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Encyclopedia > Sacred Heart
Typical illustration of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ
Typical illustration of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ

The Sacred Heart is a religious devotion to Jesus' physical heart. Roman Catholic image of Jesus Christ as the Sacred Heart - no copyright This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Roman Catholic image of Jesus Christ as the Sacred Heart - no copyright This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Catholic devotions are prayer forms which are not part of the official public liturgy of the Church but are part of the popular spiritual practices of Catholics. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


This devotion is predominantly used in the Roman Catholic Church and represents divine love for humanity.Since Jesus was at the same time both true God and true man, his heart is also the heart of God and worthy of adoration. It also stresses the central Christian concept of loving and adoring Jesus. The origin of this devotion in its modern form is derived from a French Catholic nun Marguerite Marie Alacoque, who allegedly learned the devotion from Jesus in visions. Predecessors to the modern devotion existed to some extent in the Middle Ages in various mystical sects.[1] The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... Marguerite-Marie Alacoque Saint Marguerite Marie Alacoque or Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque (22 July 1647-17 October 1690) was a French Catholic nun and mystic, who originated the Catholic devotion of the Sacred Heart in its modern form. ... In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Mysticism is the philosophy and practice of a direct experience of God. ...


The Sacred Heart is often depicted in Christian art as a flaming stylized heart, pierced by the lance-wound, surrounded by a crown of thorns, and bleeding. Sometimes the image is superimposed over Jesus' body with his wounded hands pointing at the heart. The wounds and crown of thorns allude to the manner of Jesus' death, while the fire represents love. This motif has become a part of vernacular culture through its appropriation by tattoo artists.[2] Christian art is art that spans many segments of Christianity. ... Jesus Carrying the Cross as portrayed by El Greco - Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 1580 In Christianity, the Crown of Thorns, one of the instruments of the Passion, was the woven chaplet of thorn branches worn by Jesus before his crucifixion. ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... Popular culture, or pop culture, (literally: the culture of the people) consists of widespread cultural elements in any given society. ... A tattoo is a mark made by inserting pigment into the skin; in technical terms, tattooing is dermal pigmentation. ...

Contents

History of Devotion

Another depiction of Jesus and His Most Sacred Heart
Another depiction of Jesus and His Most Sacred Heart

Catholic image of christ - from www. ... Catholic image of christ - from www. ...

Early devotion

From the time of John the Evangelist and Paul of Tarsus there has always been in the Church something like devotion to the love of God, but there is nothing to indicate that, during the first ten centuries of Christianity, any worship was rendered to the wounded Heart of Jesus.[3] It is in the eleventh and twelfth centuries that the first indications of devotion to the Sacred Heart are found. It was in the fervent atmosphere of the Benedictine or Cistercian monasteries, in the world of Anselmian or Bernardine thought, that the devotion arose, although it is impossible to say positively what were its first texts or who were its first devotees c. To St. Gertrude, St. Mechtilde, and the author of the "Vitis mystica" (previously ascribed to St. Bernard, now attributed to St. Bonaventure) it was already well known. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with John the Apostle. ... Paul of Tarsus (b. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 11th century was that century which lasted from 1001 to 1100. ... (11th century - 12th century - 13th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 12th century was that century which lasted from 1101 to 1200. ... A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... Cistercians coat of arms The Order of Cistercians (OCist) (Latin Cistercenses), otherwise Gimey or White Monks (from the colour of the habit, over which is worn a black scapular or apron) are a Catholic order of monks. ... Monastery of St. ... Saint Anselm of Canterbury (1033 or 1034 – April 21, 1109) was an Italian medieval philosopher and theologian, who held the office of Archbishop of Canterbury from 1093 to 1109. ... Bernard of Cluny (or of Morlaix) was a Benedictine monk of the first half of the twelfth century, poet, satirist, and hymn-writer, author of the famous verses On the Contempt of the World. Life His parentage, native land, and education are hidden in obscurity. ... Gertrude the Great (January 6, 1256–November 17, 1301) was a German Benedictine and mystic writer. ... Saint Mechtilde (1240/1241 - 19 November 1298) was a Saxon Christian saint (from what is now Germany) and a Benedictine nun. ... Bernard of Cluny (or of Morlaix) was a Benedictine monk of the first half of the twelfth century, poet, satirist, and hymn-writer, author of the famous verses On the Contempt of the World. Life His parentage, native land, and education are hidden in obscurity. ... For other uses, see Bonaventure (disambiguation). ...


From the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries, the devotion was propagated but it did not seem to have developed in itself. It was everywhere practised by individuals and by different religious congregations, such as the Franciscans, Dominicans, Carthusians, etc. It was, nevertheless, a private, individual devotion of the mystical order. Nothing of a general movement had been inaugurated, except for similarities found in the devotion to the Five Wounds by the Franciscans, in which the wound in Jesus' Heart figured most prominently. (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... The Order of Friars Minor and other Franciscan movements are disciples of Saint Francis of Assisi. ... A Carthusian Monastery in Jerez, Spain The Carthusian Order, also called the Order of St. ... Flag of Georgia, a variant of the Jerusalem cross representing the five Holy Wounds The Five Holy Wounds or Five Sacred Wounds of Christ were the five piercing wounds inflicted upon Jesus during his crucifixion. ...


In the sixteenth century, the devotion passed from the domain of mysticism into that of Christian asceticism. It was established as a devotion with prayers already formulated and special exercises, found in the writings of Lanspergius (d. 1539) of the Carthusians of Cologne, the Louis of Blois (Blosius; 1566), a Benedictine and Abbot of Liessies in Hainaut, John of Avila (d. 1569) and St. Francis de Sales, the latter belonging to the seventeenth century. (15th century - 16th century - 17th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 16th century was that century which lasted from 1501 to 1600. ... Mysticism is the philosophy and practice of a direct experience of God. ... Ascetic redirects here. ... A Carthusian Monastery in Jerez, Spain The Carthusian Order, also called the Order of St. ... Blois is a city in France, the préfecture (capital) city of the Loir-et-Cher département, situated on the banks of the lower river Loire between Orléans and Tours. ... A Benedictine is a person who follows the Rule of St Benedict. ... Abbots coat of arms The word abbot, meaning father, has been used as a Christian clerical title in various, mainly monastic, meanings. ... Liessies Abbey was a Benedictine monastery near Avesnes, in the Archdiocese of Cambrai and the département of Nord, France. ... Hainaut (French; English traditionally Hainault, Dutch: Henegouwen, German: Hennegau, Walloon: Hinnot) is the westernmost province of Wallonia, one of the three regions of Belgium. ... Saint John of Avila (in Spanish Juan de Ávila, Apostle of Andalusia) (b. ... Saint Francis de Sales (in French, St François de Sales) (1567-1622), seventeenth-century bishop of Geneva and Roman Catholic saint, was born at Thorens into a Savoyard noble family on 21 August 1567. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ...


The historical record from that time shows an early bringing to light of the devotion. Ascetic writers spoke of it, especially those of the Society of Jesus. The image of the Sacred Heart of Jesus was everywhere in evidence, largely due to the Franciscan devotion to the Five Wounds and to the habit formed by the Jesuits of placing the image on their title-page of their books and the walls of their churches. Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ...


Nevertheless, the devotion remained an individual, or at least a private, devotion. Jean Eudes (1602-1680) made it public, gave it an Office, and established a feast for it. Père Eudes was the apostle of the Heart of Mary; but in his devotion to the Immaculate Heart there was a share for the Heart of Jesus. Little by little, the devotion to the Sacred Heart became a separate one, and on August 31, 1670, the first feast of the Sacred Heart was celebrated in the Grand Seminary of Rennes. Coutances followed suit on October 20, a day with which the Eudist feast was from then on to be connected. The feast soon spread to other dioceses, and the devotion was likewise adopted in various religious communities. It gradually came into contact with the devotion begun at Paray, and resulting in a fusion of the two. Saint Jean Eudes was a French missionary and founder of the Eudists and of the Congregation of Our Lady of Charity; author of the liturgical worship of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. ... The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ... The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ... August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... 1670 was a common year beginning on a Saturday in countries using the Julian calendar and a Wednesday in countries using the Gregorian calendar. ... Some medieval houses, such as these at Champ-Jacquet, can still be found in the center of Rennes. ... Coutances is a commune of Normandy, France, in the Manche département, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Eudists is the common name, after the founder, for the members of the Catholic Society of Jesus and Mary. ... Paray-le-Monial is a town and commune of northeastern France, in the region of Burgundy, in the Saône-et-Loire département, at 245 m (804 ft) above sea-level. ...


Visions of St. Margaret Mary

A depiction of Jesus and His Most Sacred Heart
A depiction of Jesus and His Most Sacred Heart

The most significant source for the devotion to the Sacred Heart in the form it is known today was Visitandine Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-1690), who claimed to have received visions of Jesus Christ. There is nothing to indicate that she had known the devotion prior to the revelations, or at least that she had paid any attention to it. These alleged revelations were numerous, and the following apparitions are especially remarkable: Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 392 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (779 × 1192 pixel, file size: 860 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) copyright 2006 This image is of a poster for an event, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 392 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (779 × 1192 pixel, file size: 860 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) copyright 2006 This image is of a poster for an event, and the copyright for it is most likely owned by either the... The Order of the Visitation is an order started by St. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are usually depicted as having halos. ... Marie Alacoque (22 July 1647 - 17 October 1690) was a French nun of a mystic tendency, the founder of the devotion of the Sacred Heart. ... In religion, visions comprise inspirational renderings, generally of a future state and/or of a mythical being, and are believed (by followers of the religion) to come from a deity, directly or indirectly via prophets, and serve to inspire or prod believers as part of a revelation or an epiphany. ...

  • On December 27, probably 1673, the feast of St. John, Margaret Mary reported that Jesus permitted her, as He had formerly allowed St. Gertrude, to rest her head upon His Heart, and then disclosed to her the wonders of His love, telling her that He desired to make them known to all mankind and to diffuse the treasures of His goodness, and that He had chosen her for this work.
  • In probably June or July, 1674, Margaret Mary claimed that Jesus requested to be honored under the figure of His Heart of flesh, also claiming that, when He appeared radiant with love, He asked for a devotion of expiatory love: frequent reception of Communion, especially Communion on the First Friday of the month, and the observance of the Holy Hour.
  • During the octave of Corpus Christi, 1675, probably on June 16, the vision known as the "great apparition" reportedly took place, where Jesus said, "Behold the Heart that has so loved men ... instead of gratitude I receive from the greater part (of mankind) only ingratitude ...", and asked Margaret Mary for a feast of reparation of the Friday after the octave of Corpus Christi, bidding her consult Father de la Colombière, then superior of the small Jesuit house at Paray. Solemn homage was asked on the part of the king, and the mission of propagating the new devotion was especially confided to the religious of the Visitation and to the priests of the Society of Jesus.

A few days after the "great apparition", Margaret Mary reported everything she saw to Father de la Colombière, and he acknowledging the vision as an action of the spirit of God, consecrated himself to the Sacred Heart and directed her to write an account of the apparition. He also made use of every available opportunity to circulate this account, discreetly, through France and England. At his death, February 15, 1682, there was found in his journal of spiritual retreats a copy in his own handwriting of the account that he had requested of Margaret Mary, together with a few reflections on the usefulness of the devotion. This journal, including the account and an "offering" to the Sacred Heart, in which the devotion was well explained, was published at Lyons in 1684. The little book was widely read, even at Paray. Margaret Mary reported feeling "dreadful confusion" over the book's contents, but resolved to make the best of it, approving of the book for the spreading of her cherished devotion. Outside of the Visitandines, priests, religious, and laymen espoused the devotion, particularly a Capuchin, Margaret Mary's two brothers, and some Jesuits, among the latter being Fathers Croiset and Gallifet, who promoted the devotion. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with John the Apostle. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Octave in the liturgical sense is the eighth day following a major feast, particularly in the Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Anglican liturgal calendars. ... Corpus Christi celebrations in Antigua Guatemala, 14 June, 1979 Corpus Christi (Latin: Body of Christ) in Catholicism is a religious feast celebrated by Roman Catholics on the eighth Thursday after Easter, i. ... Reparation is a Roman Catholic theological concept that humans are creatures who have fallen from an original state of justice in which they were created, and that through the Incarnation, Passion, and Death of Jesus, they have been redeemed and restored again in a certain degree to the original condition. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... February 15 is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Events March 11 – Chelsea hospital for soldiers is founded in England May 6 - Louis XIV of France moves his court to Versailles. ... The Order of Friars Minor Capuchin (OFM Cap) is an order of friars in the Roman Catholic Church, among the chief offshoots of the Franciscans. ...


Vatican endorsement

Dates for the Feast of the Sacred Heart, 2002-2020
Year Date
2002 June 7
2003 June 27
2004 June 18
2005 June 3
2006 June 23
2007 June 15
2008 May 30
2009 June 19
2010 June 11
2011 July 1
2012 June 15
2013 June 7
2014 June 27
2015 June 12
2016 June 3
2017 June 23
2018 June 8
2019 June 28
2020 June 19

The death of Margaret Mary, October 17, 1690, did not dampen the zeal of those interested; on the contrary, a short account of her life published by Father Croiset in 1691, as an appendix to his book "De la Dévotion au Sacré Cœur", served only to increase it. In spite of all sorts of obstacles, and of the slowness of the Holy See, which in 1693 imparted indulgences to the Confraternities of the Sacred Heart and, in 1697, granted the feast to the Visitandines with the Mass of the Five Wounds, but refused a feast common to all, with special Mass and Office. The devotion spread, particularly in religious communities. The Marseilles plague, 1720, furnished perhaps the first occasion for a solemn consecration and public worship outside of religious communities. Other cities of the South followed the example of Marseilles, and thus the devotion became a popular one. In 1726 it was deemed advisable once more to importune Rome for a feast with a Mass and Office of its own, but, in 1729, Rome again refused. However, in 1765, it finally yielded and that same year, at the request of the queen, the feast was received quasi-officially by the episcopate of France. On all sides it was asked for and obtained, and finally, in 1856, at the urgent entreaties of the French bishops, Pope Pius IX extended the feast to the Catholic Church under the rite of double major. In 1889 it was raised by the Catholic Church to the double rite of first class. June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... June 18 is the 169th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (170th in leap years), with 196 days remaining. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... June 15 is the 166th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (167th in leap years), with 199 days remaining. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... June 27 is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 187 days remaining. ... June 12 is the 163rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (164th in leap years), with 202 days remaining. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... June 28 is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 186 days remaining. ... June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Giovanni Domenico Cassini observes differential rotation within Jupiters atmosphere. ... In the theology of Roman Catholicism, an indulgence is the remission of the temporal punishment due to God for a Christians sins. ... The Great Plague of Marseilles was one of the most significant European outbreaks of bubonic plague in the early 18th century. ... It has been suggested that episcopal be merged into this article or section. ... Blessed Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878, making him the longest-reigning Pope since the Apostle St. ...


On May 15, 2006, Pope Benedict XVI sent a letter to Father Peter Hans Kolvenbach, the Superior General of the Society of Jesus, on the 50th Anniversary of the encyclical Haurietis Aquas, about the Sacred Heart, by Pope Pius XII. In his letter to Father Kolvenbach, Pope Benedict reaffirmed the importance of the devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus. May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (136th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... This article is becoming very long. ... Peter Hans Kolvenbach, current Superior-General of the Catholic order or the Jesuits, in Goa, India, Nov 9, 2006. ... A Superior General, or General Superior, is the Superior at the head of a whole religious order of congregation. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church, and sovereign of Vatican City State from March 2, 1939 until his death. ...


Worship and Devotion

Depiction of the Sacred Heart in a convent chapel
Depiction of the Sacred Heart in a convent chapel

The Catholic acts of consecration, reparation and devotion were introduced when the feast of the Sacred Heart was declared. In his Papal Bull Auctorem Fidei, Pope Pius VI praised devotion to the Sacred Heart. Finally, by order of Leo XIII, in his encyclical Annum Sacrum (May 25, 1899), as well as on June 11, he consecrated every human to the Sacred Heart. The idea of this act, which Leo XIII called "the great act" of his pontificate, had been proposed to him by a religious woman of the Good Shepherd from Oporto (Portugal) who said that she had supernaturally received it from Jesus. Since c. 1850, groups, congregations, and States have consecrated themselves to the Sacred Heart. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 420 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1033 × 1475 pixel, file size: 484 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sacred Heart ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 420 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1033 × 1475 pixel, file size: 484 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Sacred Heart ... This article is about an abbey as a religious building. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ... Reparation is a Roman Catholic theological concept that humans are creatures who have fallen from an original state of justice in which they were created, and that through the Incarnation, Passion, and Death of Jesus, they have been redeemed and restored again in a certain degree to the original condition. ... Devotion is a term used to designate several related activities within the Christian church. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... The current Pope is Benedict XVI (born Joseph Alois Ratzinger), who was elected at the age of 78 on 19 April 2005. ... Pius VI, born as Giovanni Angelo Braschi, (December 27, 1717 - August 29, 1799), pope from 1775 to 1799, was born at Cesena. ... Pope Leo XIII Supreme Pontiff (1878-1903) Leo XIII, né Gioacchino Pecci (March 2, 1810 - July 20, 1903) was Pope from 1878 to 1903. ... An encyclical was a circular letter sent to all the churches of a particular area in the ancient Christian church. ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... Location    - Country Portugal    - Region Norte  - Subregion Grande Porto  - District or A.R. Porto Mayor Rui Rio  - Party PSD Area 41. ...


Peter Coudrin of France founded the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary on Dec 24, 1800. A religious order of the Roman Catholic Church, the order is best known for its missionary work in Hawaii. Peter Coudrin, depicted in a stained-glass window of the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace in Honolulu, founded the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. ... Father Pierre Coudrin, founder of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, from a window in the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace, Honolulu. ... December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (359th in leap years). ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... A religious order may mean any of the following: // In Buddhist societies such as Sri Lanka, Thailand, Korea and Tibet, a religious order is one of the strikingly large number of monastic orders of monks and nuns. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Mother Clelia Merloni from Forlì (Italy) founded the Congregation of the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Viareggio, Italy, May 30, 1894. Forlì is a comune and city in Emilia-Romagna, Italy, famed as the birthplace of the great painter Melozzo da Forlì and of Fascist leader Benito Mussolini, at the nearby comune of Predappio. ... The Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus were founded in Viareggio, Italy in 1894 by Clelia Merloni. ... Viareggio is a town in the province of Lucca situated on the coast of the Ligurian Sea in the north of Tuscany, Italy. ... May 30 is the 150th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (151st in leap years). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Worship of the Sacred Heart mainly consists of several hymns, the Salutation of the Sacred Heart, and the Litany of the Sacred Heart. It is common in Roman Catholic services and occasionally is to be found in Anglican services. See also hymn - a program to decrypt iTunes music files. ... A litany, in Christian worship, is a form of prayer used in church services and processions, and consisting of a number of petitions. ... The term Anglican (from Medieval Latin ecclesia anglicana, meaning the English Church) is used to describe how the people, institutions and churches as well as the liturgical traditions and theological concepts developed by the state established Church of England, the Anglican Communion. ...


The Feast of the Sacred Heart is a holy day in the Roman Catholic liturgical calendar, and is celebrated 19 days after Pentecost. As Pentecost is always celebrated on Sunday, the Feast of the Sacred Heart always falls on a Friday. The Feast of the Sacred Heart (or properly, the Solemnity of the Sacred Heart) is a holy day in the liturgical calendar of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The liturgical year, also known as the Christian year, consists of the cycle of liturgical seasons in some Christian churches which determines when Feasts, Memorials, Commemorations, and Solemnities are to be observed and which portions of Scripture are to be read. ... Pentecost (symbolically related to the Jewish festival of Shavuot) is a feast on the Christian liturgical calendar that commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, and the followers (men and women) of Jesus, fifty days (seven weeks) after Easter, and ten days after Ascension Thursday. ...


The Enthronement of the Sacred Heart is a Catholic ceremony in which a priest or head of a household consecrates the members of the household to the Sacred Heart. A blessed image of the Sacred Heart, either a statue or a picture, is then "enthroned" in the home to serve as a constant reminder to those who dwell in the house of their consecration to the Sacred Heart. The practice of the Enthronement is based upon Pope Pius XII's declaration that devotion to the Sacred of Jesus is "the foundation on which to build the kingdom of God in the hearts of individuals, families, and nations..."[4] Pope John Paul I s enthronement as Pope on 3rd September 1978. ... Typical illustration of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Christ The Sacred Heart is a religious devotion to Jesus physical heart. ... The Venerable Pius XII, born Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Eugenio Pacelli (Rome, March 2, 1876 - October 9, 1958) served as the Pope from March 2, 1939 to 1958. ...


Institution Names

Sacred Heart is still a widely used name for many Catholic institutions, including schools, colleges, and hospitals in many countries around the world. It is also the name of many Catholic parishes, religious orders, and stores selling Catholic goods. Download high resolution version (683x640, 50 KB)Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Koekelberg, Brussels, Belgium (taken from French wikipedia [1]). File links The following pages link to this file: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Belgium Categories: GFDL images ... Download high resolution version (683x640, 50 KB)Basilica of the Sacred Heart in Koekelberg, Brussels, Belgium (taken from French wikipedia [1]). File links The following pages link to this file: Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Belgium Categories: GFDL images ... Several basilicas are called Basilica of the Sacred Heart: the Basilica of the Sacred Heart or Basilica of the Sacré Coeur, in Paris, France the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, in Brussels, Belgium the Basilica of the Sacred Heart, in Indiana, United States the Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart... Koekelberg within the Brussels-Capital Region Koekelberg is one of the nineteen municipalities located in the Brussels-Capital Region of Belgium. ... Nickname: The Capital Of Europe, Comic City City of a 100 Museums[] Map showing the location of Brussels in Belgium Coordinates: Country Belgium Region Brussels-Capital Region Founded 979 Founded (Region) June 18, 1989  - Mayor (Municipality) Freddy Thielemans Area    - City 162 (Region) km²  (62. ... A religious order may mean any of the following: // In Buddhist societies such as Sri Lanka, Thailand, Korea and Tibet, a religious order is one of the strikingly large number of monastic orders of monks and nuns. ...


For a list of institutions named after the Sacred Heart, see Sacred Heart (disambiguation). Sacred Heart is: Sacred Heart, a Catholic concept Feast of the Sacred Heart Sacred Heart, Minnesota Sacred Heart Township, Minnesota Sacred Heart, Oklahoma Sacred Heart Catholic Church (Dubuque) Basilica of the Sacré Coeur, Paris Basilica of the Sacred Heart, Belgium Cathedral of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, Sarajevo Sacred Heart...


Sacred Heart Imagery

Religious imagery depicting the Sacred Heart is frequently featured in Catholic, and sometimes Anglican homes. Sometimes images display beneath them a list of family members, indicating that the entire family is entrusted to the protection of Jesus in the Sacred Heart, from whom blessings on the home and the family members are sought. The prayer "O Sacred Heart of Jesus, I place all my trust in Thee" is often used. One particular image has been used as part of a set, along with an image of the Blessed Virgin Mary. In that image, Mary too was shown pointing to her Immaculate Heart, expressing her love for the human race and for her Son, Jesus Christ. The mirror images reflect an eternal binding of the two hearts. Our Lady redirects here. ... The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ...


Roman Catholics are encouraged to wear a small, postage-stamp sized paper portrait of the Sacred Heart, usually glued to red flannel, on a thin ribbon necklace with a similar amulet hanging at the back. This is known as a scapular. The Brown Scapular of Mount Carmel promises salvation to its wearer. ...


In folklore

Many members of the Carlist military forces of the 19th and 20th centuries in Spain wore detentes or amulets with an image of the Sacred Heart. These Catholic monarchists believed the image would protect them against wounding by the enemy firearms. Carlism was a conservative political movement in Spain, purporting to establish an alternative branch of the Bourbons in the Spanish throne. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Detente bala is an inscription used by Carlist soldiers. ... An amulet from the Black Pullet grimoire An amulet (from Latin amuletum, meaning A means of protection) consists of any object intended to bring good luck and/or protection to its owner. ... .357 Magnum cartridges, containing bullets A bullet is a solid projectile propelled by a firearm and is normally made from metal (usually lead). ...


In popular culture

An image significantly similar to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, or the Immaculate Heart of His Mother Mary, was used as the logo for Baz Luhrman's movie Romeo + Juliet (1996). The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ... Baz Luhrmann (born Mark Anthony Luhrmann, New South Wales, 17 September 1962) is an Australian film director. ... William Shakespeares Romeo + Juliet is an Academy Award-nominated, BAFTA-winning 1996 film adaptation of William Shakespeares play, Romeo and Juliet, directed by Baz Luhrmann. ...


See also

The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ...

References

This article incorporates text from the public-domain Catholic Encyclopedia of 1913.
  1. ^ Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus II. Historical Ideas on the Development of the Devotion, para (3-4). Catholic Encyclopedia. New Advent. Retrieved on 11 July 2006.
  2. ^ Photos of Sacred Heart tattoos. Religious Tattoos. Retrieved on 11 July 2006.
  3. ^ Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus II. Historical Ideas on the Development of the Devotion, para (1). Catholic Encyclopedia. New Advent. Retrieved on 11 July 2006.
  4. ^ Pope Pius XII. Haurietis Aquas. Vatican Archives. Retrieved on November 17, 2006.

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... The Catholic Encyclopedia, also referred to today as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia, is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by The Encyclopedia Press. ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 11 is the 192nd day (193rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 173 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sacred Heart - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (929 words)
The Sacred Heart is a devotional name used by some Roman Catholics to refer to the physical heart of Jesus Christ as a symbol of Divine love.
Worship of the Sacred Heart mainly consists of several hymns, the Salutation of the Sacred Heart, and the Litany of the Sacred Heart.
Folklore and legends exist regarding the Sacred Heart as an actual physical object, kept in a vessel or crypt, by the Catholic Church or Catholic individuals, or as an essence that is passed down through a lineage of holy descent.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus (3905 words)
Now this heart of flesh is currently accepted as the emblem of the emotion and moral life with which we associate it, and hence the place assigned to the word heart in symbolic language, as also the use of the same word to designate those things symbolized by the heart.
But the relation of the Heart to the love of Christ is not that of a purely conventional sign, as in the relation of the word to the thing, or of the flag to the idea of one's country; this Heart has been and is still inseparably connected with that life of benefactions and love.
The image of the Heart of Jesus was everywhere in evidence, which fact was largely due to the Franciscan devotion to the Five Wounds and to the habit formed by the Jesuits of placing the image on their title-page of their books and the walls of their churches.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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