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Encyclopedia > Saint Giles
Saint Giles
Image:Saint Giles closeup.jpg
Hermit
Born Athens, Greece
Died 8th century, France
Feast September 1
Attributes arrow; crosier; hermitage; hind; saint accompanied by a hind
Patronage against noctiphobia; beggars; blacksmiths; breast cancer; breast feeding; cancer patients; cripples; disabled people; Edinburgh Scotland; epilepsy; epileptics; fear of night; forests; handicapped people; hermits; horses; insanity; lepers; leprosy; mental illness; mentally ill people; noctiphobics; physically challenged people; paupers; poor people; rams; spur makers; sterility; woods

Saint Giles (640?-720?) (Latin: Ægidius, French: Gilles, Italian: Egidio) was a 7th-8th century Christian hermit saint. Image File history File links Saint_Giles_closeup. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... Nyctophobia (from Greek νυξ noc-ti-pho-bi-a: night and phobia, also called scotophobia, from σκότοσ - darkness, lygophobia, from lyge - twilight, or achluophobia or noctiphobia) is a pathological fear of the dark. ... Beggars in Samarkand, 1905 Begging includes the various methods used by persons to obtain money, food, shelter, or other necessities from people they encounter during the course of their travels. ... A blacksmith A blacksmith at work A blacksmith at work A blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is a person who creates objects from iron or steel by forging the metal; i. ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... A breastfeeding infant Breastfeeding is the practice of a woman feeding an infant (or sometimes a toddler or a young child) with milk produced from her mammary glands, usually directly from the nipples. ... Although every disease has its patients, to be a cancer patient has a very specific meaning, both to the patients and their relatives and the general public. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Eucalyptus Forest at Swifts Creek in East Gippsland, Victoria, Australia. ... Onuphrius lived as a hermit in the desert of Upper Egypt in the late 4th century A hermit (from the Greek erÄ“mos, signifying desert, uninhabited, hence desert-dweller) is a person who lives to some greater or lesser degree in seclusion and/or isolation from society. ... Binomial name Equus caballus Linnaeus, 1758 The horse (Equus caballus, sometimes seen as a subspecies of the Wild Horse, Equus ferus caballus) is a large odd-toed ungulate mammal, one of ten modern species of the genus Equus. ... Inmates at Bedlam Asylum, as portrayed by William Hogarth Insanity, or madness, is a general term for a semi-permanent, severe mental disorder. ... Leprosy, also known as Hansens disease,[1] is an infectious disease caused by a DNA plasmid (transposon, or ultravirus, a small circle of DNA) carried in Hansens bacillus (the Mycobacterium leprae bacterium) which is thus the vector. ... Mental illness (or emotional disability, cognitive dysfunction) is a broad generic label for a category of illnesses that may include affective or emotional instability, behavioral dysregulation, and/or cognitive dysfunction or impairment. ... A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows his find. ... Binomial name Ovis aries Linnaeus, 1758 The domestic sheep (Ovis aries), the most common species of the sheep genus (Ovis), is a woolly ruminant quadruped which probably descends from the wild mouflon of south-central and south-west Asia. ... A spur is a metal instrument composed of a shank, neck, and prick, rowel (sharp-toothed wheel), or blunted end fastened to the heel of a horseman. ... Infertility is the inability to naturally conceive a child or to carry a pregnancy to full term. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... A Christian is a follower of Jesus of Nazareth, referred to as Christ. ... Onuphrius lived as a hermit in the desert of Upper Egypt in the late 4th century A hermit (from the Greek erÄ“mos, signifying desert, uninhabited, hence desert-dweller) is a person who lives to some greater or lesser degree in seclusion and/or isolation from society. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are usually depicted as having halos. ...

Contents

Life

Giles first lived in retreats near the mouth of the Rhône and by the River Gard, in today's southern France. (The story that he was the son of King Theodore and Queen Pelagia of Athens is probably an embellishment of his early hagiographers.) Starry Night Over the Rhone, by Vincent van Gogh (1888) The River Rhône (French Rhône, Occitan Ròse, Franco-Provençal Roun, standard German Rhone, Valais German Rotten, Italian Rodano) is one of the major rivers of Europe, running through Switzerland and France. ... The Gardon (or Gard) is a river of southern France. ... Athens (Greek: Αθήνα, Athína IPA: ) is the capital and largest city of Greece and the birthplace of democracy. ... Hagiography is the study of saints. ...


Finally he withdrew deep into the forest near Nîmes, where in the greatest solitude he spent many years, his sole companion being a deer, or hind, who in some stories sustains him on its milk. This last retreat was finally discovered by the king's hunters, who had pursued the hind to its place of refuge. An arrow shot at the deer wounded the saint instead, who afterwards became a patron of cripples. The king, who by legend was Wamba, an anachronistic Visigoth, but who must have been (at least in the original story) a Frank due to the period, conceived a high esteem for the hermit, whose humility rejected all honors save some disciples, and built him a monastery in his valley, which he placed under the Benedictine rule. Here Giles died in the early part of the 8th century, with the highest repute for sanctity and miracles. Nîmes (Provençal Occitan: Nimes in both classical and Mistralian norms) is a city and commune of southern France. ... The word Hind can refer to: A female deer, usually the red deer. ... Wamba was king of the Visigoths in Hispania (Iberia) from 672 to 680 CE. // History Religious events In 675 the Third Council of Braga was held in Braga (Bracara), Hispania. ... Migrations The Visigoths were one of two main branches of the Goths, an East Germanic tribe (the Ostrogoths being the other). ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... Monastery of St. ... A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... According to many religions, a miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ...


Legacy

Giles, pictured in the lower left with a hind, is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers
Giles, pictured in the lower left with a hind, is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers

Around his tomb in the abbey sprang up the town of St-Gilles-du-Gard. His cult spread rapidly far and wide throughout Europe in the Middle Ages, as is witnessed by the numberless churches and monasteries dedicated to him in France, Spain, Germany, Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, and Great Britain; by the numerous manuscripts in prose and verse commemorating his virtues and miracles; and especially by the vast concourse of pilgrims who from all Europe flocked to his shrine. Download high resolution version (756x1100, 238 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (756x1100, 238 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Fourteen Holy Helpers The Fourteen Holy Helpers are a group of saints venerated together in Roman Catholicism because prayer to them was thought to be particularly effective, especially against various diseases. ... Saint-Gilles or Saint-Gilles-du-Gard is a commune of the Gard département, in southern France. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus, written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... For albums named Pilgrim, see Pilgrim (album). ...


In 1562 the relics of the saint were secretly transferred to Toulouse to save them from the anger of the Huguenots and the level of pilgrimages declined. With the restoration of a great part of the relics to the church of St. Giles in 1862, and the publicized rediscovery of his former tomb there in 1865, the pilgrimages recommenced. Events Earliest English slave-trading expedition under John Hawkins. ... A relic is an object, especially a piece of the body or a personal item of someone of religious significance, carefully preserved with an air of veneration as a tangible memorial, Relics are an important aspect of Buddhism, some denominations of Christianity, Hinduism, shamanism, and many other personal belief systems. ...   New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Midi-Pyrénées Département Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ... Pilgrim at Mecca In religion and spirituality, a pilgrimage is a long journey or search of great moral significance. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Besides the city of Saint-Gilles, nineteen other cities bear his name. Cities that possess relics of St. Giles include Saint-Gilles, Toulouse and a multitude of other French cities, Antwerp, Brugge and Tournai in Belgium, Cologne and Bamberg in Germany, Rome and Bologna in Italy, Prague and Gran. The lay Community of Sant'Egidio is named after his church in Rome. Giles is also the patron saint of Edinburgh, Scotland.   New city flag (Occitan cross) Traditional coat of arms Motto: (Occitan: For Toulouse, always more) Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région Midi-Pyrénées Département Haute-Garonne (31) Intercommunality Community of Agglomeration of Greater Toulouse Mayor Jean-Luc Moudenc  (UMP) (since 2004) City... The Onze-Lieve-Vrouwekathedraal (Cathedral of our Lady) at the Handschoenmarkt, in the old quarter of Antwerp is the largest cathedral in the Low Countries and home to several triptychs by Baroque painter Rubens. ... Sometimes referred to as the Venice of the North, Bruges has many waterways that run through the city. ... The cathedral of Notre Dame de Tournai Tournai (in Dutch: Doornik) is located 85 kilometers southwest of Brussels on the river Scheldt in the Belgian province of Hainaut. ... Köln redirects here. ... For other meanings, see Bamberg (disambiguation). ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 8th century BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gran may refer to: Esztergom, a city in and former capital and persent primas of Hungary, is best known by its historical German name Gran Gran, Norway Widely used British abbreviation for grandmother (also granny) The German word for grain, and hence a traditional German unit for weight, varying in... The church of SantEgidio, seat of the community of SantEgidio The Community of SantEgidio is a Christian community that is officially recognized by the Catholic Church as a Church public lay association. It claims 50,000 members in more than 70 countries. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Motto: , traditionally rendered in Scots as Wha daur meddle wi me?[1] and in English as No one provokes me with impunity. ...


In medieval art he is depicted with his symbol, the hind. His emblem is also an arrow, and he is the patron saint of cripples. Giles is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, initially invoked as protection against the Black Death. His feast day is September 1. Japanese arrow (ya) and head // Weapon An arrow is a pointed projectile that is shot with a bow. ... In several forms of the church of Christianity, but especially in Roman Catholicism, a patron saint has special affinity for a trade or group. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Fourteen Holy Helpers The Fourteen Holy Helpers are a group of saints venerated together in Roman Catholicism because prayer to them was thought to be particularly effective, especially against various diseases. ... Illustration of the Black Death from the Toggenburg Bible (1411). ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with a saint, and referring to the day as the saints day of that saint. ... September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Master of Saint Gilles is an anonymous Late Gothic painter. The artist was given the title as the first work attributed to him were two works with Saint Giles as the subject now in the National Gallery, London. Saint Gilles and the Hind, (detail) (National Gallery, London) The Master of Saint Gilles was a Franco-Flemish painter active, probably in Paris, about 1500, working in a delicate Late Gothic manner, with rendering of textures and light and faithful depictions of actual interiors that show his affinities with Netherlandish... Gothic art refers to the art of the Gothic cultural movement in northern Europe. ... The National Gallery from Trafalgar Square The National Gallery is an art gallery in London, located on the north side of Trafalgar Square. ...


The fifth book in the Brother Cadfael murder mystery series by Ellis Peters is titled The Leper of Saint Giles. Brother Cadfael is the fictional detective in a series of murder mysteries by the late Edith Pargeter writing under the name Ellis Peters. ... Edith Mary Pargeter, BEM (September 28, 1913–October 14, 1995) was a prolific British author of works in many categories, especially history andhistorical fiction, and was also honoured for her translations of Czech classics; she is probably best known for her murder mysteries, both historical and modern. ...


List of locations and churches

The steeple of St Giles' Church in Wrexham is one of the Seven Wonders of Wales
The steeple of St Giles' Church in Wrexham is one of the Seven Wonders of Wales

Churches and other locations named after Giles include: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1772x1353, 213 KB) Summary A photo of Wrexhams St Giles church. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1772x1353, 213 KB) Summary A photo of Wrexhams St Giles church. ... St Giles Church is the parish church of Wrexham, Wales, and its tower is traditionally one of the Seven Wonders of Wales. ... Wrexham (Welsh: Wrecsam) is an industrial town in north-east Wales, close to the English border with Cheshire. ... The Seven Wonders of Wales is a traditional list of notable landmarks in Wales, commemorated in an anonymous rhyme: Pistyll Rhaeadr and Wrexham steeple, Snowdons mountain without its people, Overton yew trees, St Winefride wells, Llangollen bridge and Gresford bells. ...

United Kingdom
Other locations
  • see Saint-Gilles, for a list of places named after him in France.
  • Sant'Egidio in Trastevere, Rome, after which the Community of Sant'Egidio is named.
  • St Giles Presbyterian Church in Hurstville, Sydney, Australia
  • St Giles Church in Brunswick, Germany
  • San Gil Church (built 14th-16th centuries) in Burgos, Spain
  • St Aegidius Church in Bardejov, Slovakia (built 13th-15th centuries)
  • St Giles Church, Ottawa Ontario, Canada

Categories: British churches | London places of worship | Stub ... London (pronounced ) is the capital city of England and the United Kingdom. ... St Giles Cathedral A prominent feature of the Edinburgh skyline, St Giles Cathedral decorates the midpoint of the Royal Mile with its rounded hollow-crown tower. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Dùn Èideann () in Scottish Gaelic) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... Shown within Lincolnshire Geography Status: City Region: East Midlands Admin. ... Map sources for Chalfont St Giles at grid reference SU985935 Chalfont St Giles is a village in south east Buckinghamshire in the United Kingdom, on the edge of the Chilterns, 25 miles from London, and near to Seer Green, Jordans, Chalfont St Peter, Little Chalfont and Amersham. ... Map sources for Rowley Regis at grid reference SO9687 Rowley Regis is a town in the Sandwell borough of the West Midlands county, and a part of the Black Country. ... // The West Midlands is an area of central England. ... St Giles Church is the parish church of Wrexham, Wales, and its tower is traditionally one of the Seven Wonders of Wales. ... Wrexham (Welsh: Wrecsam) is an industrial town in north-east Wales, close to the English border with Cheshire. ... The Seven Wonders of Wales is a traditional list of notable landmarks in Wales, commemorated in an anonymous rhyme: Pistyll Rhaeadr and Wrexham steeple, Snowdons mountain without its people, Overton yew trees, St Winefride wells, Llangollen bridge and Gresford bells. ... Pontefract Castle in its heyday Pontefract (from the Latin for Broken Bridge) is a town in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near the A1 (or Great North Road), the M62 motorway, and Castleford. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Godshill is a village in Hampshire, United Kingdom, close to Fordingbridge. ... Bucklers Hard on the Beaulieu River For other uses, see New Forest (disambiguation). ... Hampshire (abbr. ... View of St Giles including St Benets Hall. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Shown within Norfolk Geography Status: City (1195) Government Region: East of England Administrative County: Norfolk Area: - Total Ranked 322nd 39. ... is a grade I listed parish church in Gilesgate, Durham, England. ... Gilesgate is a place in County Durham, in England. ... Statistics Population: 42,939 (2001) Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: NZ274424 Administration District: City of Durham Shire county: Durham Region: North East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Durham Historic county: Durham Services Police force: County Durham Ambulance service: North East Post office and telephone... Saint Giles (Latin Ægidius) was a 7th-8th century Christian hermit saint. ... The church of SantEgidio The Church of SantEgidio is part of a former monastery of Carmelite nuns named after Saint Giles. ... Logo of the rione A typical narrow alley in Trastevere seen from the lower slopes of the Gianicolo hill Piazza Santa Maria in Trastevere at night Trastevere is rione XIII of Rome, on the west bank of the Tiber, south of Vatican City. ... Nickname: The Eternal City Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 8th century BC Mayor Walter Veltroni Area    - City 1,285 km²  (496. ... The church of SantEgidio, seat of the community of SantEgidio The Community of SantEgidio is a Christian community that is officially recognized by the Catholic Church as a Church public lay association. It claims 50,000 members in more than 70 countries. ... The cathedral Our Lady of Burgos. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...

Other Saint Giles

He shares his feast day with another St Giles, an Italian hermit of the 10th century and a Blessed Giles, (d. about 1203) a Cistercian abbot of Castaneda in the Diocese of Astorga, Spain. Blessed Aegidius of Assisi is also known as Blessed Giles. As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... Events April 16 - Philip II of France enters Rouen, leading to the eventual unification of Normandy and France. ... The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Castaneda is a surname and may refer to: Carlos Castaneda, American author of shamanism Cacho Castaneda, Argentine singer and actor Maureen Castaneda, American businesswoman Movita Castaneda, American actress Hector-Neri Castaneda, philosopher [edit] Places Castaneda, Switzerland, a village in the Grisons Alfonso Castaneda, Nueva Vizcaya, a fifth class municipality in... Episcopal Palace of Astorga Astorga is a town in Spain, in the province of León. ... Blessed Aegidius of Assisi (also known as Giles of Assisi) was one of the original companions of St. ...

Saints Portal

Image File history File links Gloriole. ...

Reference

  1. ^ The Buildings of England: Worcestershire, Nikolaus Pevsner, 1963 p89

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
St Giles church, London - history of our Patron Saint (626 words)
Giles, known in early writings as Aegidius, is reputed to have been born in Athens the son of Theodore and Pelagia in about 640.
Legend says that Giles consented to be the founder of the monastery near Nimes about 673, which flourished till the Saracen invasion, when it was was burned down and, according to legend, he and his monks took refuge with Charles Martel, aiding him by their prayers in his great battle for Christianity in the West.
Giles became one of the most popular saints in the West, the patron saint of woodland, of lepers, beggars, cripples, and of those struck by sudden misery, and driven into solitude like the hind, which, according to one tradition, came to St. Giles wounded.
Saint Giles at AllExperts (650 words)
Saint Giles (640?-720?) (Latin: Ægidius, French: Gilles, Italian: Egidio) was a 7th-8th century Christian hermit saint.
In 1562 the relics of the saint were secretly transferred to Toulouse to save them from the anger of the Huguenots and the level of pilgrimages declined.
Giles is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, initially invoked as protection against the Black Death.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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