FACTOID # 26: Delaware is the latchkey kid capital of America, with 71.8% of households having both parents in the labor force.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Safed" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Safed
Safed
Hebrew צְפַת
(Standard) צפת
Arabic صفد
Name Meaning watchtower (?);
midrashic spiritual vision
Handcuffs -
Because the residents connect to the city.
Government City
Also Spelled Tsfat, Tzefat, Zfat, Ẕefat (officially)

Zephath (unofficially) Hebrew redirects here. ... Arabic ( or just ), is the largest member of the family of Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew, Amharic, and Aramaic. ... The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ...

District North
Population 26 600 (2003)
Jurisdiction 40 000 dunams

Coordinates: 32°57′57″N, 35°29′54″E Map of the districts of Israel There are six main administrative districts of Israel, known in Hebrew as mehozot (מחוזות; singular: mahoz) and fifteen sub-districts known as nafot (נפות; singular: nafa). ... The North District of Israel, highlighted. ... A dunam or dönüm, dunum, donum is a unit of area. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Safed (Hebrew: צְפַת, Tiberian: sˁə.ˈfaθ, Israeli: Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas; Arabic: صفد sˁa.fad; KJV English: Zephath) is a city in the North District in Israel. According to the CBS, at the end of 2003 the city had a total population of 26,600 residents. Safed is regarded one of the Four Holy Cities in Judaism along with Jerusalem, Tiberias and Hebron, and is a center for the Kabbalah, an esoteric form of Jewish mysticism. It is also famous as a health and holiday resort with pleasant summers and snowy winters with a lot of greenery thanks to its high altitude of more than 900 meters and high precipitation. Hebrew redirects here. ... Tiberian Hebrew is an oral tradition of pronunciation for ancient forms of Hebrew, especially the Hebrew of the Tanakh, that was given written form by masoretic scholars in the Jewish community at Tiberias in the early Middle Ages, beginning in the 8th century. ... Ashkenazi Hebrew is the pronunciation system for Biblical Hebrew favored for liturgical use by Ashkenazi Jewish practice. ... Arabic ( or just ), is the largest member of the family of Semitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic language family (classification: South Central Semitic) and is closely related to Hebrew, Amharic, and Aramaic. ... This page is about the version of the Bible; for the Harvey Danger album, see King James Version (album). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... North District, or Northern District, in Israel includes the following towns and cities: Afula עפולה Akko (Acre) עכו Bet Shean בית שאן Caesarea (Qesarriya) קיסריה Karmiel כרמיאל Maalot... Israel Central Bureau of Statistics (הלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה) is a state organization for the creation and maintenance of numeric data related to populations vis-à-vis the ethnic makeup of Israel and its cities. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nineteenth century plaque, with Jerusalem occupying the upper right quadrant, Hebron beneath it, the Jordan River running top to bottom, Safed in the top left quadrant, and Tiberias beneath it. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... Hebrew יְרוּשָׁלַיִם (Yerushalayim) (Standard) Yerushalayim or Yerushalaim Arabic commonly القـُدْس (Al-Quds); officially in Israel أورشليم القدس (Urshalim-Al-Quds) Name Meaning Hebrew: (see below), Arabic: The Holiness Government City District Jerusalem Population 724,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 123,000 dunams (123 km²) Mayor Uri Lupolianski Web Address www. ... Tiberias in 1862, the ruins reminiscent of its ancient heritage. ... The mostly deserted market in the old city. ... This article is about traditional Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism). ... Etymology Esoteric is an adjective originating during Hellenic Greece under the domain of the Roman Empire; it comes from the Greek esôterikos, from esôtero, the comparative form of esô: within. It is a word meaning anything that is inner and occult, a latinate word meaning hidden (from which... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Mysticism from the Greek μυστικός (mystikos) an initiate (of the Eleusinian Mysteries, μυστήρια (mysteria) meaning initiation[1]) is the pursuit of achieving communion or identity with, or conscious awareness of, ultimate reality, the divine, spiritual truth, or God through direct experience, intuition, or insight; and the belief that such experience is an...

Safed monument
Safed monument
A Safed neighbourhood
A Safed neighbourhood

Contents

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (576x864, 138 KB) Safed monument http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (576x864, 138 KB) Safed monument http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1547 KB) Summary Safed (צפת in Hebrew), a city in northern Israel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1547 KB) Summary Safed (צפת in Hebrew), a city in northern Israel. ...

History

Muslim quarter of Safed circa 1908
Muslim quarter of Safed circa 1908

The Canaanite city of "Tzefat" or Safed mentioned in the Bible (Judges 1:17) is almost certainly a different city, located in the south of modern Israel rather than the north.[citation needed] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1330x987, 377 KB) Muslim quarter of Safed circa 1908. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1330x987, 377 KB) Muslim quarter of Safed circa 1908. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


According to legend, Safed was founded by a son of Noah after the great flood. Historical sources indicate that the town was founded in the 2nd century AD, during Roman times. It was not mentioned for centuries after that, but in 1289 it is known that a chief rabbi of Safed, one Moses ben Judah ha-Cohen, went to Tiberias to pay homage to Rambam. Noahs Ark, Französischer Meister (The French Master), Magyar Szépművészeti Múzeum, Budapest. ... This article is on mythology involving great floods. ... The 2nd century is the period from 101 - 200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... Look up AD, ad-, and ad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For broader historical context, see 1280s and 13th century. ... Tiberias in 1862, the ruins reminiscent of its ancient heritage. ... Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon (Hebrew: רבי משה בן מיימון; Arabic: Mussa bin Maimun ibn Abdallah al-Kurtubi al-Israili; March 30, 1135—December 13, 1204), commonly known by his Greek name Maimonides, was a Jewish rabbi, physician, and philosopher. ...


In the early 16th century, the Ottoman Empire under Selim I conquered Palestine. Under the Ottomans, Safed was part of the vilayet of Sidon. Motto: دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem: Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1680, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299-1326) Bursa (1326-1365) Edirne (1365-1453) Constantinople (Istanbul) (1453-1922) Language(s) Ottoman Turkish Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 Osman I  - 1918–1922 Mehmed VI... Selim I (October 10, 1465 – September 22, 1520); also known as the Grim or the Brave, (Yavuz in Turkish; Arabic: سليم الأول) was the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire from 1512 to 1520. ... The Holy Land or Palestine Showing not only the Old of Judea and Israel but also the 12 Tribes Distinctly, and Confirming Even the Diversity of the Locations of their Ancient Positions and Doing So as the Holy Scriptures Indicate, a geographic map from the studio of Tobiae Conradi Lotter... Vilâyet (also eyalet or pashaluk) was the Turkish name for the provinces of the Ottoman Empire. ... , Sidon or Saida, (Arabic صيدا á¹¢aydā) is the third-largest city in Lebanon. ...


In 1491, mention is made that the rabbi in the town had to supplement his income through a grocery market. After the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, many prominent rabbis found their way to Safed, which became the key center for Jewish mysticism, known as Kabbalah. Among the prominent kabbalists who made their home in Safed were Isaac Luria (Arizal) and Moshe Kordovero. Besides the kabbalists, Safed also attracted numerous other Jewish scholars and spirtualists, including Joseph Caro, the author of the Shulchan Aruch and Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz, composer of the Sabbath hymn Lecha Dodi. The influx of Sephardi Jews made Safed a global center for Jewish learning and a regional center for trade throughout 15th and 16th centuries. A Hebrew printing press is established in Safed in 1577. It's the first press in Palestine and the first in whole Asia[citation needed]. The 8,000 or 10,000 Jews in Safed in 1555 grew to 20,000 or 30,000 by the end of the century. // Events December 6 - King Charles VIII marries Anne de Bretagne, thus incorporating Brittany into the kingdom of France. ... 1492 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about traditional Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism). ... Rabbi Isaac Luria (1534–July 25, 1572) was a Jewish mystic in Safed. ... Moses ben Jacob Cordovero or Moshe Cordevero (1522-1570), known by the acronym the Ramak, was a Medieval rabbi and one of the greatest scholars of Judaisms Kabbalah. ... Rabbi Yosef (Joseph) Karo is one of the most important leaders in the history of halakha (Jewish law). ... The Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: Prepared Table), by Rabbi Yosef Karo is considered the most authoritative compilation of Jewish law since the Talmud. ... Shlomo (Solomon) Halevi Alkabetz (also transliterated as Alqabitz, Hebrew: שלמה אלקבץ) (c. ... == == <nowiki>[[[[[[[[[{{pov|date=18:21, 30 January 2007 (UTC)}} {{Christian theology}} {{dablink|This article concerns the Sabbath in Christianity. ... Lecha Dodi (sometimes transliterated as Lekha Dodi, or Lekah Dodi) is a Hebrew liturgical song recited during Jewish Sabbath services on Friday evening, after sundown. ... {{Ethnic group| |image= |group=Sephardi |poptime=>1,700,000 |popplace=Israel: 950,000[1] United States: 150,000 [2] Turkey: 20,000[3] The Netherlands: 270 families Northern Africa: nn Europe (mostly in France): 600,000 Southern Africa: nn Oceania: nn |langs=*Liturgical:,[[Arabic],Sephardic Hebrew *Traditional: Ladino, Judæo...


A plague in 1742 and an earthquake in 1759 led to a decline of the Jewish community in Safed, leaving only seven families at its nadir. An influx of Russian Jews in 1776 and 1781, and of the Perushim in 1809 and 1810 reinvigorated the community. // Events January 24 - Charles VII Albert becomes Holy Roman Emperor. ... 1759 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1776 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1781 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Perushim (Hebrew: ) were disciples of Rabbi Elijah ben Solomon Zalman (the Vilna Gaon), who left Lithuania to settle in the Land of Israel, then a province of the Ottoman Empire at the beginning of the nineteenth century. ...

Seraya: the Ottoman fortress
Seraya: the Ottoman fortress

In 1812, another plague killed an estimated 80% of the Jewish population, and in 1819 the remaining Jews were held for ransom by Abdallah Pasha, the governor of Akko. In 1833 and 1834, an Arab mob attacked the Jewish community, killing and pillaging many; Seven percent of the lost property was subsequently returned. On January 1, 1837, an earthquake killed 4,000 Jewish inhabitants, mostly by burying them in their homes. In 1847, plague struck Safed again. During the whole 19th century, the Jewish community suffered from Bedouin and Arab attacks.[1] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1358 KB) Summary The ancient fortress in Safed (צפת in Hebrew), a city in northern Israel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1358 KB) Summary The ancient fortress in Safed (צפת in Hebrew), a city in northern Israel. ... For the overture by Tchaikovsky, see 1812 Overture; For the wars, see War of 1812 (USA - United Kingdom) or Patriotic War of 1812 (France - Russia) For the Siberia Airlines plane crashed over the Black Sea on October 4, 2001, see Siberia Airlines Flight 1812 1812 was a leap year starting... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... The Old City of Akko in the 19th or early 20th century, looking south-west from atop the Land Wall Promenade, the open space now a parking lot. ... 1833 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... Queen Victoria, Queen of the United Kingdom (1837 - 1901) 1837 (MDCCCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... A Bedouin man resting on a hillside at Mount Sinai Bedouin, derived from the Arabic (‎), a generic name for a desert-dweller, is a term generally applied to Arab nomadic pastoralist groups, who are found throughout most of the desert belt extending from the Atlantic coast of the Sahara via... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ...


The Jewish population was increased in the last half of the 19th century by immigration from Persia, Morocco, and Algeria. Moses Montefiore visited Safed seven times and financed rebuilding of much of the town. Virtually all the antiquities of Safed were however destroyed by earthquakes. For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... Moshe Montefiori and his wind mill. ...


Eighteen Jews were killed and 80 injured in the 1929 Arab riots. The Hebron massacre of 1929 was the murder by Arab rioters of 67 Jews in Hebron, then part of the Palestine under the British mandate. ...


Prior to 1948, about 10,000 of Safed's 12,000 residents were Arabs [2], most of whom fled as a result of the Israeli War of Independence. Among the residents who became refugees are Palestinian Authority Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas and his family.(Myre 2006; PMC 2005) The West Bank The Palestinian National Authority (PNA or PA) is a semi-autonomous state institution nominally governing the bulk of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (which it calls the Palestinian Territories). It was established as a part of Oslo accords between the PLO and Israel. ... Mahmoud Abbas (Arabic: محمود عباس) (born March 26, 1935), commonly known by the kunya or nom de guerre Abu Mazen (ابو مازن), was elected President of the Palestinian National Authority (PNA) on January 9, 2005, and took office on January 15, 2005. ...


Today, Tzfat has seen a resurgence of popularity, and has again become a center for Jewish learning. With quaint cobblestone streets, it has also gained a reputation as an artist colony.


Demographics

According to CBS, in 2003 the ethnic makeup of the city was 99.2% Jewish and other non-Arabs, without significant Arab population. See Population groups in Israel. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Population groups in Israel are the major ethnic groups of Jews and Arabs. ...


According to CBS, in 2001 there were 12,700 males and 13,200 females. The population of the city was spread out with 43.2% 19 years of age or younger, 13.5% between 20 and 29, 17.1% between 30 and 44, 12.5% from 45 to 59, 3.1% from 60 to 64, and 10.5% 65 years of age or older.


The population growth rate in 2001 was 3.0%, and 0.9% in 2003.


Income

As of December, 2001, the CBS' socio-economic ranking places the city slightly below the average, at 4 out of 10, with an average income of 4,476 shekels per month to a national average of 6,835 shekels Socioeconomics is the study of the social and economic impacts of any product or service offering, market intervention or other activity on an economy as a whole and on the companies, organization and individuals who are its main economic actors. ... Silver half-shekel struck in the Greek colony of Taras, during the Punic occupation. ...


According to CBS, as of 2000, in the city there were 6,450 salaried workers and 523 are self-employed. The mean monthly wage in 2000 for a salaried worker in the city is ILS 4,476, a real change of 8.1% over the course of 2000. Salaried males have a mean monthly wage of ILS 5,631 (a real change of 10.2%) versus ILS 3,330 for females (a real change of 2.3%). The mean income for the self-employed is 4,843. There are 425 people who receive unemployment benefits and 3,085 people who receive an income guarantee. 1 sheqel coin (1994&#8211;5). ...


Education

According to CBS, there are 25 schools and 6,292 students in the city. They are spread out as 18 elementary schools and 3,965 elementary school students, and 11 high schools and 2,327 high school students. 40.8% of 12th grade students were entitled to a matriculation certificate in 2001.

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3321x743, 478 KB) Zefat http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3321x743, 478 KB) Zefat http://www. ...

Attractions

Sculpture in Safed
Sculpture in Safed
  • Meiri Museum for Safed History
  • Printing Press Museum
  • Artist colony in the Old City
  • Biblical Museum in the Fortress Garden
  • Statue Garden and the Gallery of sculptor Moshe Ziffer

See also Safed travel guide from Wikitravel. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 2064 KB) A sculpture in Safed, Israel. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 2064 KB) A sculpture in Safed, Israel. ... Moshe Ziffer, Sculptor, b. ... Wikitravel is a project to create an open content, complete, up-to-date, and reliable world-wide travel guide. ...


2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict

Smoke rises over Safed after a Katyusha hits August 4, 2006.
Smoke rises over Safed after a Katyusha hits August 4, 2006.

On 13 July 2006, Katyusha rockets fired by Hezbollah from Southern Lebanon hit Safed killing one man and injuring others. On 14 July, further rockets killed a five-year-old boy and his grandmother. Many, though not all, residents fled the town.(Myre 2006) Since July 13, many more Katyushas have been fired at Safed causing injuries and damage to the town. On 22 July, 2006, four people were injured from a rocket strike. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3504x2336, 4031 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Safed Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3504x2336, 4031 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Safed Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... August 4 is the 216th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (217th in leap years), with 149 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Katyusha multiple rocket launchers are a type of rocket artillery built and fielded by the Soviet Union beginning in the Second World War. ... This article is becoming very long. ... July 14 is the 195th day (196th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 170 days remaining. ...


References

  • Maes, Kevin. Safed: A Battle of Living History, January 15, 2000.
  • Myre, Greg. 2 More Israelis Are Killed as Rain of Rockets From Lebanon Pushes Thousands South. New York Times, July 15, 2006.
  • Palestine Media Center - PMC [Official arm of PA]. "Full Israeli Withdrawal Not Enough -'Palestinians Would Never Give up 'Right of Return.'" May 16, 2005

The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...

See also

The Baqashot (or bakashot, שירת הבקשות) are a collection of supplications, songs, and prayers that have been sung by the Sephardic Aleppian Jewish community and other congregations for centuries each week on Shabbat (Sabbath) morning from midnight till dawn. Usually they are recited during the weeks of winter, when the nights are... The tree of life Kabbalah (&#1511;&#1489;&#1500;&#1492; Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabb&#257;l&#257;h; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Official Site (Hebrew)
  • Official Site (English)
North District
Cities Afula | Acre (Akko) | Bet She'an | Karmiel | Ma'alot-Tarshiha | Migdal HaEmeq | Nahariya | Nazareth | Nazareth Illit | Sakhnin | Shagor | Shefa-'Amr (Shfar'am) | Tamra | Tiberias | Safed | Qiryat Shemona
Local councils Abu Sinan | Ajar | Arraba | Basmat Tiv'on | Beit Jan | Bir al-Maksur | Bu'eine Nujeidat | Buq'ata | Deir Hanna | Dvorya | Eilabun | Ein Knaya | Ein Mahal | Fassuta | Ghajar | Hurfeish | Hazor HaGelilit | I'billin | Iksal | Ilut | Jadida Makar | Julis | Ka'abiyye-Tabbash-Hajajre | Kabul | Kaokab Abu al-Hija | Kfar Vradim | Kfar Yasif | Kfar Kama | Kfar Manga | Kfar Tavor | Kineret | Kisra-Sumei | Maghar | Ma'ilya | Majdal Shams | Mas'ada | Mashhad | Mazra'a | Metula | Mevo Hama | Migdal | Nahf | Peki'in | Qatzrin | Ra'ama | Reineh | Ramat Yeshi | Rosh Pinna | Sajur | Sha'ab | Shelomi | Shibli-Umm al-Janam | Tuba-Zangariyye | Tur'an | Yafi'a | Yanuh-Jat | Yavne'el | Yesod HaMa'ala | Yirka | Zarzir
Regional councils Al-Batuf | Bet Shean Valley | Bustan al-Marj | Northern Jordan Valley (Emek Hayarden) | Gilboa | Golan | Jezreel Valley | Lower Galilee | Upper Galilee | Ma'ale Yosef | Mateh Asher | Megiddo | Merom HaGalil | Mevo'ot HaHermon | Misgav

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m