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Encyclopedia > Saint Christopher
Saint Christopher

St. Christopher Carrying the Christ Child, by Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1485)
Martyr
Born unknown, Canaan (Western accounts) or Marmarica (Eastern accounts)
Died c. 251, Asia Minor
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church
Feast 25 July (West), 9 May (East)
Attributes tree, branch, as a giant or ogre, carrying Jesus, spear, shield, as a dog-headed man
Patronage bachelors, transportation (drivers, sailors, etc.), travelling (especially for long journeys), storms, Brunswick, Saint Christopher's Island (Saint Kitts), Island Rab, epilepsy, gardeners, holy death, toothache, surfers
Saints Portal

Saint Christopher (Greek: Άγιος Χριστόφορος) is a saint venerated by Roman Catholics and Orthodox Christians, listed as a martyr killed in the reign of the 3rd century Roman emperor Decius (reigned 249–251). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 371 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (494 × 798 pixel, file size: 42 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Hieronymus Bosch. ... Hieronymus Bosch, (latinized, actually Jheronimus Bosch; his real name Jeroen van Aken) (c. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country of Libya. ... Anatolia (Greek: ανατολη anatole, rising of the sun or East; compare Orient and Levant, by popular etymology Turkish Anadolu to ana mother and dolu filled), also called by the Latin name of Asia Minor, is a region of Southwest Asia which corresponds today to the Asian portion of Turkey. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Jack the Giant-Killer by Arthur Rackham. ... This article is about the mythological creature. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... A bachelor is a man above the age of majority who has never been married (see single). ... For the movement of people or objects, see transport. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Storm (disambiguation). ... Coordinates: Time zone: CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country: Germany State: Lower Saxony District: Urban district City subdivisions: 20 Boroughs Lord Mayor: Gert Hoffmann (CDU) Governing parties: CDU / FDP Basic Statistics Area: 192. ... Country Saint Kitts and Nevis Archipelago Leeward Islands Region Caribbean Area 65 sq. ... Rab (Croatia) Coat of arms The historic town center of Rab For other uses, see Rab (disambiguation). ... A toothache, also known as odontalgia or, less frequently, as odontalgy, is an aching pain in or around a tooth. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... Saint Christopher, St. ... Saints redirects here. ... Veneration is a religious symbolic act giving honor to someone by honoring an image of that person, particularly applied to saints. ... As a Christian ecclesiastical term, Catholic—from the Greek adjective , meaning general or universal[1]—is described in the Oxford English Dictionary as follows: ~Church, (originally) whole body of Christians; ~, belonging to or in accord with (a) this, (b) the church before separation into Greek or Eastern and Latin or... “Orthodox” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... // Overview Events 212: Constitutio Antoniniana grants citizenship to all free Roman men 212-216: Baths of Caracalla 230-232: Sassanid dynasty of Persia launches a war to reconquer lost lands in the Roman east 235-284: Crisis of the Third Century shakes Roman Empire 250-538: Kofun era, the first... Ordinary Magistrates Extraordinary Magistrates Titles and Honors Emperor Politics and Law This article discusses the nature of the imperial dignity, and its dynastic development throughout the history of the Empire. ... Bust of Traianus Decius. ...


The Eastern Orthodox Church venerates Saint Christopher on 9 May. The Tridentine Calendar allowed a commemoration of Saint Christopher on 25 July only in private Masses. This restriction was lifted later (see General Roman Calendar as in 1954). While the Roman Catholic Church still approves devotion to him, listing him in the Roman Martyrology among the saints venerated on 25 July,[1] it removed his feast in 1969 from the Roman Catholic calendar of saints to be commemorated universally, wherever the Roman Rite is celebrated, because, it judged this commemoration not to be of Roman tradition, in view of the relatively late (about 1550) and limited manner in which it was accepted into the Roman calendar.[2] Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... A martyrology is a catalogue or list of martyrs (or, more precisely, of saints), arranged in the calendar order of their anniversaries or feasts. ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the General Roman Calendar as it was in 1955, see Traditional Catholic Calendar. ... Latin Rite, in the singular and accompanied, in English, by the definite article, refers to the sui juris particular Church of the Roman Catholic Church that developed in the area of western Europe and northern Africa where Latin was for many centuries the language of education and culture. ...

Contents

Legends of Christopher

Saint Christopher is sometimes represented with the head of a dog.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Martyrdom of Christopher

During the reign of the Emperor Decius, a man named Reprebus or Reprobus (root of English "reprobate") was captured in combat against tribes to the west of Egypt and was assigned to the numerus Marmaritarum or "Unit of the Marmaritae", which suggests an otherwise-unidentified "Marmaritae" Berber tribe of Cyrenaica. He was of enormous size and terrifying demeanour, being a cannibal with cynocephaly (the head of a dog instead of a man), like all the Marmaritae.[3] Christopher was a Canaanite 12 cubits (18 feet) tall and with a fearsome face. While serving the king of Canaan, he took it into his head to go and serve the greatest king there was. He went to the king who was reputed to be the greatest, but one day he saw the king cross himself at the mention of the devil. On thus learning that the king feared the devil, he departed to look for the devil. He came across a band of marauders, one of whom declared himself to be the devil, so Christopher decided to serve him. But when he saw his new master avoid a wayside cross and found out that the devil feared Christ, he left him and enquired from people where to find Christ. He met a hermit who instructed him in the Christian faith. Christopher asked him how he could serve Christ. When the hermit suggested fasting and prayer, Christopher replied that he was unable to perform that service. The hermit then suggested that because of his size and strength Christopher could serve Christ by assisting people to cross a dangerous river, where many were perishing in the attempt. The hermit promised that this service would be pleasing to Christ. Bust of Traianus Decius. ... Language(s) Berber languages Religion(s) Islam (mostly Sunni), Christianity (mostly protestant), Judaism Imazighen(in Kabyle and other Berber languages: Imaziγen) are the indigenous peoples of North Africa west of the Nile Valley. ... Cannibalism is the act or practice of eating members of the same species, e. ... Cynocephalus St. ... Map of Canaan For other uses, see Canaan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ...


After Christopher had performed this service for some time, a little child asked him to take him across the river. During the crossing, the river became swollen and the child seemed as heavy as lead, so much that Christopher could scarcely carry him and found himself in great difficulty. When he finally reached the other side, he said to the child: "You have put me in the greatest danger. I do not think the whole world could have been as heavy on my shoulders as you were." The child replied: "You had on your shoulders not only the whole world but him who made it. I am Christ your king, whom you are serving by this work." The child then vanished.


Christopher later visited the city of Lycia and there comforted the Christians who were being martyred. Brought before the local king, he refused to sacrifice to the pagan gods. The king tried to win him by riches and by sending two beautiful women to tempt him. Christopher converted the women to Christianity, as he had already converted thousands in the city. The king ordered him to be killed. Various attempts failed, but finally Christopher was decapitated. Decapitation (from Latin, caput, capitis, meaning head), or beheading, is the removal of a living organisms head. ...


Historical verifiability

The veneration of this improbable figure was sharply criticized by Erasmus in his Praise of Folly, but while surviving accounts of Christopher's life are replete with miracles and events that do not mesh well with modern historiography, enough information has been preserved to present what some consider a possible account of a St. Christopher that would be amenable to modern historical sensibilities. Desiderius Erasmus in 1523 Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus (also Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) (October 27, probably 1466 – July 12, 1536) was a Dutch humanist and theologian. ... Hans Holbeins witty marginal drawing of Folly (1515), in the first edition, a copy owned by Erasmus himself (Kupferstichkabinett, Basle) The Praise of Folly (Latin title: Moriae Encomium, sometimes translated as In Praise of Folly, Dutch title: Lof der Zotheid) is an essay written in 1509 by Erasmus of... Historiography studies the processes by which historical knowledge is obtained and transmitted. ...


The first hurdle is the idea that he was a dog-headed cannibal. This can be understood in the light of the practice of the time, which was to describe all people outside the "civilized" (Greco-Roman-Persian) world as cannibals, or dog-headed albeit metaphorically. A later generation could then mistake a metaphor or hyperbole for a literal statement. This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... Not to be confused with Hyperbola. ...


The man in question is also said to have been assigned to a military unit made up of Marmaritae. The Marmaritae were the independent tribes of Marmarica (now in modern Libya), who would have been pushed to the frontier region after Roman settlement. Since he was from a frontier tribe, describing him as being from the land of dog-headed people would have been a literary convention of the day.


The various miracles attributed to him could be explained as ordinary embroidering typical of hagiography, especially regarding saints of the early centuries of Christianity. Hagiography is the study of saints. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ...


Finally, we have the statements that he was killed in Antioch and his body taken elsewhere by a bishop. St. Christopher could not have been killed in the fourth year of the Emperor Decius, as Decius only reigned for two years. However, before ascending to the throne of the Eastern Roman Empire, Maximinus was known as "Daza" before rising to power. Unfortunately, there is no record of a visit to Antioch by Maximinus in the fourth year of his reign (308). It is, of course, possible that St. Christopher was executed in Antioch during this year by the order of a lower authority; a personal trial before one of the Caesars could be a later embellishment. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Byzantine Empire. ... This article deals with 4th century Roman Emperor. ... Caesar (plural Caesars), Latin: Cæsar (plural Cæsares), is a title of imperial character. ...


Unfortunately, none of this information permits identification of the actual man. Christopher is simply Greek for "Christ-bearer", and it can refer, as in the Eastern tradition and in Jacobus de Voragine's explanation of the name, to St. Christopher's willingness to "take up the cross" - a common metaphor for converting to Christianity. Reprobus simply means "wicked person", so saying that Reprobus became Christopher amounts to saying "A wicked person became a Christian." Furthermore, no place claims to be the burial site of St. Christopher, which would be very unusual for a martyr. This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...


It has been speculated that St. Christopher could be the same man known as Saint Menas among the Copts, for whom a 4th century burial site is known but has no verifiable details about his life or martyrdom attached to him. However, there is no conclusive link. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Jesus Christ in a Coptic icon. ...


Veneration and patronage

Eastern Orthodox liturgy

The Eastern Orthodox Church's hymn for the 9 May feastday of St Christopher refers to elements of his story found also in the Western Golden Legend: Orthodox icon of Pentecost. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Arthur Sullivan oratorio, see The Golden Legend (oratorio). ...


Christopher, Great Martyr (Kontakion Tone 4): Your physique was overwhelming and your face horrifying. / You willingly suffered trauma from your own people. / Men and women tried to arouse consuming fires of passion in you, / but instead they followed you to your martyrdom. / You are our strong protector, o great martyr Christopher!

An image of Saint Christopher, such as is worn or is placed in a vehicle, for protection on journeys
An image of Saint Christopher, such as is worn or is placed in a vehicle, for protection on journeys

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (448x679, 45 KB) de: Kreuz mit Heiligem Christopherus en: Cross with Saint Christopher Scaned by me! Date: 22. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (448x679, 45 KB) de: Kreuz mit Heiligem Christopherus en: Cross with Saint Christopher Scaned by me! Date: 22. ...

Relics and medals

After having been held in Constantinople, the relics and the head of the saint were moved to the island of Rab in Croatia. When Normans tried to invade the islands and besieged the city, its inhabitants placed the saint's relics on the city walls. Miraculously, the winds changed and the bows and ships were blown away from the city. One of the city's largest medieval squares is named after the saint. This article is about the city before the Fall of Constantinople (1453). ... For other uses, see Relic (disambiguation). ... Rab (Croatia) Coat of arms The historic town center of Rab For other uses, see Rab (disambiguation). ... Norman conquests in red. ...


Christopher is one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers, and the patron saint of travellers. Medallions with his name and image are worn to show devotion to a certain saint and ask for that saint's prayers. They are frequently displayed in automobiles. In French a widespread phrase for such medals is "Regarde St Christophe et va-t-en rassuré" ("Look at St Christopher and go on reassured"); Saint Christopher medals and holy cards in Spanish have the phrase "Si en San Cristóbal confías, de accidente no morirás" ("If you trust St. Christopher, you won't die in an accident"). In Austria an annual collection for providing vehicles for the use of missionaries is taken up on a Sunday close to the feast of Saint Christopher, asking people to contribute a very small sum of money for every kilometre that they have travelled safely during the year. Fourteen Holy Helpers The Fourteen Holy Helpers are a group of saints venerated together in Roman Catholicism because prayer to them was thought to be particularly effective, especially against various diseases. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... A medal is a small metal object, usually engraved with insignia, that is awarded to a person for athletic, military, scientific, academic or some other kind of achievement. ... Car redirects here. ... A German holy card from around 1910 depicts the Crucifixion. ...

Saint Christopher and the Christ Child, by Tilman van der Burch, ca. 1470 (in situ, Cologne Cathedral)
Saint Christopher and the Christ Child, by Tilman van der Burch, ca. 1470 (in situ, Cologne Cathedral)

The Cologne Cathedral (German: , officially ) is the seat of the Archbishop of Cologne, under the administration of the Roman Catholic Church and is renowned as a monument of Christianity, of Gothic architecture and of the faith and perseverance of the people of the city in which it stands. ...

General patronage

Christopher has always been a widely popular saint, being especially revered by athletes, mariners, ferrymen, and travellers. He is revered as one of the Fourteen Holy Helpers. He holds patronage of things related to travel and travellers: people who carry things; against lightning; against pestilence; archers; automobile drivers; bachelors; boatmen; bookbinders; epilepsy; floods; fruit dealers; fullers; gardeners; hailstorms; for a holy death; truck drivers; mariners; market carriers; porters; sailors; surfers; toothache; transportation; and transportation workers. Mariner can refer to The PBM Mariner flying boat The Mariner Space Program An archaic term for sailor This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... Fourteen Holy Helpers The Fourteen Holy Helpers are a group of saints venerated together in Roman Catholicism because prayer to them was thought to be particularly effective, especially against various diseases. ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... Look up pestilence in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ... Car redirects here. ... A bachelor is a man above the age of majority who has never been married (see single). ... Bookbinding is the process of physically assembling a book from a number of separate sheets of paper or other material. ... Fuller may refer to: Someone who treats cloth: see Fulling. ... A gardener is any person involved in the growing and maintenance of plants, notably in a garden. ... This article is about the precipitation. ... For other uses, see Truck (disambiguation). ... A toothache, also known as odontalgia or, less frequently, as odontalgy, is an aching pain in or around a tooth. ...


Patronage of places

Christopher is the patron saint of the following places: Baden, Germany; Barga, Italy; Brunswick, Germany; Mecklenburg, Germany; Rab, Croatia; Roermond, The Netherlands; Saint Christopher's Island (Saint Kitts); Toses in Catalonia, Spain; Agrinion, Greece; Vilnius, Lithuania;Havana, Cuba; and Paete, Laguna, Philippines.[4] Baden is a historical state in the southwest of Germany, on the right bank of the Rhine. ... Barga is a medieval Tuscan city near the center of Italy, with a total of around 10,000 inhabitants. ... Coordinates: Time zone: CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country: Germany State: Lower Saxony District: Urban district City subdivisions: 20 Boroughs Lord Mayor: Gert Hoffmann (CDU) Governing parties: CDU / FDP Basic Statistics Area: 192. ... The name Mecklenburg derives from a castle named Mikilenburg (Old German: big castle), located between the cities of Schwerin and Wismar. ... Rab (Croatia) Coat of arms The historic town center of Rab For other uses, see Rab (disambiguation). ... National motto: Dutch: Eendracht maakt macht; French: Lunion fait la force; German: Einigkeit macht stark (English: Strength lies in unity) Official language Dutch, Limburgs, German Mayor Henk van Beers Vice-Mayor Dré Peters King Albert II Prime Minister Guy Verhofstadt Queen (Dutch) Beatrix Prime Minister (Dutch) Jan-Peter Balkenende... Country Saint Kitts and Nevis Archipelago Leeward Islands Region Caribbean Area 65 sq. ... This article is about the Spanish city. ... Agrinio (Greek, Modern: Αγρίνιο, Ancient/Katharevousa: -on, older form: Agrinion, Latin: Agrinium) is the largest town and a municipality of the Aetolia-Acarnania prefecture of Greece, with about 80. ... Not to be confused with Vilnius city municipality. ... This article is about the capital of Cuba. ...


References in popular culture

In Truman Capote's masterpiece novella Breakfast at Tiffany's, the narrator gives Holly Golightly a St. Christopher's medal for Christmas, "[b]ut at least it came from Tiffany's."


During the Beatles’ visit to New York in August 1964, a fan named Angie McGowan grabbed a St. Christopher's medal from the neck of drummer Ringo Starr. McGowan later returned the medal in a much-publicized event. The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... This article is about the state. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ...


Actor Christian Bale can often be seen wearing a St. Christopher medal, his character in The Machinist wore it throughout the film. Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is an acclaimed British[2][3] Actor who is known for his roles in the films Newsies, American Psycho, Shaft, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins, and The Prestige, among others. ... The Machinist (also known as El Maquinista) is an English-language Spanish psychological thriller film that was released in 2004. ...


In the hit BBC drama Life on Mars, the character Sam Tyler wears a St Christopher's medal. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...


Actress Jessica Alba carries a St. Christopher medal when she travels. Jessica Marie Alba (born April 28, 1981) is an American actress. ...


In the movie The Spirit of St. Louis, (1957), James Stewart stars as Charles Lindbergh, the first man to fly solo non-stop from New York City, across the Atlantic Ocean, to Paris, France. Lindbergh is given a St Christopher medal before his big flight, which he refuses to accept, to save every unnecessary ounce of weight. His friend instead hides the medal in the aircraft, to make sure that the saint would be with him for the long and dangerous trip. Whether this short scene is based in fact, or a product of Hollywood is unknown. This article is about an aircraft. ... For other persons named James Stewart, see James Stewart (disambiguation). ... Charles Augustus Lindbergh (4 February 1902 – 26 August 1974) (aka Lucky Lindy; The Lone Eagle) was an American aviator who was made world famous by being the pilot of the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic made solo from Roosevelt Field, Long Island to Paris on 20 May-21... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Eiffel Tower has become the symbol of Paris throughout the world. ...


In The Children of Green Knowe, by Lucy M. Boston, there is a large statue of St Christopher in the garden at Green Knowe.


It is notable that the large African-American healing protagonist John Coffey of the Stephen King novel and movie The Green Mile is given a medal of Saint Christopher on a necklace after healing a woman. It could be considered symbolic, since both men are large, have extraordinary abilities they use for good, and that some accounts report that Saint Christopher was from Libya or elsewhere in Africa, making him of African descent, the same as John Coffey. Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... A healer is someone who intends to aid recovery from ill health, including alleged faith healers. ... For other persons named Stephen King, see Stephen King (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Novel (disambiguation). ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as part of... The Green Mile has several different meanings, including: The Green Mile, a 1996 book by Stephen King. ...


Dennis DeYoung of the rock band Styx wrote the song "Christopher, Mr. Christopher" for Styx's 1974 album Man of Miracles. The song reflects fondly of the story of Saint Christopher and laments the perceived downgrade of Saint Christopher's status in 1969, when DeYoung sings "So when they took that saint away, all that's left were her fears". — Dennis DeYoung (born February 18, 1947 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American singer, songwriter, keyboard player and producer best known for being a founding member of the rock band Styx, a tenure which lasted from 1962 to 1999. ... Styx (pronounced sticks) is an American rock band that was popular in the 1970s and 1980s, with such hits as Come Sail Away, Babe, Lady, Suite Madame Blue, Mr. ... Man of Miracles is the fourth album by Styx, released in 1974 (see 1974 in music). ...


Tom Waits wrote the song "Hang on St. Christopher", released on the album Franks Wild Years in 1987, in which he implores Saint Christopher to watch over him as he pushes his hot-roded cars and motorcycles to their limits. Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ... Frank`s [sic] Wild Years is an album by Tom Waits, released 1987 on Island Records. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Tom Waits also penned "Tom Traubert's Blues" where he sings, "I've lost my St. Christopher, Now that I've kissed her," supposedly implying he is no longer a bachelor or is reluctant to remain one.


In the 2004 movie Crash, Peter Waters (Larenz Tate) carries around a pocket sized statue of Saint Christopher. Waters hitches a ride from police officer Tom Hansen (played by Ryan Phillippe) who has the same statue figure on his dashboard. When Hansen laughs at the thought that Waters has one too, and Waters reaches to pull his statue from his pocket, the cop suspects a gun and shoots him. When Hansen approaches the dead man's body, he discovers the statue in his hand, not a gun. Crash is an Academy Award-winning drama film directed by Paul Haggis. ... Larenz Tate (born September 8, 1975 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American actor. ... Ryan Phillippe (born Matthew Ryan Phillippe on September 10, 1974) is an American actor. ...


In the 2004 movie The Butterfly Effect, the story's main character, Evan Treborn (Ashton Kutcher) is seen wearing a Saint Christopher pendant throughout the entire movie in each stage of his life. This could symbolize the long "journey" that Evan took. For other uses, see Butterfly effect (disambiguation). ... This article is about the actor. ...


In the episode entitled "Would You Want Me to Tell You?" (1.5) of the 2007 show Saving Grace, Grace mentions that her husband (who does not exist) carries around a St. Christopher's medal for good luck while he his driving his trucks. She says that if she wanted to hurt him she would steal the medal just before a "long haul". Saving Grace is an American television crime drama series on TNT, which premiered in the summer of 2007 and stars Academy Award-winner Holly Hunter in her first TV series, Kenny Johnson, Bailey Chase, Laura San Giacomo, Leon Rippy, and Bokeem Woodbine. ...


Saint Christopher is the patron saint of the Saltee Islands in Airman, a 2008 book by Eoin Colfer.[5] Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Eoin Colfer (pronounced Owen, IPA: )(born May 14, 1965) is an Irish author. ...


In the opening of "My Traveling Star", James Taylor sings: "Watch over all those born St. Christopher's Day".


The band Fosca released a song entitled "Letter to Saint Christopher" on their 2002 album Diary of an Antibody. In it, the protagonist asks Saint Christopher if he will "ever reach point B", using the story of Christopher and the young child's journey across the river as a metaphor for moving on from an unhappy life. Fosca is a British indie band, combining indie pop songwriting with synth pop instrumentation. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


Many Icon brand motorcycle jackets feature a St. Christopher medallion in an inside pocket


Notes

  1. ^ Martyrologium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2001 ISBN 88-209-7210-7)
  2. ^ Calendarium Romanum (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 1969), p. 131
  3. ^ In both East and West, stories, such as the Irish Passion of St. Christopher], and iconography, such as that illustrated at dog-headed The Legend of Saint Christopher the Dogface present him as literally having a dog's face. The dog-faced version is found not only in the East, where it is more c<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here</nowiki></nowiki>ommon, but also in the West, as shown in some of the images in the source just quoted and in a thirteenth-century stained-glass window in the cathédral St-Maurice of Angers, France; and the image of the Christ-bearing Christopher is also found in Eastern iconography. Regardless, Reprebus accepted baptism and began to preach the faith. Eventually, the governor of Antioch (or in some versions, the Emperor himself) decreed that Reprebus was to be executed for his faith. He miraculously survived many attempts at execution, eventually permitting himself to be martyred after converting multitudes. His body was then taken back to Alexandria by Peter of Attalia.

    More elaborate legend

    According to the account in the Golden Legend by Jacobus de Voragine,<ref> [http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/golden234.htm The Life of Saint Christopher]</li> <li id="cite_note-patron-3">'''[[#cite_ref-patron_3-0|^]]''' {{cite web | last = Jones | first = Terry | title = Christopher | work = Patron Saints Index | url=http://www.catholic-forum.com/saintS/saintc05.htm | accessdate = 2007-01-22}}</li> Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Maison dAdam, House of Adam, the oldest house of Angers. ... This article is about the Christian religious act of Baptism. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Antakya. ... Death Penalty World Map Color Key: Blue: Abolished for all crimes Green: Abolished for crimes not committed in exceptional circumstances (such as crimes committed in time of war) Orange: Abolished in Practice Red: Legal Form of Punishment Execution of a soldier of the 8th Infantry at Prescott, Arizona, 1877 Execution... Historically, a martyr is a person who dies for his or her religious faith. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ... For the Arthur Sullivan oratorio, see The Golden Legend (oratorio). ... Jacobus de Voragine (c. ...

    <li id="cite_note-airman132-4">'''[[#cite_ref-airman132_4-0|^]]''' {{Airman ref|132}}</li></ol></ref>

In the Second season of Veronica Mars, a Bus Driver bought a St. Christopher Medal at a gas station. This is an important plot point as this was the last thing the bus driver bought before he drove the bus off of a cliff into the ocean.


External links

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Saint Christopher

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Christopher (0 words)
Christopher, as he was now called, would not promise to do any fasting or praying, but willingly accepted the task of carrying people, for God's sake, across a raging stream.
Christopher was only a martyr, and as such is recorded in the old martyrologies.
Christopher cannot be denied, as was sufficiently shown by the Jesuit Nicholas Serarius, in his treatise on litanies, "Litaneutici" (Cologne, 1609), and by Molanus in his history of
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