FACTOID # 24: Looking for table makers? Head to Mississippi, with an overwhlemingly large number of employees in furniture manufacturing.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Sadism and masochism
? This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims.
Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.

In BDSM, the term sadism refers to sexual gratification in the infliction of pain or suffering upon another person. The word is derived from the name of the Marquis de Sade, a prolific French philosopher-writer of sexually violent novels and plays. The receptive counterpart of sadism is masochism, the sexual pleasure or gratification of having pain or suffering inflicted upon the self; the name is derived from the name of the 19th century Austrian author Leopold von Sacher-Masoch, known for his novel Venus in Furs that dealt with masochistic themes. Image File history File links Information. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ... Shortcut: WP:CU Marking articles for cleanup This page is undergoing a transition to an easier-to-maintain format. ... This Manual of Style has the simple purpose of making things easy to read by following a consistent format — it is a style guide. ... Image File history File links Circle-question. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (722x916, 109 KB) Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (722x916, 109 KB) Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... Whipping on a post Flagellation is the act of whipping (Latin flagellum, whip) the human body. ... The Folsom Street Fair marks the end of Leather Pride Week in San Francisco, California Bondage demonstration at the 2003 Folsom Street Fair The annual Folsom Street Fair happens on the last Sunday in September and is now the final event in San Franciscos Leather Pride Week. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A collar is a common symbol in BDSM. Female bottom in bondage with leather monoglove BDSM is any of a number of related patterns of human sexual behavior. ... Sadism and masochism, in the original sense, describe psychiatric disorders characterized by feelings of sexual pleasure or gratification when inflicting suffering or having it inflicted upon the self, respectively. ... Sadistic personality disorder was never formally admitted into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM); nevertheless, some researchers and theorists continue to use its criteria. ... A collar is a common symbol in BDSM. Female bottom in bondage with leather monoglove BDSM is any of a number of related patterns of human sexual behavior. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... “Hurting” redirects here. ... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ... Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ... Leopold von Sacher-Masoch Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (January 27, 1836 – March 9, 1895), writer and journalist, was born in Lemberg, Austrian Empire (now Lviv, Ukraine). ... Book cover for Venus in Furs Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (January 27, 1836 - March 9, 1895), writer and journalist, was born in Lemberg, Austria-Hungary (now Lviv, Ukraine). ...


In non-BDSM usage both words are commonly used to describe personality traits in an emotional, rather than sexual sense.


Often interrelated, the practices are collectively known as S&M or sadomasochism. These terms usually refer to consensual practices within the BDSM community.

Contents

Distinction between S&M, BDSM and D/S

Sadists enjoy inflicting pain; this may or may not be sexual in nature. Masochists enjoy receiving pain, which again may or may not be sexual. The simple desire for pain is technically known as algolagnia. Look up algolagnia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


BDSM is a short-hand acronym for many subdivisions of the culture: B&D (bondage and discipline), D/S (domination and submission), S&M (sadism and masochism). A collar is a common symbol in BDSM. Female bottom in bondage with leather monoglove BDSM is any of a number of related patterns of human sexual behavior. ... A model in bondage cuffs with a leg spreader In the context of BDSM, bondage involves people being tied up or otherwise restrained for pleasure. ... Discipline is the use of rules and punishment to control overt behaviour in BDSM. Punishment can be pain caused physically (such as caning), humiliation caused psychologically (such as a public flagellation) or loss of freedom caused physically (such as chaining the controlee to the foot of a bed, for snoring). ...


Dominance and submission — control over another, or being controlled by another, respectively — typically describes a relationship power dynamic rather than a set of acts, and may or may not involve sadomasochism. Bondage and discipline describes a set of acts that sometimes involve D/S or S&M; although discipline often implies a level of suffering (real or pretend), participants may stop short of causing actual pain.


The biology of sadism and masochism

Pain, violence, sex and love all are associated with the release of a variety of hormones and chemicals within the human body. Furthermore, humans have been shown to exhibit sympathetic responses in their bodies while watching, hearing, or imagining such experiences. “Hurting” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Violence (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Love is any of a number of emotions and experiences related to a sense of strong affection or profound oneness. ... Norepinephrine A hormone (from Greek όρμή - to set in motion) is a chemical messenger from one cell (or group of cells) to another. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... Physical Features of the Human Body The human body is the entire physical structure of a human organism. ... a response to witnessed events or an action that is triggored by sympathy felt in the Witnessing project. ...

  • Endorphins are released by pain experiences and can be perceived as pleasurable and possibly psychologically addictive. It is due to this same release of endorphins that people can become addicted to self harm. In this way, the acts of self harm and engaging in masochistic behavior can be similar in function though most would agree, not in causality.
  • Brain chemicals such as serotonin and melatonin can be affected by emotional or stressful experiences.

The effects of S&M on body chemistry possibly reinforce the behavior and therefore might create psychological states that seek to further such behavior. Runners high redirects here. ... Addiction is an uncontrollable compulsion to repeat a behavior regardless of its negative consequences. ... Serotonin (pronounced ) (5-hydroxytryptamine, or 5-HT) is a monoamine neurotransmitter synthesized in serotonergic neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) and enterochromaffin cells in the gastrointestinal tract of animals including humans. ... Melatonin, 5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine, is a hormone found in all living creatures from algae[1] to humans, at levels that vary in a diurnal cycle. ... “Adrenaline” redirects here. ... Norepinephrine (INN)(abbr. ... In operant conditioning, reinforcement is an increase in the strength of a response following the presentation of a stimulus contingent on that response. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The psychology of sadism and masochism

Both terms were coined by german psychiatrist Richard von Krafft-Ebbing in his 1886 compilation of case studies Psychopathia Sexualis. Pain and physical violence are not essential in Krafft-Ebbing's conception, and he defined masochism entirely in terms of control.[1] Sigmund Freud, a psychoanalyst and a contemporary of Krafft-Ebing, noted that both were often found in the same individuals, and combined the two into a single dichotomous entity known as sadomasochism (often abbreviated as S&M or S/M). This observation is commonly verified in both literature and practice; many sadists and masochists define themselves as "switchable"—capable of taking pleasure in either role. However it has also been argued (Deleuze, Coldness and Cruelty) that the concurrence of sadism and masochism in Freud's model should not be taken for granted. Psychiatry is a branch of medicine that studies and treats mental and emotional disorders (see mental illness). ... Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing (August 4, 1840–December 22, 1902), German psychiatrist, wrote Psychopathia Sexualis (1886), a famous study of sexual perversity, and remains well-known for his coinage of the term sadism. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... In the field of sexuality, a switch is someone who can change from one sexual role to another. ...


Freud introduced the terms "primary" and "secondary" masochism. Though this idea has come under a number of interpretations, in a primary masochism the masochist undergoes a complete, not just a partial, rejection by the model or courted object (or sadist), possibly involving the model taking a rival as his or her preferred mate. This complete rejection is related to the death drive in Freud's psychoanalysis (Todestrieb). In a secondary masochism, by contrast, the masochist experiences a less serious, more feigned rejection and punishment by the model. Secondary masochism, in other words, has the characteristics of a charade, and most commentators are quick to point out its contrivedness.


Rejection is not desired by a primary masochist in quite the same sense as the feigned rejection occurring within a relatively equal relationship--or even where the masochist happens to be the one having true power (this is the problematic that underlies the analyses of Deleuze and Sartre, for example). In Things Hidden Since the Foundation of The World Rene Girard attempts to resuscitate and reinterpret Freud's distinction of primary and secondary masochism, in connection with his own philosophy. René Girard is a French philosopher, historian and philologist. ...


Both Krafft-Ebing and Freud assumed that sadism in men resulted from the distortion of the aggressive component of the male sexual instinct. Masochism in men, however, was seen as a more significant aberration, contrary to the nature of male sexuality. Freud doubted that masochism in men was ever a primary tendency, and speculated that it may exist only as a transformation of sadism. Sadomasochism in women received comparatively little discussion, as it was believed that it occurred primarily in men. Both also assumed that masochism was so inherent to female sexuality that it would be difficult to distinguish as a separate inclination.


Havelock Ellis, in Studies in the Psychology of Sex, argued that there is no clear distinction between the aspects of sadism and masochism, and that they may be regarded as complementary emotional states. He also made the important point that sadomasochism is concerned only with pain in regard to sexual pleasure, and not in regard to cruelty, as Freud had suggested. In other words, the sadomasochist generally desires that the pain be inflicted or received in love, not in abuse, for the pleasure of either one or both participants. This mutual pleasure may even be essential for the satisfaction of those involved. Henry Havelock Ellis (February 2, 1859 - July 8, 1939), known as Havelock Ellis, was a British doctor, sexual psychologist and social reformer. ...


Here Ellis touches upon the often paradoxical nature of consensual S&M. It is not only pain to initiate pleasure, but violence—or the simulation of violence—to express love. This contradictory character is perhaps most evident in the observation by some that not only are sadomasochistic activities usually done for the benefit of the masochist, but that it is often the masochist that controls them, through subtle emotional cues received by the sadist.


In his essay Coldness and Cruelty, (originally Présentation de Sacher-Masoch, 1967) Gilles Deleuze rejects the term 'sadomasochism' as artificial, especially in the context of the prototypical masochistic work, Sacher-Masoch's Venus In Furs. Deleuze instead argues that the tendency toward masochism is based on desire brought on from the delay of gratification. Taken to its extreme, an infinite delay, this is manifested as perpetual coldness. The masochist derives pleasure from, as Deleuze puts it, The Contract: the process by which he can control another individual and turn the individual into someone cold and callous. The Sadist, in contrast, derives pleasure from The Law: the unavoidable power that places one person below another. The sadist attempts to destroy the ego in an effort to unify the id and superego, in effect gratifying the most base desires the sadist can express while ignoring or completely suppressing the will of the ego, or of the conscience. Thus, Deleuze attempts to argue that Masochism and Sadism arise from such different impulses that the combination of the two terms is meaningless and misleading. The perceived sadistic capabilities of masochists are treated by Deleuze as reactions to masochism. Indeed, in the epilogue of Venus In Furs, the character of Severin has become bitter from his experiment in masochism, and advocates instead the domination of women. Gilles Deleuze (IPA: ), (January 18, 1925 – November 4, 1995) was a French philosopher of the late 20th century. ... eGO is a company that builds electric motor scooters which are becoming popular for urban transportation and vacation use. ... Look up ID, Id, id in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... In his theory of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud sought to explain how the unconscious mind operates by proposing that it has a particular structure. ...


Before Deleuze, however, Sartre had presented his own theory of sadism and masochism, at which Deleuze's deconstructive attack, which took away the symmetry of the two roles, was probably directed. By virtue of the fact that the pleasure or power in looking at the victim figures prominently in sadism and masochism, Sartre was able to link these phenomena to his famous philosophy of the Look of the Other. Sartre argued that masochism is an attempt by the For-itself (consciousness) to reduce itself to nothing, becoming an object that is drowned out by the "abyss of the Other's subjectivity" [2] By this Sartre means that, given that the For-itself desires to attain a point of view in which it is both subject and object, one possible strategy is to gather and intensify every feeling and posture in which the self appears as an object to be rejected, tested, and humiliated; and in this way the For-itself strives toward a point of view in which there is only one subjectivity in the relationship, which would be both that of the abuser and the abused. Conversely, of course, Sartre held sadism to be the effort to annihilate the subjectivity of the victim. That would mean that the sadist, who is exhilarated in the emotional distress of the victim, is such because he or she also seeks to assume a subjectivity which would take a point of view on the victim, and on itself, as both subject and object. Jean Paul Sartre Jean-Paul Sartre (June 21, 1905–April 15, 1980) was a French existentialist philosopher, dramatist, novelist and critic. ...


This argument may appear stronger if it is somehow understood that the Look of the Other is either only an aspect of the other faculties of desire, or somehow its primary faculty. It does not account for the turn that Deleuze took for his own philosophy of these matters, but this premise of desire-as-Look is associated with the view always attacked by Deleuze, in what he regarded as the essential error of "desire as lack," and which he identified in the philosophical temperament of Plato, Socrates, and Lacan. For Deleuze, in so far as desire is a lack it is reducible to the Look. Jacques Lacan Jacques Lacan (April 13, 1901 – September 9, 1981) was an influential French psychoanalyst as well as a structuralist who based much of his theories on Ferdinand de Saussures theories on language. ...


Finally, after Deleuze, Rene Girard included his account of sado-masochism in Things Hidden Since the Foundation of The World, originally Des choses cachées depuis la fondation du monde, 1978, making the chapter on masochism a coherent part of his theory of mimetic desire. In this view of sado-masochism, the violence of the practices are an expression of a peripheral rivalry that has developed around the actual love-object. There is clearly a similarity to Deleuze, since both in the violence surrounding the memory of mimetic crisis and its avoidance, and in the resistance to affection that is focussed on by Deleuze, there is an understanding of the value of the love object in terms of the processes of its valuation, acquisition and the test it imposes on the suitor. René Girard is a French philosopher, historian and philologist. ...


Many theorists, particularly feminist theories, have suggested that sadomasochism is an inherent part of modern Western culture.[citation needed] According to their theories, sex and relationships are both consistently taught to be formulated within a framework of male dominance and female submission. Some of them further link this hypothesized framework to inequalities among gender, class, and race which remain a substantial part of society, despite the efforts of the civil rights movement and feminism. Historically, the civil rights movement was a period of time around the world of approximately one generation (1954–1980) wherein there was much worldwide civil unrest and popular rebellion. ... Feminists redirects here. ...


There are a number of reasons commonly given for why a sadomasochist finds the practice of S&M enjoyable, and the answer is largely dependent on the individual. For some, taking on a role of compliance or helplessness offers a form of therapeutic escape; from the stresses of life, from responsibility, or from guilt. For others, being under the power of a strong, controlling presence may evoke the feelings of safety and protection associated with childhood. They likewise may derive satisfaction from earning the approval of that figure (see: Servitude (BDSM)). A sadist, on the other hand, may enjoy the feeling of power and authority that comes from playing the dominant role, or receive pleasure vicariously through the suffering of the masochist. It is poorly understood, though, what ultimately connects these emotional experiences to sexual gratification, or how that connection initially forms. In BDSM, servitude is performing tasks and following orders as an aspect of being submissive. ...


It is usually agreed on by psychologists that experiences during early sexual development can have a profound effect on the character of sexuality later in life. Sadomasochistic desires, however, seem to form at a variety of ages. Some individuals report having had them before puberty, while others do not discover them until well into adulthood. According to one study, the majority of male sadomasochists (53%) developed their interest before the age of 15, while the majority of females (78%) developed their interest afterwards (Breslow, Evans, and Langley 1985). Like sexual fetishes, sadomasochism can be learned through conditioning—in this context, the repeated association of sexual pleasure with an object or stimulus. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sexual fetishism is the attribution of attractive sexual qualities to non-living objects as an overwhelming alternative to the sexuality of a man or a woman, or as an enhancing element to a relationship. ... Conditioning is a psychological term for what Ivan Pavlov described as the learning of conditional behavior. ...


Sadism and masochism in real life

The term BDSM describes the quite common activities between consenting adults that contain sadistic and masochistic elements. Many behaviors such as erotic spanking, tickling and love-bites that many people think of only as "rough" sex also contain elements of sado-masochism. Note the issue of legal consent which may or may not represent a defense to criminal liability for any more serious injuries caused. A collar is a common symbol in BDSM. Female bottom in bondage with leather monoglove BDSM is any of a number of related patterns of human sexual behavior. ... Erotic spanking can sometimes go hand in hand with other paraphilia, such as for erotic clothes or erotic humiliation. ... A young girl tickles her sibling, evoking a pleasurable response in the child being tickled. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the criminal law, consent may be an excuse and prevent the defendant from incurring liability for what was done. ...


In certain extreme cases, sadism and masochism can include fantasies, sexual urges or behaviour that cause significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning, to the point that they can be considered part of a mental disorder. However, this is an uncommon case, and psychiatrists are now moving towards regarding sadism and masochism not as disorders in and of themselves, but only as disorders when associated with other problems such as a personality disorder. A mental disorder or mental illness is a clinically significant psychological pattern that occurs in an individual and is usually associated with distress or disability that is not expected as part of normal development or culture. ... Psychiatry is a branch of medicine dealing with the prevention, assessment, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of the mind and mental illness. ... Personality disorder, formerly referred to as a Characterological disorder is a class of mental illness characterized by rigid and on-going patterns of thought and action. ...


"Sadism" and "masochism," in the context of consensual sexual activities, are not strictly accurate terms, at least by the psychological definitions. "Sadism" in absolute terms refers to someone whose pleasure in causing pain does not depend on the consent of the "victim." Indeed, a lack of consent may be a requisite part of the experience for a true sadist. Similarly, the masochist in consensual BDSM is someone who enjoys sexual fantasies or urges for being beaten, humiliated, bound, tortured, or otherwise made to suffer, either as an enhancement to or a substitute for sexual pleasure, usually according to a certain scripted and mutually agreed upon "scene." These "masochists" do not typically enjoy pain in other scenarios, such as accidental injury, medical procedures, and so on. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A model in bondage cuffs with a leg spreader In the context of BDSM, bondage involves people being tied up or otherwise restrained for pleasure. ... Torture, according to international law, is any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has... Suffering is any aversive (not necessarily unwanted) experience and the corresponding negative emotion. ...


Similarly, the exchange of power in S&M may not be along the expected lines. While it might be assumed that the "sadist," or "top"--the person who gives the sensation or causes the humiliation--is the one with the power, the actual power may lie with the "masochist," or "bottom," who typically creates the script, or at least sets the boundaries, by which the S&M practitioners play.


Sadism and masochism in fiction

Author Leopold von Sacher-Masoch
Author Leopold von Sacher-Masoch

Many of Marquis de Sade's books, including Justine (1791), Juliette (1797) and his magnum opus The 120 Days of Sodom (published posthumously in 1905), are written from an cruelly sadistic viewpoint. Leopold von Sacher-Masoch's novel Venus in Furs (1870) is essentially one long masochistic fantasy, where the male principal character encourages his mistress to mistreat him. In general, the depiction of sadism and masochism in fiction tends to be portrayed from the viewpoint of masochistic fantasy. ... Image File history File links Sade_(van_Loo). ... Image File history File links Sade_(van_Loo). ... Portrait of the Marquis de Sade by Charles-Amédée-Philippe van Loo (c. ... Image File history File links Leopold_von_Sacher-Masoch. ... Image File history File links Leopold_von_Sacher-Masoch. ... Leopold von Sacher-Masoch Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (January 27, 1836 – March 9, 1895), writer and journalist, was born in Lemberg, Austrian Empire (now Lviv, Ukraine). ... Justine (or The Misfortunes of Virtue, or several other titles: see below) is a classical erotic novel by Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, better known as the Marquis de Sade. ... Juliette is a novel written by the Marquis de Sade and published 1797 - 1801, accompanying Sades Nouvelle Justine. ... Magnum opus (sometimes Opus magnum, plural magna opera), from the Latin meaning great work,[1] refers to the best, most popular, or most renowned achievement of an author, artist, or composer, and most commonly one who has contributed a very large amount of material. ... The 120 Days of Sodom or the School of Freedoms (Les 120 journées de Sodome ou lécole du libertinage) is a book written by the French writer Marquis de Sade in 1784. ... Book cover for Venus in Furs Leopold Ritter von Sacher-Masoch (January 27, 1836 - March 9, 1895), writer and journalist, was born in Lemberg, Austria-Hungary (now Lviv, Ukraine). ...


In Pauline Réage's novel Story of O (1954), the female principal character is kept in a chateau and educated by a group of men using a wide range of BDSM techniques. "O"'s submission is depicted as consensual. Pauline Réage, pseudonym of Anne Desclos (September 23, 1907 - April 27, 1998), was a French author. ... One version of the Roissy triskelion ring described in the book Movie-style Ring of O, as sold in Europe Histoire dO (English title: Story of O) is an erotic novel published in 1954 about sadomasochism by French author Anne Desclos under the pen name Pauline Réage. ...


As with many sexual interests, sadomasochism is a popular subject in erotica. While S&M erotica is often about consensual humiliation and power exchange, consent is often abandoned as serves fantasy. The contemporary novelist Anne Rice, best known for Interview with the Vampire, wrote the sadomasochistic trilogy The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty (1983-85) and Exit to Eden (1985) under the pseudonym of A. N. Roquelaure. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Anne Rice (birth name Howard Allen OBrien) (born on October 4, 1941) is a best-selling American author of gothic and later religious themed books. ... Interview with the Vampire is a vampire novel by Anne Rice written in 1973 and published in 1976. ... Claiming of Sleeping Beauty The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty (1983), Beautys Punishment (1984), and Beautys Release (1985), are erotic novels by Anne Rice writing under the pseudonym of A. N. Roquelaure. ... Exit to Eden is a novel by Anne Rice, initially published in 1985 under the pen name Anne Rampling, but subsequently under Rices name. ...


Sadomasochism in popular culture

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Sadism and masochism
Look up sadism in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Look up masochism in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Sadomasochism has also become a popular theme for advertisers who seek to appear "edgy" or unconventional. Anheuser-Busch, Inc., a mainstream brewer of popular beers, including Bud Lite, now sponsors the Folsom Street Fair. Diesel brand Jeans runs ads in major fashion magazines with an S&M theme. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is a sister project of Wikipedia, using the same MediaWiki software. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... The Folsom Street Fair marks the end of Leather Pride Week in San Francisco, California Bondage demonstration at the 2003 Folsom Street Fair The annual Folsom Street Fair happens on the last Sunday in September and is now the final event in San Franciscos Leather Pride Week. ...


See also

Look up algolagnia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Autosadism is the paraphilia involving sexual arousal from inflicting pain or humiliation on oneself. ... A collar is a common symbol in BDSM. Female bottom in bondage with leather monoglove BDSM is any of a number of related patterns of human sexual behavior. ... Black Lace is an imprint of Virgin Books that specializes in erotica and erotic romance written by female authors specifically for female readers; the imprint does not publish novels written by men partly as a marketing scheme, partly to better appeal to their target demographic. ... A model in bondage cuffs with a leg spreader In the context of BDSM, bondage involves people being tied up or otherwise restrained for pleasure. ... This article is about the erotic activity. ... Domination and submission (also known as Dominance and submission, D&s, Ds or D/s) is a set of psychosexual behaviors, customs and rituals relating to the dominance of one individual over another. ... Scarlet Vice, a book published by Nexus Books Nexus Books is a British imprint of Virgin Books, publishing sado-masochistic pornography written mostly for male straight readers. ... Look up paraphilia in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A rough sex classic: Slap Happy #3: Human Toilets Rough sex is wild, energetic sexual intercourse. ... A safeword[1] is a codeword or series of codewords that are sometimes used in BDSM to mean that a submissive (or bottom) is reaching a physical, emotional or moral boundary or for the dominant (or top) to stop the sceneplay. ... This article is about the erotic activity. ... Torture, according to international law, is any act by which severe pain or suffering, whether physical or mental, is intentionally inflicted on a person for such purposes as obtaining from him or a third person information or a confession, punishing him for an act he or a third person has...

References

  1. ^ von Krafft-Ebbing, Richard [1886]. "Masochism", Psychopathia Sexualis, 131. “[The masochist] is controlled by the idea of being completely and unconditionally subject to the will of a person of the opposite sex; of being treated by this person as by a master, humiliated and abused. This idea is coloured by lustful feeling; the masochist lives in fancies, in which he creates situations of this kind and often attempts to realise them” 
  2. ^ Jean-Paul Sartre, Being and Nothingness

Richard Freiherr von Krafft-Ebing (August 4, 1840–December 22, 1902), German psychiatrist, wrote Psychopathia Sexualis (1886), a famous study of sexual perversity, and remains well-known for his coinage of the term sadism. ... Being and Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay on Ontology (1943) is a philosophical treatise by Jean-Paul Sartre that is regarded as the beginning of the growth of existentialism in the 20th century. ...

External links

The Eulenspiegel Society (TES) claims to be the oldest and largest BDSM education and support group in the USA. It is based in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... See also BDSM Leather Pride flag Folsom Street Fair National Coalition for Sexual Freedom External links The Society of Janus - official site History of the Society of Janus (PDF file) Categories: Sex-related stubs | BDSM organizations ... “San Francisco” redirects here. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Phillips, Anita (1998). A Defense of Masochism. ISBN 0-312-19258-4.
  • Odd Reiersol, Svein Skeid:The ICD Diagnoses of Fetishism and Sadomasochism, in Journal of Homosexuality, Harrigton Park Press, Vol.50, No.2/3, 2006,pp.243-262

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m