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Encyclopedia > Saint Boniface
Saint Boniface of Mainz/Fulda/Dokkum

Boniface
Bishop and Martyr
Born c. 672, Crediton, Devon
Died June 5, 754, Dokkum, Frisia
Venerated in Roman Catholic Church, Lutheran Church, Anglican Communion
Major shrine Fulda
Feast June 5
Attributes axe, book; fountain; fox; oak; raven; scourge; sword
Patronage brewers; file cutters; Fulda; The Netherlands and Germany; tailors; World Youth Day
Saints Portal

Saint Boniface (Latin: Bonifacius; German: Bonifatius; c. 672June 5, 754), the Apostle of the Germans, born Winfrid or Wynfrith at Crediton in the kingdom of Wessex (now in Devon, England), was a missionary who propagated Christianity in the Frankish Empire during the 8th century. He is the patron saint of Germany and the Netherlands.[1][2] Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... , Fulda (IPA: ) is a city in Hessen, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ... Dongeradeel is a municipality in the northern Netherlands. ... Image File history File links SaintBoniface. ... Events April 11 - Adeodatus succeeds Vitalian as Pope. ... , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Pope Stephen III crowns Pepin the short King of the Franks at St. ... Dongeradeel is a municipality in the northern Netherlands. ... Satellite view of the German Bight (the Frisian Coast). ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... , Fulda (IPA: ) is a city in Hessen, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ... The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organising a liturgical year on the level of days by associating each day with one or more saints, and referring to the day as that saints day. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Saint symbology was important to people who couldnt read because they can figure out what symbols mean. ... Saint Quentin is the patron saint of locksmiths and is also invoked against coughs and sneezes. ... A brewer is someone engaged in the occupation of brewing beverages. ... , Fulda (IPA: ) is a city in Hessen, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... World Youth Day 2000 in Rome World Youth Day (It. ... Image File history File links Gloriole. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... Events April 11 - Adeodatus succeeds Vitalian as Pope. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Pope Stephen III crowns Pepin the short King of the Franks at St. ... , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... For the helicopter, see Westland Wessex. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... The Frankish Empire was the territory of the Franks, from the 5th to the 10th centuries, from 481 ruled by Clovis I of the Merovingian Dynasty, the first king of all the Franks. ... (7th century — 8th century — 9th century — other centuries) Events The Iberian peninsula is taken by Arab and Berber Muslims, thus ending the Visigothic rule, and starting almost 8 centuries of Muslim presence there. ...


He was killed in Frisia in 754. [3] His tomb is in the crypt of Fulda Cathedral. Satellite view of the German Bight (the Frisian Coast). ... , Fulda (IPA: ) is a city in Hessen, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ...

Contents

Early life

Born at Crediton, Devon, Winfrid was of a respected and prosperous family. It was somewhat against his father's wishes that he devoted himself at an early age to the monastic life. He received his theological training in the Benedictine monasteries of Adescancastre, near Exeter and Nursling, on the western edge of Southampton, under the abbot Winbert. Winfrid taught in the abbey school and at the age of 30 became a priest. He wrote the first Latin grammar produced in England. , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ... A number of other places have taken their names from Exeter The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in England, UK. It is located at 50° 43 25 N, 3° 31 39 W. In the 2001 census its population was recorded at 111,066. ... Nursling is a village in the English county of Hampshire, about six kilometres north-west of the city of Southampton. ... For other uses, see Southampton (disambiguation). ...


First Mission to Frisia

In 716, Winfrid set out on a missionary expedition to Frisia, intending to convert the inhabitants by preaching to them in their own language, his own Anglo-Saxon language being similar to Old Frisian. His efforts, however, were frustrated by the war then being carried on between Charles Martel and Radbod, king of the Frisians, and he returned to Nursling. Events April 19 - The monastery on the Island of Iona celebrates Easter on the Roman date. ... Satellite view of the German Bight (the Frisian Coast). ... Old English redirects here. ... Old Frisian was the West Germanic language spoken between the 8th and 16th centuries by the people who, from their ancient homes in North Germany and Denmark, had settled in the area between the Rhine and Elbe on the European North Sea coast in the 4th and 5th centuries. ... Charles Martel (or, in modern English, Charles the Hammer) (23 August 686 – 22 October 741) was proclaimed Mayor of the Palace, ruling the Franks in the name of a titular King, and proclaimed himself Duke of the Franks (the last four years of his reign he did not even bother... Several kings named Radbod (Frisian Redbod) were king of the Frisians, (dux in the Merovingian chronicles). ...


Thor's Oak and the Conversion of the Northern Germanic Tribes

Main article: Thor's Oak
A view inside the shrine of Saint Boniface of Dokkum in the hermit-church of Warfhuizen in the Netherlands. The little folded paper on the left contains a bone-fragment of Saint Benedict of Nursia, the folded paper on the right a piece of the habit of saint Bernard of Clairvaux. The big bone in the middle (about 5 cm in length) is the actual relic of Saint Boniface.

Winfrid again set out in 718, visited Rome, and was commissioned in 719 by Pope Gregory II, who gave him his new name of Boniface. He set out to evangelize in Germany and reorganize the church there. For five years Boniface laboured in Hesse, Thuringia, and Frisia, and on November 30, 722, he was elevated to bishop of the Germanic territories he would bring into the fold of the Roman Church. Thors Oak was an ancient tree sacred to the Germanic tribe of the Chatti, ancestors of todays Hessians, and one of the most important sacred sites of the Germans. ... Download high resolution version (1192x840, 307 KB)selfmade File links The following pages link to this file: Relic Reliquary ... Download high resolution version (1192x840, 307 KB)selfmade File links The following pages link to this file: Relic Reliquary ... For other uses, see Hermit (disambiguation). ... Warfhuizen (Gronings: Waarfhoezen) is a village in Groningen, a province in the extreme North of the Netherlands. ... Saint Benedict St. ... Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (1090–August 21, 1153) was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian monastic order. ... Events Pelayo established the Kingdom of Asturias in the Iberian peninsula (modern day Portugal and Spain). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Events The church of Nubia transfers its allegiance from the Eastern Orthodox Church to the Coptic Church. ... Saint Gregory II, pope from 715 or 716 to February 11, 731, succeeded Pope Constantine, his election being variously dated May 19, 715, and March 21, 716. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density... The Free State of Thuringia (German: Freistaat Thüringen) is located in central Germany and is considered one of the smaller of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states), with an area of 16,200 km² and 2. ... Satellite view of the German Bight (the Frisian Coast). ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events 3 January - Kinich Ahkal Mo Naab III takes throne of Maya state of Palenque Battle of Covadonga: First victory of a Christian army over a Muslim army in Spain (probable date) War between Wessex and Sussex Births Deaths Empress Gemmei of Japan Categories: 722 ...


In 723, Boniface felled the holy oak tree dedicated to Thor near the present-day town of Fritzlar in northern Hesse. He did this with Elijah in mind. Boniface called upon Thor to strike him down if he cut the "holy" tree. According to St. Boniface's first biographer, his contemporary Saint Willibald, Boniface started to chop the oak down, when suddenly a great wind, as if by miracle, blew the ancient oak over. When Thor did not strike him down, the people converted to Christianity. He built a chapel from its wood at the site where today stands the cathedral of Fritzlar. Later he established the first bishopric in Germany north of the old Roman Limes at the Frankish fortified settlement of Büraburg, on a prominent hill facing the town across the Eder River. Events Saint Boniface fells Thors Oak near Fritzlar, marking the decisive event in the Christianization of the northern Germanic tribes The worlds first mechanical clock is allegedly built in China. ... For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). ... The Cathedral (Dom), with statue of St. ... Location Time zone CET/CEST (UTC+1/+2) Administration Country NUTS Region DE7 Capital Wiesbaden Largest city Frankfurt Minister-President Roland Koch (CDU) Governing party CDU Votes in Bundesrat 5 (from 69) Basic statistics Area  21,100 km² (8,147 sq mi) Population 6,077,000 (08/2006)[1]  - Density... Elijah, 1638, by José de Ribera This article is about the prophet in the Hebrew Bible. ... Saint Willibald (born in Wessex, died 787 or 781 in Eichstätt) was an 8th century bishop of Eichstätt in Bavaria. ... The limes Germanicus, 2nd century. ... Büraburg, a prominent hill with historic significance, overlooking the Eder river near the town of Fritzlar in northern Hesse. ... The Eder is a river in Germany (ca. ...


The felling of Thor's Oak is commonly regarded as the beginning of German Christianization north and east of the old borders of the Roman Empire. From that point on, Boniface went directly to the high places of the pagans and first struck them down, which inadvertently was to cause his death. In 732, he traveled again to Rome to report, and Gregory II conferred upon him the pallium as archbishop with jurisdiction over Germany. Boniface again set out for what is now Germany, baptized thousands, and dealt with the problems of many other Christians who had fallen out of contact with the regular hierarchy of the Catholic church. During his third visit to Rome in 737–38, he was made papal legate for Germany. In 745, he was granted Mainz as metropolitan see. Thors Oak was an ancient tree sacred to the Germanic tribe of the Chatti, ancestors of todays Hessians, and one of the most important sacred sites of the Germans. ... St Francis Xavier converting the Paravas: a 19th-century image of the docile heathen The historical phenomenon of Christianization, the conversion of individuals to Christianity or the conversion of entire peoples at once, also includes the practice of converting pagan practices, pagan religious imagery, pagan sites and the pagan calendar... now. ... A papal Legate, from the Decretals of Boniface VIII (1294 to 1303). ... Events Births November 10 - Musa al-Kazim, Shia Imam (d. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ...


Tradition credits Boniface with the invention of the Christmas tree. The Oak of Thor at Geismar was chopped down by Boniface in a stage-managed confrontation with the old gods and local heathen tribes. A fir tree growing in the roots of the Oak was claimed by Boniface as a new symbol. "This humble tree's wood is used to build your homes: let Christ be at the centre of your households. Its leaves remain evergreen in the darkest days: let Christ be your constant light. Its boughs reach out to embrace and its top points to heaven: let Christ be your Comfort and Guide"[1] For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... Geismar is a Thuringian (Germany) municipality in the district of Eichsfeld. ...


After his third trip to Rome, Boniface went to Bavaria and founded there the bishoprics of Salzburg, Regensburg, Freising, and Passau. For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... The Archbishopric of Salzburg was an ecclesiastical state of the Holy Roman Empire, consisting of roughly of the present-day state of Salzburg (the ancient Roman city of Iuvavum) in Austria. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Munich and Freising — known in the German language as Erzbistum München und Freising and in Latin as Archidioecesis Monacensis et Frisingensis — is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Munich and Freising — known in the German language as Erzbistum München und Freising and in Latin as Archidioecesis Monacensis et Frisingensis — is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Bishop of Passau is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Passau in the Archdiocese of München und Freising . ...


In 742, one of his disciples, Sturm (also known as Sturmi, or Sturmius), founded the abbey of Fulda not far from Boniface's earlier missionary outpost at Fritzlar. Although Sturm was the founding abbot of Fulda, Boniface was very involved in the foundation. The initial grant for the abbey was signed by Carloman, the son of Charles Martel. Saint Sturm (Sturmius) was disciple of St. ... Fulda is a city in Hessen, Germany; it is located on the Fulda River and is the administrative seat of the Fulda district (Kreis). ... Carloman (between 706 and 716[1] – 17 August[2] 754) was the son of Charles Martel, major domo or mayor of the palace and duke of the Franks, and his wife Chrotrud. ... Charles Martel (or, in modern English, Charles the Hammer) (23 August 686 – 22 October 741) was proclaimed Mayor of the Palace, ruling the Franks in the name of a titular King, and proclaimed himself Duke of the Franks (the last four years of his reign he did not even bother...


Boniface and the Carolingians

St Boniface, Baptising and Martyrdom, from the Sacramentary of Fulda
St Boniface, Baptising and Martyrdom, from the Sacramentary of Fulda

The support of the Frankish mayors of the palace (maior domos) and later the early Pippinid and Carolingian rulers, was essential for Boniface's work. Monasticism went from the Celts to the Anglo-Saxons and thence to the Carolingian kings. From the Anglo-Saxons, Boniface joined the papacy and the Carolingian kings and provided education for them. Charles Martel erected four dioceses in Bavaria (Salzburg, Regensburg, Freising, and Passau) and gave them Boniface as archbishop and metropolitan over all Germany east of the Rhine, with his seat at Mainz. Boniface had been under his protection from 723 on; indeed, the saint himself explained to his old friend, Daniel of Winchester, that without the protection of Charles Martel he could "neither administer his church, defend his clergy, nor prevent idolatry." The Christian Frankish leaders desired to defeat their rival power, the non-Christian Saxons, and to incorporate the Saxon lands into their own growing empire. Boniface's destruction of the indigenous Germanic faith and holy sites was, thus, an important part of the Frankish campaign against the Saxons. However, Boniface's motives are unmistakable; he wished first to spread the gospel. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (543x777, 230 KB) St. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (543x777, 230 KB) St. ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Mayor of the Palace was an early medieval title and office, also known by the Latin name, maior domus or majordomo, used most notably in the Frankish kingdoms in the 7th and 8th centuries. ... Pippinid are the members of a family of Frankish nobles whose eldest scion served as major-domo, de facto ruler, of the Frankish Kingdom nominally ruled by the Merovingians. ... The Carolingians were a dynasty of rulers that eventually controlled the Frankish realm and its successors from the 8th to the 10th century, officially taking over the kingdom from the Merovingian dynasty in 751. ... Charles Martel (or, in modern English, Charles the Hammer) (23 August 686 – 22 October 741) was proclaimed Mayor of the Palace, ruling the Franks in the name of a titular King, and proclaimed himself Duke of the Franks (the last four years of his reign he did not even bother... The Archbishopric of Salzburg was an ecclesiastical state of the Holy Roman Empire, consisting of roughly of the present-day state of Salzburg (the ancient Roman city of Iuvavum) in Austria. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Munich and Freising — known in the German language as Erzbistum München und Freising and in Latin as Archidioecesis Monacensis et Frisingensis — is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Munich and Freising — known in the German language as Erzbistum München und Freising and in Latin as Archidioecesis Monacensis et Frisingensis — is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in Bavaria, Germany. ... The Bishop of Passau is the Ordinary of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Passau in the Archdiocese of München und Freising . ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... In hierarchical Christian churches, the rank of metropolitan bishop, or simply metropolitan, pertains to the diocesan bishop or archbishop (then more precisely called Metropolitan archbishop) of a metropolis; that is, the chief city of an old Roman province, ecclesiastical province, or regional capital. ... Mainz is a city in Germany and the capital of the German federal state of Rhineland-Palatinate. ... ROSIE IS A GERMN LADYGermanic paganism refers to the religion of the Germanic nations preceding Christianization. ...


Boniface balanced this support and attempted to maintain some independence, however, by attaining the support of the papacy and of the Agilolfing rulers of Bavaria. In Frankish, Hessian, and Thuringian territory, he established the dioceses of Büraburg, Würzburg, and Erfurt. He also organized provincial synods in the Frankish church and maintained a sometimes turbulent relationship with the king of the Franks, Pepin, whom he may have crowned at Soissons in 751. By appointing his own followers as bishops, he was able to retain some independence from the Carolingians, who most likely were content to give him leeway as long as Christianity was imposed on the Saxons and other Germanic tribes. The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... The Agilolfings were a family of Frankish or Bavarian nobility that ruled the historical teritory of Bavaria on behalf of their Frankish overlords from about 550 until 788. ... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... Büraburg, a prominent hill with historic significance, overlooking the Eder river near the town of Fritzlar in northern Hesse. ... Würzburg Residenz. ... The cathedral Mariendom at night. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... Pepin III (714 - September 24, 768) more often known as Pepin the Short (French, Pépin le Bref; German, Pippin der Kleine), was a King of the Franks (751 - 768). ... Soissons is a town and commune in the Aisne département, Picardie, France, located on the Aisne River, about 60 miles northeast of Paris. ... Events Pippin the Short is elected as king of the Franks by the Frankish nobility, marking the end of the Merovingian and beginning of the Carolingian dynasty. ...


Last mission to Frisia

He had never relinquished his hope of converting the Frisians, and in 754 he set out with a small retinue for Frisia. He baptized a great number and summoned a general meeting for confirmation at a place not far from Dokkum, between Franeker and Groningen. Instead of his converts, however, a group of armed inhabitants appeared who slew the aged archbishop. According to their own law (The Lex Frisionum), the Frisians had the right to kill him, since he had destroyed their shrines. Boniface's hagiographer reports that the Frisians killed the saint because they believed the chests he carried with him contained gold and other riches, but were dismayed when they discovered that there were only the bishop's books contained within. Events Pope Stephen III crowns Pepin the short King of the Franks at St. ... Dongeradeel is a municipality in the northern Netherlands. ... Coordinates: Country Netherlands Province Groningen Area (2006)  - Municipality 83. ... Lex Frisionum, the Law Code of the Frisians was recorded in Latin during the reign of Charlemagne, after the year 785, when the Frankish conquest of Frisia was completed by the final defeat of the rebel leader Widukind. ...


His remains were eventually buried in the abbey of Fulda after resting for some time in Utrecht, and they are entombed within a shrine beneath the high altar of Fulda cathedral.

Saint Boniface Crypt, Fulda, Germany
Saint Boniface Crypt, Fulda, Germany

The forcible conversion of Germany up to the Elbe River was completed by Charlemagne, who destroyed the Saxons' independence, though not that of the Frisians, in the last decades of the eighth century. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about a river in Central Europe. ... Charlemagne (left) and Pippin the Hunchback. ...

Memorials

A famous statue of St. Boniface stands on the grounds of Mainz Cathedral. A more modern rendition stands facing the cathedral of Fritzlar. A statue of him was unveiled by Princess Margaret in his native Crediton, located in Newcombes Meadow Park. There is a wooden statue in the Anglican Church - see external link from Crediton. The UK National Shrine is located at the Catholic church at Crediton, Devon, which has a bas-relief of the felling of Thor's Oak and a series of paintings by Timothy Moore. Mainz Cathedral sits to the right in this sketch (c. ... HRH The Princess Margaret, Countess of Snowdon Her Royal Highness The Princess Margaret (Margaret Rose Armstrong-Jones, née Windsor; (August 21, 1930—February 9, 2002) was a member of the British Royal Family, the second eldest daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth, and sister of the... , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... , Crediton (Credington, Cryditon, Kirton) is a town in Devon, England about 12 km north west of Exeter, with a population of about 6,500. ... Part of the seafront of Torquay, south Devon, at high tide Devon is a large county in South West England, bordered by Cornwall to the west, and Dorset and Somerset to the east. ...


His feast day is June 5 in the Catholic Church, the Lutheran Church, and the Anglican Communion and December 19 in the Eastern Orthodox Church. is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Main article: Anglicanism The Anglican Communion is a world-wide affiliation of Anglican Churches. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Faith...


A cathedral has been dedicated to him in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. It is called Saint Boniface Cathedral and is a landmark in the city. There are St Boniface Church in Bunbury, Cheshire and in Chandler's Ford, Hampshire, both in the UK. Motto: Template:Unhide = Unum Cum Virtute Multorum (One With the Strength of Many) Location City Information Established: 1738 (Fort Rouge), 1873 (City of Winnipeg) Area: 465. ... Saint Boniface Cathedral Saint Boniface Cathedral forms an important architectural feature of Saint Boniface, Manitoba, Canada, especially in the eyes of the Franco-Manitoban community. ... For other uses, see Cheshire (disambiguation). ... Chandlers Ford is a largely residential area in the borough of Eastleigh in southern England. ... For other uses, see Hampshire (disambiguation). ...


A primary school has also been established, St Boniface Catholic Primary School, in Tooting, London. It was founded in 1903 and has over 9000 pupils. There is also an active PTA, the Friends of St Boniface. A secondary school has been named after him: St. Boniface's Catholic College. It is located in Plymouth, England. For the crater on Mars, see Tooting (crater). ... This article is about the city of Plymouth in England. ...


See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Saint Boniface

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Mainz Cathedral sits to the right in this sketch (c. ...

Further reading

  • Talbot, C. H., ed., The Anglo-Saxon Missionaries in Germany: Being the Lives of S.S. Willibrord, Boniface, Strum, Leoba and Lebuin, together with the Hodoeporicon of St. Willibald and a Selection from the Correspondence of St. Boniface, NY: Sheed and Ward, 1954.

English translation of original source material. Includes the first biography of St. Boniface, written by his 8th Century contemporary St. Willibald.

External links

  • Saint Boniface of Crediton

References

  1. ^ http://www.saintboniface.info/home
  2. ^ http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9027821/Crediton
  3. ^ http://www.catholic-forum.com/saints/saintb15.htm
Preceded by
Gewielieb
Archbishop of Mainz
745-755
Succeeded by
Lullus

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: St. Boniface (0 words)
In 732 Boniface wrote again and stated among other things that the work was becoming too much for one man. Gregory III congratulated him on his success and praised his zeal, in recognition sending him the pallium, and making him an archbishop, but still without a fixed see.
That Boniface had anything to do with the dis-establishment of the old royal family and the introduction of a new one cannot be proved.
It seems that Boniface's last act as Archbishop of Mainz was the repudiation of the claim of the Archbishop of Cologne to the diocese of Utrecht.
Saint Boniface - LoveToKnow 1911 (1020 words)
SAINT BONIFACE (680-754), the apostle of Germany, whose real name was Wynfrith, was born of a good Saxon family at Crediton or Kirton in Devonshire.
At the instance of Pippin, Boniface secured Adalbert's condemnation at the synod of Soissons in 744; but he, and Clement, a Scottish missionary and a heretic on predestination, continued to find followers in spite of legate, council and pope, for three or four years more.
Between 746 and 748 Boniface was made bishop of Mainz, and became metropolitan over the Rhine bishoprics and Utrecht, as well as over those he had established in Germany - thus founding the pre-eminence of the see of Mainz.
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