FACTOID # 7: The top five best educated states are all in the Northeast.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Saint Joseph
Saint Joseph

Holy Family by Raphael (1506)
Husband of Mary;
Foster-father of the Lord; the Betrothed; the Carpenter; the Worker
Born Unknown date 1st century B/C
Died Prior to the Passion (traditional), Nazareth (traditional)
Venerated in All Christianity
Feast March 19 (Roman Catholicism), the Sunday after the Nativity of the Lord (Eastern Orthodoxy)
Attributes Carpenter's square or tools, the infant Jesus, staff with lily blossoms.
Patronage The Universal Church, workers, against doubt and hesitation and of a happy death. Many others; see [1]
Saints Portal

Joseph "of the House of David" (Hebrew יוֹסֵף, also known as Saint Joseph, Joseph the Betrothed, Joseph of Nazareth, Joseph the Worker and other titles) is known from the New Testament as the husband of Mary[1] and although according to most Christian traditions he was not the biological father of Jesus of Nazareth, he acted as his foster-father[2][3][4] and as head of the Holy Family. Joseph is venerated as a saint within the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, and Anglican churches. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 599 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1576 × 1577 pixel, file size: 267 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article is about the Renaissance artist. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... The Solemnity of Saint Joseph, commonly called the Feast of St. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Primary meaning: Saint Joseph. ... This article is about the Biblical king of Israel. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... According to the New Testament, Mary (Judeo-Aramaic מרים Maryām Bitter; Arabic مريم (Maryam); Septuagint Greek Μαριαμ, Mariam, Μαρια, Maria; Geez: ማሪያም, Māryām; Syriac: Mart, Maryam, Madonna), was the mother of Jesus of Nazareth, who at the time of his conception was the betrothed wife of Saint Joseph (cf. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Flight into Egypt: Jesus, the Virgin Mary and St. ... For other uses, see Saint (disambiguation). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...


The genealogy in Matthew[5] shows that Joseph's own father was called Jacob; but according to the genealogy in Luke[6] Joseph was a son of Heli. The canonical Gospels do not, however, give the date and place of Joseph's birth, nor of his death. All that is known from them is that Joseph lived at times in Nazareth in Galilee,[7] stayed for a couple of years in Bethlehem in Judea,[8] and for a while was forced into exile in Egypt.[9] While there is no mention of Joseph's age in the canonical Gospels, apocryphal literature, as well as many works of art based thereon, portray Joseph as a widower when he married Mary, with children from an earlier marriage, and Mary herself as a widow during the public ministry and passion of her son. The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Gospel of Luke (literally, according to Luke; Greek, Κατά Λουκαν, Kata Loukan) is a synoptic Gospel, and the third and longest of the four canonical Gospels of the New Testament. ... Heli (Also written Eli) - elevation - In Luke 3:23 mentioned as father of Joseph in the ancestry of Jesus. ... Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... For other uses, see Galilee (disambiguation). ... Arabic بيت لحم Name Meaning House of Lambs Government City (from 1995) Also Spelled Beit Lahm (officially) Bayt Lahm (unofficially) Governorate Bethlehem Population 29,930 (2006) Jurisdiction 29,799 dunams (29. ... Map of the southern Levant, c. ...


Joseph's profession is described in the Gospels as a τεκτων, a Greek word for a variety of skilled craftsmen, but Christian tradition has him as a worker in wood, or "carpenter", although the modern English words "joiner" or "cabinet-maker" might fit the sense of the Greek better.[10] Very little other information on Joseph is given in the Gospels, in which he never speaks. His places of birth and death are not given, and his dates have been presented very diffently at different periods; sometimes he has been seen as much older than Mary, and at other periods only slightly older. Persistent traditions, with some Gospel evidence to support them, make Joseph a widower when he married Mary, with children from an earlier marriage. He is mentioned in the Gospels as present on the visit to Jerusalem when Jesus was twelve, but no mention can clearly be placed later than that one. Christian tradition, though vague on the time and place of his death, represents Mary as a widow during the adult ministry of her son.[11] For other uses, see Carpenter (disambiguation). ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ...


In the Roman Catholic and other traditions, Joseph is the patron saint of workers and has several feast days (see Saint Joseph's Day). He was also declared to be the patron saint and protector of the universal Catholic Church (along with Saint Peter) by Pope Pius IX in 1870, and is the patron of several countries and regions. He is a rare example of a saint from the early days of the church whose devotional role has tended to increase in the centuries since the Middle Ages. Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... Saint Josephs Day, commonly called the Feast of St. ... St Peter redirects here. ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ...

Contents

In the canonical Gospel accounts

Holy Family with bird by Murillo (1645-50).
Holy Family with bird by Murillo (1645-50).

All the events involving Joseph's presence that have been narrated in the canonical Gospel accounts happened before Jesus's birth or during his childhood. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 777 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2536 × 1957 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 777 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2536 × 1957 pixel, file size: 433 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Murillo is a village within the municipality of Oliver Paipoonge in Ontario, Canada. ... Gospels are a genre of ancient literature concerning the life of Jesus. ...


There is only an allusion to the first event, namely Joseph's betrothal to Mary that had made her his wife according to the Jewish law.[12] The clarification has been added that they were not yet living together,[13] from which follows that they had not yet conducted the wedding rite known as the "home taking", which is the legal ceremony that permits Jewish couples to begin conjugal relations. Judaism considers marriage to be the ideal state of existence; a man without a wife, or a woman without a husband, are considered incomplete. ... Judaism considers marriage to be the ideal state of existence; a man without a wife, or a woman without a husband, are considered incomplete. ...


The first event related in some detail is Joseph's Dream during which he is told by "an angel of the Lord" not only to take his wife Mary home – in other words, to conduct the concluding legal wedding rite –, rather than to be afraid for the reason that the child with which she is now pregnant is holy, but also to name him Jesus, hence to assume legal paternity. The first command Joseph carries out, apparently promptly, the second in due time.[14] For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation). ... Judaism considers marriage to be the ideal state of existence; a man without a wife, or a woman without a husband, are considered incomplete. ...


The next event is Joseph's journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem to be enrolled as required by the political authorities. He is accompanied by Mary who is heavily pregnant and, whilst they are there, gives birth to Jesus.[15] Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ... Arabic بيت لحم Name Meaning House of Lambs Government City (from 1995) Also Spelled Beit Lahm (officially) Bayt Lahm (unofficially) Governorate Bethlehem Population 29,930 (2006) Jurisdiction 29,799 dunams (29. ...


Thereafter Joseph and his young family are visited by a group of shepherds saying that they have been guided to them by an angel who told them the good news and its implications.[16]


Eight days later, at the boy's circumcision – as the angel had told Joseph when he commanded him to take Mary home –, Joseph names him, calling him Jesus, and thus assumes legal paternity.[17] This article is about male circumcision. ...


Shortly later, after completion of the post-natal cleansing prescribed by the Law of Moses, Joseph takes Mary and Jesus to the Temple in Jerusalem to offer the sacrifices required on the occasion of the birth of a couple's first son. Whilst doing so, he and his wife receive a blessing from the aged "just man" Simeon and listen to his words and those of the prophetess Anna – two people who have been waiting eagerly for the salvation of their nation and perceive now the significance of the child before them.[18] The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ...

Joseph leads Mary and Jesus to safety in Egypt to escape from Herod (see Matthew 2:13-15), as depicted by Lorenzo Monaco (1405).
Joseph leads Mary and Jesus to safety in Egypt to escape from Herod (see Matthew 2:13-15), as depicted by Lorenzo Monaco (1405).

The next event related that involves Joseph occurred somewhat less than a couple of years later, when Joseph is told by the angel in another dream of king Herod's plan to kill Jesus, and ordered to save the boy by taking him and his mother to Egypt, which he promptly does.[19] Download high resolution version (994x602, 155 KB)The Flight into Egypt by Lorenzo Monaco (c. ... Download high resolution version (994x602, 155 KB)The Flight into Egypt by Lorenzo Monaco (c. ... The Flight into Egypt (c. ... For other uses, see Dream (disambiguation). ... Herod the Great. ...


Once Herod had died, Joseph is told by the angel in a further dream to return with Jesus and his mother to the land of Israel; but when Joseph learns that Herod has been succeeded in Judea by Archelaus, and Joseph worries on account of the latter's ill repute, a further dream guides him to the district of Galilee. And so Joseph takes mother and child to Nazareth and settles there.[20] Map of the southern Levant, c. ... Coin of Herod Archelaus Herod Archelaus (23 BC – c. ... For other uses, see Galilee (disambiguation). ... Hebrew (Natzrat or Natzeret) Arabic الناصرة (an-Nāṣira) Government City District North Population 64,800[1] Metropolitan Area: 185,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 14 200 dunams (14. ...


The last event mentioning the presence of Jesus's father, implying Joseph, is the family's Passover visit to the Temple in Jerusalem when Jesus is around 12 years old, hence coming to the end of his childhood.[21] This article is about the Jewish holiday. ... The Temple in Jerusalem or Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash and meaning literally The Holy House) was located on the Temple Mount (Har HaBayit) in the old city of Jerusalem. ...


The canonical Gospel accounts are silent about the life of Jesus and his family during the next couple of decades. They resume the narration when first John the "forerunner", and then Jesus himself commence their respective public ministries; but their accounts from thereon mention only the presence at certain events of Mary but never again of Joseph. St. ...


A notable fact about Joseph is that not one single word spoken by him is quoted in any of the four canonical Gospel accounts.


In apocryphal anecdotes

Apocryphal sources elaborate the terse canonical Gospel accounts. Thus they describe Jesus as working side by side with Joseph in Joseph's carpenter shop at Nazareth, and sometimes staying with Joseph while the latter worked. They also tell how Joseph made an important decision when he heard that Mary was pregnant before their arranged marriage and instead of allowing her to be stoned by townspeople, he took her away and protected her. In some Catholic traditions (including Roman Catholic), Joseph is described as dying "in the arms of Jesus and Mary".[22][23] Christ in the House of His Parents, 1850 Christ in the House of His Parents (1850) is a painting by John Everett Millais depicting the Holy Family in Saint Josephs carpentry workshop. ... Sir John Everett Millais Sir John Everett Millais, 1st Baronet, PRA (June 8, 1829 – August 13, 1896) was a British painter and illustrator and one of the founders of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood. ... In Judeo-Christian theologies, apocrypha refers to religious Sacred text that have questionable authenticity or are otherwise disputed. ... Gospels are a genre of ancient literature concerning the life of Jesus. ... Stoning, or lapidation, refers to a form of capital punishment execution method carried out by an organized group throwing stones or rocks at the person they mean to execute. ...


In the canonical Gospel accounts Jesus is described as being the brother of James, Joses (Matthew has the spelling: Joseph, Mark has Joses), Judas, and Simon, and of sisters whose names however are not mentioned.[24] One interpretation of the Gospel of Matthew "...he took her as his wife, but had no marital relations with her until she had borne a son..." (Matt 1:25) states that this indicated Joseph and Mary had sexual intercourse in the years following Jesus' birth.[25] Saint James the Just (יעקב Holder of the heel; supplanter; Standard Hebrew Yaʿaqov, Tiberian Hebrew Yaʿăqōḇ, Greek Iάκωβος), also called James Adelphotheos, James, 1st Bishop of Jerusalem, or James, the Brother of the Lord[1] and sometimes identified with James the Less, (died AD 62) was an important figure... Joses, in Hebrew, means He that forgives. Joses is one of the brothers of Jesus mentioned in the Gospel of Mark 6:3 and its parallel passage in Matthew 13:54 - 57. ... The Gospel of Matthew is one of the four Gospels of the New Testament. ... The Gospel of Mark is the second in the familiar sequence of the New Testament Gospels, as they were established by Jerome and appear in many but not all early manuscripts of complete gospels, and as they are commonly printed. ... Jude (alternatively Judas or Judah) is the third of the brothers of Jesus appearing in the New Testament. ...


A tradition at least as early as the second century, still current in Eastern Orthodoxy, has it that Joseph was a widower and that these brothers and sisters were from his first marriage, thus making them Jesus' half-brothers and half-sisters. This version of events is related in the apocryphal History of Joseph the Carpenter, which names the eldest brother Justus and the sisters Assia and Lydia, but does not name the wife.[26] Authoritative Orthodox sources contradict History, retaining the Biblical name of the eldest son, names Joseph's first wife Salome, and his sisters Salome and Esther along with an unnamed third sister.[27] The Roman Catholic tradition is unclear, and either the explanation above, or the explanation that these "brothers and sisters" are the cousins of Christ are both considered equally possible by the Church, but it affirms strongly that Joseph remained celibate while married to Mary. Some Protestant denominations (including many Evangelical Protestant traditions) no longer espouse strong views on the subject. Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The History of Joseph the Carpenter is one of the texts within the New Testament apocrypha concerned with period of Jesus life before he was 12. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Evangelicalism is a theological perspective in Protestant Christianity which identifies with the gospel. ...


In art

Nativity by Martin Schongauer (1475-80)
Nativity by Martin Schongauer (1475-80)

Up to about the 18th century Joseph tends to be depicted as a man advanced in years, with gray hair, often balding, occasionally frail and with arthritic fingers and a sharp nose, a comparatively marginal figure alongside Mary and Jesus if not entirely in the background, passive other than when leading them on their flight to Egypt. Joseph is shown mostly with a beard, not only in keeping with Jewish custom, but also because – although the Gospel accounts do not give his age – later literature tends to present him as an old man at the time of his wedding to Mary. This depiction arose to allay concerns about both the celibacy of the newly wedded couple[28], the mention of brothers and sisters of Jesus in the canonical Gospels,[29] and Joseph's other children spoken of in apocryphal literature – concerns discussed very frankly by Jean Gerson for example, who nonetheless favoured showing him as a younger man.[30] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 460 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1576 × 2053 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 460 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1576 × 2053 pixel, file size: 291 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... c. ... Jean de Gerson Jean Charlier de Gerson (December 14, 1363 – July 12, 1429), French scholar and divine, chancellor of the university of Paris, a guiding light of the conciliar movement and the one of most the prominent theologians at the Council of Constance, was born at the village of Gerson...


Joseph is often shown asleep in Nativities, and becomes a somewhat comical figure in some depictions, untidily dressed, and unable to help with proceedings. In medieval mystery plays, he was usually a comic figure, amiable but incapable. Mystery plays are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. ...


By the fifteenth century he is often more dignified, and this improvement continued through the Renaissance and Baroque, although a resurgence of Marian emphasis often again leaves him stranded on the margins of compositions such as the Nativity. This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ...


In recent centuries – in step with a growing interest in Joseph's rôle in Gospel exegesis – he himself has become a focal figure in representations of the Holy Family. He is now often portrayed as a younger or even youthful man (perhaps especially in Protestant depictions), whether going about his work as a carpenter, or participating actively in the daily life of Mary and Jesus as an equal and openly affectionate member.

St Joseph sleeping, Nativity by Gentile da Fabriano
St Joseph sleeping, Nativity by Gentile da Fabriano

Full cycles of his life are rare in the Middle Ages, though the scenes from the Life of the Virgin or Life of Christ where he is present are far more often seen. The Mérode Altarpiece of about 1425, where he has a panel to himself, working as a carpenter, is an early example of what remained relatively rare depictions of him pursuing his métier. Adoration of the Magi (1423). ... This page is about the Mérode Altarpiece. ...


Some statues of Joseph depict his staff as topped with flowers, recalling the non-canonical Protoevangelion's account of how Mary's spouse was chosen by collecting walking sticks of widowers in Israel, and Joseph's alone bursting into flower, thus identifying him as divinely chosen. Several Eastern Orthodox Nativity icons show Joseph tempted by the Devil (depicted as an old man with furled wings) to break off his betrothal, and how he resists that temptation. There are some paintings with him wearing a Jewish hat. The Gospel of James, also sometimes known as the Infancy Gospel of James or the Protevangelium of James, is an apocryphal Gospel probably written about AD 150. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... For the Nativity of Jesus, see Nativity of Jesus. ... The Savior Not Made By Hands (1410s, by Andrei Rublev) An icon (from Greek εικων, eikon, image) is an artistic visual representation or symbol of anything considered holy and divine, such as God, saints or deities. ... This is an overview of the Devil. ... The Jewish poet Süßkind von Trimberg wearing a Judenhut (Codex Manesse, 14. ...


Sainthood

Although always regarded as a saint, Joseph was little celebrated on his own account until the later Middle Ages, following the adoption of his feast by the Franciscans in 1399, and later by the Dominicans. The feast was only added to the Roman Breviary in 1479, and was not compulsory for the whole Catholic church until 1621. An effort by some church leaders, including Jean Gerson, at the Council of Constance in 1416 to have Joseph elevated to a rank next to Mary and above the Apostles, with a universal feast of The Marriage of Mary and Joseph, was a step too far, and not successful. The promotion of the cult of Joseph was connected with the reaction against an over-courtly emphasis on the Holy Family in the preceding centuries, and reflected a wish to think of them again as a down to earth human family, encountering many difficulties in ordinary life.[31] The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... Breviary of Cologne, 12th or 13th century (Helsinki University Library) A breviary (from Latin brevis, short or concise) is a liturgical book containing the public or canonical prayers, hymns, the Psalms, readings, and notations for everyday use, especially for priests, in the Divine Office (i. ... Jean de Gerson Jean Charlier de Gerson (December 14, 1363 – July 12, 1429), French scholar and divine, chancellor of the university of Paris, a guiding light of the conciliar movement and the one of most the prominent theologians at the Council of Constance, was born at the village of Gerson... The Council of Constance was an ecumenical council considered valid by the Roman Catholic Church. ... Alternate meaning: See Apostle (Mormonism) The Christian Apostles were Jewish men chosen from among the disciples, who were sent forth (as indicated by the Greek word απόστολος apostolos= messenger), by Jesus to preach the Gospel to both Jews and Gentiles, across the world. ...

Holy Family by James Collinson (19th century)
Holy Family by James Collinson (19th century)

Within the Roman Catholic tradition, Joseph is the patron saint of various things and places. Pope Pius IX proclaimed him the patron of the Universal Church on December 8, 1870. Joseph is the unofficial patron against doubt and hesitation, as well as the patron saint of fighting communism, and of a happy death. Joseph having died in the "arms of Jesus and Mary" according to Catholic tradition, he is considered the model of a pious believer who receives grace at the moment of death. Download high resolution version (512x665, 78 KB)James Collinson, Holy Family This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Download high resolution version (512x665, 78 KB)James Collinson, Holy Family This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Holy Family by James Collinson, 1850 James Collinson (May 9, 1825 - January 24, 1881) was a Victorian painter who was a member of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood from 1848 to 1850. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the form of society and political movement. ... For other uses, see Death (disambiguation). ...


In addition to his primary feast day in the Catholic and other traditions, St. Joseph is honored by the Feast of St. Joseph the Workman (May 1), introduced by Pope Pius XII in 1955 to counteract May Day, a union, workers and socialists holiday. This reflects St. Joseph's status as what many Catholics and other Christians consider the "patron of workers" and "model of workers." Catholic and other Christians teachings and stories about or relating to Joseph and the Holy Family frequently stress his patience, persistence, and hard work as admirable qualities which believers should adopt. is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the holidays celebrated on May 1. ...


In that tradition, Joseph is the patron saint of the New World; of the countries China, Canada, Korea, Mexico, Austria, Belgium, Bohemia, Croatia, Peru, Vietnam; of the regions Carinthia, Styria, Tyrol, Sicily; of the cities and/or dioceses of Florence, Turin, Baton Rouge, Bemidji, Buffalo, Cheyenne, Haugesund in Norway, Louisville, Nashville, San Jose, Sioux Falls, etc. Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... This article is about the Korean civilization. ... Flag of Bohemia Bohemia (Czech: ; German: ) is a historical region in central Europe, occupying the western and middle thirds of the Czech Republic. ... Carinthia (German: Kärnten, Slovenian: KoroÅ¡ka) is the southernmost Austrian state or Land; it is chiefly famous for its mountains and lakes. ... Styria redirects here. ... Coat of arms of the Counts of Tyrol Austria-Hungary in 1914, showing Tirol–Vorarlberg as the left-most province, coloured cream Capital Meran (Merano), until 1848 Government Principality Historical era Middle Ages  - Created County 1140  - Bequeathed to Habsburgs 1363 or 1369  - Joined Council of Princes 1582  - Trent, Tyrol and... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... This article is about the city in Italy. ... For other uses, see Turin (disambiguation). ... Capitol Building Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana, a state of the United States of America. ... Bemidji is a city located in Beltrami County, Minnesota. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State Coordinates: , Country State County Erie Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ... Nickname: Location in Wyoming Coordinates: , Country State County Laramie Founded 1867 Government  - Mayor Jack R. Spiker Area  - Total 21. ... County District Haugaland Municipality NO-1106 Administrative centre Haugesund Mayor (2006) Petter Steen Jr (H) Official language form BokmÃ¥l Area  - Total  - Land  - Percentage Ranked 403 73 km² 68 km² 0. ... Louisville redirects here. ... Nashville redirects here. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... Nickname: Motto: Gateway to the Plains Location in Minnehaha County and the state of South Dakota Counties (metropolitan area) Government  - Mayor Dave Munson Area  - City 178. ...


Roman Catholics also believe he prays especially for families, fathers, expectant mothers (pregnant women), travellers, immigrants, house sellers and buyers, craftsmen, engineers and working people in general. Official patronage assigned to him, however, is vague. Numerous geographical locations, some vocations and various circumstances of personal life have been attributed to his patronage (see Patron Saints Index: Saint Joseph link below). Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... Look up engineer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Feast day and role in Christian churches

Statue of St Joseph and Jesus, Millegem Kerk.
Statue of St Joseph and Jesus, Millegem Kerk.

The principal feast day of Saint Joseph is March 19, Saint Joseph's Day in the Roman Catholic and Anglican traditions. Another feast day is May 1, Feast of St. Joseph the Worker, introduced by Pope Pius XII in 1955, replacing the older feast day on Wednesday in the second week after Easter and its octave. The veneration of Saint Joseph, when compared with that of other biblical saints, was introduced rather late in the Catholic Church. Pope Pius IX declared him patron of the universal Church; and Pope John XXIII added his name to the Mass canon. Some groups of Traditionalist Catholics reject this addition, but most use the 1962 missal, which includes this change. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1932 × 2576 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1932 × 2576 pixel, file size: 1. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint Josephs Day, commonly called the Feast of St. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... See also: 15th-century Antipope John XXIII. Pope John XXIII (Latin: ; Italian: ), born Angelo Giuseppe Roncalli (November 25, 1881 – June 3, 1963), known as Blessed John XXIII since his beatification, was elected as the 261st Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City on October 28, 1958. ... The Tridentine Mass (Pontifical High Mass) being celebrated at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Wyandotte, Michigan - 1949. ... A traditionalist Catholic is a Roman Catholic who believes that there should be a restoration of the liturgical forms, public and private devotions, and presentation of Catholic teachings that prevailed in the Catholic Church just before the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the Lutheran Church, March 19 is also observed as the Feast of St. Joseph, Guardian of Jesus. This festival is on the official calendar of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, the Lutheran Church – Missouri Synod, the Wisconsin Synod and the Evangelical Lutheran Synod. Some Protestant traditions also celebrate this festival as a commemoration of Joseph's life and witness. The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. ... Official cross symbol of the Missouri Synod The Lutheran Church - Missouri Synod (LCMS) is the second-largest Lutheran body in the United States. ... WELS The Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod (WELS) is a North American religious denomination belonging to the Lutheran tradition within Christianity. ... The Evangelical Lutheran Synod or ELS is a US-based Protestant Christian denomination based in Mankato, Minnesota. ...


In the Eastern Orthodox Church, the feast day of St. Joseph is celebrated on the First Sunday after the Holy Nativity of Christ. The following hymn is chanted in honor of the saint:

Verily, Joseph the betrothed, saw clearly in his old age that the foresayings of the Prophets had
been fulfilled openly; for he was given an odd earnest,
receiving inspiration from the angels,
who cried, Glory to God; for he hath bestowed peace on earth.

Institutions and places named after St Joseph

See also: Saint Joseph's
Statue of St. Joseph with a carpenter square symbolizing his trade, and lilies chastity.
Statue of St. Joseph with a carpenter square symbolizing his trade, and lilies chastity.

There are a number of schools named after Saint Joseph: Saint Josephs University (multiple schools) Saint Josephs College (multiple schools) Saint Joseph College - West Hartford, Connecticut See also: Saint Josephs Oratory, Montreal, Quebec, Canada This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists pages that might... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (456x1024, 80 KB) Summary Description: An iconic statue of St. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (456x1024, 80 KB) Summary Description: An iconic statue of St. ... Allegory of chastity by Hans Memling. ...

Josephite Order

In the 19th century, the Josephite Fathers of the Roman Catholic Church were created under the patronage of Joseph, intending to work with the poor. The first Josephites in America re-devoted their part of the Order to ministry within the newly-emancipated African American community. The Josephite Fathers and Brothers or more properly, Saint Josephs Society of the Sacred Heart, Inc. ...


Churches

Saint Joseph's Oratory is a Roman Catholic oratory and basilica (historically-designated special church) in Montreal, Canada. Constructed at the wishes of Brother André Besette (Congregation of Holy Cross)—a blessed in the Catholic canon—it is dedicated to St. Joseph who is believed to have performed many miracles of healing in Montreal. In the oratory are hundreds of crutches and other items left by those who experienced a spontaneous healing (like those at Lourdes, France). The Oratory is the largest church in Canada, with the largest dome of its kind in the world after that of Saint Peter's Basilica in Rome. (Some churches named after St. Joseph are actually dedicated to a different saint, Saint Joseph of Cupertino.) Saint Josephs Oratory of Mount Royal, (French: Oratoire Saint-Joseph du Mont-Royal), is a Roman Catholic basilica on the northern slope of Mount Royal in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... Statue of Brother André outside St. ... The Congregation of Holy Cross (C.S.C.) is a Roman Catholic congregation of priests and brothers founded in 1837 by the Venerable Father Basil Anthony-Marie Moreau, CSC in Le Mans, France. ... Blessed may refer to: The state of having received a blessing. ... A knee support crutch A patient using underarm crutches A typical forearm crutch Crutches are medical tools used in the event that ones leg or legs may be injured or unable to support weight. ... This article is about the French pilgrimage location. ... Interior view, with the nave of the Cattedra in the back St. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Saint Joseph of Cupertino (or Giuseppe da Copertino, born Giuseppe Maria Desa) (June 17, 1603 – September 18, 1663) is an Italian saint. ...


The Cathedral Basilica of St. Joseph is located in San Jose, California and is the cathedral (episcopal headquarters) of the Roman Catholic Diocese of San Jose. The Basilica of Saint Joseph Proto-Cathedral is a prominent Roman Catholic church in Bardstown, Kentucky, United States; it was the first Roman Catholic Cathedral west of the Allegheny Mountains and the cathedral mother church of the former Roman Catholic Diocese of Bardstown. Exterior view of Cathedral Basilica of St. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... The Cathedral Basilica of St. ... Façade of Proto-Cathedral Interior showing altar The Basilica of Saint Joseph Proto-Cathedral is a Roman Catholic parish church at 310 West Stephen Foster Avenue in Bardstown, Kentucky. ... Bardstown is a city located in Nelson County, Kentucky. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Allegheny Mountain Range (also spelled Alleghany and Allegany) -- informally, the Alleghenies -- is part of the Appalachian Mountain Range of the eastern United States. ...


Many schools, universities, hosptials, churches and monasteries are dedicated to Saint Joseph in Lebanon, such as Lycée Saint-Joseph in Ain Ebel, Université Saint-Joseph in Beirut, the Hôpital Saint Joseph des Soeurs de la Croix in Dora and Church of Saint Joseph in Aitou. Ain Ebel (Arabic عين إبل) is a village located in south of Lebanon. ... Université Saint-Joseph (USJ) is a private higher institute of education founded by the Jesuits in 1875 in Beirut, Lebanon, known for its school of medicine and its hospital, Hôtel-Dieu de France. ... This article is about the Lebanese city. ... Hôpital Saint Joseph des Soeurs de la Croix or the Hospital of Saint Joseph of the Sisters of the Holy Cross is a private, non-profit medical institution in Dora, Lebanon. ... Dora is a suburb north of Beirut in the Matn district of Mount Lebanon. ... Aitou (also Aytou, Aytu, Aïtou, Arabic: ) is a village located in the Zgharta District in the North Governorate of Lebanon. ...


Places

Many cities, towns, and geographical features are named after Joseph. At least 6 places named St. Joseph exist in France and its overseas possessions, and at least 14 towns, counties, or townships in the United States. Numerous bays, rivers, peninsulas, and other features are named after Joseph (or St. Joseph) in North America.


St. Joseph, Trinidad and Tobago is the oldest town in Trinidad and Tobago. Originally named San José de Oruña, it served as the capital of Spanish Trinidad between 1592 and 1783. St. ...


According to the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, the Spanish form, San Jose, is the most common place name in the world. Probably the most-recognized San Joses are San José, Costa Rica and San Jose, California, United States, given their name by Spanish colonists. The latter is the subject of the famous song Do You Know the Way to San José. The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) is an agency of the United States Government with the primary mission of collection, analysis, and distribution of geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) in support of national security. ... San José – or its anglicized form San Jose – is the Spanish for Saint Joseph. ... This List of popular place nanes is derived from the US FIPS55 place name database (158. ... Nickname: Location of San José Canton between provinces Coordinates: , Country Province Canton San José Canton Founded circa. ... For other uses, see San José. Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Spanish colonization of the Americas was Spains conquest, settlement, and rule over much of the western hemisphere from 1492-1898. ... Do You Know the Way to San Jose is a popular song by Burt Bacharach and Hal David. ...


The emperor Joseph II once granted an audience to a tavern-owner who had commissioned a painting of the ruler to decorate his establishment, which he intended to name in honor of the monarch - only to be forbidden to do so by the Viennese city council. Joseph II told him to add a beard and a halo to the painting and rename the tavern "Saint Joseph." Joseph II (full name: Joseph Benedikt August Johannes Anton Michel Adam; March 13, 1741 – February 20, 1790) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790 and ruler of the Habsburg lands from 1780 to 1790. ...


In folklore

St Joseph with the Infant Jesus, Guido Reni (c. 1635)
St Joseph with the Infant Jesus, Guido Reni (c. 1635)

Burying a small statue of Saint Joseph on a piece of real estate for sale is reputed to enlist the saint's assistance in finding a buyer.[32] Some versions require the statue to be buried upside down. Some believe that the saint's statue should be disinterred once the house sells, to avoid the property repeatedly changing hands; others leave the buried statue in hopes that Saint Joseph will continue to protect the property.[33] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (651x800, 86 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (651x800, 86 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Autoportrait Abduction of Deianira, 1620-21 Guido Reni (November 4, 1575, Calvenzano di Vergato, near Bologna - August 18, 1642, Bologna) was a prominent Italian painter of high-Baroque style. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ...


Modern literature

  • Aramis Thorn, The Foster Father of God (a fictional account of the life of Joseph, the betrothal of Joseph and Mary and the birth and childhood of Jesus).

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Gospel According to Jesus Christ (original title: O Evangelho Segundo Jesus Cristo) is a novel by the Portuguese author José Saramago. ... Tzippori, also known by several other names & spellings including Sepphoris, is one of the oldest Jewish settlements to be uncovered by archaeologists, and one of the richest in what has been found there. ...

Other St. Josephs

Joseph of Arimathea, according to the Gospels, was the man who donated his own prepared tomb for the burial of Jesus after his crucifixion. ... The Desert Fathers were Christian Hermits who lived in the Sahara desert of Egypt, beginning in about the third century. ... Saint Joseph of Damascus (May 15, 1793 – July 10, 1860), born Joseph George Haddad Firzli (Arabic,جوزيف جورج حداد الفرزلي), was a Greek Orthodox Christian priest and educator who was canonized as a saint in 1993, and is recognized as a Doctor of the Church. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Saint Joseph of Cupertino (or Giuseppe da Copertino, born Giuseppe Maria Desa) (June 17, 1603 – September 18, 1663) is an Italian saint. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Saint Joseph

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Yosef is a given name originating from Hebrew, recorded in the Hebrew Bible, as יוֹסֵף, Standard Hebrew Yosef, Tiberian Hebrew and Aramaic Yôsēp̄. In Arabic, including in the Quran, the name is spelt يوسف or Yūsuf. ... The Solemnity of Saint Joseph, commonly called the Feast of St. ... The History of Joseph the Carpenter is one of the texts within the New Testament apocrypha concerned with period of Jesus life before he was 12. ... The following Prayers to Saint Joseph are Catholic prayers to Saint Joseph. ... Lukes genealogy of Jesus, from the Book of Kells transcribed by Celtic monks circa 800 The genealogy of Jesus through either one or both of his earthly parents (Mary and Joseph) is given by two passages from the Gospels, Matthew 1:2–16 and Luke 3:23–38. ... The Josephite Fathers and Brothers or more properly, Saint Josephs Society of the Sacred Heart, Inc. ... The Sisters of St. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Matthew 1:16
  2. ^ Souvay, Charles L. (1910) "St. Joseph" Catholic Encyclopedia Vol. VIII. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved January 22, 2008.]
  3. ^ Maier, Paul. In the Fullness of Time: a Historian Looks at Christmas, Easter, and the Early Church. Kregel Publications, 1998. p. 77
  4. ^ Lockyer, Herbert. All the Divine Names and Titles in the Bible. Zondervan, 1988. p. 68, 254-255
  5. ^ Matthew 1:16
  6. ^ Luke 3:23
  7. ^ before Jesus's birth (Luke 2:4), on return from exile in Egypt after Herod's death (Matthew 2:23, Luke 2:39), after the Passover visit to Jerusalem when Jesus was 12 years old (Luke 2:51)
  8. ^ Luke 2:4, Matthew 2:1-14
  9. ^ Matthew 2:14-22
  10. ^ See Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3. Greek τεκτων denotes primarily a skilled worker in wood, such as a carpenter or joiner, although in secular literature the term has been used also for other craftsmen and workmen. The canonical Gospel accounts do not go into detail on this point; but apocryphal sources and art portray Joseph as a carpenter.
  11. ^ moreover, when hanging on the cross Jesus made provision for the care of his mother after his own imminent death,John 19:25-27
  12. ^ Matthew 1:18b; Luke 1:27
  13. ^ Matthew 1:18c
  14. ^ Matthew 1:19-25a/b
  15. ^ Luke 2:4-6
  16. ^ Luke 2:16-17
  17. ^ Matthew 1:25b, Luke 2:21
  18. ^ Luke 2:25-38
  19. ^ Matthew 2:13-18
  20. ^ Matthew 2:19-23; Luke 2:39
  21. ^ Luke 2:41-51
  22. ^ "The general opinion that he died in the arms of Jesus and Mary has inspired the faithful with great confidence...", The Imitation of the Blessed Virgin p. 347, London, 1816, quoted in Primitive Christian Worship by James Endell Tyler
  23. ^ Novena prayer: St. Joseph
  24. ^ Matthew 13:55, Mark 6:3
  25. ^ Filson, Floyd V. A Commentary on the Gospel according to St. Matthew London: Black 1960
  26. ^ The History of Joseph the Carpenter. Comparative Religion. Retrieved on 2007-05-06.
  27. ^ Holy Apostles Convent (1989). The Life of the Virgin Mary, the Theotokos. Buena Vista: Holy Apostles Convent and Dormition Skete, p. 64. 
  28. ^ cf. Mt 1:25a
  29. ^ cf. Mt 12:46-50, Mk 3:31-35, Lk 8:19-21; Mt 13:55, Mk 6:3; cf. section above
  30. ^ Shapiro:6-7
  31. ^ Meyer Schapiro, Selected Papers, volume 3, Late Antique, Early Christian and Mediaeval Art, pp. 4-7 1980, Chatto & Windus, London, ISBN 0701125144
  32. ^ "Desperate Sellers Take Leaps of Faith", story in The Washington Post, September 8, 2007, accessed September 8, 2007.
  33. ^ "Property Rites" at snopes.com, accessed September 8, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Meyer Schapiro was a 20th century art historian. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... The Urban Legends Reference Pages (also known as snopes. ...

External links

Preceded by
Heli
Ancestry of Jesus - Father of Jesus Succeeded by
Jesus
Heli (Also written Eli) - elevation - In Luke 3:23 mentioned as father of Joseph in the ancestry of Jesus. ... Lukes genealogy of Jesus, from the Book of Kells transcribed by Celtic monks circa 800 The genealogy of Jesus through either one or both of his earthly parents (Mary and Joseph) is given by two passages from the Gospels, Matthew 1:2–16 and Luke 3:23–38. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Joseph (1511 words)
A few months later, the time came for Joseph and Mary to go to Bethlehem, to be enrolled, according to the decree issued by Caesar Augustus: a new source of anxiety for Joseph, for "her days were accomplished, that she should be delivered", and "there was no room for them in the inn (Luke 2:1-7).
Joseph's was henceforth the simple and uneventful life of an humble Jew, supporting himself and his family by his work, and faithful to the religious practices commanded by the Law or observed by pious Israelites.
The earliest traces of public recognition of the sanctity of St. Joseph are to be found in the East.
Saint Joseph: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (2112 words)
Saint Joseph was also declared to be the patron saint and protector of the Universal Catholic Church (along with Saint Peter) by Pope Pius IX in 1870, and is the patron of several countries and regions.
Joseph was betrothed to Mary at the time that she conceived Jesus; and therefore they were already legally husband and wife then, although they were not yet permitted to live together.
The Basilica of Saint Joseph Proto-Cathedral is a prominent Roman Catholic church in Bardstown, Kentucky, United States; it was the first Roman Catholic Cathedral west of the Allegheny Mountains and the cathedral mother church of the former Roman Catholic Diocese of Bardstown.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m