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In the Bible, the Sabbath is a weekly religious day of rest as ordained by one of the Ten Commandments: the third commandment by Eastern, Roman Catholic and Lutheran numbering, the fourth by other Protestants. The Hebrew word ("šhabbat", שַׁבָּת, Strong's H7676) means "the [day] of rest (or ceasing)", as it entails a ceasing or resting from labor. The institution of the Old Testament Sabbath, a "perpetual covenant ... [for] the people of Israel" (Exodus 31:16-17-NRSV), was in respect for the day during which God rested after having completed the Creation in six days: Genesis 2:2-3, Exodus 23:12, Isaiah 56:6-8. The Shabbat table is set: two covered challahs, a kiddush cup, two candles, and flowers. ... The word Sabbath can refer to: The Christian Sabbath The Jewish Shabbat The Witchs Sabbath The Neopagan Sabbat The band Black Sabbath The Doctor Who villian Sabbath This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library of Congress. ... This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Decalogue at Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Hebrew redirects here. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, oath, or bond, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bÉ™rîṯ, Standard Hebrew bÉ™rit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible. ... The Children of Israel, or Bnei Yisrael (בני ישראל) in Hebrew (also Bnai Yisrael, Bnei Yisroel or Bene Israel) is a Biblical term for the Israelites. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Creation (theology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Originally denoting Saturday, the seventh day of the week, or, more precisely, the time period from Friday sunset to Saturday nightfall, the term "sabbath" can now mean one of several things, depending on the context and the speaker:

  • Saturday as above, in reference to the Jewish day of rest, also observed by some Christian groups;
  • Sunday, as a synonym for "the Lord's Day" in commemoration of the resurrection of Christ, for Christian groups;[1][2][3][4]
  • Any day of rest, prayer, worship or ritual, as in "Friday is the Muslim Sabbath"[5][6]

The word is also infrequently used to describe the annual Holy Days observed by several Christian groups, also called High Sabbaths or High Day Sabbaths (John 19:31): the First and Last Days of the Feast of Unleavened Bread, Pentecost, the Feast of Trumpets, the Day of Atonement, the First Day of the Feast of Tabernacles, and the Eighth Day of the Feast. High Sabbaths refer to the annual festivals recorded in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Passover in the Christian tradition. ... Pentecost (symbolically related to the Jewish festival of Shavuot) is a feast on the Christian liturgical calendar that commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, and the followers (men and women) of Jesus, fifty days (seven weeks) after Easter, and ten days after Ascension Thursday. ... A shofar in the Yemenite Jewish style. ... The Christian Day of Atonement is based on the English translation of the the Jewish Holyday Yom Kippur. ... Sukkot (סוכות or סֻכּוֹת sukkōt, booths) or Succoth is an 8-day Biblical pilgrimage festival, also known as the Feast of Booths, the Feast of Tabernacles, or Tabernacles. ... Sukkot (סוכות or סֻכּוֹת sukkōt, booths) or Succoth is an 8-day Biblical pilgrimage festival, also known as the Feast of Booths, the Feast of Tabernacles, or Tabernacles. ...

Contents

Overview of the Sabbath

The special significance of the seventh day of the week, called the Sabbath, begins with God's creation of man on the earth. According to the book of Genesis, the first book of the Bible, God created man on the sixth day; and on the seventh day "he rested from all his labors", and therefore sanctified (made holy) the seventh day: Genesis 2:2-3, Exodus 20:11.


From the biblical story of Noah (Genesis 8:10), it is inferred that the knowledge of the Holy Sabbath was known from creation. Though most of the world forgot about God's laws and the Sabbath, Abraham and his son and grandson did not (Genesis 26:4-5). However, after 400 years under pagan slavery, the Israelites (Abraham's descendants) had forgotten most of their religious heritage. When God freed the Israelites from their bondage by the hand of Moses, he taught them again about his laws, beginning with the Sabbath (Exodus 16). And it is by the Sabbath that God tested the Israelites to see whether they would keep his commandments. Creation is a doctrinal position in many religions which maintains that one or a group of gods or deities is responsible for creating the universe. ... Heathen redirects here. ...


In Leviticus 23:3, God lists his Sabbath as a Feast day, or day of celebration. God's Feast days are days for rejoicing and communal unity, as well as communion with God himself (Leviticus 23:2, Isaiah 58:13, Leviticus 23:40, Deuteronomy 12, Deuteronomy 14, Deuteronomy 16). Under the Old Covenant, the Sabbath is a sign between God and his people, to indicate to them that he is the one who sanctifies them. In this regard, the Sabbath was deemed so important to God, that he commanded death for those who profaned the day, and any who did not keep it were cut off from among the people. So that, the keeping of the day constitutes a covenant, distinct from the covenant at Sinai (Exodus 31:16), as was the covenant of circumcision (Genesis 17:10-13). Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, oath, or bond, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bərîṯ, Standard Hebrew bərit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible. ... Covenant, meaning a solemn contract, oath, or bond, is the customary word used to translate the Hebrew word berith (ברית, Tiberian Hebrew bərîṯ, Standard Hebrew bərit) as it is used in the Hebrew Bible. ...


In the New Testament, Jesus declared that the Sabbath was made for man (Mark 2:27), and that therefore the son of Man is the Lord of the Sabbath (Matthew 12:8, Mark 2:28). Jesus, in his teachings, rebuked the Jews, and taught that it was right to do good on the Sabbath (Mark 3:4. Luke 6:9). After the crucifixion of Christ, the Sabbath continued to be a time of communal gathering for the Jews who were Christians, as well as learning the will of God (Acts 15:21). Christians, Jew and Gentile, continued to observe the seventh day as holy for centuries after the resurrection of Jesus. First day observance (also called the Lord's Day, on Sunday) appeared very early in the Christian Church - most Christians consider it an ordinance instituted by the Holy Spirit through the Apostles for the gathering of the church on the day of the Lord's resurrection, and the gift of the Spirit of God. First in Rome, and then later in the Orthodox (Greek) churches, the observance of the Saturday Sabbath gradually ceased, and in some respects was condemned as being divisive. Most protestants, as did the catholics before them, admit freely that this change was based upon the authority of the Holy Spirit acting in the church, and is attested in Scripture (rather than commanded) -[7][8][9][10][11] Some Christians have revived the seventh day Sabbath as a moral requirement, as under the Old Covenant, and on account of this practice some of these resist identification with Christian churches not keeping this practice, whom they consider apostate. Such seventh day sects have existed at various times throughout the Christian era. The phrase son of man is a primarily Semitic idiom that originated in Ancient Mesopotamia, used to denote humanity or self. ... Jewish Christians (sometimes called also Hebrew Christians or Christian Jews, but see below for differences) is a term which can have two meanings, a historical one and a contemporary one. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Sunday is the first day of the week – between Saturday and Monday, and the second day of the weekend in some cultures. ... Apostasy (from Greek αποστασία, meaning a defection or revolt , from απο, apo, away, apart, στασις, stasis, standing) is a term generally employed to describe the formal renunciation of ones religion, especially if the motive is deemed unworthy. ...


The keeping of a seven day week, by Christians, hearkens back to a remembrance of creation and its completion on the seventh day, when God rested from the work of creation. The sabbath-like practice, of coming away from other occupations, for worship, to hear the word of God and to keep the Lord's table, and to do works of mercy on the first day of the week, hearkens back to a remembrance of Redemption and its completion on the first day of the week with the Resurrection of Jesus Christ and the gift of the Holy Spirit on Pentecost. However, a minority of Christians continue to identify the seventh day with the covenant of redemption, as under the Old Covenant, and keep a seventh day sabbath according the commands that were given to the Jews after they had been brought out of Egypt. For other uses of the word, see Redemption Redemption is a religious concept referring to forgiveness or absolution for past sins and protection from eternal damnation. ... The resurrection of Jesus is an event in the New Testament in which God raised him from the dead[1] after his death by crucifixion. ...


Early observance of the Sabbath

See also: Christian Torah-submission#History of Christian Torah-submission

It is known that some (perhaps many) early Gentile Christians openly observed the Biblical Sabbath; some of these early Christians kept the seventh-day Sabbath in conjunction with a first-day Sunday worship. The Council of Laodicea [1] around AD 365 attempted to put a stop to the practice. Some conjecture, then, that prior to the Laodicean council Saturday was observed as a Sabbath and Sunday as a day of worship, primarily in Palestine; but after the Laodicean Council, resting on the Sabbath was forbidden. In Early Christianity, the first Christians were Jews and Jewish Proselytes, who on the weight of Biblical evidence (such as Acts 3:1; 5:27-42; 21:18-26; 24:5; 24:14; 28:22), are usually assumed to have kept the Jewish customs, including the observation of the Sabbath from Friday's sunset to Saturday's sunset. These Christians are sometimes referred to as Jewish Christians. This practice may have continued at least until Herod's Temple in Jerusalem was destroyed in AD 70 or the city was renamed Aelia Capitolina in AD 135. According to Eusebius' History of the Church Book IV, chapter V, verses 3-4 the first 15 Bishops of Jerusalem were "of the circumcision". There is evidence that even Gentile Christians also observed the Biblical Sabbath, many centuries into the Christian Era, and even up to the present time. At the same time, a widespread Christian tradition, from early on, was to also meet for worship on the first day of the week, Sunday. Christian Torah-submission” or “Christian Torah-observance” refers to the pursuit of a lifestyle that is both fully dedicated to Jesus Christ and also obedient to God’s commands found in the Torah (which includes the Law of God given to Moses on Mount Sinai). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Council of Laodicea was a regional synod of approximately 30 clerics from Anatolia, (now modern Turkey). ... Fourth-century inscription, representing Christ as the Good Shepherd. ... Proselyte, from the Greek proselytos, is used in the Septuagint for stranger (1 Chronicles 22:2), i. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... Christian Torah-submission” or “Christian Torah-observance” refers to the pursuit of a lifestyle that is both fully dedicated to Jesus Christ and also obedient to God’s commands found in the Torah (which includes the Law of God given to Moses on Mount Sinai). ... Jewish Christians (sometimes called also Hebrew Christians or Christian Jews, but see below for differences) is a term which can have two meanings, a historical one and a contemporary one. ... Herods Temple in Jerusalem was a massive expansion of the Second Temple along with renovations of the entire Temple Mount. ... Hebrew יְרוּשָׁלַיִם (Yerushalayim) (Standard) Yerushalayim or Yerushalaim Arabic commonly القـُدْس (Al-Quds); officially in Israel أورشليم القدس (Urshalim-Al-Quds) Name Meaning Hebrew: (see below), Arabic: The Holiness Government City District Jerusalem Population 724,000 (2006) Jurisdiction 123,000 dunams (123 km²) Mayor Uri Lupolianski Web Address www. ... Aelia Capitolina was a city built by the emperor Hadrian in the year 131, and occupied by a Roman colony, on the site of Syrian dominions. ... Eusebius is the name of several significant historical people: Pope Eusebius - Pope in AD 309 - 310. ... The Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem is the head bishop of the Orthodox Church of Jerusalem, ranking fourth of nine patriarchs in the Eastern Orthodox Church. ... Circumcision, when practiced as a rite, has its foundations in the Bible, in the Abrahamic covenant, such as Genesis 17, and is therefore practiced by Jews and Muslims and some Christians, those who constitute the Abrahamic religions. ... Anno Domini (Latin: In the year of the Lord), or more completely Anno Domini Nostri Jesu Christi (in the year of our Lord Jesus Christ), commonly abbreviated AD or A.D., is the designation used to number years in the dominant Christian Era in the world today. ...


The Apostolic Constitutions, generally dated in the 4th century and found in the Ante-Nicene Fathers collection state: A 4th century collection, in 8 books, of independent, though closely related, treatises on Christian discipline, worship, and doctrine, intended to serve as a manual of guidance for the clergy, and to some extent for the laity. ... The Ante-Nicene Fathers, subtitled , is a selected set of books containing English translations of the major early Christian writings. ...

2.36 [2] the Sabbath should be observed by resting and studying the Law
6.19 [3] the Law has not been dissolved as Simon (probably Simon Magus) claims citing the introduction to the Expounding of the Law in the Gospel of Matthew
7.23 [4] keep the Sabbath and the Lord's Day festival.

This is often considered an attempt of the early Christian church to distance itself from Judaism which had become unpopular in the Roman Empire after the Jewish-Roman wars (see also Constantine I and Christianity#Constantine and the Jews and John Chrysostom#Homilies Against the Jews). The 59 decrees of the Council of Laodicea are part of the Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers collection: #16 [5] states the Bible is to be read on the Sabbath, #29 [6] states Christians must not judaize by resting on the Sabbath but must work that day and then if possible rest on the Lord's Day and any found to be judaizers are anathema from Christ; #'s 49 [7] and 51 [8] state that the Sabbath and Lord's Day are to be excepted from Lenten restrictions. Tora redirects here. ... Simon Magus, also known as Simon the Sorcerer and Simon of Gitta, is the name used by the ancient Christian Orthodoxy to refer to someone they identified as a Samaritan (Proto-)Gnostic, and, also according to ancient Christian Orthodoxy, founder of his own religious sect. ... The Expounding of the Law (KJV:Matthew 5:17-48), sometimes called the Antithesis of the Law, is a less well known but highly structured (Ye have heard . ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον) is one of the four Gospel accounts of the New Testament. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Jewish-Roman War can refer to several revolts by the Jews of Judea against the Roman Empire: The First Jewish-Roman War (66–73 CE), sometimes called the First Jewish Revolt. ... This article covers the events of, reaction to, and historical legacy of Roman Emperor Constantine Is promotion, legitimization, and conversion to Christianity. ... John Chrysostom (349 - 407, Greek Ιωάννης ο Χρυσόστομος ) was a Christian bishop from the 4th and 5th centuries in Syria and Constantinople. ... The Nicene and Post-Nicene Fathers is a set of books containing translations of early Christian writings into English. ... Judaize, from the Greek Ioudaizo (ιουδαιζω), means literally to live as a Jew, however it was used primarily in a derogatory sense for Christians who chose to live more in accord with the Jesus described in the Bible, often this meant observing the... Anathema (in Greek Ανάθεμα) meaning originally something lifted up as an offering to the gods; later, with evolving meanings, it came to mean: to be formally set apart, banished, exiled, excommunicated or denounced, sometimes accursed. ... In Western Christianity, Lent is the period preceding the Christian holy day of Easter. ...


In the 5th century, Socrates Scholasticus Church History book 5[9] states: Socrates Scholasticus was a Greek Christian church historian; born at Constantinople c. ...

"Nor is there less variation in regard to religious assemblies. For although almost all churches throughout the world celebrate the sacred mysteries on the sabbath of every week, yet the Christians of Alexandria and at Rome, on account of some ancient tradition, have ceased to do this."

Also in the 5th, Sozomen Church History book 7[10] states: Salminius Hermias Sozomen (c. ...

"Assemblies are not held in all churches on the same time or manner. The people of Constantinople, and almost everywhere, assemble together on the Sabbath, as well as on the first day of the week, which custom is never observed at Rome or at Alexandria."

Map of Constantinople. ...

New Testament arguments for Christian Sabbatarianism

Some Christians continue to keep the seventh day as the Sabbath day of rest. Some of the New Testament reasons for this are as follows. From Mark 2:28 and Matthew 12:8, the statement made by Jesus, "the Son of Man is lord even of the Sabbath," indicates for some, that Sabbath keeping is central to following Christ. In other words, since He kept the seventh day Sabbath, this is the true Lord's day according to seventh day Christians. Further, in reference to the future destruction of Jerusalem, Christ states in Matthew 24:20, "And pray that your flight may not be in winter or on the Sabbath." Sabbatarians maintain that this indicates Christ expected the Sabbath to be kept subsequent His death. Also, on the weight of Hebrews 4:8-11, the Sabbath remains a Christian Holy Day, and Sabbath-keeping is an abiding duty as prescribed in the fourth commandment. The gospel of Luke states in Luke 23:56 that when the body of Christ was being prepared by His followers, they rested on the Sabbath before finishing their work.


Also, when one considers the passage in the Bible of John 19:42 it becomes clear that the day Jesus' body was hurriedly placed in the tomb was a special Sabbath (i.e. High Sabbath Day of the "Feast of Unleavened Bread" aka "1st day of UB") which this 7 day Festival commenced with a Sabbath which could be any week day depending on the calendar see Leviticus 23:6-8, it ended with a second High Sabbath Day of the "Feast of Unleavened Bread" aka "last day of UB" declared to be kept as Holy assemblies (1st day of UB and last Day of UB) by God in perpetuity for all who would be called HIS people, a possible conclusion can be made that this is a "connection" to the Creator also see Exodus 31


Another consideration can be given to Biblical Typology. This is taking into consideration stories told in the Bible that have happened, and how the same story might show relevance at a later time such as 1st) CREATION WEEK of 7 days 2nd) the time span of humanly recorded History as reckoned by some people. James Ussher placed creation of man (not earth's creation as it was already in eixstence when man was created)) at 4004 B.C. and it has been 2000 + years into "Anno Domini" "In the Year of the Lord" see Psalm 90:4, II Peter 3:8. This example shows a connection between creation week and the span of time humanity has existed since creation week.


While a clear mandate is given for the Sabbath in Exodus 20:8-11 and Deuteronomy 5:12-15, the closest passage to a command for Sabbath-keeping in the New Testament is found in Hebrews 4:9, which describes the Sabbath not as a day, but instead as a state of being, the context and grammar of the passage indicate otherwise. In that passage is found the word "sabbatismos". The Authorized Version (King James Version of 1611) and New King James Version and several others render that word as "rest". The American Standard Version of 1901, New American Standard Bible 1995 Updated Edition and several other translations somewhat more correctly render that word as "Sabbath rest". A few, such as the Darby translation, transliterate the word as "Sabbatism". However, its literal translation is "Sabbath observance", and The Scriptures, translated by The Institute For Scripture Research, render it as such, while The Bible in Basic English gives the equally literal "Sabbath keeping". In regard to taking Sabbatismos literally, Professor Andrew T. Lincoln, on page 213 in his symposium From Sabbath To The Lord's Day, states "The use of sabbatismos elsewhere in extant Greek literature gives an indication of its more exact shade of meaning. It is used in Plutarch, De Superstitione 3 (Moralia166A) of Sabbath observance. There are also four occurrences in post canonical literature that are independent of Hebrews 4:9. They are Justin, Dialogue with Trypho 23:3; Epiphanius, Adversus Haereses 30:2:2; Martyrium Petri et Pauli 1; Apostolic Constitutions 2:36:2. In each of these places the term denotes the observance or celebration of the Sabbath. This usage corresponds to the Septuagint usage of the cognate verb sabbatizo (cf. Ex. 16:30; Lev. 23:32; 26:34; 2 Chron. 36:21). Thus the writer to the Hebrews is saying that since the time of Joshua an observance of the Sabbath rest has been outstanding." The literal translation then of Hebrews 4:9 is "Therefore a Sabbath observance has been left behind for the people of God." Further, the internal evidence of the preceding verses would indicate that the Sabbath observance mentioned in this verse is indeed the seventh day Sabbath and not the Lord's Day Sabbath. In verse 8, the Hebrew writer states, "For if Joshua had given them rest, he would not have afterward spoken of another day." On first glance in our English translations, that word "another" would give the appearance of a different day. However, in the Greek, there are two words that mean "another". "Heteros" means "another of a different kind", while "allos" means "another of the same kind". The word used in Hebrews 4:8 is "allos", indicating a Sabbath day of the same kind as referred to in Hebrews 4:8-5, that is, the seventh-day Sabbath. In verse 7, the Hebrews writer uses the term "certain day". The Greek word for "certain" is "tis". It is clearly referrencing a specific day, and not the general thought of an eternal rest. The force of Hebrews 3:11-4:11 then seems to be saying that because Christians look toward the eternal rest of heaven, the type or shadow of the earthly Sabbath rest still remains, or is "left behind", literally, for Christians to observe. This is significant, in light of the greater context of the book of Hebrews, which deals with the entire Aaronic priesthood and its methods of worship as found in the Old Covenant being supplanted by the Melchizedek priesthood of Jesus Christ. As the Hebrews writer states in Hebrews 12:27, "And this word, Yet once more, signifies the removing of those things that are shaken, as of things which have been made, that those things which are not shaken may remain."


While it is true that several times the apostles also met on the first day of the week, there is disagreement as to whether they were continuing into the first day (Saturday evening) after having already been gathered for the Sabbath. That would have been the beginning of the first day (Saturday evening, or any day of the week after a High Sabbath) when some activities would have begun that had not been allowed on the Sabbaths (such as preparing a meal, collecting money, and planning for travel). In addition, in the book of Acts, also believed to be written by Luke, meeting on the Sabbath is referred to eight times. Generally the religious festivals, new moons, and accompanying high sabbaths of Leviticus 23, Numbers 28-29, Isaiah 1:13-14, Hosea 2:11, Ezekiel 45:17 and Colossians 2:16-17 were continued to be observed, as can be seen in such passages as Acts 18:21, 1 Corinthians 5:8, 2 Peter 2:13, Jude 1:12, and Acts 27:9. Some Sabbatarians believe these High Sabbaths to have been fulfilled by the coming of Christ, and their misused practice condemned by Isaiah and Hosea. However, there are some who show that these Holy Days are still referenced in the New Testament as observed holy days, and are relevant to Christians. High Sabbaths refer to the annual festivals recorded in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy. ... Etymology: Latin sabbatarius, from sabbatum sabbath Function: noun 1 : one who observes the Sabbath on Saturday in conformity with the letter of the fourth commandment 2 : an adherent of Sabbatarianism Function: adjective 1 : of or relating to the Sabbath 2 : of or relating to the Sabbatarians or Sabbatarianism External links...


For example, John in Revelation said he was in the spirit on the Lord's day Revelation 1:10. Scripture reveals that the Lord's day is the seventh day Sabbath in Isaiah 58:13-14.


Primary Sabbath (Friday sunset to Saturday sunset) Sabbatarianism

For many sabbatarians, keeping the Seventh-day is about worshipping God as Creator. It is the ultimate positive worship of God given in His commandments, and is in recognition of His authority. Just as tithes and offerings are an honor to give to the cause of worship, so also it is an honor to give time to God to meet with Him on the appointed day. It is a reminder that since God created in six days, by the same power He can also resurrect from the dead. It is a reminder that after resurrection, when the earth is recreated, we will worship in His immediate presence on the Sabbath, Isaiah 66:22-23. It is the time to rest, indicating we should be productive all other days. For without work, what is the point of rest? As with the symbol of baptism, there is new life in work and action on the first day after rest and dying to self. And naturally, it is an expression of love to God, John 14:15, 14:21. Etymology: Latin sabbatarius, from sabbatum sabbath Function: noun 1 : one who observes the Sabbath on Saturday in conformity with the letter of the fourth commandment 2 : an adherent of Sabbatarianism Function: adjective 1 : of or relating to the Sabbath 2 : of or relating to the Sabbatarians or Sabbatarianism External links...


Seventh Day Adventists contend that the Seventh-day Sabbath will be a test, leading to the sealing of God's people during the end times, though there is little consensus about how this will play out. This is taken from Ellen G. White's interpretation of Daniel 7:25 and Revelation 13:15,Rev 7; Ezekiel 20: 12, 20; Exodus 31: 13. Where the subject of persecution in prophecy is thought to be about the Sabbath commandment.


The Socinian churches of Eastern Europe and the Netherlands were emphatically anti-sabbatarian. However, a small number of them adopted Saturday as the day of worship. This small Seventh-day sect finally abandoned Christianity for orthodox Judaism. Seventh-day sabbatarianism did not become prevalent to any degree among Protestants, until it was revived in England by several groups of English Baptists, and through them the doctrine spread to a few churches in other denominations. Unitarian and seventh day leaders and churches were persecuted as heretics by the Trinitarian and Sunday-observing establishment, in England. Socinianism summarises the beliefs of the Socinians, followers of Laelius Socinus (died 1562 in Zürich) and of his nephew Faustus Socinus (died 1604 in Poland). ... Baptist is a term describing a tradition within Christianity and may also refer to individuals belonging to a Baptist church or a Baptist denomination. ... The use of the term heresy in the context of Christianity is less common today, with some notable exceptions: see for example Rudolf Bultmann and the character of debates over ordination of women and gay priests. ...


The Seventh Day Baptists arrived at the height of their direct influence on other sects, in the middle of the 19th century, in the United States, when their doctrines were instrumental in founding the Seventh-day Adventist Church and the Seventh-day Church of God. The Worldwide Church of God, which (after 1934) descended from a schism in the Seventh-day Church of God, was founded as a seventh-day Sabbath-keeping church, but in 1995 renounced sabbatarianism and moved toward the Evangelical "mainstream." Its move from sabbatarianism, and other doctrines, caused more schism, with large groups splitting off to continue to observe the Sabbath as new church organizations. See the list of Sabbath keeping Church of God. Seventh Day Baptists are Christian Baptists who observe the Sabbath on Saturday, the seventh day of the week. ... Seventh-day Adventist Churchs logo The Seventh-day Adventist Church is a Christian denomination distinguished by their doctrinal beliefs that the literal, visible second coming of Jesus Christ is imminent, and that the seventh-day Sabbath of the Ten Commandments (Saturday) is the authentic biblical day of rest and... The Worldwide Church of God was founded in 1933 by Herbert W. Armstrong as the Radio Church of God. ... Church of God is a name used by numerous, mostly unrelated bodies. ...


Protestant Sabbatarianism

A new rigorism was brought into the observance of the Christian Lord's Day with the Protestant reformation, especially among the Puritans of England and Scotland, in reaction to the laxity with which Sunday observance was customarily kept. Sabbath ordinances were appealed to, with the idea that only the word of God can bind men's consciences in whether or how they will take a break from work, or to impose an obligation to meet at a particular time. Their influential reasoning spread to other denominations also, and it is primarily through their influence that "Sabbath" has become the colloquial equivalent of "Lord's Day" or "Sunday". The most mature expression of this influence survives in the Westminster Confession of Faith, Chapter 21, "Of Religious Worship, and the Sabbath Day". Section 7-8 reads: A Puritan of 16th and 17th century England was any person seeking purity of worship and doctrine, especially the parties that rejected the Laudian reform of the Church of England. ... The Westminster Confession of Faith is a Reformed confession of faith, in the Calvinist theological tradition. ...

7. As it is the law of nature, that, in general, a due proportion of time be set apart for the worship of God; so, in his Word, by a positive, moral, and perpetual commandment binding all men in all ages, he hath particularly appointed one day in seven, for a Sabbath, to be kept holy unto him: which, from the beginning of the world to the resurrection of Christ, was the last day of the week; and, from the resurrection of Christ, was changed into the first day of the week, which, in Scripture, is called the Lord’s day, and is to be continued to the end of the world, as the Christian Sabbath.
8. This Sabbath is then kept holy unto the Lord, when men, after a due preparing of their hearts, and ordering of their common affairs beforehand, do not only observe a holy rest, all the day, from their own works, words, and thoughts about their worldly employments and recreations, but also are taken up, the whole time, in the public and private exercises of his worship, and in the duties of necessity and mercy.

New Testament arguments against Christian Sabbatarianism

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Some Christian theologians use Colossians 2:14-17 to show that Sabbath observance for Christians has been abolished — "Blotting out the handwriting of ordinances that was against us, which was contrary to us, and took it out of the way, nailing it to his cross; And having spoiled principalities and powers, he made a show of them openly, triumphing over them in it. Let no man therefore judge you in meat, or in drink, or in respect of an holyday, or of the new moon, or of the sabbath days: Which are a shadow of things to come; but the body is of Christ." This is often cited as a direct parallel to Numbers 28-29, where the Sabbath is described alongside burnt offerings and new moons; all things which are claimed to have been made obsolete with the coming of Christ. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...


In conjunction with this, a second Pauline epistle is often quoted, namely Romans 14:5-6, which states "One man esteemeth one day above another: another esteemeth every day [alike]. Let every man be fully persuaded in his own mind. He that regardeth the day, regardeth [it] unto the Lord; and he that regardeth not the day, to the Lord he doth not regard [it]." In other words, the non-Sabbatarian argument is founded upon the concept that anything which does not proceed from faith is sin (Romans 14:23). Ritual observance of a weekly Sabbath is thus not required. Nevertheless, if one believes they are sinning when they break the Sabbath, they are condemned; however if their conscience does not condemn them, they have done no wrong. To further support this idea, 2 Corinthians 3:2-3 is often used, "Ye are our epistle written in our hearts, known and read of all men: Forasmuch as ye are manifestly declared to be the epistle of Christ ministered by us, written not with ink, but with the Spirit of the living God; not in tables of stone, but in fleshy tables of the heart." Hence, the idea is that Christians no longer follow a law written "in tables of stone" (that is, the Ten Commandments), but follow a law written upon "fleshy tables of the heart." This 1768 parchment (612x502 mm) by Jekuthiel Sofer emulated the 1675 Decalogue at Amsterdam Esnoga synagogue. ...


Finally, the cumulative argument often continues with 2 Corinthians 3:7, 3:11, "But if the ministration of death, written and engraven in stones, was glorious,...which glory was to be done away... For if that which is done away was glorious, much more that which remaineth is glorious." Non-sabbatarians claim this is a direct reference to the 10 Commandments, namely that New Covenant Christians are no longer under the law (antinomianism), and thus Sabbath-keeping is no longer required. The New Covenant "law" is based entirely upon love, and love is considered the fulfillment of the law (Romans 13:10). Finally, Galatians 4:9-11 is used as justification that a Sabbath is no longer in effect under the New Covenant: "But now, after that ye have known God, or rather are known of God, how turn ye again to the weak and beggarly elements, whereunto ye desire again to be in bondage? Ye observe days, and months, and times, and years. I am afraid of you, lest I have bestowed upon you labour in vain." Essentially, non-Sabbatarians suggest Paul's claim here is that ritual observance of days, including the weekly Sabbath, is no longer prescribed under the New Covenant. Sabbatarians often point to the fact that Paul may have been referring to the Jewish festivals rather than the weekly Sabbath, or that perhaps Paul was targeting Gnostic heresy which had infiltrated the church. Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... Antinomianism (from the Greek αντι, against + νομος, law), or lawlessness (in the Greek Bible: ανομια), in theology, is the idea that members of a particular religious group are under no obligation to obey the laws of ethics or morality as presented by religious authorities. ...


In addition to the Pauline teachings which appear to rescind observing the Sabbath, Jesus himself is recorded as not resting on the Sabbath as the Mosaic Law commands. Some examples of this include Luke 13:10-17, John 5:16-18, and John 9:13-16. As Jesus proclaimed Himself to be "Lord of the Sabbath" who has "fulfilled the Law", this has been interpreted by most Christians to mean that those who follow Him are no longer bound by the Sabbath. Torah, (תורה) is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or especially law. It primarily refers to the first section of the Tanakh–the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, or the Five Books of Moses, but can also be used in the general sense to also include both the Written...


A practical distinction sometimes arises between The Lord's Day and The Sabbath. Saturday observance has become common, for example in the United States, among Jews and other seventh-day sabbatarians, whose conscientious keeping of Saturday is considered mandated by the Law of God. This is often distinguished from Sunday observance, "first day sabbatarianism", or "eighth day sabbatarianism", according to which Sunday is kept because it is the "day of light", the first day of the new creation, and the traditional day on which many Christians have met. Alternatively, many Christians suggest that on the weight of Biblical evidence such as the aforementioned, Sabbath-keeping is not a prescribed duty for Christians under the New Covenant and thus worshipping on Sunday is acceptable.


To be non-sabbatarian doesn't necessarily equate to making all days alike. A member of a non-sabbatarian church may nevertheless be very conscientious about avoiding certain kinds of activities, and doing others, because it is the day for the church to gather, a day for prayer and for works of mercy.


Basis of First Day Observance

There are two instances in the New Testament where the first Christians are said to have come together on the first day of the week to break bread, to listen to Christian preaching (Acts 20:7) and to gather collections (1 Corinthians 16:2) for the financial assistance of others. Some suggest that if they had already been gathered for the Sabbath, gathering collections and preparing a meal would have been proper to begin at sunset, and would have begun at sunset Saturday evening, when the first day actually began.


It was also on the first day, according to the Bible, that Jesus was raised from the dead (Matthew 28:1, Mark 16:2, Luke 24:1, John 20:1). The disciples of Jesus testified that on that same evening, called "the first day of the week", the resurrected Christ came to them while they were gathered in fear (John 20:19). Eight days later, on the first day of the week, Jesus is said to have appeared to them a second time (John 20:26). The writer called Luke, in the Acts of the Apostles, writes that "After his suffering, he showed himself to these men and gave many convincing proofs that he was alive. He appeared to them over a period of forty days and spoke about the kingdom of God." At the end of forty days, the Bible states that Jesus ascended into heaven while the disciples watched (Acts 1:9) and ten days later, at the onset of the feast of Pentecost (See: Shavuot) the Bible says that the Spirit of God was given to the disciples of Christ, establishing the Christian Church, on the first day of the week. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Acts of the Apostles (Greek Praxeis Apostolon) is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... Pentecost (symbolically related to the Jewish festival of Shavuot) is a feast on the Christian liturgical calendar that commemorates the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles, and the followers (men and women) of Jesus, fifty days (seven weeks) after Easter, and ten days after Ascension Thursday. ... Shavuot, also spelled Shavuos (Hebrew: שבועות (Israeli Heb. ... In various religions, most notably Trinitarian Christianity, the Holy Spirit (in Hebrew רוח הקודש Ruah haqodesh; also called the Holy Ghost) is the third consubstantial Person of the Holy Trinity. ...


These events are cited by some Christian teachers and historians, believed to have written very early, as the reason that Christians gathered on the Lord's Day, the first day of the week, including Barnabas (AD 100), Ignatius of Antioch (107), Justin Martyr (145), Bardaisan (154), Irenaeus (178), Tertullian (180), Cyprian (200), Saint Victorinus (280), and Eusebius of Caesarea (324) [Note: dates are traditional and approximate]. These early Christians believed that the resurrection and ascension of Christ signals the renewal of creation, making the day on which God accomplished it a day analogous to the first day of creation when God made the light. It is a day of fulfillment of the Jewish Shabbat which preceded it, an "eighth day" on which sin was overcome and death was conquered. Therefore the first day has become like the seventh day when God's creating work attained to its goal, a day on which man attained to the goal of rest in God. Reasoning this way, some wrote of the first day as a greater day than the Sabbath, an "eighth day" on which, through Christ, mankind was redeemed out of futility and brought into the Sabbath-rest of God. However, these writers do not call the day a Sabbath. Barnabas was an early Christian mentioned in the New Testament. ... Icon of Ignatius being eaten by lions St. ... Justin Martyr (Justin the Martyr, also known as Justin of Caesarea) (100 – 165) was an early Christian apologist. ... An engraving of Irenaeus ( 130–202), bishop of Lugdunum in Gaul (now Lyon, France). ... Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicized as Tertullian, (ca. ... This page is about Cyprian, bishop of Carthage. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ... Look up Resurrection in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the Ascension of Jesus Christ. ...


The Didache (70-75) uses the term κυριακήν (kyriaken), which literally means "the Lord's," with the word hemera ("day") being ellided. In extrabiblical Christian literature, κυριακήν always refers to Sunday[12] except for two early instances where textual readings have given rise to questions of proper translation. The use of κυριακήν in the Didache is one of those instances. The Greek expression normally translated as "On the Lord's day" in the Didache is Κατα κυριακήν δε κυριου (Holmes M. The Apostolic Fathers - Greek Texts and English Translations), which literally would be rendered in English as "On the Lord's [day] of the Lord". Consequently, Didache 14 has often been translated as "On the Lord's own day, gather yourselves together and break bread and give thanks," apparently a reference to the weekly Sunday Eucharist (cf. Acts 2:42; 20:7). The Didache (, Koine Greek for Teaching[1]) is the common name of a brief early Christian treatise ( 70–160), containing instructions for Christian communities. ...


The Epistle of Barnabas (120-150) uses Isaiah 1:13 to suggest that the "eighth day" marks the resurrection, and as such denotes the completion of God's work of saving mankind from sin. Although there is dispute over whether this is a correct interpretation of Isaiah, it is one of many indications that Sunday observance was the usual practice in Christianity at that time. Ignatius of Antioch in Letter to the Magnesians 9.1 is the first Christian writer many claim suggests replacing the Sabbath with the Lord's Day. This claim has been disputed by several scholars (S. Bacchiocchi. From Sabbath to Sunday; Lewis A.H. A Critical History of the Sabbath and Sunday in the Christian Church) due to the existence of textual variants. The Epistle of Barnabas is a Greek treatise with some features of an epistle containing twenty-one chapters, preserved complete in the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus where it appears at the end of the New Testament. ... Icon of Ignatius being eaten by lions St. ... Please wikify (format) this article as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


In 321, while yet an unbaptized catechumen, the Roman Emperor Constantine the Great issued an edict, part of which dealt with the issue of a day of rest: Constantine. ...

On the venerable day of the Sun let the magistrates and people residing in cities rest, and let all workshops be closed. In the country however persons engaged in agriculture may freely and lawfully continue their pursuits because it often happens that another day is not suitable for gain-sowing or vine planting; lest by neglecting the proper moment for such operations the bounty of heaven should be lost.

Although this does not indicate a "change" of the Sabbath, it does favor a different day for rest, in the cities at least, over the Jewish Sabbath day. The dominant religions in the regions of the world where Christianity was developing were pagan, and in Rome, Mithraism, specifically the cult of Sol Invictus, had taken hold. Mithraism met on Sunday. Some theorize that, because the practice favored the Christian day by coincidence, it also helped the church to avoid implicit association with the Jews. Jews were being persecuted routinely at this time, because of the Jewish-Roman Wars, and for this reason Constantine's edict, and Christian reception of it, is sometimes labelled anti-semitic. On a closely related issue, the Quartodeciman, Eusebius in Life of Constantine, Book III chapter 18[11], claims Constantine stated: "Let us then have nothing in common with the detestable Jewish crowd; for we have received from our Saviour a different way." Coin of Emperor Probus, circa 280, with Sol Invictus riding a quadriga, with legend SOLI INVICTO, to the undefeated Sun. Note how the Emperor (on the left) wears a radiated solar crown, worn also by the god (to the right). ... Jewish-Roman War can refer to several revolts by the Jews of Judea against the Roman Empire: The First Jewish-Roman War (66–73 CE), sometimes called the First Jewish Revolt. ... The Eternal Jew: 1937 German poster. ... Quartodecimanism (fourteenism) was the practice of fixing the date of Easter (in the Bible called Pesach) to the 14th day of Nisan in the Bibles Hebrew Calendar which, according to the Gospels, was the time Jesus was crucified in Jerusalem. ...


The Roman Catholic Church draws a distinction between Sabbath observance and Sunday worship, celebrating the occurrence of Jesus' resurrection on the eighth day (that is, Sunday: see 2174ff,[13]). From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:


2174 Jesus rose from the dead "on the first day of the week."[104] Because it is the "first day," the day of Christ's Resurrection recalls the first creation. Because it is the "eighth day" following the sabbath,[105] it symbolizes the new creation ushered in by Christ's Resurrection. For Christians it has become the first of all days, the first of all feasts, the Lord's Day (he kuriake hemera, dies dominica) Sunday: We all gather on the day of the sun, for it is the first day [after the Jewish sabbath, but also the first day] when God, separating matter from darkness, made the world; and on this same day Jesus Christ our Savior rose from the dead.[106] Sunday- fulfillment of the sabbath


2175 Sunday is expressly distinguished from the sabbath which it follows chronologically every week; for Christians its ceremonial observance replaces that of the sabbath. In Christ's Passover, Sunday fulfills the spiritual truth of the Jewish sabbath and announces man's eternal rest in God. For worship under the Law prepared for the mystery of Christ, and what was done there prefigured some aspects of Christ:[107] Those who lived according to the old order of things have come to a new hope, no longer keeping the sabbath, but the Lord's Day, in which our life is blessed by him and by his death.[108] 2176 The celebration of Sunday observes the moral commandment inscribed by nature in the human heart to render to God an outward, visible, public, and regular worship "as a sign of his universal beneficence to all."[109] Sunday worship fulfills the moral command of the Old Covenant, taking up its rhythm and spirit in the weekly celebration of the Creator and Redeemer of his people.


2177 The Sunday celebration of the Lord's Day and his Eucharist is at the heart of the Church's life. "Sunday is the day on which the paschal mystery is celebrated in light of the apostolic tradition and is to be observed as the foremost holy day of obligation in the universal Church."[110]


2178 This practice of the Christian assembly dates from the beginnings of the apostolic age.[112] The Letter to the Hebrews reminds the faithful "not to neglect to meet together, as is the habit of some, but to encourage one another."[113] Tradition preserves the memory of an ever-timely exhortation: Come to Church early, approach the Lord, and confess your sins, repent in prayer.... Be present at the sacred and divine liturgy, conclude its prayer and do not leave before the dismissal.... We have often said: "This day is given to you for prayer and rest. This is the day that the Lord has made, let us rejoice and be glad in it."114 Events First year of Yuanchu era of the Chinese Eastern Han Dynasty. ...


"The Church, on the other hand, after changing the day of rest from the Jewish Sabbath, or seventh day of the week, to the first, made the Third Commandment refer to Sunday as the day to be kept holy as the Lord's Day." The Catholic Encyclopedia Topic: Ten Commandments, 2nd paragraph The Catholic Encyclopedia is an English-language encyclopedia published in 1913 by the Roman Catholic Church, designed to give authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine. Starting in 1993, the encyclopedia (now in the public domain) was placed on the Internet through a world-wide...


Sunday vs Saturday

Eastern Orthodox Churches distinguish between "the sabbath" (Saturday) and "the Lord's Day" (Sunday), and both continue to play a special role for the believers, such as the church allowing some leniency during fasts on both of them, and having special Bible readings different from those allotted to weekdays; though the Lord's day with the weekly Liturgy is clearly given more emphasis. Catholics also distinguish between the Sabbath and the Lord's Day (Sunday), which they see as a fulfillment and replacement of the Sabbath. (The Catechism of the Holy Catholic Church on the Sabbath: http://www.scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s2c1a3.htm). Many Protestants have historically regarded Lord's Day, Sabbath, and Sunday as synonymous terms for the Christian day of worship (except in those languages in which the name of the seventh day is literally equivalent to "Sabbath" — such as Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Russian, Modern Greek, Amharic, Arabic, and of course Hebrew). For most Christians the Lord's Day is distinct from the Sabbath, and some Protestants consider it non-binding for Christians. Relatively few Christians regard the first day observance as entailing all of the ordinances of Jewish Shabbat. A minority of Protestants keep Saturday, the seventh day, as the Lord's Day and the Christian Sabbath. The Ethiopian Orthodox observe a Saturday Sabbath. The Eastern Orthodox Church is a Christian body that views itself: as the historical continuation of the original Christian community established by Jesus and the Twelve Apostles. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Amharic (አማርኛ) is a Semitic language spoken in Northern Central Ethiopia, where it is the official language. ... The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Church until it was granted its own Patriarch by Cyril VI, the Coptic Pope, in 1959. ...


Acts 20:7 says that, "On the first day of the week we came together to break bread", where Paul preached until midnight. One must remember, however, that according to Jewish tradition (and as described in Leviticus 23:32), a day begins when the sun goes down and this meeting apparently gathered in the evening. So, those who have believed that the Christians kept the Sabbath on the seventh day argue that this meeting (Acts 20:7) would have begun on Saturday night. Paul would have been preaching on Saturday night until midnight and then walked eighteen miles from Traos to Assos on Sunday. He would not have done so, if he had regarded Sunday as the Sabbath, much less boarded a boat and continued to travel to Mitylene and finally on to Chios. Sabbatarians often claim that Biblical evidence suggests that Paul was a lifelong Sabbath keeper for the sake of the Jews, and if Sunday was now the Sabbath, then this journey would have been contrary to his character. Those opposed to a Sabbath claim that the practice had been abolished by this time, and thus would have no impact on Paul's actions. Assos (Behramkale) - located in Turkey Aristotle lived here and St Paul visited, but today visitors go to Assos as a tranquil Aegean-coast seaside retreat amid ancient ruins. ... This city is not to be confused with a village in the island of Samos named Mytilinii Mytilene (Greek: Μυτιλήνη - Mytilíni, Turkish: Midilli), also Mytilini is the capital city of Lesbos, a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, and the Lesbos Prefecture as well. ... Chios (Greek: , alternative transliterations Khios and Hios, see also List of traditional Greek place names; Ottoman Turkish: صاقيز Sakız; Genoese: Scio) is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea five miles off the Turkish coasts. ...


Some doubt that this is an instance of Paul keeping the Sabbath, although it may be if it shows him waiting until the morning of the first day to continue his work. The focus of the story is about Eutychus, his accident, and his resurrection, not the changing of the Sabbath from the seventh day to the first day of the week.


Also in Acts 2:45, they went to the Temple in Jerusalem and broke bread from house to house "daily". There is no mention of the Sabbath, and it is debatable whether this is a reference to Communion. There are many instances of the Gospel being taught and preached on non-specific days as well as daily. One example is in Mark 2:1-2 another is Luke 19:47-20:1, where it clearly indicates that Jesus himself taught and preached daily. The Temple in Jerusalem or the Holy Temple (Hebrew: בית המקדש, transliterated Bet HaMikdash) was the primary resting place of the Gods presence (shechina) in the physical world according to classical Judaism. ... For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist (or Communion or The Lords Supper etc. ... For other uses, see Gospel (disambiguation). ...


The majority of Christians, who accept the practice of worship on Sunday, suggest these actions are indicative of a new reverence for God's acts in Christ, in connection with the first day of the week; and the majority of these believe that Sunday is a Sabbatical day, a resting day set aside for worship of God through Jesus Christ, and see no continuing obligation to keep the Saturday ordinances in their Jewish form.


Christians who reject the religious observance of the first day argue, based on the reasons given above, that there is no significance given to the first day, the breaking of bread, nor the preaching; they are merely mentioned as events that might take place on any day of the week. It is often argued that the loss of special reverence for Saturday was due to a Great Apostasy in connection with the Constantinian shift; and most of the groups holding this belief see seventh day sabbatarianism as a mark of the restored church. The Great Apostasy is a term of opprobrium used by some religious groups to allege a general fallen state of traditional Christianity, or especially of Catholicism, reformist Protestantism and Eastern Orthodoxy: that it is not representative of the faith founded by Jesus and promulgated through his twelve Apostles: in short... Battle of the Milvian Bridge, Raphael, Vatican Rooms. ... For other usages, see Dispensationalism, Restoration Movement, and Restoration Restorationism refers to unaffiliated religious movements that attempted to circumvent Protestant denominationalism and orthodox Christian creeds to restore Christianity to their constructions of its original form. ...


The issue over the name of the seventh day is really a cultural question. Canada, the United States, and England are actually a minority in calling Sunday the first day and Saturday the last. In most of Europe, Monday is the first day, and Sunday indeed the seventh (see Days of the week). In fact, the majority of the countries who call Sunday the seventh day of the week are those who speak Romantic languages (Italy, France, Spain) are Roman Catholic. In English the days of the week are: Sunday first: Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday Monday first: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday Saturday and Sunday are commonly called the weekend and are days of rest and recreation in most western cultures. ...


Biblical references to the Sabbath Day

Genesis 2:2-3; Exodus 16:23-29; Exodus 20:8-11; Exodus 31:12-17; Exodus 35:2-3; Deuteronomy 5:12-14; Leviticus 16:31; Leviticus 19:3; Leviticus 19:29-30; Leviticus 23; Leviticus 24:8; Leviticus 25:2-6; Leviticus 26:2; Leviticus 26:34-35; Leviticus 26:43; Numbers 15:32-36; Numbers 28-29; 2 Kings 4:23; 2 Kings 11:5-9; 1 Chronicles 9:32; 1 Chronicles 23:31; 2 Chronicles 2:4; 2 Chronicles 8:13; 2 Chronicles 23:4-8; 2 Chronicles 31:3; 2 Chronicles 36:21; Nehemiah ; Nehemiah 10:31-33; Nehemiah 13:15-22; Psalms ; Lamentations 2:6; Isaiah 1:13; Isaiah 56:1-8; Isaiah 58:13-14; Isaiah 66:22-23; Jeremiah 17:21-27; Ezekiel 20:12-24; Ezekiel 22:8; Ezekiel 22:26-31; Ezekiel 23:38; Ezekiel 44:24; Ezekiel 45:17; Ezekiel 46:1-12; Hosea 2:11; Amos 8:5; Matthew 12:1-12; Matthew 24:20-21; Matthew 28:1; Mark 1:21; Mark 2:23-28; Mark 3:2-4; Mark 6:2; Mark 15:42; Mark 16:1; Luke 4:16; Luke 4:31; Luke 6:1-9; Luke 13:10-16; Luke 14:1-5; Luke 23:50-24:1; John 5:9-18; John 7:22-23; John ; John 19:31; Acts 1:12; Acts 13:14; Acts 13:27; Acts 13:42-43; Acts 15:21; Acts 16:13; Acts 17:2; Acts 18:4; Romans 14:5-6; Galatians 4:10-11; Colossians 2:14-17; Hebrews 4:1-11


See also

Etymology: Latin sabbatarius, from sabbatum sabbath Function: noun 1 : one who observes the Sabbath on Saturday in conformity with the letter of the fourth commandment 2 : an adherent of Sabbatarianism Function: adjective 1 : of or relating to the Sabbath 2 : of or relating to the Sabbatarians or Sabbatarianism External links... Major divisions within Christianity. ... Major divisions within Christianity. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... The Expounding of the Law (KJV:Matthew 5:17-48), sometimes called the Antithesis of the Law, is a less well known but highly structured (Ye have heard . ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... A week is a unit of time longer than a day and shorter than a month. ... Christian Torah-submission” or “Christian Torah-observance” refers to the pursuit of a lifestyle that is both fully dedicated to Jesus Christ and also obedient to God’s commands found in the Torah (which includes the Law of God given to Moses on Mount Sinai). ...

References

  1. ^ American Heritage Dictionary, sabbath. Dictionary.com. The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition. Houghton Mifflin Company, 2004, use 1,2
  2. ^ Encarta Dictionary, sabbath, use 2,1
  3. ^ AskOxford.com Concise Oxford English Dictionary, sabbath, use 1
  4. ^ Merriam-Webster On-line Dictionary, sabbath, use 1,2
  5. ^ Dictionary.com, sabbath, use 3
  6. ^ Cambridge Advanced Learners Dictionary, sabbath, use 1
  7. ^ James Cardinal Gibbons, The Faith of our Fathers, 88th ed., pp. 89.
  8. ^ A Doctrinal Catechism 3rd ed., p. 174.
  9. ^ William Owen Carver, The Lord's Day in Our Day , p. 49.
  10. ^ Alexander Campbell, The Christian Baptist, Feb. 2, 1824,vol. 1. no. 7, p. 164.
  11. ^ The Sunday Problem , a study book of the United Lutheran Church (1923), p. 36.
  12. ^ G. Archer, An Encyclopedia of Bible Difficulties
  13. ^ Catechism of the Roman Catholic Church II. The Lord's Day, see also Catechism

Codex Manesse, fol. ...

External links

  • The Sabbath Directory, which lists a large number of Sabbath-keeping organizations

Lord's day (Sunday) arguments

  • DiesDomini.com: A Primer on the Third Commandment – The Sabbath in Catholic Theology
  • The Sabbath vs Sunday debate A review of the biblical evidence
  • 1917 Catholic Encyclopedia: Sabbath – A thorough conceptual overview of the Catholic idea of Sabbath
  • Three chapters from John Frame's Doctrine of the Christian Life presenting the several views in the Reformed churches and advocating one of them:
    • Chapter 28 - Views of the Sabbath
    • Chapter 29 - Theology of the Sabbath
    • Chapter 30 - The Sabbath in the New Covenant

John Frame Dr. John M. Frame (born 1939) is an American philosopher and a Calvinist theologian especially noted for his work in epistemology and presuppositional apologetics, systematic theology, and ethics. ... -1...

Seventh-day (Saturday) arguments

  • Biblical Sabbath of God
  • SabbathTruth.com– History of the attempt to change the Seventh-Day Sabbath
  • Seventh-Day-Sabbath.com– Site mentioning every scripture regarding the Sabbath
  • Sabbath Truth - Everything you ever wanted to know about the Sabbath, but were afraid to ask
  • National Sunday Law - Read the National Sunday Law Online
  • Sabbath - Basic information about the seventh-day Sabbath
  • A review of the scriptures where the first day of the week are mentioned
  • A review of Apostolic Sabbath-keeping after Jesus Christ's death
  • Our Seven Day Week - What Is the First Day of the Week?
  • Our Seven Day Week - Has the 7-Day Week Cycle Ever Been Interrupted?
  • BIBLE ANSWERS BIBLE ANSWERS TO THE SABBATH QUESTION
  • Could The Sabbath Affect Your Salvation? Is it a test.
  • Should Christians Keep the Sabbath Day?
  • Understand the Significant of Shabbat from Messianic perspective
  • In their words CHURCH CONFESSIONS ABOUT SATURDAY AND SUNDAY & the Fourth Commandment
  • The Real Truth About The Sabbath

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CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Sabbath (1602 words)
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