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Saint Helier (Jèrriais: St Hélyi) is one of the twelve parishes and the largest town on Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel. It has a population of about 28,000, and is the seat of government for the Island (although Government House is situated in St. Saviour). Jèrriais is a form of Norman language spoken in Jersey in the Channel Islands. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... The Channel Islands are a group of islands off the coast of Normandy, France, in the English Channel. ... Jump to: navigation, search Satellite view of the English Channel The English Channel, also for some time known as the British Sea (French: La Manche, the sleeve) is the part of the Atlantic Ocean that separates the island of Great Britain from northern France, and joins the North Sea to... Jump to: navigation, search Government House is the name usually given to the residence of Governors-General, Governors and Lieutenant-Governors in the Commonwealth and the former British Empire. ... Government House, official residence of the Lieutenant-Governor, is situated in St. ...


The parish covers a surface area of 5,738 vergées (10.6 sq. km.), being 9% of the total land area of the Island (this includes reclaimed land area of 957 vergées (2 sq. km.). A vergee or vergée is a measure of area. ... Land reclamation is either of two distinct practices. ...


The parish crest is two crossed gold axes on a blue background, symbolising the martyrdom of Helier and the sea. Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ...

Contents


History

The Hermitage of Saint Helier lies in the bay off St. Helier and is accessible on foot at low tide
The Hermitage of Saint Helier lies in the bay off St. Helier and is accessible on foot at low tide

It is thought that the site of St. Helier was settled at the time of the Roman control of Gaul. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1041x1290, 981 KB)Hermitage of Saint Helier in Saint Helier, Jersey Image created by User:Man vyi on 1st May 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1041x1290, 981 KB)Hermitage of Saint Helier in Saint Helier, Jersey Image created by User:Man vyi on 1st May 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Saint Helier, a 6th century ascetic hermit, is patron saint of Jersey in the Channel Islands, and in particular of the town and parish of Saint Helier, the island’s capital. ...


The medieval hagiographies of Helier, the patron saint martyred in Jersey and after whom the parish and town are named, suggest a picture of a small fishing village on the dunes between the marshy land behind and the high-water mark. Saint Helier, a 6th century ascetic hermit, is patron saint of Jersey in the Channel Islands, and in particular of the town and parish of Saint Helier, the island’s capital. ... In several forms of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ...


Although the parish church is now some considerable distance from the sea, at the time of its original construction it was on the edge of the dunes at the closest practical point to the offshore islet called the Hermitage (site of Helier's witness and martyrdom). Before land reclamation and port construction started, boats could be tied up to the churchyard wall on the seaward side. Mōkōlea Rock in Kailua Bay, O‘ahu, Hawai‘i, 2. ...


An Abbey of St. Helier was founded in 1155 on L'Islet, a tidal island adjacent to the Hermitage. Closed at the Reformation, the site of the abbey was fortified to create the castle that replaced Mont Orgueil as the Island's major fortress. The new Elizabeth Castle was named after the Queen by the Governor of Jersey 1600-1603, Sir Walter Raleigh. An abbey (from the Latin abbatia, which is derived from the Syriac abba, father), is a Christian monastery or convent, under the government of an Abbot or an Abbess, who serve as the spiritual father or mother of the community. ... Events Frederick I Barbarossa crowned Holy Roman Emperor. ... A tidal island is a piece of land that is connected to the mainland by a causeway exposed at low tide and submerged at high tide. ... // Events January January 1 - Scotland adopts January 1st as being New Years Day February February 17 - Giordano Bruno burned at the stake for heresy July July 2 - Battle of Nieuwpoort: Dutch forces under Maurice of Nassau defeat Spanish forces under Archduke Albert in a battle on the coastal dunes. ... King James I of England/VII of Scotland, the first monarch to rule the Kingdoms of England and Scotland at the same time Events March 24 - Elizabeth I of England dies and is succeeded by her cousin King James VI of Scotland, uniting the crowns of Scotland and England April... Jump to: navigation, search Alternatively, Professor Walter Raleigh was a scholar and author circa 1900. ...


Until the end of the 18th century, the town consisted chiefly of a string of houses, shops and warehouses stretching along the coastal dunes either side of the Church of St. Helier and the adjacent marketplace (since 1751, Royal Square). La Cohue (a Norman word for courthouse) stood on one side of the square, now rebuilt as the Royal Court and States Chamber (called collectively the States Building). The market cross in the centre of the square was pulled down at the Reformation, and the iron cage for holding prisoners was replaced by a prison gatehouse at the western edge of town. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Events Adam Smith is appointed professor of logic at the University of Glasgow March 31 - The future King George III of the United Kingdom succeeds his father as Prince of Wales. ... The Norman language is a Romance language, one of the Oïl languages. ... A market cross is a structure used to mark a market square in market towns. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ...

The statue of George II in the Royal Square is the zero milestone from which all distances in Jersey are measured
The statue of George II in the Royal Square is the zero milestone from which all distances in Jersey are measured

George II gave £200 towards the construction of a new harbour - previously boats would be beached on a falling tide and unloaded by cart across the sands. A statue of the king (by John Cheere) was erected in the square in 1751 in gratitude, and the market place was renamed Royal Square, although the name has remained Lé Vièr Marchi (the old market) to this day in Jèrriais. Many of St. Helier's road names and street names are bilingual English/French or English/Jèrriais, some having only one name though, although the names in the various languages are not usually translations: distinct naming traditions survive alongside each other. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (963x1366, 993 KB) Statue of King George II (by John Cheere, erected 1751) in the Royal Square, St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (963x1366, 993 KB) Statue of King George II (by John Cheere, erected 1751) in the Royal Square, St. ... Jump to: navigation, search George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... A Spanish kilometre stone A milestone on the Boston Post Road in Harvard Square, Massachusetts, USA Slate milestone near Bangor, Wales A milestone or kilometre sign is one of a series of numbered markers placed along a road at regular intervals, typically at the side of the road or in... Jump to: navigation, search George II (George Augustus) (10 November 1683–25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and Archtreasurer and Prince-Elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 until his death. ... Jèrriais is a form of Norman language spoken in Jersey in the Channel Islands. ...


The Royal Square was also the scene of the Battle of Jersey on January 6, 1781, the last attempt by French forces to seize Jersey. John Singleton Copley's epic painting The Death of Major Pierson captures an imaginative version of the scene. Jump to: navigation, search January 6 is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search Portrait of Copley by Gilbert Stuart. ...


As harbour construction moved development seaward, a growth in population meant that marshland and pasture north of the ribbon of urban activity was built on speculatively. Settlement by English immigrants added quarters of colonial-style town houses to the traditional building stock.


Continuing military threats from France spurred the construction of a citadel fortress, Fort Regent, on the Mont de la Ville, the crag dominating the shallow basin of St. Helier.


Military roads linking coastal defences around the island with St. Helier harbour had the effect of enabling farmers to exploits Jersey's temperate micro-climate and get their crops onto new fast sailing ships and then steamships to get their produce into the markets of London and Paris before the competition. This was the start of Jersey's agricultural prosperity in the 19th century. Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... London is the capital city of the United Kingdom and of England. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...

In 1855 an obelisk was constructed in Broad Street to commemorate the reformer Pierre Le Sueur, five time elected Constable of St. Helier. The monument was restored in 2005 and the fountains restored to working order.

From the 1820s, peace with France and better communications enabled by steamships and railways to coastal ports encouraged an influx of English-speaking residents. Speculative development covered the marshy basin north of the central coastal strip as far as the hills within a period of about 40 years, providing the town with terraces of elegant town houses. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1442x1116, 1148 KB) en: Broad Street, St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1442x1116, 1148 KB) en: Broad Street, St. ...


In the second half of the 19th century, the need to facilitate access to the harbour for hundreds of trucks laden with potatoes and other produce for export prompted a programme of road-widening which swept away many of the ancient buildings of the town centre. Pressure for redevelopment has meant that very few buildings remain in urban St. Helier which date to before the 19th century, giving the town primarily a Regency or Victorian character. Jump to: navigation, search Binomial name Solanum tuberosum L. The potato (plural form: potatoes) (Solanum tuberosum) is a perennial plant of the Solanaceae, or nightshade, family, grown for its starchy tuber. ...


Pierre Le Sueur, reforming Constable of St. Helier, was responsible for installing sewerage and provision of clean water in St. Helier following outbreaks of cholera in the 1830s. An obelisk with fountain in the town centre was raised to his memory following his premature death in office from overwork. A Constable is a person holding a particular office, most commonly that of law-enforcement. ... Jump to: navigation, search Cholera (also called Asiatic cholera) is an infectious disease, caused by bacteria that are typically ingested by drinking water that is contaminated by improper sanitation, or by eating improperly cooked fish, especially shellfish. ... Jump to: navigation, search The Luxor obelisk in the Place de la Concorde in Paris An obelisk is a tall, thin, four-sided, tapering monument which ends in a pyramidal top. ...


The parish is the site of the Jersey Library and Jersey Museum.


Subdivisions

Enlarge
The Parish Hall of St. Helier is the seat of municipal administration

The parish is divided into vingtaines for administrative purposes: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1265x1178, 1049 KB) en: St. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1265x1178, 1049 KB) en: St. ... A Vingtaine (literally group of twenty in French) is a political subdivision of Jersey. ...

  • La Vingtaine de la Ville
    • Canton de Bas de la Vingtaine de la Ville
    • Canton de Haut de la Vingtaine de la Ville
  • La Vingtaine du Rouge Bouillon
  • La Vingtaine de Bas du Mont au Prêtre
  • La Vingtaine de Haut du Mont au Prêtre
  • La Vingtaine du Mont à l'Abbé
  • La Vingtaine du Mont Cochon

Jump to: navigation, search The Vingtaine de la Ville is part of St Helier, and has its own webside here, which contains sites of historical interest, maps,and details of plaques. ...

Politics

For electoral purposes, the parish is divided into 4 districts.

  • St. Helier No. 1 (comprising the Vingtaine de la Ville) elects 3 Deputies
  • St. Helier No. 2 (comprising the Vingtaine de Bas du Mont au Prêtre and Vingtaine de Haut du Mont au Prêtre) elects 3 Deputies
  • St. Helier No. 3 (comprising the Vingtaine du Rouge Bouillon and Vingtaine du Mont à l'Abbé)
  • St. Helier No. 4 (comprising the Vingtaine du Mont Cochon)
votes from polling stations in Nos. 3 and 4 are combined into one district electing 4 Deputies. This district is the largest constituency in the Island.

With the Constable, the parish therefore has 11 representatives in the States of Jersey (out of 53 elected members). A constituency is any cohesive corporate unit or body bound by shared structures, goals or loyalty. ...


Saint

Major article: Helier. Saint Helier, a 6th century ascetic hermit, is patron saint of Jersey in the Channel Islands, and in particular of the town and parish of Saint Helier, the island’s capital. ...


Saint Helier is named for Helier (or Helerius), a 6th century ascetic hermit. The traditional date of his martyrdom is 555 AD. His feast day, marked by an annual municipal and ecumenical pilgrimage to the Hermitage, is on July 16. For other uses, see number 555. ... Jump to: navigation, search Pilgrim at Mecca A pilgrimage is a term primarily used in religion and spirituality of a long journey or search of great moral significance. ... Jump to: navigation, search July 16 is the 197th day (198th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 168 days remaining. ...


Reference

  • Jersey in Figures, 2003 - 2004, published by the States of Jersey


Parishes of Jersey
St Brélade | St Clement | Grouville | St Helier | St John | St Lawrence | St Martin | St Mary | St Ouen | St Peter | St Saviour | Trinity

  Results from FactBites:
 
Helier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (838 words)
Saint Helier, a 6th century ascetic hermit, is patron saint of Jersey in the Channel Islands, and in particular of the town and parish of Saint Helier, the island’s capital.
Helier’s wanderings led him through what is now the village of St.-Hellier in the département of Seine-Maritime in Normandy and eventually to the Cotentin where he sought retreat from the distractions of the world in the monastic community of Saint Marculf at Nantus (Nanteuil, now St.-Marcouf-de-l’Isle in Manche).
Helier’s relics were sent to the abbey of Beaubec (situated in Beaubec-la-Rosière (Seine-Maritime)) where they remained until the destruction of the abbey at the French Revolution.
Saint Helier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1179 words)
Saint Helier (Jèrriais: St Hélyi) is one of the twelve parishes and the largest town on Jersey, the largest of the Channel Islands in the English Channel.
The medieval hagiographies of Helier, the patron saint martyred in Jersey and after whom the parish and town are named, suggest a picture of a small fishing village on the dunes between the marshy land behind and the high-water mark.
An Abbey of St. Helier was founded in 1155 on L'Islet, a tidal island adjacent to the Hermitage.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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