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Encyclopedia > Saint Croix
Saint Croix from space, January 1993
Saint Croix from space, January 1993

Saint Croix is one of the United States Virgin Islands, a United States territory, in the Caribbean. It is the largest of the U.S. Virgin Islands being 28 by 7 miles (45 by 11 km). ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (640x636, 92 KB) Saint Croix Island, United States Virgin Islands - January 1993 image description here File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (640x636, 92 KB) Saint Croix Island, United States Virgin Islands - January 1993 image description here File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Caribbean, (Spanish: Caribe; French: Caraïbe or more commonly Antilles; Dutch: Cariben or Caraïben, or more commonly Antillen) or the West Indies, is a group of islands and countries which are in or border the Caribbean Sea which lies on the Caribbean Plate. ...

Contents


History

It was inhabited by Arawaks and Caribs prior to European colonization of the Americas. Christopher Columbus visited there on November 14, 1493 giving it the name Santa Cruz. His initial visit led to a battle in which one Spaniard and one Carib were killed. This heralded warfare between the Spaniards and Caribs which lasted for over one hundred years until the Spanish abandoned their colony. In the seventeenth century the island was colonised by Dutch and English settlers, who were soon in conflict with one another. Eventually the Dutch abandoned their settlement, and then the English settlement was destroyed by the Spanish who retook the island in 1650. However they on their turn were immediately ousted by the French. The term Arawak (from aru, the Lokono word for cassava flour), was used to designate the friendly Amerindians encountered by the Spanish in the Caribbean. ... Carib or Island Carib is the name of a people of the Lesser Antilles islands, after whom the Caribbean Sea was named; their name for themselves was Kalinago for men and Kallipuna for women. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – 20 May 1506) was an Italian explorer and trader who crossed the Atlantic Ocean and reached the Americas on October 12, 1492 under the flag of Castile. ... November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 47 days remaining. ... 1493 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the British Isles Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st UK... // Events June 23 - Claimant King Charles II of England, Scotland and Ireland arrives in Scotland, the only of the three Kingdoms that has accepted him as ruler. ...


The island was owned by the Knights of St John after being bequeathed by De Poincy, Governor of the French colony of St Kitts in 1660. However they sold it to the French West India Company in 1665. Under Governor Dubois the colony became profitable with over 90 plantations growing such crops as tobacco, cotton, sugar cane, and indigo. After Dubois' death the colony declined and the island was abandoned by Europeans until 1733 when it was sold to the Danish West India and Guinea Company. This company placed no national restrictions on colonists and soon attracted Spanish Sephardic Jews, Huguenots, and English settlers, the last of which came to dominate the Island. Sugar became the major crop. However the development of sugar beet in Europe undermined the economy of the colony. The Knights Hospitaller (also known by such names as Knights of Rhodes, Knights of Malta, Cavaliers of Malta, and Order of St John of Jerusalem) is a tradition which began as a Benedictine nursing Order founded in Jerusalem, following the First Crusade, ca. ... In various forms, France had colonial possessions since the beginning of the 17th century until the 1960s. ... Saint Kitts and Nevis is an island nation in the Caribbean. ... Events Expulsion of the Carib indigenous people from Martinique by French occupying forces. ... Events March 4 - Start of the Second Anglo-Dutch War. ... Species N. glauca N. longiflora N. rustica N. sylvestris N. tabacum Ref: ITIS 30562 as of August 26, 2005 Tobacco (, L.) refers to a genus of broad-leafed plants of the nightshade family indigenous to North and South America, or to the dried and cured leaves of such plants. ... Cotton From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. ... Species Ref: ITIS 42058 as of 2004-05-05 Sugarcane is one of six species of a tall tropical southeast Asian grass (Family Poaceae) having stout fibrous jointed stalks whose sap at one time was the primary source of sugar. ... Indigo dye indigo molecule Indigo dye is an important dyestuff with a distinctive blue color (see indigo). ... Events February 12 - British colonist James Oglethorpe founds Savannah, Georgia. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France, or historically as the French Calvinists. ... Two sugar beets - the one on the left has been cultivated to be smoother than the traditional beet, so that it traps less soil. ...


Slavery was abolished in 1848, but in 1862, St. Croix received a shipload of East Indians that were indentured on the island for five years. There was a revolt by former slaves in 1878 when much of Frederiksted, the major town was burnt. The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... 1848 is a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Frederiksted is a city on the west end of the U.S. Virgin Island of St. ...


In 1917, the Virgin Islands were sold by Denmark to the United States of America for $25 million. In return, the United States backed Denmark's claim to Greenland. 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...


The island suffered major damage in September 1989 when it was struck by Hurricane Hugo. Look up September in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hurricane Hugo was a destructive Category 5 Atlantic hurricane that struck Puerto Rico, St. ...


Although the U.S. Virgin Islands remain under the U.S. flag, the islands are an unincorporated territory with a non-voting delegate to the United States House of Representatives. Although taxpaying citizens, residents of the islands have no vote in national elections. An incorporated territory of the United States is a specific area under the jurisdiction of the United States, over which the United States Congress has determined that the United States Constitution is to be applied in its entirety, in the same manner as it applies to the individual U.S... The chamber of the United States House of Representatives is located in the south wing of the Capitol building, in Washington, D.C.. The Media:United States House of Representatives is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States. ...


Geography

A 1754 Danish map of the island
A 1754 Danish map of the island

There are two towns on the island; Christiansted with a 2004 population of 3,000 and Frederiksted with a 2004 population of 830. The total population of the island is about 50,000. Inhabitants are called "Crucians" and English is the most common language with some Creole and Spanish also spoken. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (991x665, 122 KB)A 1754 map of the island of St Croix by Danish cartographer I.M. Beck. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (991x665, 122 KB)A 1754 map of the island of St Croix by Danish cartographer I.M. Beck. ... 1754 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Christiansted is a town on St. ... Frederiksted is a city on the west end of the U.S. Virgin Island of St. ...


Fort Christiansvaern built in 1749 and other buildings are maintained by the National Park Service as the Christiansted National Historic Site. Events While in debtors prison, John Cleland writes Fanny Hill (Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure). ... The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. ... Christiansted is a town on St. ...


Buck Island Reef National Monument preserves a 176 acre (71 ha) island just north of Saint Croix and the surrounding reefs. This is a popular destination for snorkelers, and it is the only underwater national park in the United States. Buck Island Reef National Monument, or just Buck Island is a small, uninhabited, 176-acre island about 1. ...


There are several scuba diving companies operating from Christiansted. Off the north coast of the island, there are many good destinations for diving, featuring scenic coral reefs, clear water, and abundant tropical fish.


Point Udall on the island is proclaimed as the easternmost point in the United States. (However, that distinction actually belongs to Saipan, the largest of the Northern Mariana Islands in the Pacific Ocean) Aerial view of Udall Point. ...


St. Croix lies at 17°45′N 64°45′W. The island has an area of a little over eighty square miles (207 km²). The terrain is rugged, though not extremely so. The highest point on the island, Mount Eagle, is 1,165 feet (355 m) high. Most of the east end is quite hilly and steep, as is the north side from Christiansted west. From the north side hills a fairly even plain slopes down to the south coast: this was the prime sugar land on the island. The trade wind blows more or less along the length of the island, and the hills of the western part of the island receive a good deal more rain than the east end: annual rainfall is on the whole extremely variable, averaging perhaps forty inches (1000 mm) a year. Fairly severe and extended drought has always been a problem, particularly considering the lack of fresh ground water. Desalination is an option, however most residential homes have a built-in cistern used to collect rain water. Desalination or desalinization refers to any of several processes that remove the excess salt and other minerals from water in order to obtain fresh water suitable for animal consumption or irrigation, and if almost all of the salt is removed, for human consumption, sometimes producing table salt as a by... A cistern (Middle English cisterne, from Latin cisterna, from cista, box, from Greek kistê, basket) is a receptacle for holding liquids, usually water. ...


Economy

St. Croix is home to HOVENSA, one of the worlds largest oil refineries. HOVENSA is a joint venture between Hess Oil Virgin Islands Corp. (HOVIC), a division of Amerada Hess, and the government of Venezuela. The Amerada Hess Corporation NYSE: AHC is an integrated oil company based in New York City. ...


St. Croix is also home to the Cruzan Rum Distillery, makers of Cruzan Rum. The Cruzan Rum Distillery was founded in 1760, and for many years used locally grown sugar cane to produce a single "dark" style rum. The distillery now imports sugar cane molasses from other caribbean islands, primarily from the Dominican Republic. In recent years Cruzan Rum, along with Bacardi from Puerto Rico and Goslings from Bermuda, has also contributed to the resurgence of "single barrel" super-premium rum. Caribbean rum, circa 1941 Rum is a distilled beverage made from sugarcane by-products such as molasses and sugarcane juice by a process of fermentation and distillation. ... The Bacardi logo The Cathedral Of Rum at Distillery in Puerto Rico near San Juan Aerial view of Bacardis factory in Cataňo, near San Juan. ...


Population

While locals call themselves "Crucians", there is much debate as to what constitutes a "real" Crucian. Most people feel that as long as you were "bahn 'ya" ("born here", on the island) you can claim to be Crucian.


In the late 1990s an attempt was made to legislate the definition of "Crucian" as anyone who could trace their ancestry to 1927, the year in which Virgin Islanders were given U.S. citizenship. This effort, by a select group of nationalist senators, eventually failed after much public outcry.


Transportation

St. Croix has an airport with regular flights from the U.S. mainland and Puerto Rico; flights are also available to nearby islands. Although St. Croix is a U.S. territory, travelers do need to go through Customs and present a passport before returning to the continental United States. (U.S. citizens are not required to carry a passport when traveling to the USVI, although carrying photo identification and a copy of a birth certificate is suggested.) Photo identification is generally used to define any form of identification that includes a photograph of the holder. ...


Island roads tend to be narrow and often take sharp turns. Cars drive on the left hand side of the road. There are automobile rental agencies on the island, but it is often helpful to make reservations in advance. There is a public bus service, but this can be unreliable at times. Taxis are a more common means of transport, particularly for tourists; expect to spend around US$20 for a taxi ride to or from the airport.


In addition to taxis and buses, St. Croix has shared taxis, locally known as "Taxi Buses" (these may also be found on other U.S. Virgin Islands). Taxi Buses are full-sized vans which follow a more-or-less predefined route from one end of the island to the other. These Taxi Buses are generally privately owned and operated; they do not follow a regular schedule, and there are no pre-specified stops. Instead, people simply wait by the side of the road until a Taxi Bus approaches, then flag the driver down by waving. Likewise, when a rider is approaching his or her destination, a simple, "Stop up here at the next intersection!" will suffice. While often less costly than a public bus or regular taxi (most Taxi Buses charge a flat rate for the trip, regardless of where a rider gets on and off), this informal system of transportation may be confusing or intimidating for someone unfamiliar with local customs. In many countries (especialy developing countries) the main system for public transport involves share taxis. ...


See also



The Danish West Indies (DWI, Dansk Vest Indien) are a former colony of Denmark in the Caribbean, now known as the U.S. Virgin Islands. ... Denmark had a colonial empire from the 18th century until the 20th. ... This is a history of the Kingdom of Denmark and the areas comprising modern day Denmark. ... Tranquebar, 1600. ...

Flag of the United States Virgin Islands

  Territory of the Virgin Islands of the United States  

Geography | Economy | Demographics | Communications | Transportation Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_States_Virgin_Islands. ... Population: 120,917 (July 2000 est. ... Telephones - main lines in use: 58,000 (1999) Telephones - mobile cellular: 2,000 (1992) Telephone system: domestic: modern, uses fiber-optic cable and microwave radio relay international: submarine cable and satellite communications; satellite earth stations - NA Radio broadcast stations: AM 5, FM 11, shortwave 0 (1998) Radios: 107,000 (2003...

Government:

Politics | Governors | Congressional Delegates | Senators | Elections Country name: conventional long form: Virgin Islands of the United States conventional short form: Virgin Islands former: Danish West Indies Data code: VQ Dependency status: organized, unincorporated territory of the US with policy relations between the Virgin Islands and the US under the jurisdiction of the Office of Insular Affairs... List of U.S. Virgin Islands Governors 1917 - 1917 Edwin Taylor Pollock 1917 - 1919 James Harrison Oliver 1919 - 1921 Joseph Wallace Oman 1921 - 1922 Sumner Ely Wetmore Kittelle 1922 - 1923 Henry Hughes Hough 1923 - 1925 Philip Williams 1925 - 1927 Martin Edwin Trench 1927 - 1931 Waldo A. Evans 1931 - 1935 Paul... Delegates of the U.S. Virgin Islands to the U.S. Congress Categories: U.S. Virgin Islands ... 26th Legislature of the U.S. Virgin Islands (2005-2006) Senator At-Large (Saint John) Craig W. Barshinger (Democratic Party) Saint Croix Senators Norman Jn Baptiste (Senate Vice President) Pedro Pete Encarnacion (Democratic Party) Neville James (Democratic Party) Terrence Positive Nelson (ICM) Usie Raymond Richards (ICM) Ronald E. Russell (Democratic... Elections in the U.S. Virgin Islands gives information on election and election results in the U.S. Virgin Islands. ...

Capital:

Charlotte Amalie Charlotte Amalie is the capital of the U.S. Virgin Islands, a territory of the United States of America. ...

Small Cities:

Charlotte Amalie | Christiansted | Frederiksted | Cruz Bay Charlotte Amalie is the capital of the U.S. Virgin Islands, a territory of the United States of America. ... Christiansted is a town on St. ... Frederiksted is a town on the west end of the U.S. Virgin Island of St. ... Cruz Bay is a town on the west coast of St. ...

Islands:

Saint Croix | Saint John | Saint Thomas | Water Island | Other Saint John is the smallest of the three main United States Virgin Islands (USVI), a United States territory. ... Saint Thomas is an island in the Caribbean Sea and a constituent of the United States Virgin Islands (USVI). ... Water Island is the fourth and most recent main island in the U.S. Virgin Islands, a United States territory located in the Caribbean Sea. ... The United States Virgin Islands is a group of islands in the Caribbean. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Saint Croix river canoe trip, rentals & shuttles (546 words)
The Saint Croix river is excellent for learning basic whitewater paddling technique or the art of poling a canoe.
Notable Qualities: The Saint Croix river is perhaps the only choice for an extended canoe trip, with whitewater, in the middle of the summer season and into the fall in Maine.
Canoeing the Saint Croix in the summer provides an excellent opportunity to learn basic whitewater technique and wilderness camping skills with warm water and warm weather conditions well past the fl fly season which infringes on spring in Maine.
Saint Croix Island, Maine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (658 words)
Saint Croix Island, or Dochet Island as it is called today, is a small uninhabited island in Maine near the mouth of the Saint Croix River that forms part of the International Boundary separating Maine from New Brunswick.
French nobleman Pierre Dugua de Monts (Sieur de Monts) established a settlement on Saint Croix Island in June of 1604 under the authority of the King of France.
During a boundary dispute between Britain and the U.S. in 1797, the island was deemed to be under U.S. sovereignty by a survey of the river which determined it to be on the western side of the main river channel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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