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Encyclopedia > Sailor
Three types of mariners are seen here in the wheelhouse: a master, an able seaman, and a harbour pilot.
Three types of mariners are seen here in the wheelhouse: a master, an able seaman, and a harbour pilot.

A sailor or mariner is a person who navigates water-borne vessels or assists in their operation, maintenance, or service. The term can apply to professional mariners, military personnel, and recreational sailors as well as a plethora of other uses. Etymologically, the name preserves the memory of the time when ships were commonly powered by sails, but applies to the personnel of all vessels, whatever their mode of locomotion. Sailor may refer to: A sailor is a crewperson on a ship or boat. ... Mariner can refer to The PBM Mariner flying boat The Mariner Space Program An archaic term for sailor The Major League Baseball team, the Seattle Mariners This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bridge of the brigantine LEtoile The bridge of a ship is an area or room where the ships navigational controls and other essential equipment related to ship operations are housed and operated. ... Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostron receiving a loving cup from Margaret Brown for his rescue of RMS Titanic survivors Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks Captain is the traditional customary title given to the person in charge of a ship at sea. ... In the Royal Navy in the middle of the 18th century, the term Able Seaman referred to a seaman with at least two years experience at sea. ... left|Signal flag H(Hotel) - Pilot on Board Boarding is tricky, as both vessels are moving and cannot afford to slow down. ... For online phenomenon of shipping, see Shipping (fandom). ... A gaff-rigged cutter flying a mainsail, staysail and genoa jib For other uses, see Sail (disambiguation). ...


Professional mariners hold a variety of professions and ranks which are fairly standard, with the exception of slight naming differences around the world. Common categories by department include the Deck department, the Engineering department, and the Steward's department. Mariners can also be categorized by status as a senior licensed mariners or unlicensed mariners. The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... The Engine room of Argonaute, a French supply vessel. ... Main article: Ship transport Seafarers hold a variety of professions and ranks, and each of these roles carries unique responsibilities which are integral to the successful operation of a seafaring vessel. ... A United States Merchant Marine license. ...


A number of professional mariners have left the industry and lead noteworthy lives in the naval services or on the shore. For example, Traian Băsescu, started his career as a third mate in 1976 and is now the President of Romania. Arthur Phillip joined the Merchant Navy in 1751 and 37 years later founded Sydney, Australia. Merchant mariner Douglass North went from seaman to navigator to win the 1993 Nobel Prize in Economics. Traian Băsescu (born November 4, 1951) is a Romanian politician and former Merchant Navy officer. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ... Admiral Arthur Phillip RN (11 October 1738 – 31 August 1814) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator. ... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... Douglass Cecil North (born November 5, 1920) is co-recipient of the 1993 Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. ...

Contents

Professional mariners

Seafarers hold a variety of professions and ranks, each of which carry unique responsibilities which are integral to the successful operation of an ocean-going vessel. A ship's crew can generally be divided into four main categories: the deck department, the engineering department, the steward's department, and other.


Deck department

For more details on this topic, see Deck department.
An able seaman stands iceberg lookout on the bow of the freighter USNS Southern Cross during a re-supply mission to McMurdo Station, Antarctica; circa 1981.
An able seaman stands iceberg lookout on the bow of the freighter USNS Southern Cross during a re-supply mission to McMurdo Station, Antarctica; circa 1981.

Officer positions in the deck department include but are not limited to: Master and his Chief, Second, and Third officers. The official classifications for unlicensed members of the deck department are Able Seaman and Ordinary Seaman. The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... Image File history File links Lookout. ... Image File history File links Lookout. ... McMurdo Station from Observation Hill. ... The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... Master Mariner is the official title of someone qualified to command a ship; the qualification is colloquially called a Masters Ticket. The term was introduced in the mid 19th century, and is usually held by the chief officer/first mate as well as the captain). ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Mate (C/M) or Chief Officer is a licensed member and head of the deck department of a merchant ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Second Mate (2/M) or Second Officer is a licensed member of the deck department of a merchant ship. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ... This article is about a civilian occupation. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks In the United States Merchant Marine, an Ordinary Seaman or OS is an entry-level position in a ships deck department. ...


A common deck crew for a ship includes:

Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Mate (C/M) or Chief Officer is a licensed member and head of the deck department of a merchant ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Second Mate (2/M) or Second Officer is a licensed member of the deck department of a merchant ship. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ... The bosun aboard a modern merchant ship stands cargo watch as freight is lowered into an open hatch. ... This article is about a civilian occupation. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks In the United States Merchant Marine, an Ordinary Seaman or OS is an entry-level position in a ships deck department. ...

Engineering department

For more details on this topic, see Engineering department.

A ship's engineering department consists of the members of a ship's crew that operates and maintains the propulsion and other systems onboard the vessel. Marine engineering staff also deal with the "hotel" facilities onboard, notably the sewage, lighting, air conditioning and water systems. Engineering staff manage bulk fuel transfers and require training in firefighting and first aid. Additional duties include maintaining the ship's boats and performing other nautical tasks. Engineers play a key role in cargo loading/discharging gear and safety systems, though the specific cargo discharge function remains the responsibility of deck officers and deck workers. The Engine room of Argonaute, a French supply vessel. ... Sewage is the mainly liquid waste containing some solids produced by humans which typically consists of washing water, faeces, urine, laundry waste and other material which goes down drains and toilets from households and industry. ... Note: in the broadest sense, air conditioning can refer to any form of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning. ... Firefighter with an axe A firefighter, sometimes still called a fireman though women have increasingly joined firefighting units, is a person who is trained and equipped to put out fires, rescue people and in some areas provide emergency medical services. ...


A common engineering crew for a ship includes:

  • (1) Chief Engineer
  • (1) Second Engineer / First Assistant Engineer
  • (1) Third Engineer / Second Assistant Engineer
  • (1-2) Fourth Engineer / Third Assistant Engineer
  • (0-2) Fifth Engineer / Junior Engineer
  • (1-3) Oiler (unlicensed qualified rating)
  • (0-3) Greaser/s (unlicensed qualified rating)
  • (1-5) Entry-level rating (such as Wiper (occupation), Utilityman, etc)

American ships also carry a Qualified Member of the Engine Department. Other possible positions include Motorman, Machinist, Electrician, Refrigeration Engineer, and Tankerman. A Chief Engineer is a licensed mariner in charge of the engineering department on a merchant vessel. ... A First Assistant Engineer (also called the Second Engineer in some countries) is a licensed member of the engineering department on a merchant vessel. ... A Second Assistant Engineer or Third Engineer is a licensed member of the engineering department on a merchant vessel. ... An oiler is one of the most junior crewmember in the engine room of a ship (senior only to a wiper). ... A wiper is the most junior crewmember in the engine room of a ship. ... A Qualified Member of the Engineering Department or QMED is a senior unlicensed crewmember in the engine room of a ship. ... A machinist is a craftsman who uses machine tools to make parts or alter parts by cutting away excess material. ... For theatrical electricians, see Electrician (theater). ...


Steward's department

For more details on this topic, see Steward's department.

A typical Steward's department for a cargo ship is a Chief Steward, a Chief Cook, and a Steward's Assistant. All three positions are typically filled by unlicensed personnel. Main article: Ship transport Seafarers hold a variety of professions and ranks, and each of these roles carries unique responsibilities which are integral to the successful operation of a seafaring vessel. ... Main article: Ship transport Seafarers hold a variety of professions and ranks, and each of these roles carries unique responsibilities which are integral to the successful operation of a seafaring vessel. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Steward (often shortened to steward) is the senior unlicensed crewmember working in the Stewards Department of a ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Cook (often shortened to Cook) is a senior unlicensed crewmember working in the Stewards department of a merchant ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Stewards Assistant or SA is an unlicensed, entry-level crewmember in the Stewards Department of a merchant ship. ...


The chief steward directs, instructs, and assigns personnel performing such functions as preparing and serving meals; cleaning and maintaining officers' quarters and steward department areas; and receiving, issuing, and inventorying stores.


The chief steward also plans menus; compiles supply, overtime, and cost control records. The steward may requisition or purchase stores and equipment. Galley roles may include baking.


A chief steward's duties may overlap with those of the Steward's Assistant, the Chief Cook, and other Steward's Department crewmembers. Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Stewards Assistant or SA is an unlicensed, entry-level crewmember in the Stewards Department of a merchant ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Cook (often shortened to Cook) is a senior unlicensed crewmember working in the Stewards department of a merchant ship. ...


A person has to have a Merchant Mariner's Document issued by the United States Coast Guard in the United States Merchant Marine in order to serve as a chief steward. All chief cooks who sail internationally are similarly documented by their respective countries because of international conventions and agreements. A United States Merchant Mariners Document (front). ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Source: This article contains material from the CIA World Factbook which, as a US government publication, is in the public domain. ...


Other departments

For more details on this topic, see Seafarer's professions and ranks#Other.

Various types of staff officer positions may exist on board a ship, including Junior Assistant Purser, Senior Assistant Purser, Purser, Chief Purser, Medical Doctor, Professional Nurse, Marine Physician Assistant, and Hospital Corpsman. These jobs are considered administrative positions and are therefore regulated by Certificates of Registry issued by the United States Coast Guard. Pilots are also merchant marine officers and are licensed by the Coast Guard. A vessel is, say, like a town in that everything works such that. ... A ships purser, or just purser is the person on a ship responsible for the handling of money on board. ... The word physician should not be confused with physicist, which means a scientist in the area of physics. ... This article is about the occupation. ... The HM rating symbol (a caduceus). ... left|Signal flag H(Hotel) - Pilot on Board Boarding is tricky, as both vessels are moving and cannot afford to slow down. ...


Working conditions

Standard merchant watch system
Day 1 Day 2 Day 3
4am-8am Team 1 Team 1 Team 1
8am-12pm Team 2 Team 2 Team 2
12pm-4pm Team 3 Team 3 Team 3
4pm-8pm Team 1 Team 1 Team 1
8pm-12am Team 2 Team 2 Team 2
12am-4am Team 3 Team 3 Team 3

Mariners spend extended periods at sea. Most deep-sea mariners are hired for one or more voyages that last for several months. There is no job security after that. The length of time between voyages varies by job availability and personal preference.[1] A watch system or watch schedule is a method of assigning regular periods of work duty aboard ships and some other areas of employment. ...


The rate of unionization for these workers in the United States is about 36 percent, much higher than the average for all occupations. Consequently, merchant marine officers and seamen, both veterans and beginners, are hired for voyages through union hiring halls or directly by shipping companies. Hiring halls fill jobs by the length of time the person has been registered at the hall and by their union seniority. Hiring halls typically are found in major seaports.


At sea, on larger vessels mariners usually stand watch for 4 hours and are off for 8 hours, 7 days a week.[2]


Mariners work in all weather conditions. Working in damp and cold conditions often is inevitable, although ships try to avoid severe storms while at sea. It is uncommon for modern vessels to suffer disasters such as fire, explosion, or a sinking. Yet workers face the possibility of having to abandon ship on short notice if it collides with other vessels or runs aground. Mariners also risk injury or death from falling overboard and from hazards associated with working with machinery, heavy loads, and dangerous cargo. However, modern safety management procedures, advanced emergency communications, and effective international rescue systems place modern mariners in a much safer position.


Most newer vessels are air conditioned, soundproofed from noisy machinery, and equipped with comfortable living quarters. These amenities have helped ease the sometimes difficult circumstances of long periods away from home. Also, modern communications, especially email, link modern mariners to their families. Nevertheless, some mariners dislike the long periods away from home and the confinement aboard ship. They consequently leave the profession.


Life at sea

The tanker SS Overseas Alice takes seas over the bow during a 1981 run from New Orleans to Panama.
The tanker SS Overseas Alice takes seas over the bow during a 1981 run from New Orleans to Panama.

Professional mariners live on the margins of society, with much of their life spent beyond the reach of land. They face cramped, stark, noisy, and sometimes dangerous conditions at sea. Yet men and women still go to sea. For some, the attraction is a life unencumbered with the restraints of life ashore. Sea-going adventure and a chance to see the world also appeal to many seafarers. Whatever the calling, those who live and work at sea invariably confront social isolation. Image File history File links Ovrseas_alice. ... Image File history File links Ovrseas_alice. ...


Findings by the Seafarer's International Research Center indicate a leading cause of mariners leaving the industry is "almost invariably because they want to be with their families." U.S. merchant ships typically do not allow family members to accompany seafarers on voyages. Industry experts increasingly recognize isolation, stress, and fatigue as occupational hazards. Advocacy groups such as International Labor Organization, a United Nations agency, and the Nautical Institute seek improved international standards for mariners.


One’s service aboard ships typically extends for months at a time, followed by protracted shore leave. However, some seamen secure jobs on ships they like and stay aboard for years. In rare cases, veteran mariners choose never to go ashore when in port.


Further, the quick turnaround of many modern ships, spending only a matter of hours in port, limits a seafarer's free-time ashore. Moreover, some seafarers entering U.S. ports from a watch list of 25 countries deemed high-risk face restrictions on shore leave due to security concerns in a post 9/11 environment. However, shore leave restrictions while in U.S. ports impact American seamen as well. For example, the International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots notes a trend of U.S. shipping terminal operators restricting seamen from traveling from the ship to the terminal gate. Further, in cases where transit is allowed, special "security fees" are at times assessed. The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... The International Organization of Masters, Mates & Pilots is the marine division of the International Longshoremens Association. ...


Such restrictions on shore leave coupled with reduced time in port by many ships translate into longer periods at sea. Mariners report that extended periods at sea living and working with shipmates who for the most part are strangers takes getting used to. At the same time, there is an opportunity to meet people from a wide range of ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Recreational opportunities have improved aboard some U.S. ships, which may feature gyms and day rooms for watching movies, swapping sea stories, and other activities. And in some cases, especially tankers, it is made possible for a mariner to be accompanied by members of his family. However, a mariner’s off duty time at sea is largely a solitary affair, pursuing hobbies, reading, writing letters, and sleeping.


Notable mariners

Further information: List of notable mariners

Merchant seamen have gone on to make their mark on the world in a number of interesting ways. Traian Băsescu, who started his career as a third mate in 1976 is now the President of Romania. Arthur Phillip joined the Merchant Navy in 1751 and 37 years later founded the city of Sydney, Australia. Merchant mariner Douglass North went from seaman to navigator to winner of the 1993 Nobel Prize in Economics. Jimmy Carter went on to become the 39th President of the United States after service in the US Navy. This list of sailors includes any seagoing person who does not qualify for the list of naval commanders and/or list of sea captains. ... Traian Băsescu (born November 4, 1951) is a Romanian politician and former Merchant Navy officer. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ... Admiral Arthur Phillip RN (11 October 1738 – 31 August 1814) was a British naval officer and colonial administrator. ... This is about the city of Sydney in Australia. ... Douglass Cecil North (born November 5, 1920) is co-recipient of the 1993 Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


Members of the British Merchant Navy have won the Distinguished Service Cross, and have had careers taking them from 'Deck Boy Peter' to Air Marshal Sir Beresford Peter Torrington Horsley KCB, CBE, LVO, AFC. Canadian merchant seamen have won the Victoria Cross and the Medal of Honor. American merchant seamen have won the Medal of Honor in the Korean War and Vietnam War, and one went on to become the "Father of the American Navy." One doesn't have to look far to find merchant seamen who became war heroes in Scotland, France, New Zealand, Peru, or Denmark. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Air Marshal Sir (Beresford) Peter (Torrington) Horsley, KCB CBE LVO AFC, a senior Royal Air Force officer. ... Philip Eric Bent,VC, DSO,(January 3, 1891 - October 1, 1917), was a Canadian recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... Charles Andrew MacGillivary, taken shortly before his death. ... George H. O’Brien, Jr. ... Sp6c. ... John Paul Jones (July 11, 1747–July 18, 1792) was Americas first well-known naval hero in the American Revolutionary War. ... David Broadfoot (21 July 1899 - 31 January 1953) was the radio officer on the Princess Victoria which sank disastrously in 1953, and was posthumously awarded the George Cross, the highest award for bravery to British civilians. ...


Since World War II, a number of merchant seamen have become notorious criminals. American William Colepaugh was convicted as a Nazi spy in World War II and Fritz Sauckel was convicted as a Nazi war criminal. Briton Duncan Scott-Ford was hanged for treachery in World War II. George Hennard was an American mass murderer who claimed 24 victims on a rampage at Luby's Cafeteria in Killeen, Texas. And Perry Smith's own murderous rampage was made famous in Truman Capote's non-fiction novel In Cold Blood. William Curtis Colepaugh was an American traitor of World War II who, following his 1943 discharge from the US Naval Reserve (for the good of the service, according to official reports), defected to Nazi Germany in 1944. ... Fritz Sauckel (Ernst Friedrich Christoph Sauckel) (October 27, 1894 – October 16, 1946) was a Nazi war criminal, who organized the systematic enslavement of millions of men and boys from lands occupied by Nazi Germany. ... Duncan Alexander Croall Scott-Ford (September 4, 1921 – November 3, 1942) was a British merchant seaman who was hanged for Treachery after giving information to an enemy agent during World War II. Scott-Ford was born in Plymouth. ... Image:Http://www. ... Killeen is a city in Bell County, Texas, United States. ... Perry Edward Smith (October 27, 1928 – April 14, 1965) was one of two ex-convicts who murdered four members of the Clutter family in Holcomb, Kansas on November 15, 1959, a crime made infamous by Truman Capote in his 1966 non-fiction novel In Cold Blood. ... Truman Capote (pronounced ; 30 September 1924 – 25 August 1984) was an American writer whose stories, novels, plays, and non-fiction are recognized literary classics, including the novella Breakfast at Tiffanys (1958) and In Cold Blood (1965), which he labeled a non-fiction novel. ... In Cold Blood: A True Account of a Multiple Murder and Its Consequences, by Truman Capote, details the 1959 murders of Herb Clutter, a wealthy farmer from Holcomb, Kansas; his wife, Bonnie; his sixteen-year-old daughter, Nancy; and his fifteen-year-old son, Kenyon, and the aftermath (ISBN 0679745580). ...


Mariners are well represented in the visual arts. French pilot's assistant Paul Gauguin would later become a leading post-impressionist painter and pioneered modern art's synthetist style. American seaman Haskell Wexler later won two Academy Awards, the latter for a biography of his shipmate Woody Guthrie. British Merchant Navy member Ken Russell later directed films such as Tommy, Altered States, and The Lair of the White Worm. Merchant seaman Johnny Craig was already a working comic book artist before he joined up, but Ernie Schroeder wouldn't start drawing comics until after returning home from World War II. Eugène Henri Paul Gauguin (7 June 1848 – 8 May 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... Haskell Wexler (born February 6, 1922 in Chicago, Illinois) is an Academy Award-winning American cinematographer, and a film producer and director. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Woodrow Wilson Woody Guthrie (July 14, 1912 – October 3, 1967) was an American songwriter and folk musician. ... Henry Kenneth Alfred Russell, known as Ken Russell (born July 3, 1927), is an English film director, particularly well-known for his films about famous composers and his controversial, often outrageous pioneering work in film. ... Tommy is a given name that is the English diminutive of Thomas and could refer to: Tommy Atkins, nickname for a British soldier Thompson submachine gun, also known as the Tommy Gun Tommy (rock opera), by The Who Tommy (film), based on the rock opera Tommy (comics) is a former... Altered States is the name of both a novel (ISBN 0060107278) and a film adaptation of that novel, both written by Paddy Chayefsky. ... The Lair of the White Worm is a 1988 film written, produced and directed by Ken Russell which starred Hugh Grant and Amanda Donohoe. ... Johnny Craig is an American illustrator who was born in Pleasantville, New York, in 1926. ... The Heap on the cover of Airboy Comics vol. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Merchant sailors have also made a splash in the world of sport. In football, with Fred Blackburn in England and the likes of Dan Devine and Heisman Trophy winner Frank Sinkwich in the U.S. In track and field, American seamen Cornelius Cooper Johnson and Jim Thorpe both won Olympic medals, though Thorpe didn't get his until 30 years after his death. Seamen Jim Bagby, Jr. and Charlie Keller went on to Major League Baseball. Drew Bundini Brown was Muhammad Ali's assistant trainer and cornerman, and Joe Gold went on to make his fortune as the bodybuilding and fitness guru of Gold's Gym. Fred Blackburn (born 1879 in Blackburn, Lancashire) was an English footballer. ... Dan Devine (December 22, 1924 - May 9, 2002) was a football coach who served as head coach at three colleges and also served for four years as head coach of the Green Bay Packers from 1971 to 1974. ... Francis Frank Sinkwich (October 10, 1920 - October 22, 1990) won the Heisman Trophy in 1942, while playing at the University of Georgia, the first recipient from the Southeastern Conference. ... Cornelius Cooper Johnson (August 28, 1913 - February 15, 1946) was an African-American athlete in the high jump. ... For other uses, see Jim Thorpe (disambiguation). ... James Charles Jacob Bagby, Jr. ... Charles Ernest (Charlie) Keller (September 12, 1916 - May 23, 1990) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Drew Bundini Brown, born on March 21, 1928, in Florida, was an assistant trainer and cornerman of Muhammad Alis throughout the former heavyweight champions career. ... Joe Gold (March 10, 1922 in East Los Angeles, California - July 12, 2004 in Marina del Rey, California) founder of Golds Gym and World Gym. ... Golds Gym International, Inc. ...


Other sporting notables include Edwin Stratton the founder of Yoshinkan UK, Dutchman Henk de Velde known for sailing solo around the world, and Briton Matthew Webb who was the first person to swim the English Channel without the use of artificial aid. Edwin William James Stratton (July 17, 1936 - March 9, 2000) was a British aikido teacher and the founder of Yoshinkan UK. He first encountered with martial arts when at the age of 9 his father gave his a pair of boxing gloves. ... Henk de Velde was born the 12th of January 1949, in the Netherlands and is a Dutch seafarer. ... Captain Matthew Webb (19 January 1848 – 24 July 1883) was the first person to swim the English Channel without the use of artificial aids. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ...


Irish Merchant Navy member Kevin McClory spent 14 days in a lifeboat and later went on to write the James Bond movies Never Say Never Again and Thunderball. Members of the American Beat Movement Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, Bob Kaufman, and Herbert Huncke were all Merchant Mariners. Kevin ODonovan McClory (b. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, and artist from Lowell, Massachusetts. ... Bob Kaufman (April 18, 1925 – January 12, 1986), born Robert Garnell Kaufman in New Orleans, Louisiana, was an American Beat poet and surrealist inspired by jazz music. ... Huncke on the cover of his anthology. ...


It's perhaps not surprising that the writers of Moby Dick, The American Practical Navigator, and Two Years Before the Mast were Merchant Mariners. It might be surprising that the writers of Borat, A Hard Day's Night, and Cool Hand Luke were. Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet. ... Nathaniel Bowditch (March 26, 1773 – March 16, 1838) was an early American mathematician remembered for his work on ocean navigation. ... Richard Henry Dana Jr. ... Peter Baynham is a British comedy writer and perfomer born in Cardiff, Wales. ... Alun Owen (November 24, 1925 – December 6, 1994) was a British screenwriter, predominantly active in television but best remembered by a wider audience for writing the screenplay of The Beatles debut feature film A Hard Days Night in 1964. ... Donn Pearce (b. ...


Seamen always complain about leaving their girl friends ashore, but imagine how James Dougherty felt, leaving his 17-year-old wife Marilyn Monroe on the beach. Merchant Navy steward Freddie Lennon had a surprise when he returned home to find he had a newborn son. That son would later found the musical group The Beatles. James Edward Dougherty (April 12, 1921 in Los Angeles, California - August 15, 2005 in San Rafael, California) was the first husband of Marilyn Monroe. ... Cover of the 1965 single for Thats My Life Alfred Freddie Lennon (14 December 1912 – 1 April 1976) was the father of English musician John Lennon. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ...


A number of U.S. Merchant Mariners from World War II later played well known television characters. The list includes Milburn Drysdale on The Beverly Hillbillies, Archie Bunker on All in the Family, Columbo on Columbo, Jim Rockford on The Rockford Files, Steve McGarret on Hawaii Five-O, Uncle Jesse Duke on The Dukes of Hazzard, and Cheyenne Bodie on Cheyenne. Raymond Bailey (May 6, 1904 – April 15, 1980) was an American actor. ... John Carroll OConnor (August 2, 1924 – June 21, 2001) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, producer and director whose television career spanned four decades. ... Peter Michael Falk (born September 16, 1927) is an American actor. ... For other uses, see James Garner (disambiguation). ... John Joseph Patrick Ryan (December 30, 1920 â€“ January 21, 1998), best known by his stage name Jack Lord, was an American television, film, and Broadway actor. ... Denver Dell Pyle (May 11, 1920 – December 25, 1997) was an American film and television actor. ... Norman Eugene Clint Walker (born May 30, 1927) is an American actor best known for his cowboy role as Cheyenne Bodie in the TV Western series, Cheyenne. ...


Other uses

An ancient term, the word "sailor," has come to mean many things. Sailor may refer to:

  • a person who practices the art of controlling the motion of a sailing ship or sailboat, across a body of water,
  • anyone from a recruit to an admiral in a navy,
  • a person who goes out sailing, boating or yachting,
  • an enlisted member of a military naval force,
  • anyone on a boat
  • a person who is under sail and not on a vessel with motorised power of any kind in the Royal Navy,
  • members of the deck department as opposed to members of other departments in the Merchant Navy

Diagram of Sailboat, in this case a typical monohull sloop with a bermuda or marconi rig. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Naval redirects here. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ... // Boating, the leisurely activity of traveling by boat typically refers to the recreational use of boats whether power boats, sail boats, or yachts (large vessels), focused on the travel itself, as well as sports activities, such as fishing or waterskiing. ... Yachting is a physical activity involving boats. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... For the steam locomotives, see SR Merchant Navy Class. ...

See also

Nautical Portal

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A vessel is, say, like a town in that everything works such that. ... This article is about a military rank. ... THE MARINE SOCIETY[1] - the world’s oldest seafarers’ charity In 1756, at the beginning of the Seven Years War against France, Austria, Russia, Sweden and Saxony (and subsequently Spain and Portugal) Britain urgently needed to recruit men for the navy. ... For the steam locomotives, see SR Merchant Navy Class. ... Source: This article contains material from the CIA World Factbook which, as a US government publication, is in the public domain. ... For either of the songs named Sailing, see Sailing (song). ...

External links

Notes and references

  1. ^ * Water Transportation Occupations. U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  2. ^ On smaller vessels with a single mate 6 hours on and 6 hours off are common. Mariners employed on Great Lakes ships work 60 days and have 30 days off. They do not work in the winter when the lakes are frozen. Workers on rivers, on canals, and in harbors are more likely to have year-round work. Some work 8-hour or 12-hour shifts and go home every day. Others work steadily for a week or a month and then have an extended period off. When working, they usually are on duty for 6 or 12 hours and off for 6 or 12 hours. Those on smaller vessels are normally assigned to one vessel and have steady employment.
Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostron receiving a loving cup from Margaret Brown for his rescue of RMS Titanic survivors Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks Captain is the traditional customary title given to the person in charge of a ship at sea. ... A Chief Engineer is a licensed mariner in charge of the engineering department on a merchant vessel. ... Signal flag H(Hotel) - Pilot on Board Boarding is tricky, as both vessels are moving and cannot afford to slow down. ... The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Mate (C/M) or Chief Officer is a licensed member and head of the deck department of a merchant ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Second Mate (2/M) or Second Officer is a licensed member of the deck department of a merchant ship. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ... The bosun aboard a modern merchant ship stands cargo watch as freight is lowered into an open hatch. ... For other uses, see Carpenter (disambiguation). ... This article is about a civilian occupation. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks In the United States Merchant Marine, an Ordinary Seaman or OS is an entry-level position in a ships deck department. ... The Engine room of Argonaute, a French supply vessel. ... The First Assistant Engineer or Second Engineer supervises the daily maintenance and operation of the engine department and reports directly to the Chief Engineer. ... The Second Assistant Engineer or Third Engineer is junior to the First Assistant Engineer in the engine department of a merchant vessel and is usually in charge of boilers, fuel, auxiliary engines, condensate and feed systems. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Qualified Member of the Engineering Department or QMED is a senior unlicensed crewmember in the engine room of a ship. ... For theatrical electricians, see Electrician (theater). ... An oiler is one of the most junior crewmember in the engine room of a ship (senior only to a wiper). ... A wiper is the most junior crewmember in the engine room of a ship. ... Main article: Ship transport Seafarers hold a variety of professions and ranks, and each of these roles carries unique responsibilities which are integral to the successful operation of a seafaring vessel. ... A ships purser, or just purser is the person on a ship responsible for the handling of money on board. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Steward (often shortened to steward) is the senior unlicensed crewmember working in the Stewards Department of a ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Cook (often shortened to Cook) is a senior unlicensed crewmember working in the Stewards department of a merchant ship. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Stewards Assistant or SA is an unlicensed, entry-level crewmember in the Stewards Department of a merchant ship. ...

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