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Encyclopedia > Saint Denis Basilica
West façade of Saint Denis
West façade of Saint Denis
Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance
Depiction of the Trinity over the main entrance

The Basilica of Saint Denis (French: Basilique de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is the famous burial site of the French monarchs, comparable to Westminster Abbey in England. Almost all the kings of France were buried in the Basilica, but unlike Westminster Abbey it was not used for coronations (a role designated to the Cathedral of Reims). The basilica is located in Saint-Denis, now a northern suburb of Paris. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (726x968, 267 KB)Front of Saint Denis Basilica (July 2002) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (726x968, 267 KB)Front of Saint Denis Basilica (July 2002) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links France_Paris_St-Denis_Trinity. ... Image File history File links France_Paris_St-Denis_Trinity. ... For other uses, see Trinity (disambiguation). ... This is a list of famous cemeteries, mausoleums and other places people are buried, world-wide. ... Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France See also List of Queens and Empresses of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later... The Abbeys western façade The Collegiate Church of St Peter, Westminster, which is almost always referred to by its original name of Westminster Abbey, is a mainly Gothic church, on the scale of a cathedral (and indeed often mistaken for one), in Westminster, London, just to the west... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... St. ... Façade of the Notre-Dame de Reims The Notre-Dame de Reims (Our Lady of Rheims) is the Cathedral of Reims, where the kings of France were once crowned. ... Saint Denis can refer to: a Christian saint: see Denis Seine-Saint-Denis a département of France Several communes in France: Saint-Denis,in the Aude département Saint-Denis, in the Gard département Saint-Denis, in the Seine-Saint-Denis département, home of Saint Denis Basilica... Housing subdivision near Union, Kentucky, a suburb of Cincinnati, Ohio. ... City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Paris Eiffel tower as seen from the esplanade du Trocadéro. ...


Saint Denis is a patron saint of France and, according to legend, was the first bishop of Paris. A shrine was erected at his burial place. There Dagobert I, king of the Franks, who reigned from 628 to 637, founded the Abbey of Saint Denis, a Benedictine monastery. The shrine itself was created by Eligius, a goldsmith by training. It was described in the early vita of Saint Eligius: Saint Denis, also known as Denise, Dionysius, or Dennis is a Christian saint, bishop of Paris, martyr, and a patron saint of France. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are usually depicted as having halos. ... The archbishop of Paris is one of twenty-three archbishops in France. ... Dagobert I (c. ... For other uses, see Franks (disambiguation). ... Events Khusro II of Persia overthrown Pippin of Landen becomes Mayor of the Palace Brahmagupta writes the Brahmasphutasiddhanta Births Deaths Empress Suiko of Japan Theodelinda, queen of the Lombards Categories: 628 ... Events Arabs take Jerusalem Arabs take Aleppo Battle of al-Qadisiyah: Arabs defeat Persian army, take Persian capital of Ctesiphon Battle of Mag Rath: Dalriada influence in Ulster greatly reduced Births Deaths Categories: 637 ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... Monastery of St. ... Signature of St. ... Vita or VITA can refer to any of a number of things: Vita (Latin for life) can also refer to a brief biography, often that of a saint (i. ...

Above all, Eligius fabricated a mausoleum for the holy martyr Denis in the city of Paris with a wonderful marble ciborium over it marvelously decorated with gold and gems. He composed a crest [at the top of a tomb] and a magnificent frontal and surrounded the throne of the altar with golden axes in a circle. He placed golden apples there, round and jeweled. He made a pulpit and a gate of silver and a roof for the throne of the altar on silver axes. He made a covering in the place before the tomb and fabricated an outside altar at the feet of the holy martyr. So much industry did he lavish there, at the king's request, and poured out so much that scarcely a single ornament was left in Gaul and it is the greatest wonder of all to this very day. [1]

None of this work survives. A Ciborium is a container, used in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and related Churches rituals to store Holy Communion. ...

Contents

Architecture

The northwest nave of Saint Denis at sunset
The northwest nave of Saint Denis at sunset

The church is an architectural landmark as it was the first major structure built in the Gothic style , although the ambulatory at the chevet, or east end is the only remaining portion of this building to remain. The Gothic church was begun in 1136[2] by the Abbot Suger (1081-1155), and consecrated on the 11th of June 1144 after only four years of work.[3] The majority of the present day structure, however, is a later construction from the end of the 13th century. [4] Among other innovative features, one of the stained glass windows contained the first example of the typical Jesse Tree composition. Image File history File links Interior Photo of Saint Denis Church in north Paris. ... Image File history File links Interior Photo of Saint Denis Church in north Paris. ... Links to full descriptions of the elements of a Gothic floorplan are also found at the entry Cathedral diagram. ... Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... The ambulatory (Med. ... Events Completion of the Saint Denis Basilica in Paris Peter Abelard writes the Historia Calamitatum, detailing his relationship with Heloise People of Novgorod rebel against the hereditary prince Vsevolod and depose him Births Amalric I of Jerusalem William of Newburgh, English historian (died 1198) Deaths November 15 - Margrave Leopold III... Suger of Saint-Denis on a medieval window Suger (c. ... Events Corfu taken from Byzantine Empire by Robert Guiscard, Italy Byzantine emperor Nicephorus III is overthrown by Alexius I Comnenus, ending the Middle Byzantine period and beginning the Comnenan dynasty Alexius I helps defend Albania from the Normans (the first recorded mention of Albania), but is defeated at the Battle... Events Frederick I Barbarossa crowned Holy Roman Emperor. ... Events Louis VII capitulates to Pope Celestine II and so earns the popes absolution Pope Celestine II is succeeded by Pope Lucius II December 24 - Edessa falls to Zengi Montauban, France, is founded First recorded example of an anti-Semitic blood libel in England Normandy comes under Angevin control... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Strictly speaking, stained glass is glass that has been painted with silver stain and then fired. ... The oldest complete Jesse Tree window is in Chartres Cathedral, 1145. ...


Burial site

The abbey is where the kings of France and their families were buried for centuries and is therefore often referred to as the "royal necropolis of France". All but three of the monarchs of France from the 10th century until 1789 have their remains here. The abbey church contains some fine examples of cadaver tombs. The effigies of many of the kings and queens are on their tombs, but during the French Revolution, these tombs were opened by workers under orders from revolutionary officials. The bodies were removed and dumped in two large pits nearby. Archaeologist Alexandre Lenoir saved many of the monuments from the same revolutionary officials by claiming them as artworks for his Museum of French Monuments. View of the Etruscan necropolis of Banditaccia, in Cerveteri, Italy. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 10th century was that century which lasted from 901 to 1000. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Beneath Masaccios fresco of the Trinity painted in 1425-28 in Santa Maria Novella, Florence, is a painted representation of a cadaver tomb A cadaver tomb (or memento mori tomb, Latin for reminder of death) is a sarcophagus that resembles a carved stone bunk-bed with the deceased shown... i heart kate young The French Revolution was a period of major political and social change in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to... The protection in France known as Monument historique is a State procedure by which heritage is instituted for a building or a specific part of a building, a collection of buildings or an entire neighborhood, plus gardens, bridges, and other structures because of their architectural and historical importance. ...


The bodies of the beheaded King Louis XVI, Queen Marie Antoinette, Madame Elisabeth (the King's sister) were not buried in Saint Denis. They were buried in the churchyard of the Madeleine and covered with quicklime. The body of the Dauphin, who died of an illness, was buried in an unmarked grave in a Parisian churchyard near the Temple. The Maiden, an older Scottish design. ... Léglise de la Madeleine, or Léglise Sainte-Marie-Madeleine (or simply La Madeleine), is a church in a commanding position in the 8th arrondissement of Paris, in its present form designed as a temple to the glory of Napoleons army. ... Calcium oxide (CaO), commonly known as lime or quicklime, is a widely used chemical compound. ...


Napoleon Bonaparte reopened the church in 1806, but the royal remains were left in their mass-graves. Following Napoleon's first exile to Elba, the Bourbons briefly returned to power. They ordered a search for the corpses of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette, the few remains, a few bones that were presumably the king's and a clump of greyish matter containing a lady's garter, were found on January 21, 1815, brought to St. Denis and buried in the crypt. In 1817 the mass-graves containing all the other remains were opened but it was impossible to distinguish any one from the collection of bones. As such, the remains were placed in an ossuary in St. Denis' crypt, behind two marble plates with the names of the hundreds of members of the succeeding French Dynasties that were interred in the church duly recorded. Bonaparte as general Napoleon Bonaparte ( 15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution and was the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from November 11, 1799 to May 18, 1804, then as Emperor of the French (Empereur des... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Elba (bottom centre) from space, February 1994. ... Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... Louis XVI, King of France Louis XVI (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... January 21 is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... Crypt is also a commonly used name of water trumpets, aquatic plants. ... 1817 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... An ossuary is a chest, building, well or site made to serve as the final resting place of human skeletal remains. ...


King Louis XVIII, on his death in 1824, was buried in the center of the crypt, near the graves of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. The coffins of members of the royal Family that died in between 1815 and 1830 were also placed in the vaults. Under the direction of architect Viollet-le-Duc, famous for his work on Notre-Dame de Paris, the monuments that were taken to the Museum of French Monuments were returned to the church. The corpse of King Louis VII, who had been buried at the Abbey at Saint-Pont and whose tomb had not been touched by the revolutionaries, was brought to St. Denis and buried in the crypt. In 2004 the mummified heart of the Dauphin, the boy that would have been Louis XVII, was sealed into the wall of the crypt. Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Eugène Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc (January 27, 1814 – September 17, 1879) was a French architect and theorist, famous for his restorations of medieval buildings. ... This article is about the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris. ... Louis VII the Younger (French: Louis VII le Jeune) (1120 – September 18, 1180) was King of France from 1137 to 1180. ... Coat of Arms of the Dauphins of France. ... Louis XVII of France (March 27, 1785 - June 8, 1795) also known as Louis-Charles, Duke of Normandy (1785-1789), Louis-Charles, Dauphin of Viennois (1789-1791), and Louis-Charles, Prince Royal of France (1791-1793), was the son of King Louis XVI of France and Marie Antoinette, who never...


Tombs

Except for three members of the royal families of France ruling the country since 496 all are buried in the Saint Denis Basilica. The most prominent are: Coronation of Louis VIII and Blanche of Castile at Reims in 1223; a miniature from the Grandes Chroniques de France, painted in the 1450s, kept at the National Library of France See also List of Queens and Empresses of France The monarchs of France ruled, first as kings and later...

Childebert I (Rheims, c. ... Queen Frédégonde, seated on her Throne, gives orders to two young Men of Térouanne to assassinate Sigebert, King of Austrasia. ... Chilpéric I of Neustria was born c. ... Clovis I (variously spelled Chlodowech or Chlodwig, giving modern French Louis and modern German Ludwig) (c. ... Dagobert I (c. ... Clovis II (or Chlodowech or Chlodwig, modern French Louis, modern German Ludwig) (637-November 27, 655) succeeded his father Dagobert I in 639 as King of Neustria and Burgundy. ... For the 13th century titular King of Hungary, see Charles Martel dAnjou. ... Carloman (died December 12, 884), king of Western Francia, was the eldest son of King Louis the Stammerer, and became king, together with his brother Louis III, on his fathers death in 879. ... Pippin the Younger Pippin the Younger or Pepin[1] (714 – September 24, 768), often known under the mistranslation Pippin the Short or the ordinal Pippin III, was the king of the Franks from 751 to 768 and is best known for being the father of Charlemagne, or Charles the Great. ... Bertrada of Laon, also called Bertha of the Big Foot, (720 - July 12, 783) was a Frankish queen. ... Philip III the Bold ( French: Philippe III le Hardi) (April 3, 1245 - October 5, 1285) reigned as King of France from 1270 to 1285. ... Philippe IV, recumbent statue on his tomb, Royal Necropolis, Saint Denis Basilica Philip IV (French: Philippe IV; 1268–November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Isabella of Aragon (1247 – January 28, 1271), infanta of Aragon, was, by marriage, Queen consort of France in the Middle Ages from 1270 to 1271. ... Leo (also Leon or Levon) VI of Armenia (1342-1393) ruled the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia from 1374 to 1393. ... Francis I (François Ier in French) (September 12, 1494 – March 31, 1547), called the Father and Restorer of Letters (le Père et Restaurateur des Lettres), was crowned King of France in 1515 in the cathedral at Reims and reigned until 1547. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Catherine de Medici, c. ... Francis II (French: François II) (January 19, 1544 – December 5, 1560) was a King of France (1559 – 1560). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Louis XV of France (February 15, 1710 – May 10, 1774), the Beloved (French: le Bien-Aimé), was King of France from 1715 until his death. ... Louis XVI, King of France Louis XVI (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) ruled as King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then as King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... Marie-Antoinette, Queen of France and Archduchess of Austria (born November 1755 – executed 16 October 1793) Daughter of Maria Theresa of Austria, wife of Louis XVI and mother of Louis XVII. She was guillotined at the height of the French Revolution. ... Louis XVIII (November 17, 1755 - September 16, 1824) was King of France and Navarre from 1814 (although he declared that he considered his reign to have begun in 1795) until his death in 1824, with a brief break in 1815 due to Napoleons return in the Hundred Days. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Vita S. Eligius, edited by Levison, on-line at Medieval Sourcebook
  2. ^ citation needed
  3. ^ H. Honour and J. Fleming, The Visual Arts: A History. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2005. ISBN 0-13-193507-0
  4. ^ It has been argued (most recently by architectural historian Dan Cruickshank in "Britain's Best Buildings" for the BBC) that Durham Cathedral, as well as being a superb example of Romanesque architecture, also contains the first evidence of Gothic design. The nave at Durham contains pointed traverses and pointed arches while flying buttresses are concealed over the aisles - the main elements of Gothic, 20 years before this style was seen elsewhere in Europe.

Dan Cruickshank Professor Dan Cruickshank (born 1949) is an architectural historian and television presenter, currently working for the BBC, and lives in Spitalfields, London. ... Durham Cathedral silhouetted against the sunset Durham Cathedral from nearby The Rose Window in the Chapel of the Nine Altars. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gothic architecture is a style of architecture, particularly associated with cathedrals and other churches, which flourished in Europe during the high and late medieval period. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 752 KB) Saint Fulrade Abbé de Lièpvre, Haut-Rhin, France Photographie personnelle, prise le 28 juillet 2005 Copyright © Christian Amet File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (768x1024, 752 KB) Saint Fulrade Abbé de Lièpvre, Haut-Rhin, France Photographie personnelle, prise le 28 juillet 2005 Copyright © Christian Amet File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Saint Fulrad ( Fulrade) (710—July 16, 784) was abbot of St. ...

See also

This is a list of famous cemeteries, mausoleums and other places people are buried, world-wide. ... Amiens floorplan: massive piers support the west end towers; transepts are abbreviated; seven radiating chapels form the chevet reached from the ambulatory This article discusses cathedral diagrams. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Saint Denis Basilica

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikimedia Commons logo by Reid Beels The Wikimedia Commons (also called Commons or Wikicommons) is a repository of free content images, sound and other multimedia files. ...

Gallery

Coordinates: 48°56′08″N, 2°21′35″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Saint Denis Basilica - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (861 words)
Almost all the kings of France were buried in the Basilica, but unlike Westminster Abbey it was not used for coronations (a role relegated to the Cathedral of Reims).
Saint Denis is a patron saint of France and, according to legend, was the first bishop of Paris.
The Saint Denis Gothic structure that we know and see today was begun in 1136 by the Abbot Suger (1081-1155), but the major construction was not completed until the end of the 13th century.
Saint-Denis - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1181 words)
Saint-Denis is home to the royal necropolis of Saint Denis Basilica and was also the location of the associated abbey.
Later his grave became a shrine and a pilgrimage center, with the building of the Abbey of Saint Denis, and the settlement was renamed Saint-Denis.
Saint Denis, the first bishop of Paris and patron saint of France, was martyred in about 250 and buried in the cemetery of Catolacus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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