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In Christian belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. The root meaning of the Latin word sacramentum is to "make sacred". Views concerning both what rites are sacramental, and what it means for an act to be sacramental vary among Christian denominations and traditions. Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... In Christianity, divine grace refers to the sovereign favor of God for humankind, as manifest in the blessings bestowed upon all —irrespective of actions (deeds), earned worth, or proven goodness. ... The term Sacred Mysteries is used in the Eastern Churches to refer to what the Western Church calls Sacraments and Sacramentals. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ...


The most conventional functional definition of a sacrament is that it is an outward, visible sign that conveys an inward, spiritual grace. The two most widely accepted sacraments are Baptism and the Eucharist; although several traditions include five others: Confirmation (Chrismation in the Orthodox tradition), ordination, Reconciliation of a Penitent (confession), Anointing of the Sick, and Matrimony. Taken together, these are the Seven Sacraments as recognised by churches in the High church tradition - notably Roman Catholic, Eastern Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Independent Catholic, Old Catholic and some Anglicans. Other denominations and traditions typically affirm only Baptism and Eucharist as sacraments. Baptism in early Christian art. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Confirmation can refer to: Confirmation (sacrament) Confirmation (epistemology) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Chrismation is the name given in Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox and Eastern_rite Catholic churches to the sacrament known as confirmation in the Latin Rite Catholic churches. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Eastern Christianity. ... Catholic deacon candidates prostrate before the altar of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles during a 2004 diaconate ordination liturgy Holy Orders in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, and Independent Catholic churches includes three orders: bishop, priest, and deacon. ... Confession of sins is an integral part of the Christian faith and practice. ... Extreme Unction, part of The Seven Sacraments (1445) by Roger van der Weyden. ... Ancient Christian Marriage symbol: two gold rings and Greek letters chi (X) and rho (P) for Jesus Christ // The Christian views of marriage historically have regarded marriage as ordained by God for the lifelong union of a man and a woman. ... The practice of the Roman Catholic Church includes seven sacraments. ... High Church relates to ecclesiology and liturgy in Christian theology and practice. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ... The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself: as the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus Christ and the Twelve Apostles. ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keeps the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils of the undivided Church - the councils of Nicea, Constantinople and Ephesus. ... The independent Catholic Churches are, by and large, very small Churches, some of them the size of one congregation, that claim valid Apostolic Succession of their bishops, though these are often dismissed in mainstream Catholic, Orthodox and Anglican circles as episcopi vagantes (wandering bishops). // The actual beginnings of the independent... The Old Catholic Church is not so much a religious denomination, as a community, part of whose member churches split from the Roman Catholic church in 1870. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...

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Varying definitions

The churches of the Catholic tradition, as well as some among the United Methodist, Lutheran and Anglican confessions, hold that sacraments are not mere symbols, but rather that they effect that which they signify, that is, the sacraments in and of themselves, rightly administered, are used by God as a means to communicate grace to faithful recipients, and for recipients to communicate praise and thanksgiving to God. As a communicative device, they thus constitute a specific form of prayer. The United Methodist Church is the largest Methodist denomination, and the second-largest Protestant one, in the United States. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Mary Magdalene in prayer. ...


Some post-Reformation (a.k.a. Protestant) denominations do not maintain a sacramental theology, although they may practice the rites themselves. These rites may be variously labelled "traditions" or - in the case of Baptism and the Eucharist ("the Lord's Supper") - "ordinances," since they are seen as having been ordained by Christ to be permanently observed by the church. Protestant denominations, both sacramental and non-sacramental, almost invariably affirm only these two as sacraments, traditions, or ordinances; although they may also practice anointing of the sick, ordination, marriage, etc. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


Clearly, Christian churches, denominations, and sects are divided regarding the number and operation of the sacraments, but they are generally held to have been instituted by Jesus Christ. They are usually administered by the clergy to a recipient or recipients, and are generally understood to involve visible and invisible components. The invisible component (manifested inwardly) is understood to be brought about by the action of the Holy Spirit, God's grace working in the sacrament's participants, while the visible (or outward) component entails the use of such things as water, oil, and bread and wine that is blessed or consecrated; the laying-on-of-hands; or a particularly significant covenant that is marked by a public benediction (such as with marriage or absolution of sin in the reconciliation of a penitent). St. ... A religious denomination, (also simply denomination) is a subgroup within a religion that operates under a common name, tradition, and identity. ... A sect is generally a small religious or political group that has branched off from a larger established group. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... To consecrate an inanimate object is to dedicate it in a ritual to a special purpose, usually religious. ...


Catholic views

Enumeration

Main article: Sacraments of the Catholic Church
The Seven Sacraments by Rogier van der Weyden, ca. 1448.
The Seven Sacraments by Rogier van der Weyden, ca. 1448.

The following are the Seven Sacraments of the Catholic Church: This article is an expansion of a section entitled Sacraments within the article: Roman Catholic Church. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1136x980, 182 KB) Summary This work may be freely used for reproduction for commercial and non-commercial purposes as long as the source is explicitly mentioned. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1136x980, 182 KB) Summary This work may be freely used for reproduction for commercial and non-commercial purposes as long as the source is explicitly mentioned. ... Deposition by Roger van der Weyden (c. ... The practice of the Roman Catholic Church includes seven sacraments. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ...

As mentioned above, churches of the Catholic tradition hold to the sacramental nature of all seven of these. For Roman Catholics, this assertion is entirely uncomplicated by reservations or diverse perspectives. Various churches of the Catholic tradition also have sacramentals, acts of worship that differ from sacraments proper, but which are also means of grace. Items such as the rosary or the various scapulars and holy medals issued by some groups are counted among these sacramentals. Baptism in early Christian art. ... Infant baptism (also called paedobaptism and pedobaptism), the baptism of the infant children of believers, is an ancient custom of much of Christianity, including the Roman Catholic church, the Orthodox churches, Anglicans, Lutherans, Presbyterians, and Methodists, to name a few. ... Confirmation is a rite used in many Christian Churches. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... Ancient Christian Marriage symbol: two gold rings and Greek letters chi (X) and rho (P) for Jesus Christ // The Christian views of marriage historically have regarded marriage as ordained by God for the lifelong union of a man and a woman. ... Catholic deacon candidates prostrate before the altar of the Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels in Los Angeles during a 2004 diaconate ordination liturgy Holy Orders in the Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Assyrian, Old Catholic, and Independent Catholic churches includes three orders: bishop, priest, and deacon. ... Extreme Unction, part of The Seven Sacraments (1445) by Roger van der Weyden. ... Sacramentals are things (sacramentalia) set apart or blessed by the Catholic Church to manifest the respect due to the Sacraments, and so to excite good thoughts and to increase devotion, and through these movements of the heart to remit venial sin, according to the Council of Trent (Session XXII, 15). ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... The Brown Scapular of Mount Carmel promises salvation to its wearer. ... A Medal is a word used for various types of compact objects: a wearable medal awarded by an authority government for services redered, especially to a country (such as Armed force service); strictly speaking this only refers to a medal of coin-like appearance, but informally the word also refers...


Lutheran and Anglican views

Main article: Anglican sacraments

Martin Luther defined a sacrament as: Like other churches in the Catholic tradition, the Anglican Communion recognises seven sacraments. ... Martin Luther (November 10, 1483 – February 18, 1546) was a German monk,[1] priest, professor, theologian, and church reformer. ...

  1. instituted by God;
  2. in which God Himself has joined His Word of promise to the visible element;
  3. and by which He offers, gives and seals the forgiveness of sin earned by Christ (Luther's Small Catechism with Explanation, St. Louis: Concordia, 1991, 236).

This strict definition narrowed the number of sacraments down to just two, Baptism and Holy Communion, with the other five rituals eliminated for not having a visible element or the ability to forgive sin. This definition, and the resulting elimination, has historically been held by both Lutheranism and, later, the much of the Anglican Communion. Baptism in early Christian art. ... The Eucharist is either the Christian sacrament of consecrated bread and wine or the ritual surrounding it. ... Lutheranism is a movement within Christianity that began with the theological insights of Martin Luther in the 16th century. ... The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ...


Within Lutheranism, the sacraments, are a Means of Grace, and, together with the Word of God, empower the Church for mission (Use and Means of Grace, Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress Press, 1997, 56). The Means of Grace in Christian theology are those things (the means) through which God gives His grace. ...


Views within the churches of the Anglican Communion vary (see Anglican sacraments). The Thirty-nine Articles from the 1662 Book of Common Prayer declares that Baptism and Communion are the two dominical sacraments recognized in the English Church, and that the other five practices are "commonly called sacraments", but "are not to be counted for Sacraments of the Gospel". The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Like other churches in the Catholic tradition, the Anglican Communion recognises seven sacraments. ... The Thirty-Nine Articles are the defining statements of Anglican doctrine. ... For the novel by Joan Didion, see A Book of Common Prayer. ...


Anglo-Catholics, a branch of Anglicanism, have always counted the sacraments at seven. In this sense, Baptism and Eucharist are the "precepted, primary, and principal sacraments ordained for our salvation." This is a view shared by Old Catholics and others. The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... The Old Catholic Church is not so much a religious denomination, as a community, part of whose member churches split from the Roman Catholic church in 1870. ...


Eastern and Oriental Orthodox views

Main article: Sacred Mysteries
See also: Eastern Orthodoxy - Mysteries

The seven sacraments are also accepted by Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy, but these traditions do not limit the number of sacraments to seven, holding that anything the Church, does as Church is in some sense sacramental. To be more accurate, for the Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Christian the term “Sacrament” is a Westernism that seeks to classify something that may be impossible to classify. Preferably the term “Sacred Mystery” is used, the reason being that the “How it is possible” is unanswerable to human understanding. God touches us through material means such as water, wine, bread, oil, incense, candles, altars, icons, etc. How God does this is a mystery. On a broad level, the Mysteries are an affirmation of the goodness of created matter, and are an emphatic declaration of what that matter was originally created to be. The term Sacred Mysteries is used in the Eastern Churches to refer to what the Western Church calls Sacraments and Sacramentals. ... ... ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the communion of Eastern Christian Churches that recognize only the first three ecumenical councils — the First Council of Nicaea, the First Council of Constantinople and the Council of Ephesus — and reject the dogmatic definitions of the Council of Chalcedon. ... Sacramentals are things (sacramentalia) set apart or blessed by the Catholic Church to manifest the respect due to the Sacraments, and so to excite good thoughts and to increase devotion, and through these movements of the heart to remit venial sin, according to the Council of Trent (Session XXII, 15). ... ... The term Oriental Orthodoxy refers to the churches of Eastern Christian traditions that keeps the faith of only the first three ecumenical councils of the undivided Church - the councils of Nicea, Constantinople and Ephesus. ...


Despite this broad view, Orthodox divines do write about there being seven "principal" mysteries. On a specific level, while not systematically limiting the mysteries to seven, the most profound Mystery is the Eucharist, in which the partakers, by participation in the liturgy and receiving the consecrated bread and wine, understood to have become the body and blood of Christ itself, directly communicate with God. In this sense, there is no substantial difference from the practice of other churches of the Catholic patrimony.


The emphasis on mystery is, however, characteristic of Orthodox theology, and is often called "apophatic," meaning that any and all positive statements about God and other theological matters must be balanced by negative statements. For example, while it is correct and appropriate to say that God exists, or even that God is the only Being which truly exists, such statements must be understood to also convey the idea that God transcends what is usually meant by the term "to exist." Apophasis is a rhetorical figure of speech wherein the speaker or writer invokes a subject by denying that it should be invoked. ...


Views from other Christian Traditions

The Eucharist (also called Holy Communion or the Lord’s Supper) is considered a sacrament, ordinance, or equivalent in most Christian denominations.
The Eucharist (also called Holy Communion or the Lord’s Supper) is considered a sacrament, ordinance, or equivalent in most Christian denominations.

The numeration, naming, understanding, and the adoption of the sacraments vary according to denomination. Many post-Reformation traditions (a.k.a. Protestants) affirm Luther's definition and have only Baptism and Eucharist as sacraments, while others see the ritual as merely symbolic, and still others do not have a sacramental dimension at all. Image File history File links Methodistcommunion6. ... For other uses, see Eucharist (disambiguation). ... A religious denomination, (also simply denomination) is a subgroup within a religion that operates under a common name, tradition, and identity. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


In addition to the seven sacraments that have, more or less, been common contenders, other rituals have been considered and are in use in some Christian traditions. In particular, foot washing (see Gospel of John 13:14), as seen in Anabaptist and Brethren groups, and the hearing of the Gospel, as understood by a few Christian groups (such as the Polish National Catholic Church of America), have been argued for inclusion as sacraments. Feet washing is a religious rite observed as an ordinance by several Christian denominations. ... Anabaptists (Greek ανα (again) +βαπτιζω (baptize), thus, re-baptizers [1], German: Wiedertäufer) are Christians of the Radical Reformation. ... The Brethren are any of several Christian denominations, most of which are Anabaptist-Pietist. ... The Polish National Catholic Church (PNCC) is a former member of the Old Catholic Union of Utrecht and for much of that period was the only member church of the Union of Utrecht based outside Western or Central Europe (although it was not so when the Philippine Independent Church, also...


Among many post-Reformation traditions, the word mediates or conveys would mean only that it is a visible symbol or reminder of invisible grace. Since most post-Reformation denominations do not regard clergy as having a classically sacerdotal or priestly function, they avoid the term "sacrament," preferring the terms "sacerdotal function," "ordinance," or "tradition." This belief invests the efficacy of the ordinance in the obedience and participation of the believer and the witness of the presiding minister and the congregation. This view stems from a highly developed concept of the priesthood of the individual believer. In this sense, the believer him or herself performs the sacerdotal role. Sacerdotalism (from Latin sacerdos, priest, literally one who presents sacred offerings, sacer, sacred, and dare, to give) is a term applied (usually in a hostile sense) to the system, method, and spirit of a priestly order or class, under which the functions, dignity, and influence of the members of the... The priesthood of all believers is a Protestant doctrine founded on the First Epistle of Peter, 2:9: But ye are a chosen generation, a royal priesthood, an holy nation, a peculiar people; that ye should shew forth the praises of him who hath called you out of darkness into...


Baptists and Pentecostals, among other Christian denominations, choose to use the word ordinance, rather than sacrament because of certain sacerdotal ideas that the word sacrament has gathered to itself.[1] These Churches argue that the word ordinance points to the ordaining authority of Christ which lies behind the practice.[2] Baptist churches are part of a Christian movement often regarded as an Evangelical, Protestant denomination. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... List of Christian denominations ordered by historical and doctrinal relationships. ... Christ is the English translation of the Greek word (Christós), which literally means The Anointed One. ...


The Community of Christ holds that the sacraments express the continuing presence of Christ through the Church. They help believers establish and continually renew their relationship with God. Through them believers establish or reaffirm our covenant with God in response to God’s grace.[3] This Christian denomination recognizes eight sacraments: Baptism, Confirmation, Blessing of Children, The Lord's Supper, Marriage, Administration to the sick, Ordination, and Evangelist's blessing.[4] Community of Christ Temple in Independence, Missouri, USA. Dedicated 1994 RLDS redirects here. ... The sacraments are viewed as vital ministries in the Community of Christ for both individual and community spiritual development. ... Baptism in early Christian art. ... Confirmation can refer to: Confirmation (sacrament) Confirmation (epistemology) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ... “Matrimony” redirects here. ... Extreme Unction, part of The Seven Sacraments (1445) by Roger van der Weyden. ... Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and other Latter Day Saint denominations, a patriarchal blessing (also called an evangelists blessing) is a special blessing or ordinance given by a patriarch (evangelist) to a church member. ...


The Latter Day Saint movement (also know as Mormonism), the Sacrament is the Lord's Supper, in which participants eat bread and drink wine (or water, in the case of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since the late 1800s). It is essentially the same as the Eucharist, Communion in some other Christian denominations. Normally in Mormon congregations, the Sacrament is provided every Sunday as part of the Sacrament meeting. In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints the word ordinance is used approximately as the word Sacrament is used in Christianity in general. The Latter Day Saint movement is a religious movement which began in the early 19th century and is generally considered to be founded by Joseph Smith, Jr. ... Mormonism is a term to describe religious, ideological, and cultural aspects of the various denominations of the Latter Day Saint movement. ... In Mormonism, the Sacrament is the Lords Supper, in which participants eat bread and drink wine (or water, in the case of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since the late 1800s). ... The Lords Supper is a variation of the name and the service of The Last Supper or Eucharist. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... Sacrament meeting is the weekly worship service held on Sunday in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... In Mormonism, an ordinance is a religious ritual of special significance, often involving a covenant with God. ...


Some denominations do not have a sacramental dimension (or equivalent) at all. The Salvation Army does not practice formal sacraments for a variety of reasons, including a belief that it is better to concentrate on the reality behind the symbols; however, it does not forbid its members from receiving sacraments in other denominations[5] Shield of The Salvation Army The Salvation Army is a non-military evangelical Christian organization founded in 1865 by one time Methodist minister William Booth. ...


The Quakers (Religious Society of Friends) do not practice formal sacraments, believing that all activities should be considered holy. Rather, they are focused on an inward transformation of one's whole life. The Quakers use the words "Baptism" and "Communion" to describe the experience of Christ's presence and his ministry in worship.[6] The Religious Society of Friends (commonly known as Quakers) is a Christian religious denomination that began in England in the 17th century by people who were dissatisfied with the existing denominations and sects of Christianity. ...


Eternal significance of sacraments

At one time, the Christian belief was widespread that regular participation in the sacraments affected the disposition of the soul in eternity. This was most frequently seen in the case of baptism, in which the unbaptized were thought, under most circumstances, to go to hell or, according to Roman Catholicism, to a mediate state between heaven and hell (called limbo), in the case of unbaptized infants, when they died. It was also thought that failure to confess one's sins and receive absolution or to regularly receive Holy Communion could likewise negatively affect one's eternal destiny. In many traditions, such beliefs have been modified or abandoned; However, Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy continue to teach participation in the sacraments has eternal significance. The soul, acording to many religious and philosophical traditions, is a self-aware ethereal substance particular to a unique living being. ... Medieval illustration of Hell in the Hortus deliciarum manuscript of Herrad of Landsberg (about 1180) A hell, according to many religious beliefs, is an afterlife of suffering where the wicked or unrighteous dead are punished. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the theological concept. ...


References

General Online References

  1. ^ BBC: Religion and Ethics: Pentecostalism
  2. ^ BELIEVE Religious Information Source: Baptists
  3. ^ Community of Christ: Sacraments in the Community of Christ Community of Christ
  4. ^ Community of Christ: The Sacraments
  5. ^ The Salvation Army: Why does The Salvation Army not baptise or hold communion?.
  6. ^ [Eden Grace: Reflection on what Quakers bring to the ecumenical table]

Ecumenical

  • Stookey, Laurence Hull. Baptism: Christ's Act in the Church. Nashville, Abingdon Press, 1982. ISBN 0-687-02364-5
  • Stookey, Laurence Hull. Eucharist: Christ's Feast With the Church. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1993. ISBN 0-687-12017-9
  • World Council of Churches. Baptism, Eucharist and Ministry. Faith and Order paper. Geneva: World Council of Churches,1982. ISBN 2-8254-0709-7

The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ... The World Council of Churches (WCC) is an international Christian ecumenical organization. ...

Orthodox

  • Coniaris, Anthony. These Are the Sacraments: The Life-Giving Mysteries of the Orthodox Church Minneapolis: Light & Life Publishing, 1981. ISBN 0-937032-22-0

Roman Catholic

  • Martos, Joseph. Doors to the Sacred: A Historical Introduction to Sacraments in the Catholic Church. Revised Ed. Liguori, MO: Liguori Publications, 2001. ISBN 0-7648-0718-8
  • Power, David Noel. Sacrament: The Language of God's Giving. New York: Herder & Herder, 1999. ISBN 0-8245-1798-9
  • New Advent Catholic Encyclopedia 1913

Anglican

  • MacQuarrie, John A Guide to the Sacraments'.' London: Continuum International Publishing, 1997. ISBN 0-8264-1027-8

Protestant

  • Neal, Gregory S. Grace Upon Grace Koinonia Press, 2000. ISBN 0-9679074-0-3
  • Stamm, Mark W. Sacraments & Discipleship: Understanding the Sacraments in a United Methodist Context. Discipleship Resources, 2001. ISBN 0-88177-285-2
  • White, James F. The Sacraments in Protestant Practice and Faith. Nashville: Abingdon Press, 1999. ISBN 0-687-03402-7

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Sacraments of the Catholic Church - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2042 words)
Though not every individual receives every sacrament, the sacraments as a whole are seen as necessary means of salvation for the faithful, conferring each sacrament's particular grace, such as incorporation into Christ and the Church, forgiveness of sins, or consecration for a particular service.
The Eucharist is the sacrament (the third of Christian initiation) by which Catholics partake of the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ and participate in his one sacrifice.
The sacrament is celebrated publicly in the presence of the priest (or another witness appointed by the Church) and other witnesses, though in the theological tradition of the Latin Church the ministers of the sacrament are the couple themselves.
Sacrament - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1274 words)
The numeration, naming, and understanding of sacraments and the adoption of the remaining sacraments vary according to denomination.
The seven sacraments accepted by Roman Catholicism are generally also accepted by Eastern Orthodoxy and Oriental Orthodoxy and by many in the Anglican Communion, as well, but the latter traditions do not limit the number of sacraments to seven, holding that anything the Church does as Church is in some sense sacramental.
The Salvation Army does not practice formal sacraments for a variety of reasons, including a belief that it is better to concentrate on the reality behind the symbols; however, it does not forbid its members from receiving sacraments in other denominations [1].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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