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sex determining region Y
Identifiers
Symbol SRY
Entrez 6736
HUGO 11311
OMIM 480000
RefSeq NM_003140
UniProt Q05066
Other data
Locus Chr. Y p11.3

SRY (Sex-determining Region Y) is a sex-determining gene on the Y chromosome in humans and other primates. It is not the only, or even most common sex-determining gene in mammals. Most non-primate mammals use the Y chromosome gene UBE1 for the same purpose. The Entrez logo The Entrez Global Query Cross-Database Search System allows access to databases at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) website. ... Look up Hugo in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Mendelian Inheritance in Man project is a database that catalogues all the known diseases with a genetic component, and - when possible - links them to the relevant genes in the human genome. ... National Center for Biotechnology Information logo The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) is part of the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), a branch of the National Institutes of Health. ... Swiss-Prot is a curated biological database of protein sequences created in 1986 by Amos Bairoch during his PhD and developed by the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the European Bioinformatics Institute. ... Short and long arms Chromosome. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Look up sry on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Gene (disambiguation). ... The human Y chromosome is one of two sex chromosomes, it contains the genes that cause testis development, thus determining maleness. ... This article is about modern humans. ... Families 15, See classification A primate is any member of the biological order Primates, the group that contains all the species commonly related to the lemurs, monkeys, and apes, with the latter category including humans. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including those that produce milk, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... The gene UBE1 is commonly used in non-primates, instead of the SRY gene. ...


The SRY gene encodes the testis determining factor, which is also referred to as the SRY protein. Testis-determining factor (TDF) is a general term for the gene (or product thereof) that results in maleness in humans and some other species. ...

Contents

Impact upon gender

Since its discovery, the importance of the SRY gene in sex determination has been extensively documented:

  • Humans with one Y chromosome and multiple X chromosomes (XXY, XXXY etc.) are usually males.
  • Individuals with a male phenotype and an XX (female) genotype have been observed; these males have the SRY gene in one or both X chromosomes, moved there by chromosomal translocation. (However, these males are infertile.)
  • Similarly, there are females with an XXY or XY genotype. These females have no SRY gene in their Y chromosome, or the SRY gene exists but is defective (mutated).

‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... Not to be confused with XYY syndrome or XXX syndrome. ... Individuals in the mollusk species Donax variabilis show diverse coloration and patterning in their phenotypes. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Chromosomal translocation of the 4th and 20th chromosome. ...

SRY and the Olympics

One of the most controversial uses of this discovery was as a means for gender verification at the Olympic Games, under a system implemented by the International Olympic Committee in 1992. Athletes with a SRY gene were not permitted to participate as females, although all athletes in whom this was "detected" at the 1996 Summer Olympics were ruled false positives and were not disqualified. In the late 1990s, a number of relevant professional societies in United States called for elimination of gender verification, including the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American College of Physicians, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the Endocrine Society and the American Society of Human Genetics, stating that the method used was uncertain and ineffective.[1] The screening was eliminated as of the 2000 Summer Olympics.[1][2][3] Gender verification in sports (also sometimes loosely referred to as Sex determination) is the issue of verifying the eligibility of an athlete to compete in a sporting event that is limited to a single gender. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Stamp The International Olympic Committee (French: Comité International Olympique) is an organization based in Lausanne, Switzerland, created by Pierre de Coubertin and Demetrios Vikelas on June 23, 1894. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The 1996 Summer Olympics, formally known as the Games of the XXVI Olympiad and informally known as the Centennial Olympics, were held in 1996 in Atlanta, Georgia, United States. ... Type I errors (or α error, or false positive) and type II errors (β error, or a false negative) are two terms used to describe statistical errors. ... The American Medical Association (AMA) is the largest association of medical doctors in the United States. ... The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) is an organization of pediatricians, physicians trained to deal with the medical care of infants, children, and adolescents. ... The American College of Physicians (ACP) is a national organization of doctors of internal medicine (internists) -- physicians who specialize in the prevention, detection and treatment of illnesses in adults. ... The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) is a professional association of medical doctors specializing in obstetrics and gynecology in the United States. ... The Endocrine Society is a professional, international medical organization in the field of endocrinology and metabolism, founded in 1916. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ...


SRY-related diseases and defects

Individuals with XY genotype and functional SRY gene can have a female phenotype, where the underlying cause is androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Individuals in the mollusk species Donax variabilis show diverse coloration and patterning in their phenotypes. ... Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS, or Androgen resistance syndrome) is a set of disorders of sexual differentiation that results from mutations of the gene encoding the androgen receptor. ...


SRY has been linked to the fact that men are more likely than women to develop dopamine-related diseases such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease. SRY makes a protein that controls concentrations of dopamine, the neurotransmitter that carries signals from the brain that control movement and coordination.[4][5] For other uses, see Dopamine (disambiguation). ...


See also

A sex-determination system is a biological system that determines the development of sexual characteristics in an organism. ... Testis-determining factor is a general term for the gene (or product thereof) that results in maleness in humans and some other species. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Facius, Georg M. (August 2004). The Major Medical Blunder of the 20th Century. Bodies Like Ours. Retrieved on May 30, 2006.
  2. ^ Elsas, LJ; Ljungqvist A, Ferguson-Smith MA, Simpson JL, Genel M, Carlson AS, Ferris E, de la Chapelle A, Ehrhardt AA (July-August 2000). "Gender verification of female athletes". Genetics in Medicine 2 (4): 249-54. PMID 11252710. Retrieved on 2006-05-30. 
  3. ^ Dickinson, BD; Genel M, Robinowitz CB, Turner PL, Woods GL (October 2002). "Gender verification of female Olympic athletes". Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 34 (10): 1543. PMID 12370551. Retrieved on 2006-05-30. 
  4. ^ Dewing, P; Chiang CW, Sinchak K, Sim H, Fernagut PO, Kelly S, Chesselet MF, Micevych PE, Albrecht KH, Harley VR, Vilain E (Feb 21 2006). "Direct regulation of adult brain function by the male-specific factor SRY". Current Biology 16 (4): 415-20. PMID 16488877. Retrieved on 2006-05-30. 
  5. ^ Haaxma, C., et al. (Feb. 22-26, 2006). "Gender differences in Parkinson's disease". 1st World Parkinson Congress. 

is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • MeSH Genes,+sry
  • MeSH Sex-Determining+Region+Y+Protein

  Results from FactBites:
 
SRY at AllExperts (384 words)
SRY (Sex-determining Region Y) is a sex-determining gene on the Y chromosome in humans and other primates.
Athletes with an SRY gene were not permitted to participate as females, although all athletes in whom this was "detected" at the 1996 Summer Olympics were ruled false positives and were not disqualified.
SRY has been linked to the fact that men are more likely than women to develop dopamine-related diseases such as schizophrenia and Parkinson's disease.
SRY Missense Paper (865 words)
The existence of the SRY gene was shown by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as described elsewhere (5).
Detection of a mutation in the SRY gene.
The arrow indicates the nucleotide substitution G to A in the 107th codon from the methionine initiation codon of the SRY gene.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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