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Encyclopedia > Sailing master

Master Mariner is the official title of someone qualified to command a ship; the qualification is colloquially called a "Master's Ticket". The term was introduced in the mid 19th century, and is usually held by the chief officer/first mate as well as the captain). This term was in use in England from at least the 13th century. The captain of a merchant vessel is also called the master of that ship. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population - Total (mid-2004) - Density Ranked 1st UK 50. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... Captain is both a nautical term and a military rank. ... Italian ship-rigged vessel Amerigo Vespucci in New York Harbor, 1976 A ship is a large, sea-going watercraft, sometimes with multiple decks. ...


In the Royal Navy in the days of sail, "master" was often used as an abbreviation for the Sailing Master, the warrant officer responsible for the navigation and steering of the vessel. The position of sailing master was later commissioned and renamed the Navigating Officer. The Navigating Officer on a flagship, however, continued to be known as the Master of the Fleet until after the Second World War. The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the British armed services, being the oldest of its three branches. ... A warrant officer (WO) is a member of a military organization holding one of a specific group of ranks. ... There are several traditions of navigation. ... In military organizations, a commissioned officer is a member of the service who derives authority directly from a sovereign power, and as such holds a commission from that power. ... A flagship is the ship used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


The Master's Mates were the assistants to the Sailing Master, also warrant officers, and were usually young men with family connections not quite good enough to become midshipmen who either aspired to become sailing masters themselves or to be commissioned as lieutenants, as often happened. Fletcher Christian was Master's Mate on HMS Bounty. For the fishes called midshipman, see Midshipman fish In the navies of English-speaking countries, a midshipman is a low-ranking commissioned officer, usually the lowest rank. ... A Lieutenant is a military, paramilitary or police officer. ... Fletcher Christian Fletcher Christian (September 25, 1764 - October 3, 1793) was a Masters Mate on board the Bounty during William Blighs fateful voyage to Tahiti for breadfruit plants. ... for other meaning see Mutiny on the Bounty (disambiguation) The mutineers turning Lt Bligh and some of the officers and crew adrift from HMAV Bounty, 29 April 1789 The Mutiny on the Bounty was a historical event in the late 18th century, most widely known through fiction, of an officer...


In the Royal Navy, in the days of sail, a ship's master was a standing officer. A ship's most senior warrant officers, those who headed the ship's technical departments, received their warrants from various Boards and Commissions. Their appointment and promotion did not lay within the Captain's discretion. The rate of all the more junior crew members did lay within the captain's discretion -- even midshipmen. A board may be a: piece of lumber (or other rigid material made of wood), milled or sawn flat surfboard, skateboard, or snowboard (often made of fibreglass) commission or committee, such as an executive board of directors or a (sometimes rather supervisory) board of governors bulletin board system or other... The term rating or rate carries different meanings depending on which navy is being discussed. ...


Master and Commander was the full title of the rank held by Commanders when they were first introduced into the Royal Navy, then equivalent to a major in the British Army. It was shortened to commander in 1814. The corresponding title in the US Navy was Master Commandant. Insignia of a United States Navy Commander Commander is a military rank used in many navies but not generally in armies or air forces. ... Major is the name most commonly given to the military rank equivalent to NATO rank code OF-3. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... 1814 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Master Commandant was a rank within the early United States Navy. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Master Mariner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (364 words)
In the Royal Navy in the days of sail, "master" was often used as an abbreviation for the Sailing Master, the warrant officer responsible for the navigation and steering of the vessel.
The position of sailing master was later commissioned and renamed the Navigating Officer.
The Master's Mates were the assistants to the Sailing Master, also warrant officers, and were usually young men with family connections not quite good enough to become midshipmen who either aspired to become sailing masters themselves or to be commissioned as lieutenants, as often happened.
sailing - definition of sailing by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia. (967 words)
sailing - the departure of a vessel from a port
You yourself wait until the season for sailing is come, and then haul your swift ship down to the sea and stow a convenient cargo in it, so that you may bring home profit, even as your father and mine, foolish Perses, used to sail on shipboard because he lacked sufficient livelihood.
SEEING a ship sailing by upon the sea of politics, an Ambitious Person started in hot pursuit along the strand; but the people's eyes being fixed upon the Presidency no one observed the pursuer.
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