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Encyclopedia > Sailor Moon
Sailor Moon
The major characters of the Sailor Moon anime
美少女戦士セーラームーン
(Bishōjo Senshi Sērā Mūn)
Genre Adventure, Magical girl, Romance
Manga: Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon
Author Naoko Takeuchi
Publisher Flag of JapanKodansha
Demographic Shōjo
Serialized in Flag of JapanNakayoshi and Run Run
Flag of the United StatesMixxzine and Smile
Original run February 1992March 1997
Volumes original: 18; renewed: 12
TV anime: Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon (SM, SM:R, SM:S, SM:Supers, SM:Sailor Stars)
Director Jun'ichi Satoh, Kunihiko Ikuhara, Takuya Igarashi
Studio Toei Animation
Network Flag of Japan TV Asahi
Original run March 7, 1992February 8, 1997
Episodes 200 (SM:46, R:43, S:38, Supers:39, SailorStars:34), various Specials
Films
  • Sailor Moon R: The Movie
  • Sailor Moon S: The Movie
  • Sailor Moon Supers: The Movie
Musical series

Sailor Moon musicals (Seramyu): 25 stage shows based on the Sailor Moon franchise were released between 1993 and 2005. Image File history File links Flag_of_Turkey. ... ATV is a nation wide tv channel in Turkey. ... TRT Headquarters in Ankara TRT, the Turkish Radio and Television Corporation (Türkiye Radyo ve Televizyon Kurumu), was founded in 1964, it is the national public broadcaster of Turkey. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Flyer from the 2004 Musical SeraMyū (セラミュー seramyū, abbreviated from Sailor Moon musical セーラームーン・ミュージカル sērāmūn myūjikaru ) is the common abbreviation for a series of live theatre productions based on Naoko Takeuchis metaseries Sailor Moon. ...

Live-action series

Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon: a 49 episode live action series directed by Ryuta Tasaki ran from October 4, 2003, to September 25, 2004. There were also two direct-to-video releases: a sequel (Special Act), and a prequel (Act Zero). Icons of tokusatsu in the late 1970s: Spider-Man, Kamen Rider Stronger, Kamen Rider V3, Battle Fever J, Ultraman Jonias, as well as the manga and anime icon Doraemon Tokusatsu ) is a Japanese word that literally means special effects. ... Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon )[1] (often abbreviated to PGSM) is a tokusatsu television series in the Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon metaseries originally created by Naoko Takeuchi. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Sequel (disambiguation). ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ...

Video games

Quite a few Sailor Moon video games have been released, mainly in Japan, with very few ever being translated into other languages. This article is about computer and video games. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Related series
  • Codename: Sailor V

Sailor Moon (美少女戦士セーラームーン Bishōjo Senshi Sērā Mūn?, officially translated as Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon) is the title of a Japanese media franchise created by Naoko Takeuchi. It is generally credited with popularizing the concept of a sentai (team) of magical girls, as well as the general (re-)emergence of the magical girl genre itself. i eat poop alot A media franchise is an intellectual property involving the characters, setting, and trademarks of an original work of media (usually a work of fiction), such as a film, a work of literature, a television program, or a video game. ... Naoko Takeuchi (武内直子 Takeuchi Naoko), born March 15, 1967, is a manga artist who lives in Tokyo, Japan. ... Sentai is a Japanese word which roughly translates to task force. It is often use to refer to a specific type of fictional story, which stars a specially organized group of heroes; good examples of Sentai is the various Super Sentai live-action Japanese television programs which the American Power... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the gay mens lifestyle magazine, see Genre (magazine). ...


The story of the various metaseries revolves around the reincarnated defenders of a kingdom that once spanned the solar system, and the evil forces that they battle. The major characters—called Sailor Senshi (literally "Sailor Soldiers"; frequently called "Sailor Scouts" in the North American version)—are teenage girls who can transform into heroines named for the moon and planets (Sailor Moon, Sailor Mercury, Sailor Mars, etc). The use of "Sailor" comes from a style of girls' school uniform popular in Japan, the sērā fuku (sailor outfit), after which the Senshi's uniforms are modeled. The elements of fantasy in the series are heavily symbolic and often based on mythology. A metaseries includes series of stories which include references to each other and some overall similar chronological or cast backdrop, but are not similar enough to be considered direct sequels. ... This article is about the Solar System. ... The Sailor Team. ... North American redirects here. ... Teen redirects here. ... This article is about Earths moon. ... This article is about the astronomical term. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Japanese school uniform Japanese high school students wearing the sailor outfit Japan introduced school uniforms in the late 19th century as a part of its modernisation program. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mythology (disambiguation). ...


Creation of the Sailor Moon manga was preceded by another, Codename: Sailor V, which centered around just one Sailor Senshi. Takeuchi devised the idea when she wanted to create a cute series about girls in outer space, and her editor asked her to put them in sailor fuku.[1] When Sailor V was proposed for adaptation into an anime, the concept was modified so that Sailor V herself became only one member of a team. The resulting manga series was a fusion of the popular magical girl and sentai genres of which Takeuchi was a fan,[2] making Sailor Moon one of the first series ever to combine the two. This article is about the comics created in Japan. ... Codename wa Sailor V (コードネームはセーラーブイ, Codename: Sailor V) is a manga created by Naoko Takeuchi in 1991, though finalised chapters ran from May, 1993 to March, 1994 in Kodanshas Run Run magazine, with its last chapter reappearing in 1997. ... Layers of Atmosphere - not to scale (NOAA)[1] Outer space, sometimes simply called space, refers to the relatively empty regions of the universe outside the atmospheres of celestial bodies. ... Animé redirects here. ... Minako Aino , or Mina in the English versions) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... The first cover of the Sailor Moon manga, February 1992. ... The official logo of the Super Sentai Series introduced in 2000 during the run of Mirai Sentai Timeranger The Super Sentai Series ) is the name given to the long running Japanese superhero team genre of shows produced by Toei Company Ltd. ... For more information on fans of football (soccer), see Football (soccer) culture. ...


The manga resulted in spinoffs into other types of media, including a highly popular anime, as well as musical theatre productions, video games, and a live-action (tokusatsu) series. Although most concepts in the many versions overlap, there are often notable differences, and thus continuity between the different formats is limited. The Sailor Moon anime series , Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon) was co-produced by TV Asahi, Toei Agency and Toei Animation. ... The Black Crook (1866), considered by some historians to be the first musical[1] Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... In film and video, live action refers to works that are acted out by flesh-and-blood actors, as opposed to animation. ... Icons of tokusatsu in the late 1970s: Spider-Man, Kamen Rider Stronger, Kamen Rider V3, Battle Fever J, Ultraman Jonias, as well as the manga and anime icon Doraemon Tokusatsu ) is a Japanese word that literally means special effects. ... In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ...

Contents

Story

The protagonist of Sailor Moon is Usagi Tsukino, who lives as an ordinary middle school girl until she is found by a talking cat named Luna. Through Luna, Usagi learns that the world is about to be attacked by a Dark Kingdom that had appeared once before, long ago, and destroyed the kingdom of the moon. Her dormant powers are then awakened to defend the Earth against the coming onslaught, and she is led to a number of friends who join her in the battle. Usagi Tsukino , or Serena in the English versions) is the protagonist of the Sailor Moon metaseries as well as its title character, best known by her pseudonym, Sailor Moon ). She is the de facto leader of the series primary heroines, the Sailor Senshi. ... Artemis, Diana, and Luna in the anime. ... The Dark Kingdom ) is an organization of antagonists in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... The Silver Millennium was golden-age of an ancient civilization in the famous series, Sailor Moon. ...


Usagi fights using the identity of Sailor Moon, and as the story progresses she learns more and more about the enemies which face her and the evil force that is sending them. Gradually she discovers the truth about her own past life, her destined true love, and the possibilities for the future of the Solar System. Just as the name suggests, this charming fellow was the final enemy of Sailor Moon, and he vowed to utterly destory the universe. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Solar System. ...


The plot spans five major story arcs, each of which is represented in both the manga and anime, usually under different names. These are the Dark Kingdom arc, the Black Moon arc (Sailor Moon R), the Infinity arc (Sailor Moon S), the Dream arc (Sailor Moon Supers), and the Stars arc (Sailor Stars). The anime added an additional minor arc at the start of the second series, and spent the first few episodes of Sailor Stars wrapping up the plot from the previous series. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon The Dark Kingdom arc is the first story arc in the Sailor Moon anime and manga metaseries. ... The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon R Sailor Moon R is the shortened title of Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon R ), the second major story arc and series in the Sailor Moon anime. ... This article is about the third story arc of Sailor Moon. ... The manga was translated into English by TOKYOPOP (then Mixx). ... The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon: Sailor Stars Sailor Stars is the shortened title of Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon: Sailor Stars ), which is the fifth and final major story arc in the anime Sailor Moon. ... Ann and Ail, the aliens. ...


Characters

See also: List of minor Sailor Moon characters
Usagi Tsukino (月野 うさぎ Tsukino Usagi?)
The main character of the series, called Serena in the English anime (nicknamed Bunny in the English manga). Usagi is a carefree schoolgirl with an enormous capacity for love, and transforms into the heroine called Sailor Moon. At the beginning of the series she is portrayed as an immature crybaby who hates having to fight evil and wants nothing more than to be a normal girl. As she progresses, however, she embraces the chance to use her power to protect those she cares about.
Mamoru Chiba (地場 衛 Chiba Mamoru?)
A student somewhat older than Usagi, called Darien in the English adaptations of the series. As a young child he was in a terrible car accident that robbed him of his parents and his knowledge of who he is. During the series he has some precognitive ability, including dreams that inspire him to take on the guise of Tuxedo Mask and fight alongside the Sailor Senshi. After an initially confrontational relationship, he and Usagi remember their past lives together and fall in love again.
Ami Mizuno (水野 亜美 Mizuno Ami?)
A quiet bookworm in Usagi's class, called Amy in the English adaptations of the series. She is hugely intelligent, with a rumored IQ of 300,[3] can transform into Sailor Mercury, acquiring power over all phases of water. Ami's shy exterior masks a passion for knowledge and for taking care of the people around her. She hopes to be a doctor one day, like her mother, and tends to be the practical one in the group. Secretly, she is also a fan of pop culture and romance novels, and becomes embarrassed whenever this is pointed out.
Rei Hino (火野 レイ Hino Rei?)
An elegant miko (shrine maiden), called Raye in the English versions. Because of her work as a Shintō priestess, Rei can sense and dispel evil even in civilian form. When she transforms into Sailor Mars, she can also manipulate fire. She is very serious and focused, but although easily annoyed by Usagi's flightiness, cares about her very much. Rei is portrayed as boy-crazy in the early anime, but is uninterested in romance in both the manga and live-action series. She attends a private Catholic school, separate from the other girls.
Makoto Kino (木野 まこと Kino Makoto?)
A tomboy who transfers into Usagi's school, called Lita in the English versions. Very tall and strong for a Japanese schoolgirl, she can transform into Sailor Jupiter, attacking with lightning and with some control over plants. Both Makoto's parents died in a plane crash years ago, so she lives alone and takes care of herself. She cultivates her physical strength as well as more domestic interests, including housekeeping, cooking, and gardening. She wants to marry young and to own a flower and cake shop.
Minako Aino (愛野 美奈子 Aino Minako?)
A perky dreamer who acted on her own as Sailor V for some time. Called Mina in the English versions, she has a companion cat called Artemis who works alongside Luna in guiding the Sailor Senshi. Minako transforms into Sailor Venus, Soldier of Love, and is the leader of Sailor Moon's four inner guardians. She also dreams of becoming a famous singer and idol and attends auditions whenever she can. At the start of the live-action series, she is already these things, but has poor health and separates herself from the other Senshi.
Chibiusa (ちびうさ?)
A little girl from 1,000 years in the future, called Rini in the English versions of the series. She comes to the 20th century on several occasions, whether to seek help or to be trained as a soldier, and learns to transform into Sailor Chibi Moon (or, in the English anime, Sailor Mini Moon). Chibiusa co-stars with Usagi in certain story arcs, though they sometimes have an adversarial relationship. She considers herself much more mature than Usagi, and wants to grow up and become a lady in her own right.
Setsuna Meioh (冥王 せつな Meiō Setsuna?)
A mysterious woman, called Trista in the English anime. She is first revealed as Sailor Pluto, the Guardian of Time, whose duty is to protect the Space-Time Door from unauthorized travelers. It is only later that she appears on Earth, living as a college student. She has a distant personality and can be very stern, but can also be quite friendly and helps the younger Sailor Senshi when she can. After so long at the gate of time she carries a deep sense of loneliness, although she is close friends with Chibiusa.
Michiru Kaioh (海王 みちる Kaiō Michiru?)
A talented violinist with some precognition, called Michelle in the English anime. She is a year older than most of the other Sailor Senshi and can transform into Sailor Neptune, channeling the power of the ocean. She worked alone for some time before finding her partner, Sailor Uranus, with whom she fell in love. Michiru is elegant and personable, already well-known for her music as well as her painting, but has given up her own dreams for the life of a Senshi. She is fully devoted to this duty and willing to make any sacrifice for it.
Haruka Tenoh (天王 はるか Ten'ō Haruka?)
A good-natured, masculine-acting girl, called Amara in the English anime. Haruka is the same age as her partner, Michiru, and transforms into Sailor Uranus, Soldier of the Sky. Before becoming a Sailor Senshi, she dreamt of being a racer, and is skilled at driving. She tends to dress and, in the anime, speak like a man. She is so friendly and genial that nearly everyone she meets is attracted to her. When it comes to fighting the enemy, however, she distrusts outside help and prefers to work solely with Sailor Neptune and later Pluto and Saturn.
Hotaru Tomoe (土萠 ほたる Tomoe Hotaru?)
A sweet, lonely young girl whose name is unchanged in English (though pronounced slightly differently). Daughter of a possessed mad scientist, she is sickly and weak as the result of a terrible lab accident in her youth. After overcoming the darkness that has surrounded her family, she is able to become the Soldier of Silence, Sailor Saturn. She wields forces of destruction so powerful that she is rarely called upon to use them, and unlike the others, her Senshi and civilian personae seem somewhat disconnected. She is often pensive, and as a human has the inexplicable power to heal others.

This is a list of supporting characters from the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Sailor Moon ) is a fictional character in the Sailor Moon metaseries and the main protagonist of the franchise, as well as its title character. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Tuxedo Mask ) is the primary male protagonist of the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... For other uses, see Amnesia (disambiguation). ... Precognition (from the Latin præ-, “prior to,” + cognitio, “a getting to know”) denotes a form of extra-sensory perception wherein a person is able to perceive information about places or events before they happen through paranormal means. ... Sailor Mercury ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Bibliophilia is the love of books. ... IQ redirects here. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, is the vernacular (peoples) culture that prevails in a modern society. ... A romance novel is a literary genre developed in Western culture, mainly in English-speaking countries. ... Sailor Mars ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Miko at Aso shrine in Aso, Japan Miko lit. ... A torii at Itsukushima Shrine Shinto (神道 Shintō) (sometimes called Shintoism) is a native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... For other uses, see Fire (disambiguation). ... Catholic schools are education ministries of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Sailor Jupiter ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... For other uses, see Tomboy (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with lighting. ... For other uses, see Plant (disambiguation). ... Housekeeping is the maintenance of a clean environment, usually in a house, but it also applies to industrial, commercial, and institutional settings. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... A gardener Gardening is the practice of growing flowering plants, vegetables, and fruits. ... Sailor Venus ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Codename wa Sailor V (コードネームはセーラーブイ, Codename: Sailor V) is a manga created by Naoko Takeuchi in 1991, though finalised chapters ran from May, 1993 to March, 1994 in Kodanshas Run Run magazine, with its last chapter reappearing in 1997. ... Artemis, Diana, and Luna in the anime. ... For other uses, see Love (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Singer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Teen idol (disambiguation). ... Audition can refer to: The sense of hearing The audio editing software Adobe Audition ... Chibiusa or Rini in the English versions), is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Chibiusa or Rini in the English versions), is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Setsuna Meioh Setsuna Meioh (冥王 せつな Meiō Setsuna) is a character in the anime Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon. ... In special relativity and general relativity, time and three-dimensional space are treated together as a single four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian manifold called spacetime. ... Loneliness is an emotional state in which a person experiences a powerful feeling of emptiness and isolation. ... Michiru Kaioh Michiru Kaioh (海王 みちる Kaiō Michiru) is a character in the Japanese manga and anime metaseries known as Sailor Moon. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Haruka Tenoh Haruka Tenoh (天王 はるか Tenō Haruka) is a Sailor Senshi, one of the central characters of the anime and manga Sailor Moon. ... For other uses, see Sky (disambiguation). ... This articles is about cross-dressing in general, that is the act of wearing the clothing of another gender for any reason. ... For other uses, see Androgyny (disambiguation). ... Sailor Saturn ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... They LAUGHED at my theories at the institute! Fools! Ill destroy them all! Caucasian, male, aging, crooked teeth, messy hair, lab coat, spectacles/goggles, dramatic posing — one popular stereotype of mad scientist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Silence is a relative or total lack of sound. ... A German Thrash metal band formed in Lörrach, Germany in 1983. ... For the Todd Rundgren album, see Healing (Todd Rundgren). ...

Adaptations

Manga

Main article: Sailor Moon (manga)

The Sailor Moon series began as a manga written and drawn by Takeuchi, the series' creator. It was an evolution from her earlier Codename: Sailor V idea, expanding the concept into a team of five girls rather than just one.[1] Recurring motifs include astronomy, astrology, Greek myth, Roman myth, geology, Japanese elemental themes,[4] teen fashions, and schoolgirl antics.[5] The first cover of the Sailor Moon manga, February 1992. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... The bust of Zeus found at Otricoli (Sala Rotonda, Museo Pio-Clementino, Vatican) Greek mythology is the body of stories belonging to the Ancient Greeks concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. ... A head of Minerva found in the ruins of the Roman baths in Bath Roman mythology, the mythological beliefs of the people of Ancient Rome, can be considered as having two parts. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Many ancient philosophies used a set of archetypal classical elements to explain patterns in nature. ...


Only one story arc was originally planned,[6] and the storyline developed in meetings a year prior to publications,[7] but after it was completed Takeuchi was asked to continue. Four more story arcs were produced,[6] often being published simultaneously with the five corresponding anime series. The anime series would only lag the manga by a month or two.[7]The complete original manga spans 52 issues, known as Acts, as well as ten separate side-stories. Its main series was serialized in Nakayoshi, Kodansha's shōjo magazine, from 1991 to 1995; the side-stories were serialized in Kodansha's Run Run. Nakayoshi best friend, also romanized Nakayosi) is a monthly shōjo manga magazine published by Kodansha in Japan which began publication in December 1954, making it a long-running magazine with over 60 years worth of manga publication history. ... The head office of Kodansha Kodansha Limited ) is the largest Japanese publisher of literature and manga, headquartered in (Bunkyo), Tokyo. ... Page from long running shōjo manga Glass Mask by Suzue Miuchi, demonstrating archetypal shōjo art conventions Shōjo or shoujo ) is a term used in English to refer to manga and anime aimed at a female audience between the ages of 13 and 18. ... The head office of Kodansha Kodansha Limited ) is the largest Japanese publisher of literature and manga, headquartered in (Bunkyo), Tokyo. ...


The entire series has been published in book form by Kodansha. The first edition came out as the series was being produced, from 1992 until 1997, and consisted of 18 volumes with all the Acts and side stories in the order in which they had been released. The second edition, called the shinsōban or "renewal" edition, began in 2003 when the live-action series was running. The individual Acts were redistributed so that there are more per book, and some corrections and updates were made to the dialogue and drawings. New art was featured as well, including completely new cover art and character sketches (including characters unique to the live-action series). In all, the new edition consists of 12 story volumes and two separate "short story" volumes.[8] Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon )[1] (often abbreviated to PGSM) is a tokusatsu television series in the Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon metaseries originally created by Naoko Takeuchi. ...


Anime

The anime's original series logo, which officially translates to "Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon"
The anime's original series logo, which officially translates to "Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon"
Main article: Sailor Moon (anime)
See also: List of Sailor Moon episodes

The Sailor Moon anime was produced by Toei Animation, and started airing only a month after the first issue of the manga was published. With 200 episodes airing from March 1992 to February 1997 on TV Asahi, Sailor Moon is one of the longest magical girl anime series.[9] The anime sparked a highly successful merchandising campaign of over 5000 items,[10] which contributed to demand all over the world and translation into numerous languages. Sailor Moon has since become one of the most famous anime properties in the world.[11][12] Image File history File links Smlogo. ... The Sailor Moon anime series , Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon) was co-produced by TV Asahi, Toei Agency and Toei Animation. ... This article is about the episodes of the anime series. ... Toei Animation Company, Limited ) (JASDAQ: 4816) is a Japanese animation studio owned by the Toei Company. ... 1992 was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1997 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... TV Asahi Corporation ) (TYO: 9409 ), also known as EX and Tele-Asa ), is a television network headquartered in Roppongi, Minato, Tokyo, Japan. ... A coffee mug bearing the logo of a company or organization is a common example of product merchandising. ... The supply and demand model describes how prices vary as a result of a balance between product availability at each price (supply) and the desires of those with purchasing power at each price (demand). ...


Strictly speaking, Sailor Moon is an anime metaseries. It consists of five separate series averaging around 40 episodes each, often referred to as seasons by North American fans because of the over-arching storyline. Each series roughly corresponds to one of the five major story arcs of the manga, following the same general storyline and including most of the same characters. There were also three theatrically-released movies, as well as four special animated shorts. The series saw many adaptations into other languages, but not all episodes were always included, such as with the English-language releases. A television program (US), television programme (UK) or simply television show is a segment of programming in television broadcasting. ... Early American actor William Garwood starred in numerous short films, many of which were only 20 minutes in length Short subject is a format description originally coined in the North American film industry in the early period of cinema. ...


Music for the series was written and composed by numerous people, including the series' creator. All of the background musical scores were composed and arranged by Takanori Arisawa, who won several awards due to the popularity of the various soundtracks in Japan and other countries. Over 40 Japanese-language music albums based on the series were released, as well as some 33 CD singles. In North America, only three CDs albums were released.[13] Takanori Arisawa ) (April 4, 1951 - November 26, 2005) was a Japanese composer from Tokyo. ... Not to be confused with the Javanese language. ... An album is a collection of related audio tracks, released together commercially in an audio format to the public. ... A CD single is a music single in the form of a compact disc. ...


Traditional animation techniques were used throughout the series. The series was directed first by Junichi Satō, then by Kunihiko Ikuhara and later by Takuya Igarashi. Character design was headed by Kazuko Tadano, Ikuko Itoh and Katsumi Tamegai, all of whom were also animation directors. Traditional animation, also referred to as classical animation, cel animation, or hand-drawn animation, is the oldest and historically the most popular form of animation. ... A television director is usually responsible for directing the actors and other taped aspects of a television production. ... Junichi Satō ) is a Japanese director of anime born March 11, 1960 in Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture, Japan. ... Ikuhara, from the Utena Art Collection artbook, circa 1999 Kunihiko Ikuhara (幾原邦彦 Ikuhara Kunihiko) (born December 21, 1964) is a Japanese creative artist who has collaborated on several famous anime and manga series. ... Takuya Igarashi is a Japanese animator who has directed the anime series Bishôjo senshi Seera Muun S (Sailor Moon S), Bishôjo senshi Seera Muun Seera Staazu (Sailor Stars), and Oja majô doremi (Bothersome Witch Doremi). ... Ikuko Itoh ) is a Japanese character designer and animation director best known as the creator of Princess Tutu. ... An animation director is the director in charge of all aspects of the animation process during the production of an animated film or animated segment for a live-action film. ...


Musicals

Main article: Sailor Moon musicals

The musical stage shows, usually referred to collectively as SeraMyu, were a series of live theatre productions that played over 800 performances in some 29 musicals between 1993 and 2005. The stories of the shows include anime-inspired plotlines as well as a large amount of original material. Music from the series has been released on about 20 "memorial" albums.[13] Flyer from the 2004 Musical The Sailor Moon musicals ), commonly referred to as SeraMyu ), are a series of live theatre productions based on Naoko Takeuchis metaseries Sailor Moon. ... An album (from Latin albus white, blank, relating to a blank book in which something can be inserted) is a packaged collection of related things. ...


Musicals ran twice a year, in the winter and in the summer. In the summer, the only venue for the musicals was the Sunshine Theatre in the Ikebukuro area of Tokyo; however, in the winter it went on tour to the other large cities in Japan. Sunchine City Entrance Sunshine City (サンシャインシティ) is a building complex located in East Ikebukuro, Toshima, Tokyo. ... Ikebukuro Ikebukuro at night Ikebukuro at night Ikebukuro (池袋), a part of Toshima ward, is a large commercial and entertainment district of Tokyo, Japan. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ...


The final incarnation of the series, The New Legend of Kaguya Island (Revised Edition) (新・かぐや島伝説 <改訂版> Shin Kaguyashima Densetsu (Kaiteban)?), was staged in January 2005. After that show, the series went on a hiatus. There have been no signs that the show will continue.[14] 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in January • 29 Ephraim Kishon • 25 Philip Johnson • 23 Johnny Carson • 22 Parveen Babi • 20 Jan Nowak-Jeziorański • 17 Virginia Mayo • 17 Zhao Ziyang • 15 Ruth Warrick • 14 Rudolph Moshammer Recent deaths Ongoing events • Tsunami relief...


Live-action series

A tokusatsu (live-action) version of Sailor Moon was broadcast from October 4, 2003, through September 25, 2004. The series is known officially as Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon (usually abbreviated to PGSM by fans), and it is the first series in the franchise to have a complete English-language title. It lasted a total of 49 episodes, and the broadcast originated from the Tokyo Broadcasting System. Numerous other television stations in Japan retransmitted the series.[15] Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon )[1] (often abbreviated to PGSM) is a tokusatsu television series in the Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon metaseries originally created by Naoko Takeuchi. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image:Tokyo Broadcasting System(年末瑞穂第一小学校) in Akasaka . ... The term television channel generally refers to either a television station or its cable/satellite counterpart (both outlined below). ...


The series' storyline more closely follows the original manga than the anime at first, but in later episodes it proceeds into a significantly different storyline from either, with original characters and new plot developments.


In addition to the main episodes, there were two direct-to-video releases after the show ended its television broadcast. These were the "Special Act", which is set four years after the main storyline ends and which shows the wedding of the two main characters, and "Act Zero", a prequel which shows the origins of Sailor V and Tuxedo Mask. A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and/or video signals which transmit programs to an audience. ... A prequel is a work that portrays events which include the structure, conventions, and/or characters of a previously completed narrative, but occur at an earlier time. ... Minako Aino Minako Aino (愛野 美奈子 Aino Minako) is a fictional character from the Japanese entertainment series known as Sailor Moon. ... Tuxedo Mask ) is the primary male protagonist of the Sailor Moon metaseries. ...


Video games

Numerous Sailor Moon console and arcade games were released in Japan, all based on the anime series. They were primarily made by Bandai and a Japanese game company called Angel, with some being produced by Banpresto.[16] The early games were side-scrolling fighters, whereas the later ones were unique puzzle games, or versus fighting games. Another Story was a turn-based role-playing game. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Game console redirects here. ... Centipede by Atari is a typical example of a 1980s era arcade game. ... This article is about the Japanese toy manufacturer. ... Banpresto Co. ... Beat Em Up is the Iggy Pop album on which the band were first labeled as The Trolls: Iggy Pop, Whitey Kirst, Pete Marshall, Alex Kirst, Lloyd Mooseman Roberts. ... Minesweeper, a popular computer puzzle game found on many machines. ... This article describes fighting games in which opponents face off in a battle. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The games mainly saw release on the Super Famicom, with the first side-scroller being ported to the Sega Mega Drive. Two side-scrolling adventure games were produced for the Game Boy (Sailor Moon and Sailor Moon R), and a side-scrolling game was also produced for the Game Gear (Sailor Moon S), as well as a game for the PC Engine. A final versus fighting game was released for the Sega Saturn and Sony PlayStation. The last Sailor Moon-related game to date was released in November 2001 - Happy Chibiusa World. There was a rumored game for the Wii console in development by NAMCO with the working title of "Sailor Moon" but this turned out to be just a rumour.[17] This article should be merged with Super Nintendo Entertainment System The Super Famicom design differed from that of the American SNES, though the controllers are almost the same. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Side-scrolling game. ... The Sega Mega Drive ) is a video game console released by Sega in Japan in 1988, North America in 1989, and the PAL region in 1990. ... This article is about the computer and video game genre. ... For the entire Game Boy series of handheld consoles, see Game Boy line. ... The Sega Game Gear was Segas first portable gaming system. ... The PC Engine was a video game console released by NEC, a Japanese company, in 1987. ... The Sega Saturn ) is a 32-bit video game console, first released on November 22, 1994 in Japan, May 11, 1995 in North America and July 8, 1995 in Europe. ... The original PlayStation was produced in a light grey colour; the more recent PSOne redesign sports a smaller more rounded case. ... November 2001 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December November - The Doha Declaration slightly relaxes the grip of international intellectual property. ... The Wii (pronounced as the pronoun we, IPA: ) is the fifth home video game console released by Nintendo. ... This article is about Namco, a Japanese leisure company and game developer. ...


The only original Sailor Moon game to be released outside of Japan was the Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon game developed by Angel, released in France as "Sailormoon" in 1994.[16] The other games are hard to find in any other country, unless downloaded from the internet as ROMs, some of which have been translated into languages other than Japanese. A ROM image, or simply ROM, is a computer file which contains a copy of the data from a read-only memory chip, often from a video game cartridge, a computers firmware, or from an arcade games main board. ...


A handful of games were produced in North America, including "The 3D Adventures of Sailor Moon".


English adaptations

The Sailor Moon anime and manga metaseries has been adapted into many different languages, including English. ...

English-dubbed anime

The English adaptation of Sailor Moon was produced in an attempt to capitalize on the success of Mighty Morphin Power Rangers.[5] After a bidding war between Toon Makers, who wanted to produce a half live-action and half American-style cartoon version,[18] and DiC Entertainment,[19] DiC (which at the time was owned by The Walt Disney Company)[20] acquired the rights to the first 72 episodes of Sailor Moon, consisting of the entire first series and two-thirds of Sailor Moon R. Through the omission of 6 episodes and the merging of two, the total episode count was reduced to 65, the minimum number of episodes required for strip syndication on US television. The remaining episodes were each cut by several minutes to make room for more commercials, to censor plot points or visuals deemed inappropriate for children, and to allow the insertion of "educational" segments called "Sailor Says" at the end of each episode. The remaining 17 episodes of Sailor Moon R were adapted later, and were treated in much the same way. Image File history File links Sailor_Moon_English_logo. ... Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (MMPR) is an American live-action television series, created for the American market, based on the sixteenth installment of the Japanese Super Sentai franchise, Kyōryū Sentai Zyuranger. ... The DIC Incredible World logo used from the late 2001-present. ... Disney redirects here. ... In the television industry (as in radio), syndication is the sale of the right to broadcast programs to multiple stations, without going through a broadcast network. ... For other uses, see Censor. ...


The English adaptations by Optimum Productions for Cloverway of Sailor Moon S and Sailor Moon Supers (the third and fourth series) stayed relatively close to the original Japanese versions, and no episodes were skipped or merged.

DVD cover for "Sailor Moon: A Heroine is Chosen", released in 2002 by ADV Films.[21]

During 1996-97, a total of six VHS tapes, each containing two key (nonconsecutive in most cases) episodes of the series, were released by Buena Vista Home Video . These tapes were originally available exclusively through Toys 'R' Us stores, but later saw wider distribution in other chains. In 1998, a VHS boxset containing all thirteen episodes of the "Doom Tree" storyline (the first part of R) was released, also through Buena Vista. Image File history File links SailorMoonDVDCover. ... Image File history File links SailorMoonDVDCover. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... ADV Films logo ADV Films is the home video publication arm of A.D. Vision based in Houston, Texas. ... “Miramax” redirects here. ... Toys Я Us NYSE: TOY is a toy store chain based in the United States. ...

Sailor Moon Dark Kingdom arc DVD boxset released in 2003 by ADV Films.

Pioneer Entertainment (now Geneon Entertainment) had the rights to release Sailor Moon S, SuperS and the movies on Region-1 DVD and VHS, both in the dubbed and uncut versions. In 2000, ADV released the English dubs of Sailor Moon and Sailor Moon R in a 20 volume VHS series.[22] During 2001, Pioneer had released Sailor Moon in four different stock-keeping units, and released a box set of the movies in that October.[23] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 554 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,844 × 1,994 pixels, file size: 916 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a DVD cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the DVD or... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 554 × 599 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,844 × 1,994 pixels, file size: 916 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This image is of a DVD cover, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the publisher of the DVD or... The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon The Dark Kingdom arc is the first story arc in the Sailor Moon anime and manga metaseries. ... Geneon Entertainment, Inc. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... For other uses of the acronym SKU, go here. ...


The fifth and final series, Sailor Stars, has never been licensed for adaptation into English. As of May 2004, the rest of the metaseries has officially gone off the air in all English-speaking countries due to lapsed licenses which have not been renewed.[24] The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon: Sailor Stars Sailor Stars is the shortened title of Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon: Sailor Stars ), which is the fifth and final major story arc in the anime Sailor Moon. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December Deaths in May • 28 Gerald Anthony • 27 Umberto Agnelli • 22 Richard Biggs • 20 Len Murray • 17 Tony Randall • 17 Ezzedine Salim • 9 Alan King • 9 Akhmad Kadyrov • 8(?) Nick Berg • 7 Waldemar Milewicz Other recent deaths Ongoing...


English-language manga

The manga was translated into English in 1997 by manga publisher Mixx (now renamed Tokyopop). The manga was initially syndicated in MixxZine but was later pulled out of that magazine and moved into a secondary magazine called "SMILE."[25] The US comic was released as three series: Sailor Moon, which collects the first three arcs (the Dark Kingdom, Black Moon, and Infinity arcs), Sailor Moon Super S, which collects the Supers arc, and Sailor Moon Stars, which collects the Sailor Stars arc. They feature all of the content from the original manga collections (though the names of characters introduced in the first two story arcs were changed to those used in the English anime), as well as the occasional new sketch and "thank you" commentary from the series' creator . For the music movie, see Tokyo Pop. ... Tokyopop magazine, originally named MixxZine, was a manga anthology published in North America by Tokyopop (originally named Mixx). MixxZine at the start published four series, two of which were shōjo and two of which were seinen: Ice Blade Magic Knight Rayearth Parasyte Sailor Moon As the seinen and sh... SMILE is an international magazine of multiple origins. ...


As of May 2005, Tokyopop's license to the Sailor Moon manga has lapsed, and the English-language manga is out of print.[26][27] 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21: Subodh Mukherjee May 21: Stephen Elliott May 20...


Reception

The Sailor Moon anime was originally planned to run for only six months, but was extended repeatedly due to its popularity, concluding after a five-year run.[28] In Japan, it aired every Saturday night in prime time,[10][29] getting TV viewership ratings around 11-12% for most of the series run.[10][30] The media franchise is one of the most successful Japan has ever had, reaching 1.5 billion dollars in merchandise sales during the first three years.[31] Ten years after the series completion, the series has featured among the top thirty of TV Asahi's Top 100 Anime polls in 2005 and 2006.[11][12] The anime series won the Animage Anime Grand Prix prize in 1992. Prime time is the block of programming on television during the middle of the evening. ... September 1997 cover of Animage, featuring artwork from the Studio Ghibli film Princess Mononoke. ...


Sailor Moon has also been popular internationally. The first dubbed version was made in France, premiering on Club Dorothée in December 1993.[32] Other countries followed suit, including Italy, Spain, and China (Hong Kong), before it was picked up for a North American adaptation.[31] It is credited as being the beginning of a wider movement of girls taking up shōjo manga.[33] In 2001, the Sailor Moon manga was Tokyopop's best selling property, outselling the next-best selling titles by at least a factor of 1.5.[34] In filmmaking, dubbing or looping is the process of recording or replacing voices for a motion picture. ... Frédérique Hoschédé (born on 14 July 1953 in Paris, France), known as Dorothée, is a French singer and actress. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... For the music movie, see Tokyo Pop. ...


The anime series has been commended for its "memorable characters", "charm" and its ability to appeal on a wide level.[35] It is credited with changing the genre of magical girls—its heroine must use her powers to fight evil, not simply to have fun as previous magical girls had done.[36] In contrast, Sailor Moon is also sometimes considered campy and melodramatic,[35] and has been criticised for its use of formulaic plots, monsters of the day,[37] and stock footage.[38] Characterization is the process of conveying information about characters in fiction or conversation. ... Camp is an aesthetic in which something has appeal because of its bad taste or ironic value. ... Poster for The Perils of Pauline (1914). ... King Sphinx, an example of a Villain of the Week, from the Power Rangers series Villain of the week (or, depending on genre, monster of the week or freak of the week) is a term that describes the nature of one-use antagonists in episodic fiction, specifically ongoing American genre... Stock footage, also termed archive footage, library pictures and file footage is film or video footage that is reused in a film. ...


In the West, Sailor Moon was sometimes associated with the Girl Power movement and with empowering its viewers,[33] compared both favorably and unfavorably with Barbie and Mighty Morphin Power Rangers.[10][39][40] Despite the series' apparent popularity among Western anime fandom, the dubbed version of the series received poor ratings in the United States and did not do well in DVD sales in the United Kingdom.[41] Anne Allison attributes the lack of popularity in the United States primarily to poor marketing (in the United States, the series was initially broadcast at times which did not suit the target audience - weekdays at 9:00 am and 2:00 pm). Executives connected with Sailor Moon suggest that poor localization played a role.[5] Helen McCarthy and Jonathan Clements go further, calling the dub "indifferent", and suggesting that Sailor Moon was put in "dead" timeslots due to local interests.[42] The British distributor, MVM Films, has attributed the poor sales to the United Kingdom release being of the dub only, and that major retailers refused to support the show leading to the DVD release appealing to neither children nor older anime fans.[41] A 2002 anime DVD The phrase Girl Power, as a term of empowerment, expressed a cultural phenomenon of the mid-late 1990s to the early 2000s and is also linked to third-wave feminism. ... Information Occupation See: Barbies careers Family See: List of Barbies friends and family Created by Ruth Handler Barbie is a best-selling fashion doll launched in 1959. ... Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (MMPR) is an American live-action television series, created for the American market, based on the sixteenth installment of the Japanese Super Sentai franchise, KyōryÅ« Sentai Zyuranger. ... Fandom (from the noun fan and the affix -dom, as in kingdom, dukedom, etc. ... Anne Allison is a professor of cultural anthropology at Duke University in the United States, specializing in contemporary Japanese society. ... Helen McCarthy is the British author of such anime reference books as 500 Manga Heroes and Villains, Anime!, The Anime! Movie Guide and Hayao Miyazaki: Master of Japanese Animation. ... Jonathan Clements (born July 9, 1971) is a British author and scriptwriter. ... MVM Films is a British distributor of Japanese animation. ...


The manga won the Kodansha Manga Award in 1993 for shōjo.[43] Sales of Sailor Moon's fashion dolls overtook that of Licca-chan in the 1990s, Mattel suggested that this was due to the "fashion-action" blend of the Sailor Moon storyline. Doll accessories included both fashion items and the Senshi's weapons.[5] The Kodansha Manga Award is an annual award for serialized manga published in the previous year. ... Licca-chan logo. ... Mattel headquarters in El Segundo Mattel Inc. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Takeuchi, Naoko (September 2003). Sailor Moon Shinsouban Volume 2. Kodansha. ISBN 4-06-334777-X. 
  2. ^ McCarter, Charles. Public Interview with Takeuchi Naoko (Q & A Interview). EX:CLUSIVE. www.ex.org. Retrieved on 2006-11-30.
  3. ^ Takeuchi, Naoko (July 6, 1992September 5, 1996). "Act 2", Bishoujo Senshi Sailor Moon Volume 1. Kodansha. ISBN 4-06-178721-7. 
  4. ^ Miller, Ian Andreas. Introduction to DIES GAUDII. DIES GAUDII. Retrieved on 2006-04-27.
  5. ^ a b c d Allison, Anne (2000). "A Challenge to Hollywood? Japanese Character Goods Hit the US". Japanese Studies 20 (1): 67-88. Routledge. doi:10.1080/10371390050009075. 
  6. ^ a b Takeuchi, Naoko (October 1999). Materials Collection. Kodansha. ISBN 4-06-324521-7. 
  7. ^ a b Schodt, Frederik (1996). Dreamland Japan: Writings on Modern Manga. Berkeley, CA: Stone Bridge Press, p.93. ISBN 978-1880656235. 
  8. ^ Glover, Alex (unknown). The Manga of Takeuchi Naoko - Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon Manga Translations. Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  9. ^ See Ojamajo Doremi series, which holds the record at 201 episodes.
  10. ^ a b c d Grigsby, Mary (1998). "Sailormoon: Manga (Comics) and Anime (Cartoon) Superheroine Meets Barbie: Global Entertainment Commodity Comes to the United States" The Journal of Popular Culture 32 (1) 59-80 doi:10.1111/j.0022-3840.1998.3201_59.x
  11. ^ a b TV Asahi Top 100 Anime Part 2 (2005-09-23). Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  12. ^ a b Japan's Favorite TV Anime (2006-10-13). Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  13. ^ a b The Compleat Sailor Moon CD List. Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  14. ^ eternal.legend. Retrieved on 2007-03-06.
  15. ^ Sailor Dream. Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  16. ^ a b Ken Arromdee's Sailor Moon FAQ. Retrieved on 2007-03-03.
  17. ^ Sailor Moon (Working Title) (Japan Version) - GAME - NAMCO - Free International Shipping. Games. YesAsia.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-18.
  18. ^ Arnold, Adam "OMEGA" (June 2001). Sailor Moon à la Saban: Debunked - An Interview with Rocky Solotoff (Q&A). Animefringe.
  19. ^ A clip from the Americanized version of Sailor Moon that Toon Makers presented to Toei can be seen at Toonami Digital Arsenal. Retrieved on 2007-03-16.
  20. ^ DIC Entertainment
  21. ^ ADV Announces Sailor Moon DVDs - Anime News Network
  22. ^ ADV Press Release re: Sailor Moon, Announces Dirty Pair Flash DVD - Anime News Network
  23. ^ ICv2 Talk Back - Sailor Moon Explained, Plus Fushigi Yugi, Cardcaptors, More
  24. ^ AnimeNation News - What's the Current Status of Sailor Moon in America?. Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  25. ^ Mixx Controversies: Analysis. Features. Anime News Network (August 14, 1998). Retrieved on 2007-01-24.
  26. ^ Tokyopop Out of Print. Retrieved on 2008-04-13.
  27. ^ The Comics Reporter. Retrieved on 2006-10-06.
  28. ^ Animazement Sailor Moon Voice Actors 2005 (May 2005). Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  29. ^ Johnson, Dany. "Q & A Rocking the Boat", Akadot, Digital Manga, Inc., 2001-04-21. Retrieved on 2007-02-21. 
  30. ^ Doi, Hitoshi. Hitoshi Doi. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  31. ^ a b DiC promotional video. Available at Toonami Digital Arsenal. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  32. ^ Homme de Verre (August 19, 2006). Sailor Moon. Fiches de Séries. Planète Jeunesse. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  33. ^ a b Yang, Sandy. "Girl Power Make Up—The Beginning of Shoujo in the US", Akadot, Digital Manga, Inc., 2000-10-25. Retrieved on 2007-01-18. 
  34. ^ ICv2 News - Sailor Moon Graphic Novels Top Bookstore Sales
  35. ^ a b Harcoff, Pete (May 26, 2003). Sailor Moon R: The Movie Review. The Anime Critic. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  36. ^ Ross, Christina. Sailor Moon. THEM Anime Reviews 4.0. Retrieved on 2007-02-16.
  37. ^ Bertschy, Zac (August 10, 2003). Sailor Moon DVD - Review. Anime News Network. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.
  38. ^ Merrill, Dave (January 17, 2006). Sailor Moon Super S TV Series Complete Collection. Anime Jump. Retrieved on 2007-02-17.
  39. ^ Allison, Anne [June 2000]. "Sailor Moon: Japanese Superheroes for Global Girls", in Timothy J. Craig: Japan Pop!: Inside the World of Japanese Popular Culture. M.E. Sharpe, 259-278. ISBN 978-0765605610. 
  40. ^ Barry, Dave. "Forget about Sailor Moon; we love Barbie!", The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Journal Communications, April 9, 1995. Retrieved on 2007-02-10. 
  41. ^ a b Cox, Gemma (Spring of 2006). "Anime Archive: Sailor Moon - The Most Popular Unsuccessful Series Ever?". NEO (18): 98. Uncooked Media. 
  42. ^ Clements, Jonathan; Helen McCarthy (2001-09-01). The Anime Encyclopedia: A Guide to Japanese Animation Since 1917, 1st ed., Berkeley, California: Stone Bridge Press, p. 338. ISBN 1-880656-64-7. OCLC 47255331. 
  43. ^ Joel Hahn. Kodansha Manga Awards. Comic Book Awards Almanac. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.

Naoko Takeuchi (武内直子 Takeuchi Naoko), born March 15, 1967, is a manga artist who lives in Tokyo, Japan. ... The head office of Kodansha Kodansha Limited ) is the largest Japanese publisher of literature and manga, headquartered in (Bunkyo), Tokyo. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The head office of Kodansha Kodansha Limited ) is the largest Japanese publisher of literature and manga, headquartered in (Bunkyo), Tokyo. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... The head office of Kodansha Kodansha Limited ) is the largest Japanese publisher of literature and manga, headquartered in (Bunkyo), Tokyo. ... Frederik L. Schodt is an American writer, translator and interpreter, notable in manga and anime fandom for his translations of works such as Osamu Tezukas Phoenix, Riyoko Ikedas The Rose of Versailles, Keiji Nakazawas Barefoot Gen, and others. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Magical DoReMi. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 65th day of the year (66th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see June (disambiguation). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hitoshi Doi, as pictured on his website. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... DIC can refer to: Diploma of Imperial College Dubai International Capital DIC Entertainment In chemistry, Diisopropylcarbodiimide Disseminated intravascular coagulation This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Anne Allison is a professor of cultural anthropology at Duke University in the United States, specializing in contemporary Japanese society. ... For the English musician, see Dave Berry (musician). ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... NEO is a 100-page monthly magazine that is published in the UK and Ireland that reviews and contains articles about different forms of asian entertainment, including anime and manga, live action films originating from Hong Kong, Korea, Japan and other asian countries; and J-pop/J-rock etc. ... Jonathan Clements (born July 9, 1971) is a British author and scriptwriter. ... Helen McCarthy is the British author of such anime reference books as 500 Manga Heroes and Villains, Anime!, The Anime! Movie Guide and Hayao Miyazaki: Master of Japanese Animation. ... The Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) was founded in 1967 and originally named the Ohio College Library Center. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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v  d  e
Sailor Moon series
Codename: Sailor V | Manga | Anime | Episode list | Stage musicals | Video games | Live-action | English adaptations | Actors | Story locations | Parallel
Protagonists (including Sailor Senshi)
Sailor Moon | Tuxedo Mask | Chibiusa
Sailor Mercury | Sailor Mars | Sailor Jupiter | Sailor Venus
Sailor Pluto | Sailor Neptune | Sailor Uranus | Sailor Saturn
Queen Serenity | Luna, Artemis, and Diana
Sailor Starlights | Princess Kakyuu | ChibiChibi
Minor and supporting characters

Story arcs
Dark Kingdom | R / Black Moon | S / Infinity | Supers/Dream | Sailor Stars
Antagonists
Dark Kingdom (Shitennou/Generals)
Makaiju aliens | Black Moon Clan (Ayakashi Sisters)
Death Busters (Witches 5)
Dead Moon Circus (Amazon Trio, Amazoness Quartet)
Shadow Galactica (Sailor Galaxia, Sailor Animamates)
Chaos

Movies
Sailor Moon R | Sailor Moon S | Sailor Moon Supers
Image File history File links Flag_of_Sailor_Moon. ... The first cover of the Sailor Moon manga, February 1992. ... The Sailor Moon anime series , Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon) was co-produced by TV Asahi, Toei Agency and Toei Animation. ... This article is about the episodes of the anime series. ... Flyer from the 2004 Musical The Sailor Moon musicals ), commonly referred to as SeraMyu ), are a series of live theatre productions based on Naoko Takeuchis metaseries Sailor Moon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pretty Guardian Sailor Moon )[1] (often abbreviated to PGSM) is a tokusatsu television series in the Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon metaseries originally created by Naoko Takeuchi. ... The Sailor Moon anime and manga metaseries has been adapted into many different languages, including English. ... Series creator Naoko Takeuchi (front row, third from left) with the cast of the Summer 1996 musical. ... The List of Sailor Moon locations tries to enumerate the most important locations found in the world of Sailor Moon, an anime/manga metaseries set mostly in a fictionalized version of Tokyo, Japan. ... Kousagi Tsukino, hungry and enthusiastic. ... The Sailor Team. ... Sailor Moon ) is a fictional character in the Sailor Moon metaseries and the main protagonist of the franchise, as well as its title character. ... Tuxedo Mask ) is the primary male protagonist of the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Chibiusa or Rini in the English versions), is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Sailor Mercury ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Sailor Mars ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Sailor Jupiter ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Sailor Venus ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Setsuna Meioh Setsuna Meioh (冥王 せつな Meiō Setsuna) is a character in the anime Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon. ... Michiru Kaioh Michiru Kaioh (海王 みちる Kaiō Michiru) is a character in the Japanese manga and anime metaseries known as Sailor Moon. ... Haruka Tenoh Haruka Tenoh (天王 はるか Tenō Haruka) is a Sailor Senshi, one of the central characters of the anime and manga Sailor Moon. ... Sailor Saturn ) is one of the central characters in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... The Silver Millennium was golden-age of an ancient civilization in the famous series, Sailor Moon. ... Artemis, Diana, and Luna in the anime. ... The Sailor Starlights is a group of three fictional characters introduced in the final story arc of the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Princess Kakyuu )[1] is a fictional character from the fifth arc of the Sailor Moon series. ... ChibiChibi ) is a fictional character in the fifth story arc of the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... This is a list of supporting characters from the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon The Dark Kingdom arc is the first story arc in the Sailor Moon anime and manga metaseries. ... The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon R Sailor Moon R is the shortened title of Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon R ), the second major story arc and series in the Sailor Moon anime. ... This article is about the third story arc of Sailor Moon. ... The manga was translated into English by TOKYOPOP (then Mixx). ... The anime series logo, which translates to Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon: Sailor Stars Sailor Stars is the shortened title of Pretty Soldier Sailor Moon: Sailor Stars ), which is the fifth and final major story arc in the anime Sailor Moon. ... The Dark Kingdom ) is an organization of antagonists in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... The Shitennou , Four Heavenly Kings) are a group of villains from the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Ann and Ail, the aliens. ... The Black Moon Clan ) is a fictional clan existing in the 30th century in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... The Four Ayakashi Sisters. ... The Death Busters ) are a group of antagonists in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... The Witches 5 ) are fictional antagonists in the anime series Sailor Moon S. The group is a subset of the Death Busters lead by Professor Souichi Tomoe. ... The Dead Moon Circus are the primary villains from the Sailormoon metaverses fourth season, SuperS (pronounced zu-paa-zu). Spoiler warning: During an eclipse of the sun, a strange circus floats into the town of Juuban, Tokyo, but no one seems to take notice. ... The Amazon Trio--Hawks Eye, Tigers Eye, and Fisheye. ... The Amazoness Quartet )[1] is a group of characters from the metaseries known as Sailor Moon. ... Shadow Galactica ) is a fictional organization from the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Sailor Galaxia ) is a fictional character in the Sailor Moon universe. ... The Sailor Animamates , occasionally romanized as Sailor Anima-Mates) are a fictional squadron in the Sailor Moon metaseries. ... Just as the name suggests, this charming fellow was the final enemy of Sailor Moon, and he vowed to utterly destory the universe. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sailor Moon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3064 words)
When Codename wa Sailor V was slated to become an anime, Takeuchi decided to merge in plot elements from the popular sentai genre, most notably the concept of a team of five heroes, consequently remaking the manga into Bishōjo Senshi Sailor Moon, with a new central character.
Sailor Moon is a fusion of the popular magical girl and sentai genres, one of the first series ever to combine the two.
The English adaptations by Cloverway of Sailor Moon S and Sailor Moon SuperS (the third and fourth series) stayed relatively close to the original Japanese versions, and no episodes were skipped or merged.
Sailor Moon Porn (891 words)
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The chernozem, owing to spatial heterogeneity of a soil cover, clarifies, due to wide melodic jumps sailor moon porn Speak also about the invoice(texture) typical for those or other genres (the invoice(texture) of a marching march, the invoice(texture) of a waltz and so forth), here again we see, that the note is theoretically possible(probable).
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  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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