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Encyclopedia > Saint Joseph's University

Saint Joseph's University Université Saint-Joseph (USJ) is a private higher institute of education founded by the Jesuits in 1875 in Beirut, Lebanon, known for its school of medicine and its hospital, Hôtel-Dieu de France. ...

Motto “The Hawk Will Never Die”
Tagline Spirit / Intellect / Purpose
Established September 15, 1851
Type Private
Religious affiliation Roman Catholic (Jesuit)
Endowment $132.3 million
President Timothy R. Lannon, S.J.
Staff 815
Undergraduates 4,250 (2006)
Postgraduates 2,770 (2006)
Location Philadelphia
Lower Merion Twp
, Pennsylvania, USA
Campus Urban, 65 acres (263,000 m²)
Colors Crimson and grey            
Mascot Hawks
Website http://www.sju.edu
Philadelphia Portal

Saint Joseph's University is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic university located partially in Philadelphia and partially in Lower Merion Township in Pennsylvania, United States. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... A tagline is a variant of a branding slogan typically used in marketing materials and advertising. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Lower Merion Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and part of the Pennsylvania Main Line. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Crimson (disambiguation). ... Achromatic redirects here. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Hawk is the mascot for Saint Joseph’s University. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Portal. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Lower Merion Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and part of the Pennsylvania Main Line. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ...


The school was founded in 1851 as Saint Joseph's College by the Society of Jesus. As of 2007, Saint Joseph's University is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities. Saint Joseph's University educates over 7,000 students each year in over 40 undergraduate majors, 10 special-study options, 20 study abroad programs, 52 graduate study areas, and an Ed.D. in Educational Leadership. The school is one of 142 nationwide with a Phi Beta Kappa chapter and AACSB business school accreditation. 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities or AJCU is an American voluntary service organization based in Washington, D.C. whose mission is to serve its member institutions, the 28 colleges and universities in the United States administered by the Society of Jesus. ... The Doctor of Education degree (Ed. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of Scotts site can be found at Degree programmes delivered by Management Schools. ...


Saint Joseph's has grown in physical size and national scope in the new millennium. This has culminated in the University being ranked 8th among Best Universities-Master’s (North) in U.S. News and World Report's "America's Best Colleges 2008" edition. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

Background

History

On the morning of September 15, 1851, some thirty young men gathered in the courtyard outside Old St. Joseph's Church, located in Willing's Alley off Walnut and Fourth Street, one block from Independence Hall. After attending High Mass and reciting the Veni Creator in the church, these young men were assigned to their classes in a building adjacent to the church. That September morning marked the beginning of a rich and exciting history for Saint Joseph's University. is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Old St. ... Independence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. ...


As far back as 1741, a Jesuit College in Philadelphia had been proposed and planned by Rev. Joseph Greaton, S.J., the first resident pastor of Saint Joseph's Church. The suppression of the Jesuits (1773-1814) and lack of human and financial resources delayed for over a hundred years the realization of Fr. Greaton's plans for a college. Credit for founding the college is given to Rev. Felix Barbelin, S.J., who served as its first president. He, along with four other Jesuits, formed the first faculty of Saint Joseph's College. Before the end of the first academic year, the enrollment rose from fewer than forty to ninety-seven students. In the following year (1852), when the college received its charter of incorporation from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the enrollment grew to 126 students. // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius...


The University was also housed on Fibert Street and on Stiles Street before moving to its current location on City Avenue in 1927.


In the fall of 1970, the undergraduate day college opened its doors to women, bringing to an end its tradition as an all-male institution. Saint Joseph's was recognized as a university by the Secretary of Education of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania on July 24, 1978. The corporate charter was formally changed to reflect university status on December 27, 1978.


Recent developments and future plans

In 2005, the University agreed to purchase the Merion campus of neighboring Episcopal Academy. Once completed, the acquisition will add 38 acres containing 52 classrooms, eight laboratories, 113 offices, and 14.5 acres of playing fields. Subsequent to the announcement of the agreement, alumnus James J. Maguire '58 donated $10 million to help fund the purchase, and Saint Joseph's officials announced that the tract will be known as the James J. Maguire '58 Campus once the University takes possession of it, expected to be 2008 or 2009. Maguire's gift was later matched by a donation of the same amount by Brian Duperreault '69; the two donations are the largest single alumni gifts in Saint Joseph's history.[2] The Episcopal Academy is a private, coeducational secondary school with students from Pre-K to 12th grade. ...


In addition to the Maguire Campus, the University is currently building a large state-of-the-art parking facility on 54th Street, next to Borgia Hall. The facility will provide enclosed parking for students, faculty, staff and basketball game attendees, as well as two first-floor restaurants. The University Bookstore, which is currently located in the middle of campus in Simpson Hall, will be moving to the parking facility's first floor when the building is completed, slated for October 2007.[3]


On October 6th, 2007, groundbreaking began on the new Saint Joseph's University Fieldhouse expansion and renovation project. The facility will be renamed the Michael J. Hagan upon completion of the project that will include a brand new east wing and south entrance. Flannigan Hall and Barry Annex will be demolished during Fall 2007 to make room for the new wing. Barry Hall will remain standing and renovated into the new Athletic Department office building. The project includes a brand new hall of fame area, basketball suite, varsity locker rooms and offices as well as a full concourse with concessions that allows access to the arena from 54th and Overbrook. The expansion will also add an additional 1000 person occupancy capacitiy to the arena.


Academics

College of Arts and Sciences

The goal of education in the College of Arts and Sciences is to "stimulate the mind to think more critically and more imaginatively; the heart to feel more compassionately; and the spirit to be more attentive to the intimations of the divine in the world." The College of Arts and Sciences is comprised of 16 departments, offering a wide array of majors as well as many interdisciplinary minors. These programs include actuarial science, aerospace studies (Air Force ROTC), Asian studies, biology, chemistry, computer science, criminal justice, economics, education, English, environmental science, European studies, fine and performing arts, foreign languages and literatures, gender studies, history, interdisciplinary health services, international relations, labor studies, Latin American studies, mathematics, Medieval and Renaissance Studies, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology, and theology.


Graduate degrees in the College of Arts and Sciences include biology, computer science, criminal justice, education, gerontological services, health administration, health education, nurse anesthesia, psychology, public safety and environmental protection, training and organizational development, and writing studies. Many of the programs offer post-master's certificates in a variety of areas. The College also offers a doctoral degree in education.


Erivan K. Haub School of Business

The mission of the Haub School of Business is to "support the aspirations of students to master the fundamental principles and practices of business in a diverse, ethical, and globally aware context. All degree programs stress the development of the knowledge, skills, abilities, and values that prepare our graduates to assume leadership roles in organizations of all sizes and types."


The HSB is ranked 23rd among the nation's part-time MBA program and the best in Philadelphia, according to a 2007 U.S. News and World Report survey. The MBA program offers concentrations in Accounting, Decision and System Sciences, Finance, Health and Medical Services, Human Resource Management, International Business, International Marketing, Management, and Marketing. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Undergraduate programs include Accounting, Decision and System Sciences, Finance, Food Marketing, International Business and Marketing, Management, Marketing, and Pharmaceutical Marketing.


In addition to the MBA program, HSB offers graduate degrees in Human Resource Management, Financial Services, International Marketing, Decision & System Sciences, an Executive MBA, Executive MS in Food Marketing, Executive MBAs in Food Marketing and Pharmaceutical Marketing, and a number of China Programs. The school also offers post-MBA certificate programs


University College

The University College is Saint Joseph's undergraduate continuing studies division. As early as 1852, the administration at Saint Joseph's organized educational opportunities for adults. A regular series of non-credit courses in several areas was offered beginning in 1942, and beginning in 1946, the Evening Division, which would eventually be known as University College, was formally established. In addition to traditional on-campus programs and majors, University College offers accelerated degree programs in English and professional communications, health administration, and leadership. Adult students wishing to pursue a degree during the day take advantage of the division's bridge program, and professionals in certain areas can take part in off-campus programs in professional communications, criminal justice, food marketing, and purchasing and acquisitions.


Campus

Saint Joseph's University is located on City Avenue, which splits the University between the northwestern edge of Philadelphia and Lower Merion Township. Its 65 acres are concentrated from Cardinal Avenue to 52nd Street and Overbrook Avenue to City Avenue, but also includes individual buildings separate from the main campus. City Avenue is the local name of a section of U.S. Route 1, and is a major commercial and residential arterial street that divides the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and the suburban communities of Bala Cynwyd, Merion Station, & Penn Wynne which are all located in Lower Merion Township and... Lower Merion Township is a township in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania and part of the Pennsylvania Main Line. ...


Buildings

Saint Joseph's most recognizable building is Barbelin Hall, opened in 1927 when the University moved to its current location. The hall is known for its Gothic architecture, particularly the gargoyles that mark the quadrangle and the tall, four-spired bell tower that can be seen from miles away. The bell tower that sits atop Barbelin served as the University's logo for several years and is located upon Philadelphia's highest geograhical location. The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ...


Barbelin, and adjacent Lonergan Hall, are one of six dedicated classroom buildings on campus. Other class buildings include John R. Post Hall, Mandeville Hall, Bellarmine Hall, the Science Center, and Boland Hall, the University's fine arts building. Classes are also held in Claver Hall, the home of the Honors Program; McShain Hall, a residence center; and the ELS building for international students.


The University has three dormitory-style residence halls: McShain, Sourin Hall, and LaFarge Residence Center. Students also live in several campus houses, including Barry, Flanigan, Hogan, Jordan, Quirk, St. Albert's, St. Mary's, Simpson, Sullivan, Tara, and Xavier Halls and the Morris Quadrangle Townhouses. Apartment-style living is available on campus at Ashwood, Borgia, Merion Gardens, Rashford, and Wynnewood. Rashford and Borgia Halls are the newest campus residences, opened in 2004.


Many of the campuses houses are located on Lapsley Lane, which features a number of campus offices housed in the former homes of Lower Merion residents. These include Bronstein Hall, Regis Hall (Office of the President), and St. Thomas Hall.


Athletics

Saint Joseph's University is home of the Hawks, the University's athletic program. It fields teams in 20 varsity sports in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The Hawks are part of to the Atlantic Ten Conference; because the Atlantic 10 does not support men's lacrosse, the Hawks play that sport in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. Along with the Atlantic 10, Saint Joseph's is a member of the Philadelphia Big 5, enhancing rivalries with Temple University and Villanova University. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Hawk is the mascot for Saint Joseph’s University. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly on the United States eastern seaboard. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... The Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference (MAAC, pronounced mack) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Five and its variants, see Big five (disambiguation). ... For the private Christian university in Tennessee, see Tennessee Temple University. ... Villanova University is a private university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. ...


The PERFECT SEASON. In 2004, the Saint Joseph's men's basketball team finished with a undefeated season suffering their only losses to Xavier University and Oklahoma State. Despite the two losses, the school still hung a banner up in the Fieldhouse declaring 2004 a PERFECT SEASON. [1] Xavier University is a private, Jesuit, co-educational Catholic university in the United States located in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Oklahoma State University, located in Stillwater, Oklahoma, is an institution of higher learning founded in 1890 as a land-grant university, known as Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College (Oklahoma A&M). ...


The Saint Joseph's basketball teams play most of their home games at Alumni Memorial Fieldhouse on the school's campus, while some games are played at the Palestra on the campus of the University of Pennsylvania. Saint Joseph's University also offers 30 intramural and recreational programs. Their historic rival has been the Explorers of La Salle University, Their recent major rival, especially in men's basketball, is Villanova University (known locally as the Holy War). Alumni Memorial Fieldhouse is a 3,200-seat multi-purpose arena in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... For the Greek and Roman sports arenas, see Palaestra The Palestra is a historic arena and the home gym of the University of Pennsylvania Quakers mens and womens basketball teams, volleyball teams, wrestling team, and Philadelphia Big 5 mens basketball. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... La Salle Universitys 23 varsity sports teams, known as the Explorers, compete in the NCAAs Division I and are a member of the Atlantic Ten Conference. ... La Salle University is a private, co-educational, comprehensive university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Named for St. ... Villanova University is a private university located in Radnor Township, a suburb northwest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the United States. ... The Holy War is a rivalry game in the Philadelphia Big 5 between Saint Josephs University and Villanova University, a game that is considered the most intense of all the Big 5 games. ...


Fans of the Hawks often chant "The Hawk Will Never Die!". Since the school's "undefeated" season, this chant has gained familiarity with the team's opponents. In 2003, Sports Illustrated listed that cheer among The 100 Things You Gotta Do Before You Graduate (Whatever the Cost), calling it "the most defiant cheer in college sports"[2]. The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


Saint Joseph's University will host first and second round games of the 2009 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The games will be played at the Wachovia Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on March 19 and March 21. The 2009 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament will involve 65 schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The Wachovia Center, formerly known as the CoreStates Center and the First Union Center, is an indoor arena located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


Notable alumni

William Aloysius Barrett was an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Michael Allen Bantom (born December 3, 1951 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American former professional basketball player. ... The National Basketball Association of the United States and Canada, commonly known as the NBA, is the premier professional basketball league in North America. ... The Phoenix Suns are a professional basketball team, based in Phoenix, Arizona. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (or simply Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... The New Jersey Nets are a National Basketball Association team based in East Rutherford, New Jersey. ... The Indiana Pacers are a professional basketball team that plays in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... 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Major league affiliations American League (1998–present) East Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 12, 42 Name Tampa Bay Rays (2008–present) Tampa Bay Devil Rays (1998-2007) Other nicknames Ballpark Tropicana Field (1998–present) Major league titles World Series titles (0) none AL Pennants (0) none Division titles... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 14, 37, 41, 42 Name New York Mets (1962–present) Other nicknames The Amazin Mets, The Amazins, The Metropolitans, The Kings of Queens Ballpark Shea Stadium (1964–present) Polo Grounds (1962–1963) Major league... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ... 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References

The phrase Perfect Season usually refers to the 1972 Miami Dolphins undefeated campaign. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Joseph Saint: Free Encyclopedia Articles at Questia.com Online Library (1592 words)
As the foster father of Jesus and the chaste spouse of Mary, St. Joseph is highly honored by Orthodox and Roman Catholics.
JOSEPH, SAINT husband of the Virgin Mary, a carpenter...Jesus and the chaste spouse of Mary, St. Joseph is highly honored by Orthodox and Roman...19; another feast, the Solemnity of St. Joseph: third Wednesday after Easter...
SAINT JOSEPH, cities, United States sant jo z...on Lake Michigan at the mouth of the St. Joseph River across from Benton Harbor ; inc...site of a trading post founded (1826) by Joseph Robidoux.
Saint Joseph's Hospital - Atlanta (586 words)
Celebrating its 125 anniversary this year, Saint Joseph’s was founded by the Sisters of Mercy in 1880 and is Atlanta’s oldest hospital.  Today, the 382-bed, acute-care hospital is recognized as one of the top specialty-referral hospitals in the Southeast.
At the core of Saint Joseph's long tradition of service is its Catholic mission dedicated to improving the health and well-being of the communities it serves.
Saint Joseph’s Mercy Care Services, one of the largest outreach efforts in Atlanta, provides health care and essential services to the homeless, new immigrants, and the uninsured at multiple sites throughout the metropolitan area and to elderly and disabled persons at its site in Rome, Ga.
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