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Encyclopedia > Sabre
French naval officers' sabre of the 19th Century
French naval officers' sabre of the 19th Century
From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers' sabre, and a carbine.
From left to right: two bayonets, a short curved infantry or artillery briquet, a straight infantry officers' sabre, and a carbine.

The sabre or saber (see spelling differences) traces its origins to the European backsword and usually but not always has a curved, single-edged blade and a rather large hand guard, covering the knuckles of the hand as well as the thumb and forefinger. Although sabres are typically thought of as curved-bladed slashing weapons, those used by the world's heavy cavalry often had straight and even double-edged blades more suitable for thrusting. The length of sabres varied, and most were carried in a scabbard hanging from a shoulder belt known as a baldric or from a waist-mounted sword belt. Exceptions not intended for personal carry include the famed Patton saber adopted by the United States Army in 1913 and always mounted to the cavalryman's saddle. Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sabre. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1780x1252, 107 KB) Officer sabre of the French Navy, 19th Century. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1780x1252, 107 KB) Officer sabre of the French Navy, 19th Century. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1051 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1051 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... For other uses, see bayonet (disambiguation). ... A briquet may refer to: A block of flammable matter, see briquette. ... A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ... Spelling differences redirects here. ... 19th century French Navy officer sabre A backsword is a sword having a blade with only one edge. ... Hilt of Szczerbiec silver damascened rapier guard, between 1580 and 1600. ... Not to be confused with Golgotha, which was called Calvary. ... A scabbard is a sheath for holding a sword or other large blade. ... A baldric is a wide, usually ornamental belt worn around the waist and over one shoulder that is typically used to carry weapons (such as swords). ... George Smith Patton Jr. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ...


The word sabre was thought to derive from Hungarian szablya "sabre", literally "tool to cut with", from szabni "to cut".[1] However, a linguistically and historically much more realistic etymology was presented by Marek Stachowski in his study "The Origin of the European Word for Sabre" (in: Studia Etymologica Cracoviensia 9 [2004], p. 133–141).


The origins of the sabre are somewhat unclear, and it may come from designs such as the falchion or the scimitar (shamshir) used in the Middle Ages by such Central Asian cavalry as the Turks, Tatars, and Mongols. The sabre first appeared in Europe with the arrival of the Hungarians (Magyars) in the 10th Century. Originally, the sabre was used as a cavalry weapon that gradually came to replace the various straight bladed cutting sword types on the battlefield. As time went on, sabres became insignia of rank in many armies, and dress use of sabres continues to this day in some armed services around the world. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Talwar, 17th Century, from India. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Central Asia is a region of Asia. ... This article is about the people. ... The name Mongols (Mongolian: Mongol) specifies one or several ethnic groups. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The sabre saw extensive military use in the early 19th century, particularly in the Napoleonic Wars, during which Napoleon used heavy cavalry charges to great effect against his enemies. The sabre faded as a weapon by mid-century, as longer-range rifles made cavalry charges obsolete, even suicidal. In the American Civil War, the sabre was used infrequently as a weapon, but saw notable deployment in the Battle of Brandy Station and at East Cavalry Field at the Battle of Gettysburg in 1863. Many cavalrymen—particularly on the Confederate side—eventually abandoned the long, heavy weapons in favour of revolvers and carbines. Although there was extensive debate over the effectiveness of "white" weapons such as the sabre and lance, the sabre remained the standard weapon of cavalry for mounted action in most armies until World War I (1914–18). Thereafter it was gradually relegated to the status of a ceremonial weapon, and most horse cavalry was replaced by armored cavalry from 1930 on. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich João Francisco de Saldanha Oliveira e Daun Gebhard von... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Alfred Pleasonton J.E.B. Stuart Strength 11,000 9,500 Casualties 907 (69 killed, 352 wounded, 486 missing/captured)[1] 523[1] The Battle of Brandy Station was the largest predominantly cavalry engagement of the American Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Some Confederate soldiers The Confederate States Army (CSA) was organized in February 1861 to defend the newly formed Confederate States of America from military action by the United States government. ... rEVOLVEr (2004) is the fourth studio album release by Swedish thrash metal band The Haunted. ... A carbine is a firearm similar to, but generally shorter and less powerful than, a rifle or musket of a given period. ... The term lance has become a catchall for a variety of different pole weapons based on the spear. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Mechanized warfare be merged into this article or section. ...


In the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth (16–18th century) a specific type of sabre-like mêlée weapon, the szabla, was used. The Don Cossacks used shashka. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Mêlée generally refers to disorganized hand-to-hand combat involving a group of fighters. ... Szablas in Muzeum Wojska Polskiego, Warsaw. ... Don Cossacks refers to cossacks that settled along the Don River, Russia it its lower and middle parts. ... A Cossack from Orenburg, with shashka at his side. ...


During the 19th and in the early 20th century, sabres were also used by both mounted and dismounted personnel in some European police forces. When the sabre was used by mounted police against crowds, the results could be appalling, as in a key scene in Doctor Zhivago. The awkward and heavy sabre was later phased out in favour of the baton (or night stick) for both practical and humanitarian reasons. (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Doctor Zhivago (Russian: Доктор Живаго) is a 1965 film directed by David Lean and loosely based on the famous novel of the same name by Boris Pasternak. ... It has been suggested that some sections of this article be split into a new article entitled Club (law enforcement). ...


In the United States, swords with saber blades are worn by Army, Navy, and Coast Guard officers. Marine officers and non-commissioned officers also wear such swords. They are not intended for use as weapons, however, and now serve primarily in ornamental or ceremonial functions. USN redirects here. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the United States armed forces a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States military responsible for providing power projection from the sea,[1] utilizing the mobility of the U.S. Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. ... An officer is a member of a military, naval, or if applicable, other uniformed services who holds a position of responsibility. ... A non-commissioned officer (sometimes noncommissioned officer), also known as an NCO or Noncom, is an enlisted member of an armed force who has been given authority by a commissioned officer. ...


A derivative of this weapon is used under this name in the Olympic sport of fencing. Ornamental versions of the sabre are sometimes spun and tossed by color guards or majorettes in modern marching bands and drum and bugle corps. A sabre fencer. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... Clemson colorguard Color guard is a combination of military drill, also called marching, and the use of flags, sabres or rifles. ... Look up Majorettes in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An American college marching band on the field (University of Texas) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching â€“ with their musical performance. ... The Cavaliers Drum and Bugle Corps, a DCI Division I corps from Rosemont, Illinois. ...


Sabres in popular culture

  • Captain Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean wields a sabre compared to that of the other pirates who wield cutlass which are slightly shorter and more curved. It is said in the second DVD that Jack preferred to have slightly more reach over his opponents.
  • Juken Sentai Gekiranger has the character Jan Kando/GekiRed use the GekiSabers as a result of learning Fierce Beast Shark-Fist.

Captain Jack Sparrow is a fictional pirate and one of the primary characters of the Pirates of the Caribbean film trilogy: The Curse of the Black Pearl (2003), Dead Mans Chest (2006), and the as-of-yet unreleased third installment, At Worlds End (2007). ... Pirates of the Caribbean is a multi-billion dollar Walt Disney franchise encompassing a theme park ride, a series of films and spinoff novels as well as numerous video games and other publications. ... French naval cutlass of the 19th Century A cutlass is a short, thick saber or slashing sword, with a straight or slightly curved blade sharpened on the cutting edge, and a hilt often featuring a solid cupped or basket-shaped guard. ... Juken Sentai Gekiranger , translated as Beast-Fist Squadron Gekiranger1) is TOEI Company Limiteds thirty-first entry in the Super Sentai franchise. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Sabre
Look up Sabre in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... A pair of bokken A bokken (, bok(u), wood, and ken, sword), is a wooden Japanese sword used for training, usually the size and shape of a katana, but sometimes shaped like other swords. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Sabre. ... Chinese Dao Knife or Sabre Dao (Chinese: ; Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: tao1, knife) is a category of single-edge Chinese swords primarily used for slashing and chopping (sabres), often called a broadsword in English translation because some varieties have wide blades. ... For other uses, see Katana (disambiguation). ... A Mameluke Sword is a cross hilted, curved scimitar-like sword. ... The 1908 Pattern Cavalry Troopers Sword (and the 1912 Pattern, the equivalent for officers) was the last service sword issued to the cavalry of the British Army. ... // Sabrage; Sabering the Champagne bottle. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Harper, Douglas (2001). "Online Etymology Dictionary". 


  Results from FactBites:
 
Fencing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (8869 words)
The spadroon and the heavy cavalry-style sabre, both of which saw widespread competitive use in the 19th century, fell into disfavour in the early 20th century with the rising popularity of the lighter and faster weapon used today, based on the Italian duelling sabre.
In sabre, according to the FIE rules, "the parry is properly carried out when, before the completion of the attack, it prevents the arrival of that attack by closing the line in which that attack is to finish".
In foil and sabre, despite the presence of all the gadgetry, it is still the referee's job to analyse the phrase and, in the case of simultaneous hits, to determine which fencer had the right of way.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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