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Encyclopedia > Saint Isabel of France

Saint Isabel of France (March, 122523 February 1270) was the daughter of Louis VIII of France and Blanche of Castile, and brother of Louis IX of France. She founded the Abbey of Longchamp. Events Births Thomas Aquinas, Christian philosopher and theologian. ... February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events The Eighth Crusade is launched against Tunis, and ends when its leader, Louis IX of France, dies. ... Louis VIII the Lion (French: Louis VIII le Lion) (September 5, 1187 - November 8, 1226) reigned as King of France from 1223 to 1226. ... Blanche of Castile (1188-1252), wife of Louis VIII of France, third daughter of Alfonso VIII, king of Castile, and of Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II, was born at Palencia. ... Only representation of Saint Louis known to be true to life - Early 14th century statue from the church of Mainneville, Eure, France King Louis IX of France or Saint Louis (April 25, 1214/1215–August 25, 1270) was King of France from 1226 until his death. ...


When still a child at court, Isabel, was devoted to religion. By a Papal bull of 26 May 1254, Pope Innocent IV allowed her to retain some Franciscan fathers as her special confessors. She was even more devoted to the Franciscan Order than her royal brother. She not only broke off her engagement with a count, but moreover refused the hand of Conrad IV of Germany, son of Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor, although pressed to accept him by everyone, even by Innocent IV, who however did not hesitate subsequently to praise her fixed determination to remain a virgin. A Papal bull is a written communication from the Vatican Chancery, bearing a formal papal seal. ... May 26 is the 146th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (147th in leap years). ... Events December 2 - Manfred of Sicily defeats army of Pope Innocent IV at Foggia. ... Innocent IV, né Sinibaldo de Fieschi ( 1180/90 - December 7, 1254), pope from 1243 to 1254, belonged to one of the first families of Genoa, and, educated at Parma and Bologna, passed for one of the best canonists of his time. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... Conrad IV ( April 25, 1228 Andria, Italy - May 21, 1254), Lavello, was king of Jerusalem 1228- 1254, Germany 1237- 1254, and Sicily 1250- 1254. ... Frederick II (left) meets al-Kamil (right) Frederick II (December 26, 1194 - (December 13, 1250), Holy Roman Emperor of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was pretender to the title of King of the Romans from 1212, unopposed holder of that monarchy from 1215, and Holy Roman Emperor from 1220 until his death...


As Isabel wished to found a convent of the Order of Poor Ladies of Saint Clare, Louis IX began in 1255 to acquire the necessary land in the Forest of Rouvray-Catillon, not far from the Seine and in the neighbourhood of Paris. On 10 June 1256, the first stone of the convent church was laid. The building appears to have been completed about the beginning of 1259, because Pope Alexander IV gave his sanction on 2 February 1259, to the new rule which Isabel had had compiled by the Franciscan Mansuetus on the basis of the Rule of the Order of Saint Clare. These rules were drawn up solely for this convent, which was named the Monastery of the Humility of the Blessed Virgin (monasterium humilitatis beatae Mariae virginis). The sisters were called in the rule the Sorores Ordinis humilium ancillarum Beatissimae Mariae Virginis ("sisters of the humble order of servants of the most blessed virgin Mary"). The fast was not so strict as in the Rule of Saint Clare; the community was allowed to hold property, and the sisters were subject to the Franciscans. The first sisters came from the convent of the Poor Clares at Reims. The Order of Poor Ladies, also known as the Poor Clares, the Poor Clare Nuns, the Clarisse, or the Minoresses is a Franciscan order founded by Saint Clare of Assisi. ... Saint Clare of Assisi, born Chiara Offreduccio, (July 16, 1193–August 11, 1253) was one of the first followers of Francis of Assisi and founded the Order of Poor Ladies to organize the women who chose to take the Franciscan vow of poverty and celibacy. ... Events Königsberg was founded Births Emperor Albert I of Germany, in July Deaths Monarchs/Presidents Aragon - James I King of Aragon and count of Barcelona (reigned from 1213 to 1276) Categories: 1255 ... This article is about the river in France; it should not be confused with the Senne, a much smaller river that flows through Brussels. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... June 10 is the 161st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (162nd in leap years), with 204 days remaining. ... Events Hanseatic League formed. ... Alexander IV, né Rinaldo Conti ( 1199 - May 25, 1261), pope from 1254, was, like Innocent III and Gregory IX, a member of the family of the counts of Segni. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events The chronicle of Matthew Paris ends due to his death. ... Location within France Reims (English traditionally Rheims) (pronounced in French) is a city of northern France, 144 km. ...


Isabel herself never entered the cloister, but from 1260 (or 1263) she followed the rules in her own home near by. Isabel was not altogether satisfied with the first rule drawn up, and therefore submitted through the agency of her brother Louis IX, who had also secured the confirmation of the first rule, a revised rule to Pope Urban IV. Urban approved this new constitution on 27 July 1263. The difference between the two rules consisted for the most part in outward observances and minor alterations. This new rule was also adopted by other French and Italian convents of the Order of St. Clare, but one can by no means say that a distinct congregation was formed on the basis of Isabel's rule. In the new rule Urban IV gives the nuns of Longchamp the official title of sorores minores inclusae, which was doubtlessly intended to emphasize closer union with the Order of Friars Minor (the Franciscans). Urban IV, né Jacques Pantaléon ( 1195 - October 2, 1264), pope (1261-1264), was the son of a cobbler of Troyes, France, studied theology and common law in Paris, became bishop of Verdun, was employed in various missions by Innocent IV, and was made Patriarch of Jerusalem by Alexander IV... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... Events Detmold, Germany was founded. ... Races at Lonchamp - Édouard Manet, 1867 The Hippodrome de Longchamp, commonly referred to as Longchamp, is a 57 hectare horse-racing facility located on the Route des Tribunes in the Bois de Boulogne at Paris, France. ...


Isabella died in her house at Longchamp on 23 February 1270, and was buried in the convent church. After nine days her body was exhumed, when it showed no signs of decay, and many miracles were said to have been wrought at her grave. In 1521 Pope Leo X allowed the Abbey of Longchamp to celebrate her feast with a special office. On 4 June 1637, a second exhumation took place. On 25 January 1688, the nuns obtained permission to celebrate her feast with an octave, and in 1696 the celebration of the feast on 31 August was permitted to the whole Franciscan Order. February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events The Eighth Crusade is launched against Tunis, and ends when its leader, Louis IX of France, dies. ... Events January 3 - Pope Leo X excommunicates Martin Luther. ... Pope Leo X Leo X, né Giovanni di Lorenzo de Medici (December 11, 1475 - December 1, 1521), was the only pope who has bestowed his own name upon his age, and one of the few whose original extraction has corresponded in some measure with the splendour of the pontifical dignity. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (156th in leap years), with 210 days remaining. ... Events February 3 - Tulipmania collapses in Netherlands by government order February 15 - Ferdinand III becomes Holy Roman Emperor December 17 - Shimabara Rebellion erupts in Japan Pierre de Fermat makes a marginal claim to have proof of what would become known as Fermats last theorem. ... January 25 is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events A high-powered conspiracy of notables, the Immortal Seven, invite William and Mary to depose James II of England. ... The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ...


The history of the Abbey of Longchamp had many vicissitudes. The French Revolution closed it, and in 1794 the empty and dilapidated building was offered for sale, but as no one wished to purchase it, it was destroyed. In 1857 the walls were pulled down except one tower, and the grounds were added to the Bois de Boulogne. The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which democrats and republicans overthrew the absolute monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. ... Bois de Boulogne is a park located along the western edge of the 16ème arrondissement of Paris. ...


References

  • This article incorporates text from the public domain Catholic Encyclopedia.
  • Agnes d'Harcourt (third Prioress of Longchamp, 1263&nadsh;1270), Vie de Madame Isabelle, Archives Nationales L. 1021 MSS., Paris.
  • André, Histoire de Ste Isabelle, Carpentras, 1885.
  • Daniélo, Vie de Madame Ste Isabelle, Paris, 1840.
  • Berguin, La Bienheureuse Isabelle de France, Grenoble, 1899.
  • Duchesne, Histoire de l'abbaye royale de Longchamp, 12557ndash;1789, Paris, 1904.
  • Sbaralea, Bull. Franc., III, Rome, 1765, 64-9.
  • Sbaralea, Bull. Franc., II, Rome, 1761, 477-86.

  Results from FactBites:
 
St. Isabel of France (727 words)
As Isabel wished to found a convent of the Order of St. Clare, Louis IX began in 1255 to acquire the necessary land in the Forest of Rouvray, not far from the Seine and in the neighbourhood of Paris.
Isabel herself never entered the cloister, but from 1260 (or 1263) she followed the rules in her own home near by.
Isabel was not altogether satisfied with the first rule drawn up, and therefore submitted through the agency of her brother Louis IX, who had also secured the confirmation of the first rule, a revised rule to Urban IV.
Isabel of France - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (831 words)
Saint Isabel of France (March, 1225 23 February 1270) was the daughter of Louis VIII of France and Blanche of Castile.
As Isabel wished to found a convent of the Order of Poor Ladies of Saint Clare, Louis IX began in 1255 to acquire the necessary land in the Forest of Rouvray-Catillon, not far from the Seine and in the neighbourhood of Paris.
Isabel was not altogether satisfied with the first rule drawn up, and therefore submitted through the agency of her brother Louis IX, who had also secured the confirmation of the first rule, a revised rule to Pope Urban IV.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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