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Encyclopedia > Saffron Walden

Coordinates: 52.0262° N 0.2449° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Saffron Walden
Statistics
Population: 15,095
Location
OS grid reference: TL541387
Latitude: 52.0262°
Longitude: 0.2449°
Administration
District: Uttlesford
Shire county: Essex
Region: East of England
Constituent country: England
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Other
Ceremonial county: Essex
Historic county: Essex
Services
Police force: Essex Police
Fire and rescue: Essex County Fire and Rescue Service
Ambulance: East of England
Post office and telephone
Post town: SAFFRON WALDEN
Postal district: CB10 and CB11
Dialling code: 01799
Politics
UK Parliament: Saffron Walden
European Parliament: East of England

Saffron Walden is a small market town in the Uttlesford district of Essex, England. It is located 12 miles (19 km) north of Bishop's Stortford, 15 miles (24 km) south of Cambridge and approx 35 miles (56 km) north of London. The town retains a picturesque, rural appearance and many very old buildings dating from the medieval period onwards. In 2001 the parish had a population of 15,095 although this has increased due to new development occurring around the outskirts of the town and along the dismantled railway line. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 11 KB) Summary Description: A blank map of the United Kingdom, with country outline and coastline; contact the author for help with modifications or add-ons Source: Reference map provided by Demis Mapper 6 Date: 2006-21-06 Author: User... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... Latitude, usually denoted symbolically by the Greek letter phi, , gives the location of a place on Earth north or south of the equator. ... Longitude, sometimes denoted by the Greek letter λ (lambda),[1][2] describes the location of a place on Earth east or west of a north-south line called the Prime Meridian. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Uttlesford is a local government district in Essex, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East of England is one of the nine official regions of England. ... Constituent countries is a phrase sometimes used, usually by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the former Yugoslavia (example here) and European institutions such as the Council of Europe... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... The historic counties of England are ancient subdivisions of England. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Essex Police is a Home Office (territorial) police force with responsibility for policing the county of Essex in south east England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Essex County Fire and Rescue Service are the statutory fire fighting service for the county of Essex in the south-east of England. ... This is a list of ambulance services in the United Kingdom: Ambulance services in England, after July 1, 2006 are A few deviations from the above have been made for operational reasons. ... The East of England Ambulance Service NHS Trust is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Luton, Norfolk, Peterborough, Southend-on-Sea, Suffolk and Thurrock, in the East of England region. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The CB postcode area or Cambridge postcode area is a group of 16 postal districts in Cambridgeshire. ... The CB postcode area or Cambridge postcode area is a group of 16 postal districts in Cambridgeshire. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Saffron Walden is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The European Parliament (formerly European Parliamentary Assembly) is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... East of England is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_England_(bordered). ... Uttlesford is a local government district in Essex, England. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Bishops Stortford is a market town in east Hertfordshire, England just touching the border with Essex. ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

There has been a village on or near the site of present day Saffron Walden since before the Roman occupation of Britain, when Bronze and Iron Age tribes settled in the area. After the Romans withdrew from the country, a flourishing Anglo-Saxon town was established. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The famous parade helmet found at Sutton Hoo, probably belonging to King Raedwald of East Anglia circa 625. ...


With the Norman invasion of 1066, a stone church was built. The castle was constructed c.1141. A Priory, later to become Walden Abbey, was also founded under the patronage of Geoffrey de Mandeville, first Earl of Essex: the abbey was separated from the town of Walden by Holywell Field, which was enclosed in the sixteenth century to form part of the park of Audley End, the house of Sir Thomas Audley, who converted the abbey cloisters to a dwelling c. 1538-44. The inner or Little Court of the seventeenth-century house corresponds to one of the cloisters. Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Geoffrey de Mandeville, 1st Earl of Essex (d. ...


In 1141 the area’s market was transferred to the town from nearby Newport, further increasing the area’s influence. The town’s first charter was granted in 1300. This early town was known as Chipping Walden. The town was at first largely confined to the castle's outer bailey, but in the 13th century the Battle or Repell Ditches were built or extended, to enclose a new larger area to the south. The focus of the town moved southwards to Market Square. Events February 2 - Battle of Lincoln. ... Newport is a village in Essex near Saffron Walden, in which Newport Free Grammar School is located. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Events February 22 - Jubilee of Pope Boniface VIII. March 10 - Wardrobe accounts of King Edward I of Englanddo (aka Edward Longshanks) include a reference to a game called creag being played at the town of Newenden in Kent. ... Chipping is a prefix used in a number of place names in England, probably derived from ceapen, an Old English word meaning market, though the meaning may alternatively come from (or via) the Medieval English word chepynge with a more specific meaning of long market square. Examples include: Chipping Campden...


In the medieval period the primary trade in Saffron Walden was in wool. However, in the 16th century and 17th century the saffron crocus (crocus sativus) became widely grown in the area. The flower was precious, as extract from the stigmas, the saffron, was used in medicines, as a condiment, as a perfume and as an expensive yellow dye. This industry gave its name to the town and Chipping Walden became Saffron Walden. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Species See text. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Amaryllis style and stigmas A carpel is the female reproductive organ of a flower; the basic unit of the gynoecium. ...


By the end of the 18th century the saffron flower was no longer in such demand, and the flower was replaced by malt and barley. In the 1830s there were more than 30 maltings and breweries running. Although this trade was not so rewarding as the saffron, the town continued to grow throughout the 19th century, having a cattle market and building a library and other civic buildings. During this time Quakers became very active in Saffron Walden, the most influential family being the Gibsons, who aided in the construction of several buildings that remain today, such as the museum [1] and the Town Hall. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Malted barley Malting is a process applied to cereal grains, in which the grains are made to germinate and then are quickly dried before the plant develops. ... Binomial name Hordeum vulgare L. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is a major food and animal feed crop, a member of the grass family Poaceae. ... Events and Trends Electromagnetic induction discovered by Michael Faraday Dutch-speaking farmers known as Voortrekkers emigrate northwards from the Cape Colony Croquet invented in Ireland Railroad construction begins in earnest in the United States Egba refugees fleeing the Yoruba civil wars found the city of Abeokuta in south-west Nigeria... Maltings is a building that houses the process of converting barley into malt, for use in the brewing process. ... The entrance of a brewery. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information resources and services, organized for use, and maintained by a public body, institution, or private individual. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ...


Today, Saffron Walden is a flourishing, beautiful and historic town. Because it has never been sacked or destroyed by fire, many of the buildings, streets and features, especially in the centre of town, date back centuries. Although the 1900s brought many changes and expansion, the character of the town and the valley in which it sits remains strongly intact // First flight by the Wright brothers, December 17, 1903. ...


Sites and buildings of interest

A diagram of Saffron Walden turf maze, an unusual variation on the medieval labyrinth pattern
A diagram of Saffron Walden turf maze, an unusual variation on the medieval labyrinth pattern
A photo of the maze
A photo of the maze
The basement is what remains of the Walden Castle
The basement is what remains of the Walden Castle

Saffron Walden is home to the largest parish church in Essex. St. Mary and the Virgin dates mainly from the end of the 15th century, when the previously existing and smaller church was extensively rebuilt in flint. In 1769 it was damaged by lightning and the repairs, carried out in the 1790s, removed many of the medieval features. The present spire was added in 1832 to replace an older ‘lantern’ tower. The church is 183 feet (56 m) long and the spire 193 feet (59 m) high. Image File history File links Saffron_Walden_Turf_Maze_Diagram. ... Image File history File links Saffron_Walden_Turf_Maze_Diagram. ... A Roman mosaic picturing Theseus and the Minotaur. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 698 KB) Summary walden maze Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 698 KB) Summary walden maze Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 663 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 663 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... A townhouse with basement windows showing A basement is one or more floors of a building that are either completely or partially below the ground floor. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... A flint nodule from the Onondaga limestone layer, Buffalo, New York. ... 1769 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Events and Trends French Revolution (1789 - 1799). ... A modern spire on the Lancaster University Chaplaincy Centre A spire is a tapering conical or pyramidal structure on the top of a building, particularly a church tower. ...


Saffron Walden also features the ruins of the 12th century Walden Castle, which is thought to have been built by Geoffrey de Mandeville, the Second Earl of Essex. After the medieval period, the castle fell slowly into disuse and much of the flint was taken and used in the construction of local houses. All that remains today is the ruined basement. (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ...


Nearby to the castle is the Maze, a series of circular excavations cut into the turf of the common. It is the largest turf maze in England, the main part being about 100 feet (30 m) in diameter. The earliest record of it was in 1699, and it has been extensively restored several times, most recently in 1979. The maze is the Saffron Walden Round Table's logo (the events organiser of Saffron Walden) and is on the town common. In England and Wales, a common is a piece of land over which other people -- often neighbouring landowners -- could exercise one of a number of traditional rights, such as allowing their cattle to graze upon it. ... Walking the turf maze at Wing, Rutland Historically, a turf maze is a labyrinth made by cutting a convoluted path into a level area of short grass, turf or lawn. ... Events January 26 - Treaty of Karlowitz signed March 30 - the tenth Sikh Master, Guru Gobind Singh created the Khalsa. ... For the song by The Smashing Pumpkins, see 1979 (song). ...


There is also a hedge maze in nearby Bridge End Gardens. The garden, which lies off Castle Street and Bridge Street, dates from the 1840s and was originally laid out by Francis Gibson, a member of the locally well-known Gibson family who were eminent Quakers, bankers and brewers. Close to the Bridge End Gardens is the Fry Art Gallery which exhibits the work of artists who had an association with Saffron Walden and north west Essex. One artist of note included in the Fry Art Gallery collection is Edward Bawden who lived in the town during the 1970s and 80s. // Events and Trends Technology First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. War, peace and politics First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February... The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers) is a Christian religious denomination that began in England in the 17th century by people who were dissatisfied with the existing denominations and sects of Christianity. ... The Fry Art Gallery is an art gallery located in Saffron Walden, Essex, England. ...


Another tourist attraction is Audley End, a manor house built by the Earl of Suffolk in the seventeenth century on the site of the medieval Walden Abbey, which had been rebuilt by Sir Thomas Audeley. When first constructed, the house was one of the largest in England. However, two thirds of it was later demolished when it was found to be difficult to maintain. The house and gardens are now owned by English Heritage and are open to the public. During the summer months; several concerts which help make up the BBC Proms are held here. It is usually an evening of music varying from classical to rock to jazz followed by a fireworks display. Another annual fireworks display is held on the Saturday nearest to the 5th November. This event is organised by the Round Table and is held on the common - near the maze. Audley End House (grid reference TL524381) is largely an early 17th-century country house just outside Saffron Walden, Essex, south of Cambridge, England. ... Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ... English Heritage is a United Kingdom government body with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ... The word classical has several meanings: Pertaining to the societies of the classical antiquity, ancient Greece or Rome. ... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States at around the start of the 20th century, mostly popular in the 1920s. ...


Nearby Audley End is the Audley End Miniature Railway, which is a 10 ¼" gauge railway ride through woodland.The ride is 1.5 miles long and has been part of the Saffron Walden landscape since it was opened in 1964. It is a popular site with children. Rail gauge is the distance between the inner sides of the two parallel rails that make up a railway track. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ...


Other sites include the Corn Exchange (now a library) and the market square around which a number of buildings of historical interest and the Town Hall are centred. Market Days are Tuesdays and Saturdays. The Market square (or sometimes the market place) is a feature of many British and other European towns. ...


Tune

Saffron Walden is the name of a tune, best associated with the hymn Just as I am. It was written by Arthur Henry Brown (1830-1926). Brown was from Essex and wrote many hymn tunes, which he often named after his favourite places, but there is no recorded reason as to why this particular tune was named Saffron Walden. The tune can be heard at the CyberHymnal website (see external links). Just As I Am is one of the most well-known hymns of all time, popularized especially as an altar call song in the Billy Graham crusades. ...


Notable births and residents

Thomas Smith was the name of the following men: Sir Thomas Smith (1513-1577), also spelled Smyth; an English scholar and diplomat. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... 1513 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... // Events Construction begins on Blenheim Palace, in Oxfordshire, England. ... Henry Winstanley (1644–November 27, 1703) was an English engineer. ... The Eddystone Lighthouse is situated some 9 miles (15km) South West of Rame Head Cornwall, England on the treacherous Eddystone Rocks 50°10. ... Diana Wynne Jones (born London August 16, 1934) is a British writer, principally of fantasy novels for children and adults, as well as a small amount of non-fiction. ... Friends School Saffron Walden is an independent fee-paying school associated with the Religious Society of Friends. ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Tom Robinson (born June 1, 1950, in Cambridge) is an English songwriter and broadcaster probably best-known for the UK hit songs 2-4-6-8 Motorway (1977), Sing If Youre Glad To Be Gay (1978) and War Baby (1983). ... Friends School Saffron Walden is an independent fee-paying school associated with the Religious Society of Friends. ... 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (the link is to a full 1961 calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... Stephen McGann (born 2 February 1963 in Liverpool) is an English actor. ... Stan Stammers (born May 19, 1961, England) is best known as the bass player for British post punk band Theatre of Hate, Spear of Destiny and present band Plastic Eaters co founded with Robdaly. ... James Trevor Oliver MBE (May 27, 1975), better known as Jamie Oliver and The Naked Chef, is an English celebrity chef. ...

References

  • chesterford.org

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Saffron Walden at AllExperts (992 words)
In the 16th century the primary trade in Saffron Walden was in wool.
The flower was precious, as extract from the stigmas, the saffron, was used in medicines, as a condiment, as a perfume and as an expensive yellow dye.
Saffron Walden also features the ruins of the 12th century Walden Castle, which is thought to have been built by Geoffrey de Mandeville, the Second Earl of Essex.
Saffron Walden (942 words)
Walden, or Saffron Walden is in the hundred of Uttlesford, which occupies the north-western extremity of the county : it is near the Cam, and a little to the right of the road from London to Newmarket and Norwich, 42 miles from London.
At the period of the Domesday survey the lordship of Walden was possessed by a Norman, Geoffrey de Magnaville, one of the companions of the Conqueror.
Walden is a municipal though not a parliamentary borough.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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