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Encyclopedia > Saint Mary's College of California

Saint Mary's College of California

Motto Signum Fidei
Established 1863
Type Private,
Roman Catholic,
Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools
President Br. Ronald Gallagher, F.S.C.
Faculty 190
Undergraduates 2,500
Postgraduates 2,200
Location Moraga, CA, United States
Campus Suburban, 420 acres
Colors Red and Blue
Nickname Gaels
Mascot Gael Force One
Website http://www.stmarys-ca.edu/

Saint Mary's College of California is a private, coeducational college located in Moraga, California, United States. It is affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church and administered by the De La Salle Christian Brothers. It is known for its Liberal Arts education, including its Great Books and Seminar programs, its business program, which in recent years has become the college's most popular program, and nursing program, partnered with Samuel Merritt College, whose campus is in Oakland. Recently the college has garnered mild national attention for its men's basketball program. The college is located in Moraga; a small, suburban community located about 12 miles east of Oakland. Image File history File links SMC_logo. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... La Salle Academy, New York City The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools [[1]], also known as the Christian Brothers, the Lasallian Brothers, the French Christian Brothers, or the De La Salle Brothers, is a Roman Catholic religious teaching order, founded by French Priest Saint Jean-Baptiste de... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... // Moraga Way view toward Moraga Road. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The Gaels are an ethno-linguistic group which spread from Ireland to many parts of Britain, specifically Scotland, the Isle of Man, Wales and Cornwall. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... // Moraga Way view toward Moraga Road. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... La Salle Academy, New York City The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools [[1]], also known as the Christian Brothers, the Lasallian Brothers, the French Christian Brothers, or the De La Salle Brothers, is a Roman Catholic religious teaching order, founded by French Priest Saint Jean-Baptiste de... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Great Books refers to a curriculum and a book list. ... A seminar is, generally, a form of academic instruction, either at a university or offered by a commercial or professional organization. ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ...


The college's official literature states that Saint Mary's mission is guided by three traditions: Liberal Arts, Catholic and Lasallian. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools also known as the Christian Brothers or the Lasallian Brothers is a Roman Catholic religious teaching order, founded by John Baptist de la Salle. ...

Contents

History

The Saint Mary's College chapel with the statue of St. John Baptist De la Salle in front.
The Saint Mary's College chapel with the statue of St. John Baptist De la Salle in front.

St. Mary's College began in 1863 as a diocesan college for boys established by Most Rev. Joseph Alemany, OP, Archbishop of San Francisco, California. Unhappy with the archdiocese's operation of the college, Archbishop Alemany applied for assistance from Rome and St. Mary's College was handed over to the De La Salle Christian Brothers in 1868. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 44 KB) Saint Marys College chapel I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (600x800, 44 KB) Saint Marys College chapel I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Pope Pius XI blesses Bishop Stephen Alencastre as fifth Apostolic Vicar of the Hawaiian Islands in a Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace window. ... Joseph Sadoc Alemany (1814 - 1888) was a U.S. (Spanish-born) archbishop and missionary. ... The Order of Preachers (Ordo Praedicatorum), more commonly known as the Dominican Order, is a Catholic religious order. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... In some Christian churches, the diocese is an administrative territorial unit governed by a bishop, sometimes also referred to as a bishopric or episcopal see, though more often the term episcopal see means the office held by the bishop. ...


In 1889, the college moved east across San Francisco Bay to Oakland, California. The location on the corner of 30th and Broadway became affectionately known as "The Brickpile" and Saint Mary's College would call Oakland home until 1928, when it moved further eastward to Moraga. The Oakland site is a California Historical Landmark and is marked by a commemorative plaque. San Francisco Bay, San Pablo Bay, and the Golden Gate San Francisco Bay is a shallow, productive estuary through which water draining approximately forty percent of California, flowing in the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers from the Sierra Nevada mountains, enters the Pacific Ocean. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... California Historical Landmarks (CHLs) are buildings, structures, sites, or places in the state of California that have been determined to have statewide historical significance by meeting at least one of the criteria listed below: approved for designation by the County Board of Supervisors or the City/Town Council in whose... A commemorative plaque, or simply plaque, is a plate of metal attached to a wall or other vertical surface and bearing text in memory of an important figure or event. ...


During its first years in Moraga, the college nearly went bankrupt, but eventually managed to gain financial security when it was bought by Archbishop John Joseph Mitty, for whom a residence hall is now named. During World War II the college was used by the United States Navy for the training of pilots. Gerald Ford was briefly stationed at the school and served as a naval instructor.[1] The navy erected many buildings, including the world's largest indoor pool, but only one, Assumption Hall, remains on the campus as the school had little use for most of the buildings after the war. Saint Mary's continued to be a male-only school until the early 1970s, when it became coeducational. Since then, more women have come to the college and by 2004, 60% of the students were women. For the 2006-2007 school year, the teacher-student ratio was 12:1 with no student-teachers leading classes.[2] John Joseph Mitty (20 January 1884—15 October 1961) was an American Roman Catholic bishop. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USN redirects here. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


There are still roughly two dozen Christian Brothers living and working at the school, and the school presidents have always been brothers. However, recognizing the dwindling number of Christian Brothers, in 2003 the college's bylaws were changed to allow the election of a non-Christian Brother to the presidency if no qualified Brother exists or steps forward. The current president is Brother Ronald Gallagher, FSC who took office in 2005.


Athletics

Saint Mary's Gaels logo
Saint Mary's Gaels logo

The nickname of sports teams at Saint Mary's is the Gaels. Saint Mary's College was once known for its American football team. In 2004, however, after a long period of decline, the football team was finally disbanded after a dismal 1-11 2003 season. Because of Title IX they were required to devote more funds to the school's other growing programs. Saint Mary's is currently well known for its basketball, baseball and women's volleyball teams. Almost all of the Division I varsity teams compete in the WCC. In 2001 the women's basketball team played in the NCAA tournament and advanced to the second round. In March 2005, the men's basketball team also competed in the NCAA championship tournament, though it lost its first game. The men's basketball team has gained national attention for its turnaround, going from two wins in 2001 to 25 in 2005. The women's volleyball team has played in the post season for the past three years, advancing to the "Sweet Sixteen" in 2004. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Gaels are an ethno-linguistic group which spread from Ireland to many parts of Britain, specifically Scotland, the Isle of Man, Wales and Cornwall. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, now known as the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in honor of its principal author, but more commonly known simply as Title IX, is a 76-word United States law enacted on June 23, 1972 that states: No person... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... A view of the playing field at Busch Memorial Stadium, St. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Another successful sports program at Saint Mary's is rugby, which, though not well known in the United States generally, is the oldest athletic club at Saint Mary's. The men's rugby team has enjoyed a rise in the past few years. Revitalized with a new coaching staff and increasing alumni support, the team has finished the season ranked among the top ten teams in the country for three consecutive years, competing with large high-profile schools such as California, Ohio State, and the military academies. A wide variety of intramural and noncompetitive sports are also available on the campus. A BCRFC match at Boston College Rugby football, often just rugby, may refer to a number of sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School in England United Kingdom. ...


Academics

There are presently four schools of study at Saint Mary's: the School of Liberal Arts, the School of Science, the School of Economics and Business Administration (SEBA), and the School of Education. The school also had the School of Extended Education for adults seeking to further their education and other non-traditional undergraduate students, but the program has recently been discontinued. Saint Mary's College prides itself on being a Liberal Arts institution, and the majority of students are in the School of Liberal Arts. However, the most popular major is Business Administration. This is then followed by Communication, Psychology, Liberal and Civic Studies (primarily a major for students seeking to become teachers), and English. In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Communication is a process that allows beings - in particular humans - to exchange information by several methods. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhē, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology...


The School of Science has in the past few years grown as a result of a new science building, Brousseau Hall, which has made the college more appealing to students wishing to major in the life sciences.


As a reflection of the school's liberal arts tradition, most students are allowed to take a broad array of courses to fulfill the college's general education requirement. Two courses in humanities, one each in math and science, two in social sciences, two in religious studies, foreign language as needed, and a diversity course are required of almost all students. However, aside from a common lower division religious studies course, students can take a variety of different courses to fulfill these requirements (for example, a course on U.S. History and a course on Psychology would satisfy the social science requirement). Freshmen and sophomore students who are undecided about their major often take advantage of the wide degree of flexibility offered in the general education requirements.


The school also has graduate programs in fine arts, liberal studies, psychology and business.


Collegiate Seminar

In addition to these general education courses, students must take four Collegiate Seminar or Great Books courses. Although modeled after the academic programs at St. John's College, this program is unique to Saint Mary's College in that only the four courses are required, and that they are integrated into all majors of study (including non-liberal arts majors such as business and science). The four courses must be taken in order, two freshmen year, and the other two during the sophomore, junior or senior years. These classes deal with the most important literature and philosophy of the time, and are meant to include discussion of the text rather than lecture. Most notably, all teachers, even those who generally teach subjects far from literature and philosophy, teach seminar classes. Since all professors teach seminar, one criticism of the program is that the experience varies widely based on which teacher you receive for Seminar. Some are prone to lecture even during discussions and dominate the conversation, while others will remain silent even if the students are not discussing the text. However, the program's advocates argue that Collegiate Seminar encourages students to ask questions about the texts rather than rely on professors to dictate information, and teaches them to logically articulate their thoughts and ideas more than students who do not go through such a program. There have also been discussions for decades about whether the program is too focused on western civilization. Great Books refers to a curriculum and a book list. ... St. ...


Below are the four seminars and a sampling of some of the texts read:


Greek Thought

Roman, Christian & Early Medieval Thought Odysseus and Nausicaä - by Charles Gleyre For other uses, see Odyssey (disambiguation). ... Lisístrata is a 2002 Spanish comedy by Francesc Bellmunt based on a comic book by the gay German cartoonist Ralf König, which in turn is loosely based on the play Lysistrata by Aristophanes. ... Oedipus the King (also known as Oedipus Rex and Oedipus Tyrannos) is a Greek tragedy, written by Sophocles around 427 BC. The play was the second of Sophocles three Theban plays to be produced, but its events occur before those of Oedipus at Colonus or Antigone. ... PLATO was one of the first generalized Computer assisted instruction systems, originally built by the University of Illinois (U of I) and later taken over by Control Data Corporation (CDC), who provided the machines it ran on. ... The Republic is an influential dialogue by Plato, written in the first half of the 4th century BC. This Socratic dialogue mainly is about political philosophy and ethics. ... Meno is a Socratic dialogue written by Plato. ... (The) Apology (of Socrates) is Platos version of the speech given by Socrates as he defends himself against the charges of being a man who corrupted the young, did not believe in the gods, and created new deities. Apology here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the... The Nicomachean Ethics is one of Aristotles great works and discusses virtues. ... Aristotle (Greek: AristotélÄ“s) (384 BC – 322 BC) was a Greek philosopher, a student of Plato and teacher of Alexander the Great. ... Ancient Greek bust. ... Euclid (Greek: ), also known as Euclid of Alexandria, was a Greek mathematician of the Hellenistic period who flourished in Alexandria, Egypt, almost certainly during the reign of Ptolemy I (323 BC-283 BC). ...

Renaissance Thought The Aeneid is a Latin epic written by Vergil in the 1st century BC that tells the legendary story of Aeneas, a Trojan who traveled to Italy where he became the ancestor of the Romans. ... Publius Vergilius Maro (October 15, 70 BC – September 21, 19 BC), later called Virgilius, and known in English as Virgil or Vergil, was a classical Roman poet, the author of the Eclogues, the Georgics and the substantially completed Aeneid, the last being an epic poem of twelve books that became... Lucretius Titus Lucretius Carus (c. ... Meditations is a series of writings by Marcus Aurelius setting forth his ideas on Stoic philosophy. ... Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus (April 26, 121[1] – March 17, 180) was Roman Emperor from 161 to his death. ... Dante shown holding a copy of The Divine Comedy, next to the entrance to Hell, the seven terraces of Mount Purgatory and the city of Florence, in Michelinos fresco. ... Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ... The word Confessions has several meanings: Confessions is a series of books composed by St. ... “Augustinus” redirects here. ... A medieval illumination showing Hildegard von Bingen and the monk Volmar Hildegard von Bingen or Hildegard of Bingen (September 16, 1098 – September 17, 1179) was a German abbess, monastic leader, mystic, author, and composer of music. ... Rumi (born November 29, 1982) is a Persian-Canadian Singer-songwriter and a Photographer who is currently based in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...

Modern Thought Il Principe (The Prince) is a political treatise by the Florentine public servant and political theorist Niccolò Machiavelli. ... Detail of the portrait of Machiavelli, ca 1500, in the robes of a Florentine public official Niccolò Machiavelli (May 3, 1469—June 21, 1527) was an Italian political philosopher during the Renaissance. ... (IPA: , but see spelling and pronunciation below), fully titled (The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote of La Mancha) is an early novel written by Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ... Notes was the only full-length book authored by Thomas Jefferson. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... King Lear and the Fool in the Storm by William Dyce (1806-1864) King Lear is a play by William Shakespeare, considered one of his greatest tragedies, based on the legend of King Lear of Britain. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... First edition of Oroonoko, 1688 Oroonoko is a short novel by Aphra Behn (?1640 – April 16, 1689), published in 1688, concerning the tragic love of its hero, an enslaved African in Surinam in the 1660s, and the authors own experiences in the new South American colony. ... A sketch of Aphra Behn by George Scharf from a portrait believed to be lost. ... Jean-Jacques Rousseaus Discourse on the Origin of Inequality, written for the Académie de Dijon in 1754, is an attempt to answer the question What is the origin of inequality among men, and is it authorized by natural law? Rousseau had won a previous competition with his 1st... Rousseau is a French surname. ... Candide, ou lOptimisme, (Candide, or Optimism) (1759) is a French language picaresque novel by the Enlightenment philosopher Voltaire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Destruction of Leviathan. 1865 engraving by Gustave Doré. Leviathan (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; Twisted; coiled) was a Biblical sea monster referred to in the Old Testament (Psalm 74:13-14; Job 41; Isaiah 27:1). ... “Hobbes” redirects here. ...

Wage-Labor and Capital is a notable essay on economics by Karl Marx, written in 1847. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Charles Darwins Origin of Species (publ. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... A Room of Ones Own is an extended essay by Virginia Woolf. ... For the American childrens writer, see Virginia Euwer Wolff Virginia Woolf (née Stephen) (January 25, 1882 – March 28, 1941) was an English novelist and essayist regarded as one of the foremost modernist literary figures of the twentieth century. ... Beloved is a 1987 novel by Toni Morrison about the legacy of slavery. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ...

Integral Program

The Integral program is a major at Saint Mary's College that incorporates the Seminar method for all of its classes, modeled almost completely after St. John's College. Instead of just taking four classes integrated as part of the general education, Integral majors' entire curriculum, including subjects not traditionally related to the "classics," is done in the Seminar style. For example, math is taught through reading and dicussing Euclid and Galileo, rather than actually completing numerical problem sets. In addition, the Seminar portion of the program, while twice as long (eight semesters vs. four), moves much more quickly and covers more material than the traditional Seminar program. The program does not have any tests, and students average 100-200 pages of reading per night. There are a number of colleges with the name St. ...


Because of the small number of students, those students who are in the program remain with the same class for their entire four years. While many students enjoy the uniqueness of the program and the intimate class setting, others find that either the isolation of the program from the rest of the campus (aside from a small number of electives that are allowed, Integral majors take classes only with other Integral majors) or the intense focus on the classics are not for them. These students may transfer after their sophomore year to another major, with almost all of their general education requirements fulfilled.


While the Integral program is housed in the School of Liberal Arts and Integral majors receive a Bachelor of Arts degree, graduate separately from the other Liberal Arts majors and are the last students to receive their diplomas during the commencement ceremony.


January Term

Another feature of Saint Mary's Academics is January Term, or Jan Term for short. During the month of January students are encouraged to take a class that has nothing to do with their major. This differs from many colleges at which January Term or "Intersession" is optional. Each year, a committee meets to determine the year's Jan Term theme.


Classes during Jan Term range from Shakespeare to Star Trek, and upperclassmen have the option to travel abroad for their January class. There are also optional quarter credit classes for Jan Term and during the semesters, such as digital photography or weight training. All students must take four Jan Term classes to graduate. Jan Term classes are more intensive than a normal fall or spring class. Instead of meeting twice a week or three times a week, they meet four times a week for two hours and 30 minutes. Some of the classes also have optional meetings beyond the class time.


Student Life

Since the 1990s, a wide variety of clubs for students have been founded at the college. They include political clubs such as the Republican, Democratic, and "SMC Progressives" clubs, ethnic clubs such as the Black Student Union (BSU), the Latin American Student Association (LASA), Asia-Pacific American Student Association (APASA), South Asian, Hawaiian, Italian, German and Irish student unions and clubs, which are open to all students regardless of ethnicity, and clubs for students with career interests and hobbies, such as the Intervarsity Christian Fellowship, the accounting club and the chess club. Three new clubs have been started for the 2007-08 school year; the philosophy club, the law club, and Students Reaching Consciousness. Another recently founded organization is Project Green, a student group which promotes sustainable environmental development on campus, through recycling and promotion of fuel conservation and organic food.


The oldest club at Saint Mary's was the speech and debate club, which was founded in the late 1800s, was disbanded in the 1970s, and returned in 2003. In 2006, the club was replaced by a full-fledged forensics program, sponsored by SMC alum ('62) John Macken and headed by a Director of Forensics and full-time faculty member in the Communication Department. In February 2007, the speech and debate club was restarted by current and former members of the forensics program. Now known as the speech force, it sponsors on-campus debate events.


Being a Lasallian school, community service plays a big role on campus. The Catholic Institute for Lasallian Social Action coordinates most service work on campus, and each year students perform many hours of community service. In January of 2006, twenty-five students and two professors travelled to New Orleans to help clean up parks and rebuild homes destroyed by Hurricane Katrina. There was another trip to New Orleans by Saint Mary’s students and faculty in January 2007. The Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools also known as the Christian Brothers or the Lasallian Brothers is a Roman Catholic religious teaching order, founded by John Baptist de la Salle. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ...


The current ASSMC student body president is Connor McNeill, who took office on May 1, 2007. The student government is handled by the Associated Students of Saint Mary's College (ASSMC) and the office of Student Involvement and Leadership. Each class elects a president, vice-president, secretary and treasurer, as well as five student senators. The entire school elects the ASSMC president and the three executive vice-presidents (Administration, Student Affairs and Finance). Voting is now done online, which has not helped to improve the recent trend of extremely low turnout for class elections. There is also some concern over the fact that some offices have had only one candidate or no candidates at all in recent years.


There are several organizations on campus related to the Catholic religion, including the campus ministry and the Catholic Institute for Lasallian Social Action (CILSA). A main purpose for these organizations is to get students involved in community service activities. The campus has a chapel in which mass is held at least once a week. There are several priests who work on campus, some of whom also teach classes. In late 2006 a Catholic youth group known as Xalt! Was started by students. It has weekly meetings in the chapel, with presentations given by professors.


It is not a requirement to be Catholic in order to attend Saint Mary's, and students do not have to take courses in Catholicism (two general Religious Studies classes are required, an introductory course of the Bible as literature and an elective of the student's choosing).


Saint Mary's has an academic support center which helps students who have disabilities and other special needs. There are also offices set up to assist students of color (41% of the student body identifies as an ethnic minority) and first-generation college students (over one-third of the total students).


The college has a weekly newspaper called "The Collegian", a yearbook known as "The Gael," a radio station, KSMC 89.5, and a television station, GaelVision (Channel 19).


The Collegian, one of the oldest college newspapers on the west coast, was first published in 1903 and currently publishes weekly during the academic calendar.


Some student organizations and academic departments sponsor a variety of people from around the world to speak at Saint Mary's College. Some of the most notable people who have spoken at Saint Mary's College are human rights activists Dolores Huerta and Mother Antonia. Dolores C. Huerta (born April 10, 1930) is the co-founder and First Vice President Emeritus of the United Farm Workers of America, AFL-CIO (UFW). ... Mother Antonia, born Mary Clarke in 1926, is a Catholic sister. ...


Off-Campus Activities

Being a relatively small community of mostly long-time elderly residents or families with young children, Moraga is known for its lack of entertainment that caters to college students. [citation needed] As one sign of its suburban setting, Saint Mary's location is distinguished by having a Safeway at the bottom of the hill no matter which way you turn out of campus. However, there are several movie theaters, fast food places and restaurants within a short drive of campus, and the Orinda Theatre is only about ten minutes away. Bianca's Deli & Catering sandwiches are well-regarded by many students as well. [weasel words] Some students also go to nearby larger towns, such as Concord, and Walnut Creek and the cities of Oakland and San Francisco. Moraga Way view toward Moraga Road. ... Safeway Inc. ... Location of Concord in California. ... Walnut Creek is a regional business center and suburb several miles east of Oakland in Contra Costa County, California, USA, in the East Bay region of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ...


Infrastructure

De La Salle Residence Hall and De La Salle quad.
De La Salle Residence Hall and De La Salle quad.

Most freshmen at Saint Marys live on campus. There are six freshmen dorms (Augustine Pallo lived here, Justin, Mitty, De La Salle, Aquinas and Assumption Halls). All freshman dorms are set up "community style," in which two or three students usually share a room and the entire floor shares a central bathroom. Floors are usually separated by sex in freshman halls (because of the shared bathrooms). The only exceptions are Aquinas hall which has students live in suites with their own bathroom, and the first floor of Assumption, which is coeducational with girls’ rooms having their own bathrooms. Aquinas is also open to upperclassmen. Floors are also co-ed in Aquinas. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...


Currently, freshmen living on campus are guaranteed a spot on campus for their second year. Sophomores live in Becket Hall, More Hall, North and South Claeys Halls, and Ageno A, B, and C Halls. All of these halls are "suite" style living and each suite comes with three or four bedrooms, accommodates six students, and has its own bathroom and shower. Floors on suite buildings are co-ed.


Juniors and seniors enter into a housing lottery to determine if they can live on campus. Upperclassmen live in "townhouse" buildings: Ageno East and West, Guerreri East and West, Freitas, Thille, Syufy and Sabatte Halls. All townhouses come with two or three bedrooms (accommodating five to six students), a bathroom and shower, kitchen and living room. Upperclassmen also live off-campus in Moraga, Orinda, Lafayette, and Walnut Creek. Upperclassmen resident advisers, as well as a few other upperclassmen, live in the traditionally freshman and sophomore halls. All residence hall rooms are fully furnished and come with two phones with free long distance, free Internet, and free TV cable outlet. Others often choose to live at home if they are within half an hour of campus. In addition to several student resident advisers, each residence hall also has at least one resident director, who is often a professor and lives in the residence hall.

Br. Alfred Brousseau Hall, where science classes are held.
Br. Alfred Brousseau Hall, where science classes are held.

The majority of classes are held in Galileo, Dante and Garaventa halls, which each have three floors. Most of the professors’ offices are also in these halls. A new science building, known as Brousseau Hall or Gatehouse, was built in 2000. Sichel Hall is a smaller, media-oriented classroom building, and Syufy Performing Arts Hall is the newest building on campus. There are separate classrooms for Fine Arts, Psychology, and the School of Education. The college broke ground on Filippi Academic Hall in May 2006, which will house the School of Education. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 721 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brother Alfred Brousseau Hall (formerly J.C. Gatehouse) Hall at Saint Marys College of California I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 721 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Brother Alfred Brousseau Hall (formerly J.C. Gatehouse) Hall at Saint Marys College of California I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into... Alfred Brousseau (1907-1988) was an American monk, photographer and mathematician and was known mostly as a founder of the Fibonacci Association and as an educator. ...


The cafeteria is called Oliver Hall. The Cassin Student Union features a sandwich shop and grill as well as a coffee shop. Also in the student union are Dryden Hall, a game room/lounge for all students, Delphine Intercultural Center, and the bookstore.


Athletics facilities include McKeon Pavilion (basketball and volleyball), the Saint Mary’s swimming pool, Saint Mary's stadium (soccer and lacrosse), Madigan Gym (Rec sports), Louis Guisto field (baseball), Cotrell Field (softball) as well as an additional soccer field, a rugby field and an intramural field. The college also has a tennis court area and frequently hosts the WCC tennis tournaments. The Power Plant, slightly old and antiquated, is where students work out, but the college hopes to replace it within a few years.[3] There is also a new Cardio Workout Center on the second floor of the Madigan Gym. McKeon Pavilion is a 3,500 seat multi-purpose arena in Moraga, California. ...


Two other important buildings are the Soda Activity Center and the Lefevre Theatre, where various events are held. All buildings on campus except Assumption Hall are named after an important person in the Catholic religion or a person important to the school.


Semester Schedules

St. Mary's has a "4-1-4" system, similar to Middlebury College: Fall semester, January Term, and Spring Semester. Students are given three weeks off for Christmas following Fall semester, one week off following Jan-Term (which many students use to visit friends at other colleges, many of whom do not have a week off in January), and one week in the middle of Spring semester for Easter. Fall semester usually begins the Monday before Labor Day and runs through the second week of December. Graduation is usually the third or fourth week of May. St. Mary's also does not have a "week of preparation" for finals. The school goes directly from a regular class schedule to its finals. Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Christmas is an annual holiday that celebrates the birth of Jesus. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Easter, the Sunday of... Labour Day (or Labor Day) is an annual holiday that resulted from efforts of the labour union movement, to celebrate the economic and social achievements of workers. ...


Classes meet for one hour on Monday, Wednesday and Friday or for an hour and a half on Tuesdays and Thursdays. However, beginning in the fall semester of 2006, classes midday on Monday and Friday were changed to an hour and a half, freeing up time during the middle of the day on Wednesday for what the college is calling "community time," during which events (guest speakers, cultural events, concerts, BBQs, special masses, etc.) can be scheduled by various campus groups (student, faculty or staff). No classes are held during community time and all offices are closed so that the entire campus has the opportunity to attend these events if they choose.


Transportation

Saint Mary's can sometimes be difficult to find as no major highways or freeways connect Moraga with the rest of the Bay Area. Two-lane roads connecting Moraga to Orinda to the northwest and Lafayette to the northeast are the main access points, although Moraga can also be reached by way of a long, narrow and winding road through the Oakland Hills connecting it with Oakland. Orinda may be Orinda, California Orinda (pseudonym) used by the English poet Katherine Philips (1631-1664) ... Lafayette, LaFayette, or La Fayette may refer to: // Gilbert du Motier, marquis de La Fayette (Marquis de Lafayette), French general and revolutionary (sometimes referred to as the Marquis de la Fayette) Marie-Madeleine Pioche de la Vergne, comtesse de la Fayette (Madame de Lafayette), French author Elliston-Lafayette, Virginia La... Oakland hills is a common informal name for that section of the Berkeley Hills which extends along the eastern side of Oakland, California. ... Oakland is the name of several places in the United States of America: Oakland, Alabama Oakland, California (The best-known city with this name) Oakland, Florida Oakland, Maine Oakland, Maryland Oakland, Michigan Oakland, Missouri Oakland, Nebraska Oakland, New Jersey Oakland, Oklahoma Oakland, Oregon Oakland, Pennsylvania Oakland, Rhode Island Oakland, Tennessee...


The Contra Costa County Connection provides two buses that serve the campus. Students currently can ride these lines for free, but must pay to use any other line in the system (unless transferring). Both bus lines make stops at local BART stations. Students can take BART to Oakland, Berkeley, downtown San Francisco and other parts of the Bay Area including San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport. A westbound BART train with aerodynamic design A car in downtown San Francisco. ... Aerial view looking west over downtown Oakland, Lake Merritt and the Port of Oakland in the upper left portion of the image. ... Berkeley is a city in the San Francisco Bay Area of northern United States. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... FAA diagram of SFO “SFO” redirects here. ... Oakland International Airport (IATA: OAK, ICAO: KOAK, FAA LID: OAK), also known as Metropolitan Oakland International Airport, is an airport located 4 miles (6 km) south of downtown Oakland in Alameda County, California. ...


Many students and faculty who live on campus and do not have cars believe that the public transportation for Saint Mary's College is not good enough. [citation needed] [weasel words] Over the past couple of years students and administrators have attempted to create a shuttle system for students to use, but have had no success. [citation needed]


Notable Alumni

The chapel on campus hosts many weddings.

Some of Saint Mary's notable alumni are as follows: the two numbers after their name are the last two digits of the year that they graduated (in the twentieth century unless otherwise noted).[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (771 × 1156 pixel, file size: 215 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Umbrella Saint Marys College of... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (771 × 1156 pixel, file size: 215 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Umbrella Saint Marys College of...

  • Joseph Alioto '37, (dec.) former mayor of San Francisco
  • Brother Mel Anderson '51, served as president of Saint Mary's College for 27 years from 1971 to 1997. He continues to live on campus and is a resident director. (Allegedly, when the board asked him to retire, he told them "Old brothers never retire! We just die!")
  • Brother Alfred Brousseau '28 (dec.) mathematician, widely-renowned authority on the Fibonacci numbers. The recently built science building is named after him.
  • Walter Englert '74, Omar and Althea Hoskins Professor of Classical Studies and Humanities at Reed College
  • Laura (Garcia)) Cannon '91, anchorwoman, NBC-11
  • Jackson Graves '1872, (dec.) first graduate, Los Angeles historian
  • Shirley Griffin '93, Executive Vice President, Wells Fargo Bank
  • James Guyette '67, President & CEO, Rolls-Royce of North America, Inc.
  • Robert Hass '63, Poet Laureate of the United States, 1995-97
  • Jack Henning '38, former U.S. Ambassador to New Zealand; California labor leader
  • Ken Hofmann '45, owner, Oakland Athletics; developer
  • Harry Hooper 1907, (dec.) National Baseball Hall of Fame
  • J.J. Jelincic, President of the California State Employees Association
  • John Henry Johnson '53, Pro Football Hall of Fame
  • Bob Ladouceur '89, head football coach, De La Salle High (Concord), holder of longest high school winning streak (151 games)
  • Herman Lujan '58, provost, Cal State University, Los Angeles
  • Manuel Lujan '50, former Secretary of the Interior, 1989-1993; Congressman (NM), 1969-1989
  • Tom Lyons '50, activist, Catholic Relief Services; detention minister
  • Ronald McArthur '49, founder, St. Thomas Aquinas College
  • John Macken '62 scientist, inventor with numerous patents. Developed LaserCraft technology. Primary sponsor of the Saint Mary’s speech and debate team.
  • Tony Martin '35, entertainer; member, Hollywood Walk of Fame
  • Brother Leo Meehan '08 (dec.), famed academian; author; orator
  • Tom Meschery '61, pro and college basketball great; teacher and poet
  • George P. Miller '12 (dec.), Member of Congress from California, 1945-1973
  • Nicholas Moore '63, Chairman (Retired), PriceWaterhouseCoopers
  • Don Perata '67, Majority Leader & Senator, California State, 1998-
  • Dr. Andrea Pernell-Sawicki '83, Surgeon; member, SMC Athletics Hall of Fame
  • Quentin Reynolds '29 (dec.), former Chairman, CEO, Safeway Stores, Inc.
  • Greg Reyes '84, Chairman & CEO, Brocade Communication; ownership group, San Jose Sharks
  • George Schmitt '65, President (Retired), Omnipoint Communication & AirTouch International
  • Raymond Syufy, Sr. '40 (dec.), Founder, Century Theaters
  • Brother Jerome West '40 (dec.), Christian Brothers Provincial; founder of 3 high schools. The building in which the registration office is located is named after him.
  • Herman Wedemeyer '49 (dec.), football star; Hawaii legislator; original cast of "Hawaii 5-0"
  • Dr. Carl Wu '74, distinguished cancer researcher, National Institute of Health

Joseph Lawrence Alioto (b. ... Alfred Brousseau (1907-1988) was an American monk, photographer and mathematician and was known mostly as a founder of the Fibonacci Association and as an educator. ... Leonardo of Pisa (1170s or 1180s – 1250), also known as Leonardo Pisano, Leonardo Bonacci, Leonardo Fibonacci, or, most commonly, simply Fibonacci, was an Italian mathematician, considered by some the most talented mathematician of the Middle Ages. ... Reed College is a private, independent liberal arts college located in Portland, Oregon. ... Robert L. Hass (b. ... Harry Hooper Baseball card issued by American Tobacco Company, 1912. ... Joseph John Jelincic, Jr. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... John Henry Johnson (born November 24, 1929 in Waterproof, Louisiana) was an American football player. ... Bob Ladoucer is a religion teacher and the head football coach at De La Salle High School. ... Categories: People stubs | 1928 births | U.S. Secretaries of the Interior ... Tony Martin (born December 25, 1912) is an American actor and traditional pop singer. ... Tom Meschery (born October 26, 1938 Harbin Manchuria China - ) was a forward with a 10 year career from 1962 to 1971. ... George Paul Miller (January 15, 1891 - December 29, 1982) was a U.S. Representative from California. ... Nicholas Moore (16 November 1918 – 1986) was an English poet, associated with the New Apocalyptics in the 1940s, who later dropped out of the literary world. ... Don Perata (born April 30, 1945) is a California Democratic politician, who is the current President Pro Tempore of the California State Senate. ... Quentin James Reynolds (1902–1965), born in New York City, was a journalist and World War II war correspondent. ... Gregory Reyes is the former CEO of Brocade Communications Systems. ... Herman John Wedemeyer (born May 20, 1924 in Hilo, Hawaii; died January 25, 1999 in Honolulu, Hawaii) was an American actor, football player, and politician. ...

References

  1. ^ Gael Lore :: Mission and History. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  2. ^ Undergraduate Programs & Admissions :: Prospective Students. Retrieved on 2007-04-02.
  3. ^ McAvoy, Julie. "President Gallagher reveals upcoming changes", The Collegian, 2007-03-13. Retrieved on 2007-03-19. 
  4. ^ Notable Alumni of Saint Mary's College of California. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
SAINT MARYS COLLEGE, CALIFORNIA Period of Record Daily Climate Summary (10993 words)
SAINT MARYS COLLEGE, CALIFORNIA Period of Record Daily Climate Summary
Daily Records for station 047661 SAINT MARYS COLLEGE state: ca For temperature and precipitation, multi-day accumulations are not considered either for records or averages.
The year given is the year of latest occurrence.
Saint Mary’s College of California - Review of Admission, Undergraduate Program, and Student Life (852 words)
Saint Mary’s College of California is a rather small, private, Catholic school located in the town of Moraga, California, and is home to over 2,400 undergraduate students and approximately 1,150 graduate and part-time professional students.
Admission to Saint Mary’s College is not terrifically competitive numerically, however, the students who do apply tend to be very motivated and academically successful in the past.
Saint Mary’s College has a very manageable student to faculty ratio of 12:1, and the family values element of the school certainly applies to the professors.
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