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Encyclopedia > Saint Margaret of Scotland
Saint Margaret
Queen
Born c. 1045, Castle Reka, Southern Hungary
Died 16 November 1093, Edinburgh Castle, Midlothian
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church; Anglican Church
Canonized 1251
Major shrine Dunfermline Abbey
Feast 16 November
Attributes Queen, reading
Patronage Dunfermline; Scotland; Anglo-Scottish relations
Saints Portal

Saint Margaret (c. 104516 November 1093 AD), was the sister of Edgar Ætheling, the short-ruling and uncrowned Anglo-Saxon king of England. She married Malcolm III, King of Scots, becoming his Queen consort. is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Donald III of Scotland comes to the throne of Scotland. ... The castle dominates the Edinburgh skyline as seen here from Princes Street Gardens Edinburgh Castle is an ancient fortress which, from its position atop Castle Rock, dominates the sky-line of the city of Edinburgh, and is Scotlands second most visited tourist attraction, after the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and... The central portions of the old province of Lothian in Scotland, centred around Edinburgh, became known as Midlothian, Scotland. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... This article is about the process of declaring saints. ... Shrine is also used as a conventional translation of the Japanese Jinja. ... Dunfermline Abbey and Church - illustration from Cassells History of England circa 1902 Dunfermline Abbey is the remains of a great Benedictine abbey founded in 1070 by Queen Margaret, wife of Malcolm Canmore and granddaughter of Edmund Ironside, King of England. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... This article is about the country. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Events Emperor Go-Reizei ascends the throne of Japan. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Donald III of Scotland comes to the throne of Scotland. ... Look up AD, ad-, and ad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Edgar Ætheling[1], also known as Edgar the Outlaw, (c. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (anglicised Malcolm III) (1030x1038–13 November 1093) was King of Scots. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

Early life

The daughter of the English prince Edward the Exile, son of Edmund Ironside, Margaret was probably born in Hungary. The provenance of her mother, Agatha, is disputed. Edward the Exile (1016 – February 1057), son of King Edmund Ironside and of Ealdgyth, gained the name of Exile from his life spent mostly far from the England of his forefathers. ... Edmund II or Eadmund II (c. ... Agatha was the wife of Edward the Exile (heir to the throne of England) and mother of Edgar Ætheling, Saint Margaret of Scotland and Cristina of England. ...


According to popular belief, Margaret was a very serious person, so much that no one ever could recall seeing her laugh or smile.[citation needed]


When her uncle, Edward the Confessor, the French-speaking Anglo-Saxon King of England, died in 1066, she was living in England where her brother, Edgar Ætheling, had decided to make a claim to the vacant throne. St Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... For the book, see 1066 And All That. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Edgar Ætheling[1], also known as Edgar the Outlaw, (c. ...


According to tradition, after the conquest of the Kingdom of England by the Normans the widowed Agatha decided to leave Northumberland with her children and return to the Continent, but a storm drove their ship to Scotland where they sought the protection of King Malcolm III. The spot where she is said to have landed is known today as St. Margaret's Hope, near the village of North Queensferry. Malcolm was probably a widower, and was no doubt attracted by the prospect of marrying one of the few remaining members of the Anglo-Saxon royal family. The marriage of Malcolm and Margaret soon took place and was followed by several invasions of Northumberland by the Scottish king, probably in support of the claims of his brother-in-law Edgar. These, however, had little result beyond the devastation of the province. Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Norman conquests in red. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ... This article is about the country. ... Máel Coluim mac Donnchada (anglicised Malcolm III) (1030x1038–13 November 1093) was King of Scots. ... North Queensferry is a town in Fife, Scotland, on the Firth of Forth, between the Forth Bridge and the Forth Road Bridge. ... Alternate uses: see widow (typesetting). ... The Anglo-Saxons refers collectively to the groups of Germanic tribes who achieved dominance in southern Britain from the mid-5th century, forming the basis for the modern English nation. ... Northumberland is a county in the North East of England. ...


Family

Margaret and Malcolm had eight children, six sons and two daughters:

  1. Edward, killed 1093.
  2. Edmund of Scotland
  3. Ethelred, abbot of Dunkeld
  4. King Edgar of Scotland
  5. King Alexander I of Scotland
  6. King David I of Scotland
  7. Edith of Scotland, also called Matilda, married King Henry I of England
  8. Mary of Scotland, married Eustace III of Boulogne

Her husband, Malcolm III, and their eldest son, Edward, were killed in a fight against the English at Alnwick Castle on 13 November 1093. Her son Edmund was left with the task of telling his mother of their deaths. Margaret was ill, and she died on 16 November 1093, three days after the deaths of her husband and eldest son. Edmund of Scotland (Etmond mac Maíl Choluim) was king of Scotland between 1094 and 1097, in a joint rule with his uncle Donald III. He was the son of Malcolm III and his second wife St Margaret. ... Ethelred was the son of King Máel Coluim III and his wife Margaret, the third oldest of the latter and the probable sixth oldest of the former. ... Dunkeld (Dùn Chailleann in Scottish Gaelic) is a small town in Strathtay, Perth and Kinross, Scotland, approximately 15 miles north of Perth on the A9 road into the Scottish Highlands and on the opposite (north) side of the River Tay from the Victorian village of Birnam. ... Edgar of Scotland (Etgair mac Maíl Coluim) (1074 – January 8, 1107 ), was king of Scotland from 1097 to 1107. ... Alexander I (Alasdair mac Maíl Coluim) (c. ... Linguistic division in early twelfth century Scotland. ... Edith of Scotland, (c. ... Henry I (c. ... Eustace III, was a count of Boulogne, successor to his father Count Eustace II of Boulogne. ... Alnwick Castle, from the east, across the pastures and the River Aln Alnwick Castle is a castle and stately home in Alnwick, Northumberland, England, United Kingdom and the residence of the Duke of Northumberland, built immediately following the Norman conquest, and renovated and remodelled a number of times. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Donald III of Scotland comes to the throne of Scotland. ... Edmund of Scotland (Etmond mac Maíl Choluim) was king of Scotland between 1094 and 1097, in a joint rule with his uncle Donald III. He was the son of Malcolm III and his second wife St Margaret. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Margaret and Scottish culture

Malcolm and Margaret as depicted in a 16th century armorial
Malcolm and Margaret as depicted in a 16th century armorial

It is notable that while Malcolm's children by his first wife Ingibjörg all bore Gaelic names, those of Margaret all bore non-Gaelic names. Later tradition often has it that Margaret was responsible for starting the demise of Gaelic culture in the lowlands and Scotland in general. The forenames of Margaret's children were probably intended to bear Margaret's claims to the Anglo-Saxon throne in the period before permanent Norman rule was recognized, and so the first group of children were given Anglo-Saxon royal names. In fact, in Gaeldom, she has usually not been considered a saint, but referred to as Mairead/Maighread nam Mallachd: Accursed Margaret[citation needed]. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Ingibiorg Finnsdottir (Standard Old Norse: Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir) was a daughter of Earl Finn Arnesson and Bergljot Halvdansdottir, a niece of Kings of Norway Olaf Haraldsson (Saint Olaf) and Harald Sigurdsson (Harald Hardraade). ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... Lowland-Highland divide The Scottish Lowlands (a Ghalldachd, meaning roughly the non-Gaelic region, in Gaelic), although not officially a geographical area of the country, in normal usage is generally meant to include those parts of Scotland not referred to as the Highlands (or Gàidhealtachd), that is, everywhere due... Geographic distribution of Gaelic-speakers in Scotland in 2001. ... Saints redirects here. ...


Moreover, it is unlikely that they were originally seen as successors to the Scottish throne, as Malcolm had other (grown) sons and brothers who were much more likely to succeed him. Furthermore, Margaret freely patronized Gaelic churchmen, and Gaelic remained an expanding language in northern Britain. Nevertheless, these sons regarded their Anglo-Saxon heritage as important, as the latter was one of the main devices for legitimizing the authority of the Scottish kings in English-speaking Lothian and northern England.


Veneration

Margaret was canonised in 1251 by Pope Innocent IV on account of her personal holiness and fidelity to the Church. She would personally serve orphans and the poor every day before she herself would eat, and would rise at midnight to attend church services every night. The Roman Catholic Church formerly marked the feast of Saint Margaret of Scotland on 10 June, but the date was transferred to 16 November, the actual day of her death, in the 1969 revision of the Roman Catholic calendar of saints.[1] Queen Margaret University (founded in 1875), Queen Margaret Union, Queen Margaret Hospital (just outside Dunfermline), North Queensferry, South Queensferry, Queen Margaret Academy (Ayr) and several streets in Dunfermline are named after her. This article discusses the process of declaring saints. ... Events First Shepherds Crusade Births Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Castile - Ferdinand III, the Saint King of Castile and Leon (reigned from 1217 to 1252) Categories: 1251 ... Pope Innocent IV (Manarola, 1180/90 – Naples, December 7, 1254), born Sinibaldo de Fieschi, Pope from 1243 to 1254, belonged to the feudal nobility of Liguria, the Fieschi, counts of Lavagna. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the General Roman Calendar as it was in 1955, see Traditional Catholic Calendar. ... Queen Margaret University (formerly Queen Margaret University College) is a university in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... This page is about one of the students unions at the University of Glasgow, and not the students union for Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... North Queensferry is a town in Fife, Scotland, on the Firth of Forth, between the Forth Bridge and the Forth Road Bridge. ... South Queensferry seen from the Forth Road Bridge. ... Queen Margaret Academy (Scottish Gaelic: )is a Roman Catholic secondary school in the south of Ayr in southwest Scotland. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ...

Preceded by
Ingibiorg Finnsdottir
Queen consort of Scotland
1070 - 1093
Succeeded by
Sybilla de Normandy

Ingibiorg Finnsdottir (Standard Old Norse: Ingibjörg Finnsdóttir) was a daughter of Earl Finn Arnesson and Bergljot Halvdansdottir, a niece of Kings of Norway Olaf Haraldsson (Saint Olaf) and Harald Sigurdsson (Harald Hardraade). ... The List of Queens of Scotland concerns the Kingdom of Scotland, which was first unified as a state by Kenneth I of Scotland in 843. ... Events Hereward the Wake begins a Saxon revolt in the Fens of eastern England. ... // Events Donald III of Scotland comes to the throne of Scotland. ... Sybilla de Normandy (1092- 12 July/13 July 1122) was queen consort of Alexander I of Scotland. ...

References

  1. ^ Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 126

Reading

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition article "St Margaret", a publication now in the public domain.
  • Chronicles of the Picts and Scots (Edinburgh, 1867) edited 1876, by W. F. Skene; and W. F. Skene, Celtic Scotland (Edinburgh).
  • Acta SS., II, June, 320; John Capgrave, Nova Legenda Angliae (London, 1515), 225
  • William of Malmesbury, Gesta Regum in P.L., CLXXIX, also in Rolls Series, ed. *William Stubbs (London, 1887-9)
  • Richard Challoner, Britannia Sancta, I (London, 1745), 358
  • Alban Butler, Lives of the Saints, 10 June
  • Richard Stanton, Menology of England and Wales (London, 1887), 544
  • William Forbes-Leith, Life of St. Margaret. . . (London, 1885)
  • Madan, The Evangelistarium of St. Margaret in Academy (1887)
  • Alphons Bellesheim, History of the Catholic Church in Scotland, tr. Blair, III (Edinburgh, 1890), 241-63.
  • Parsons, John Carmi. Medieval Mothering, 1996

Encyclopædia Britannica, the eleventh edition The Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition (1910–1911) is perhaps the most famous edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. ... The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... William Forbes Skene (1809–1892), Scottish historian and antiquary, was the second son of Sir Walter Scotts friend, James Skene (1775–1864), of Rubislaw, near Aberdeen, and was born on June 7 1809. ... Acta Sanctorum (Acts of the Saints) is an encyclopedic text in 68 folio volumes of documents examining the lives of Christian saints, in essence a critical hagiography, which is organised according to each saints feast day. ... John Capgrave (1393 - 1464) was an English historian and theologian. ... William of Malmesbury (c. ... The Rolls Series, official title The Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland during the Middle Ages, is a major collection of Britich and Irish historical materials and primary sources, published in the second half of the nineteenth century. ... William Stubbs (June 21, 1825 - April 22, 1901) was an English historian and Bishop of Oxford. ... Richard Challoner (1691-1781), was an English Roman Catholic bishop, a leading figure of English Catholicism during the greater part of the eighteenth century. ... Alban Butler (October 24 NS, 1710 - St-Omer, France May 15, 1773), English Roman Catholic priest and hagiographer, was born at Appletree Northamptonshire. ... For the nineteenth century politician, see Richard H. Stanton. ...

See also

St Margarets Chapel, Edinburgh St. ... The castle dominates the Edinburgh skyline as seen here from Princes Street Gardens Edinburgh Castle is an ancient fortress which, from its position atop Castle Rock, dominates the sky-line of the city of Edinburgh, and is Scotlands second most visited tourist attraction, after the Kelvingrove Art Gallery and...

External links

  • University of Pittsburgh: Margaret of Scotland
  • "St. Margaret of Scotland". Catholic Encyclopedia. (1913). 
Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Saint Margaret of Scotland - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (937 words)
The daughter of the English prince Edward the Exile or "Edward Outremer", son of Edmund Ironside, Margaret was probably born in Hungary.
Margaret was ill, and she died on 16 November, 1093, three days after the deaths her husband and her eldest son.
Nevertheless, the descendents of Margaret did, after the death of Duncan I, through the assistance of the Norman establishment of England, succeed Malcolm; and these sons regarded their Anglo-Saxon heritage as important, as the latter was one of the main devices for legitimizing the authority of the Scottish kings in Lothian and northern England.
Saint Margaret’s | Our Patron - St. Margaret (795 words)
Under Queen Margaret's leadership the Rite of the Celebration of the Mass was brought under standardized norms, the vernacular of the Mass was changed from the many dialects of Gaelic spoken throughout Scotland to the unifying Latin, the Scots began to receive Communion regularly, and the observance of Lent was improved.
In 1250, Queen Margaret was canonized by Innocent IV, and her relics were translated on 19 June, 1259, to a new shrine, the base of which is still visible beyond the modern east wall of her restored chapel.
Margaret was loved by the poor, especially orphans to whom she was particularly attached in personal care and through the unceasing distribution of alms.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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