alexander VII by Bernini. A skeleton lifts a fold of red marble drapery and holds an hourglass symbolising the inevitability of death. He is flanked on the right by a statue representing religion, who holds her foot atop a globe, right upon the British Isles is also an old name for the Great Britain, Great Britain Ireland The Isle of Man The Isle of Wight The Northern Isles, including Orkney, Shetland and Fair Isle The Hebrides, including the Inner Hebrides, Outer Hebrides and Small Isles Rockall The islands of the lower Firth of... British Isles, symbolizing the pope's problems with the The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and is the mother branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. Christianity was planted in Britain in the first or second centuries and existed independent of the Church of... Church of England.

image of Pope John Paul Is tomb - full permission of Dr. M.A Tierney to use his images File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the image...
image of Pope John Paul Is tomb - full permission of Dr. M.A Tierney to use his images File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. Click on date to download the file or see the image... Enlarge
The tomb of Pope John Paul I, beneath St. Peter's

Over the main altar stands a 30 m (90 ft.) tall baldachin held by four immense pillars, all designed by A self portrait: Bernini is said to have used his own features in the David (below, left) Gian Lorenzo Bernini (Giovanni Lorenzo Bernini) (December 7, 1598 - November 28, 1680), who worked chiefly in Rome, was the pre-eminent baroque artist. Eminent as a sculptor and architect, he was also a... Bernini between Events The Netherlands establish a trading colony at Kaohsiung on Taiwan. Thirty Walloon families settle in the New Netherland colony. Oslo is destroyed by fire. When rebuilt by Christian IV, it would be renamed Christiania. Claudio Monteverdi publishes Tancredi e Clorinda. Jean Louis Guez de Balzac publishes his Lettres. Bernardo... 1624 and See also: 1632 (novel) Events February 22 - Galileos Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems is published July 23 - 300 colonists for New France depart Dieppe. November 16 - Battle of Lützen Christina becomes queen of Sweden; five regents, headed by Axel Oxenstierna, govern country. Antigua and Barbuda is... 1632. The baldachin was built to fill the space beneath the cupola, and it is said that the bronze used to make it was taken from the Pantheon. Underneath the baldachin is the traditional tomb of St. Peter. In the four corners surrounding the baldachin are statues of Flavia Iulia Helena, also known as Saint Helena and Helena of Constantinople, (AD c.248 - c.329) probably born in Drepanum (afterwards re-named Helenopolis) on the Gulf of Nicomedia, was the first wife of Constantius Chlorus, and allegedly the daughter of an innkeeper. Later legend, mentioned by Geoffrey of... St Helena (northwest, holding a large cross in her right hand), Longinus is the name given in Christian mythology to the Roman soldier who pierced the side of Jesus on the cross. No name for this soldier is given in the Gospels. The spear used is known as the Spear of Destiny, or Lance of Longinus, and figures in the Holy... St Longinus (northeast, holding his spear in his right hand), Saint Andrew (Greek: Andreas, manly), the Christian Apostle, brother of Saint Peter, was born at Bethsaida on the Lake of Galilee. He had been a disciple of John the Baptist (John 1:37-40) and was one of the first to follow Jesus. He lived at Capernaum (Mark 1:29... St Andrew (southeast, spread upon the cross which bears his name) and Abgar of Edessa in a 10th-century icon, displaying the miraculous image of Edessa, a veronica According to the Acta Sanctorum published by the Bollandists (under February 4), Saint Veronica or Berenice was a pious woman of Jerusalem who, moved with pity as Jesus carried his cross to Golgotha, gave... St Veronica (southwest, holding her veil). The statue of Longinus is by Bernini ( Events January 14 - Connecticuts first constitution, the Fundamental Orders, is adopted. March 13 - Harvard University is named for a clergyman named John Harvard. November 24 - Jeremiah Horrocks observes the transit of Venus. Charles I starts the first of the Bishops Wars against Scotland. The Casiquiare canal, a river forming... 1639) and the others are by his followers. Each of these statues contains a relic associated with the person, respectively, a piece of According to Christian tradition, the True Cross is the cross upon which Jesus was crucified. According to medieval legend, the True Cross was built from the Tree of Jesse (father of King David), which became identified with the Tree of Knowledge that had grown in the Garden of Eden. Finding... The Cross, the This article is about the myth and legends of the artifact known as the Spear of Destiny (or of Longinus). The history of the relic of the Holy Lance itself is separately treated. Spear of Destiny is also the title of a computer game, a sequel to Wolfenstein 3D, and... Spear of Destiny, St Andrew's head (as well as part of his cross) and Veronica's Veil. In 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). Events January January 1 - Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland is dissolved. January 3 - Senator Barry Goldwater announces that he will seek the Republican nomination for President. January 5 - In the first meeting between leaders of the... 1964, St Andrew's head was returned to the Greek Orthodox Church can refer to: the Orthodox Church of Constantinople, headed by the Patriarch of Constantinople, who is also the first among equals of the Eastern Orthodox Communion. the Church of Greece, which has been autocephalous since 1833. any Eastern Orthodox church that uses a Greek liturgy, including the... Greek Orthodox Church by the Pope. It should be noted that the Vatican makes no claims as to the authenticity of several of these relics, and in fact other Catholic churches also possess "the same" relics. Along the base of the inside of the dome is written, in letters 8 ft. (2.5m) high, TV ES PETRVS ET SVPER HANC PETRAM AEDIFICABO ECCLESIAM MEAM. TIBI DABO CLAVES REGNI CAELORVM ( The Vulgate Bible is an early 5th century translation of the Bible into Latin made by St. Jerome on the orders of Pope Damasus I. It takes its name from the phrase versio vulgata, the common (i.e., popular) version (cf. Vulgar Latin), and was written in an everyday Latin... Vulgate, from Matthew 16:18-19 (http://php.ug.cs.usyd.edu.au/~jnot4610/bibref.php?book=%20Matthew&verse=16:18-19&src=4); "...you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church. ... I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven...."). Near the top of the dome is another, smaller, circular inscription: S. PETRI GLORIAE SIXTVS PP. V. A. M. D. XC. PONTIF. V. (To the glory of St. Peter; Sixtus V, pope, in the year 1590 and the fifth year of his pontificate).


At the far end of the church is the Cattedra of St. Peter ( Events September 2 - Great Fire of London: A large fire breaks out in London in the house of Charles IIs baker on Pudding Lane near London Bridge. The fire burns for three days destroying 10,000 buildings including St. Pauls Cathedral, but only 16 people are known to... 1666) by Bernini. It is topped by a yellow window in which is a dove, portraying the The Holy Spirit, from the Christian viewpoint, while related to Gods will, is not Gods will personified. The Christian and Jewish views of the Holy Spirit vary greatly. In the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) the Hebrew term Ruach HaKodesh is used many times; it is translated literally as... Holy Spirit, surrounded by twelve rays, symbolising the apostles. Beneath it is the chair of St. Peter, given to the Vatican from Charles the Bald (Charles II of France and Holy Roman Emperor Charles II) (823_877), Roman emperor and king of the West Franks, was the son of the emperor Louis the Pious and his second wife Judith. He was born when his elder brothers were already adults who had been assigned... Charles the Bald in Events December 29 - Charles the Bald, king of west Danes capture Lindisfarne and arrive in Cambridge. Harald Fairhair subdues the rovers on the Orkneys and Shetland Islands and adds them to his kingdom. Births Deaths August 12 - Louis II, western emperor (b. 825) Amram Gaon, Jewish liturgist Abu Muslim, hadith... 875. To the right of the chair are Saint Ambrose, Latin Sanctus Ambrosius, Italian SantAmbrogio (circa 340 - April 4, 397), bishop of Milan, was one of the most eminent fathers of the Christian church in the 4th century. A man of vigorous mind, trained as a lawyer, of unwearying zeal and uncommon generosity within the Catholic community... St Ambrose and St. Augustine of Hippo as pictured during the Renaissance Aurelius Augustinus, Augustine of Hippo ( November 13, 354 – August 28, 430) is a saint and the pre-eminent Doctor of the Church according to Roman Catholicism; he was the eldest son of Saint Monica. In the Eastern Orthodox Church, which... St Augustine (fathers of the Latin church), and to the left are Athanasius of Alexandria (also spelled Athanasios) was a Christian bishop of Alexandria in the fourth century. He is revered as a saint by both the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. Roman Catholics have declared him one of 33 Doctors of the Church. Born: 298 Died: May 2... St Athanasius and John Chrysostom (347 - 407) was a notable Christian bishop and preacher from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. He is famous for eloquence in public speaking and his denunciation of abuse of authority in the Church and in the Roman Empire of the time. He had notable... St John Chrysostom (fathers of the Greek church). Further to the right is the monument to Urban VIII, né Maffeo Barberini (April 1568 - July 29, 1644) was pope from 1623-1644. A portrait by Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) He was born Maffeo Barberini in 1568 to an important Florentine family. Through the influence of an uncle, who had become apostolic protonotary, he, while still a... Urban VIII and further to the left is the monument to Pope Paul III, (1543) portrait by Titian (Tiziano Vecelli), Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte, Naples Paul III, né Alessandro Farnese (February 29, 1468 - November 10, 1549) was pope from 1534 to 1549. He also called the Council of Trent in 1545. Born Alessandro Farnese in Carino, in Tuscany, he came through... Paul III.


Miscellaneous

Few are aware that St. Peter's is not, in fact, a A cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy (such as the Roman Catholic Church or the Anglican churches), which serves as the central church of a bishopric. As cathedrals are often particularly impressive edifices, the term is sometimes also used loosely as a... cathedral, i.e. the seat of a Bishop (disambiguation). A bishop is an ordained priest who holds a specific position of authority in any of a number of Christian churches. Bishops in the New Testament The bishops role is typically called the episcopacy, because the word bishop is derived ultimately from the Greek word episkopos (ε... bishop. The pope is the bishop of Rome, but the In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. In the Roman Catholic Church, the Church of England and the... diocese is traditionally based in the cathedral of the The late Baroque façade of the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterno was completed by Alessandro Galilei in 1735 after winning a competition for the design. Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterno — also known in the English language as Saint John Lateran Basilica and the Archbasilica of... Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterno.


Despite a frequent confusion due to the similar names, the church of The chains of St. Peter San Pietro in Vincoli (Saint Peter in Chains) is a basilica in Rome, Italy. It is most famous for housing Michelangelos statue Moses. The basilica was first built in the middle of the 5th Century to house the relic of the chains that bound... San Pietro in Vincoli (famous for hosting the precious Michelangelo's "Moses") is a different church, situated on the other side of the Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third longest river in Italy (disputed — see talk page) at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through the Campagna and Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches... Tiber river.


The The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of superlatives: both in terms of human achievement and the extrema of the natural world. The first edition... Guinness Book of Records currently lists There is a similarly-named Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace in Honolulu. The Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro in Côte dIvoire was consecrated in 1990. It is the largest Christian church in Africa. Its status as the largest church in the world is currently... Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro as the largest church, surpassing St. Peter's when it was completed in 1989 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. Events January January 7 - Akihito becomes Emperor of Japan following the death of Hirohito. The Heisei period begins January 8 - the Kegworth Air Disaster - A British Midland Boeing 737 crashes on approach to East Midlands Airport - 44 dead... 1989. The validity of this, however, continues to be debated.


The Emirates Palace hotel entrance hall dome in The Burj-al-Arab Hotel Dubai or Dubayy (in Arabic: دبيّ) refers to either One of the seven emirates that make up the United Arab Emirates on the Arabian Peninsula, or That emirates main city, sometimes called Dubai City to distinguish it from the emirate. The... Dubai is said to surpass St. Peter's Basilica in height.


See also

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The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free images, sound and other multimedia files. It is a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. Files uploaded to this repository can be used as local files by other projects on the Wikimedia servers, including Wikipedia, Wikibooks and Wikinews... Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
  • Basilica of St. Peter, Rome by Activitaly (http://www.activitaly.it/inglese/monument/basilica_St_Peter_rome.htm)
  • Johann Tetzel (1465-1519) was a Dominican priest who is perhaps best known for selling indulgences during the 16th century. In 1517, Tetzel was trying to raise money for the ongoing construction of St. Peters Basilica and it is believed that Martin Luther was inspired to write his 95... Johann Tetzel

 
 

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