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Encyclopedia > Sacrifice fly

In baseball, a batted ball is considered a sacrifice fly (denoted by SF) if the following four criteria are met: This article is about the sport. ...

  • There are fewer than two outs when the ball is hit.
  • The ball is hit to the outfield.
  • The batter is out because an outfielder or an infielder running in the outfield catches the ball (or would have been out if not for an error).
  • A runner who is already on base scores on the play.

A sacrifice fly is not counted as a turn at bat (AB) for the batter and he is also credited with a run batted in (RBI). The purpose of not counting a sacrifice fly as an at bat is to avoid penalizing hitters for a successful tactical maneuver. A sacrifice fly does however hurt a players' on base percentage (OBP). This introduces a subtle change in batting strategies. Normally, a line drive (a ball hit on or slightly above a level trajectory) is seen as more likely to result in a hit than a fly ball. However, with a player on third and fewer than two outs, a hard-hit fly ball is of equal or even higher value, since it is likely to go farther and become a sacrifice fly, thus producing a run. The outfield is a sporting term used in cricket and baseball to refer to the area of the field of play further from the batsman or batter than the infield. ... An infielder is a baseball player who plays on the infield, the dirt portion of a baseball diamond between first base and third base. ... In baseball, an error is the act, in the judgment of the official scorer, of a fielder misplaying a ball in a manner that allows a batter or baserunner to reach one or more additional bases, when such an advance should have been prevented given ordinary effort by the fielder. ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... In baseball statistics, a run batted in (RBI) is given to a batter for each run scored as the result of a batters plate appearance. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ...


The sacrifice fly is still credited even if another runner is put out on appeal for failing to tag up, so long as the run scores prior to the third out. A fly-out double play does not affect the validity of the sacrifice fly. In baseball, a runner must tag up if a batted ball is caught in flight. ... After stepping on second base, the fielder throws to first to complete a double play In baseball, a double play (denoted on statistics sheets by DP) for a team or a fielder is the act of making two outs during the same continuous playing action. ...


In the case of a fly ball dropped for an error, the sacrifice fly is only credited if the official scorer believes the run would have scored had the ball been caught.


In most cases, the sacrifice fly results because a runner scores from third base. However, in rare cases, a fast runner may legally tag up and score from second base if the fly ball were hit to a particularly deep part of the field. By rule, this is still credited as a sacrifice fly and an RBI, unless the player only reaches home due to an error.


The major-league record for most sacrifice flies by a team in one game is 5.[1]


The sacrifice fly is one of two instances in baseball where a batter is not charged with a time at bat after putting a ball in play; the other is the sacrifice hit (also known as the 'sacrifice bunt', or simply a 'sacrifice'). Batters have not been charged with a time at-bat for a sacrifice hit since 1893, but baseball has changed the sacrifice fly rule multiple times. The sacrifice fly as a statistical category was instituted in 1908, only to be discontinued in 1931. The rule was again adopted in 1939, only to be eliminated again in 1940, before being adopted for the last time in 1954. This may be because unlike a sacrifice hit, where a batter by definition does not take a full swing, a batter who hits a sacrifice fly does swing away, and therefore arguably does not "give himself up". The sacrifice fly is addressed in Rule 10.09 (e) of the Official Baseball Rules (OBR). Since the rule was reinstated in its present form, Gil Hodges of Brooklyn NL holds the record for most sacrifice flies in one season with 19, in 1954. Also, for the purposes of hit streaks, if a player has no official turns at bat, but has a sacrifice fly, that player's hit streak will end. In baseball, a sacrifice hit (also called a sacrifice bunt) is the act of deliberately bunting the ball in a manner that allows a runner on base to advance to another base, while the batter is himself put out. ... The Official Baseball Rules govern all professional play in the United States and Canada. ...


All Time Major League Leaders in Sacrifice Flies

As of the end of the 2006 season, the all time leaders in sacrifice files were:

  • Eddie Murray (128)
  • Cal Ripken Jr. (127)
  • Robin Yount (123)
  • Hank Aaron (121)
  • George Brett (120)
  • Ruben Sierra (120)
  • Rafael Palmeiro (119)
  • Rusty Staub (119)
  • Andre Dawson (118)
  • Don Baylor (115)
  • Frank Thomas (115)

See also

Statistics are very important to baseball, perhaps as much as they are for cricket, and more than almost any other sport. ... Tim Kurkjian, (born December 10, 1956) in Bethesda, Maryland. ...

External links

  • MLB Official Rules: 10.00 The Official Scorer
  • Baseball rules chronology that includes the chronology of the sacrifice fly rule

  Results from FactBites:
 
Sacrifice fly - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (548 words)
A sacrifice fly is not counted as a turn at bat (AB) for the batter and he is also credited with a run batted in (RBI).
The purpose of not counting a sacrifice fly as an at bat is to avoid penalizing hitters for a successful tactical maneuver.
The sacrifice fly is one of two instances in baseball where a batter is not charged with a time at bat after putting a ball in play; the other is the sacrifice hit (also known as the 'sacrifice bunt', or simply a 'sacrifice').
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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