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Encyclopedia > SPICE
This article is part
of the Cuisine series
Foods

Bread - Pasta - Cheese - Rice
Sauces - Soups - Desserts
Herbs and spices
Other ingredients Image File history File links Title_Cuisine_2. ... Cuisine (from French cuisine, cooking; culinary art; kitchen; ultimately from Latin coquere, to cook) is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture. ... For other uses, see Bread (disambiguation). ... Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... Cheese is a solid food made from the milk of cows, goats, sheep, and other mammals. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sauce (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soup (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Desert. ... Herbs: basil Herbs (IPA: hə()b, or əb; see pronunciation differences) are seed-bearing plants without woody stems, which die down to the ground after flowering. ... Food is any substance, usually composed primarily of carbohydrates, fats, water and/or proteins, that can be eaten or drunk by an animal for nutrition and/or pleasure. ...

Regional cuisines
Asia - Europe - Caribbean
South Asia - Latin America
Middle East - North America - Africa
Other cuisines...
Preparation techniques and cooking items
Techniques - Utensils
Weights and measures
See also:
Kitchens - Meals
Wikibooks: Cookbook

A spice is a dried seed, fruit, root, bark or vegetative substance used in nutritionally insignificant quantities as a food additive for the purpose of flavoring, and indirectly for the purpose of killing and preventing growth of pathogenic bacteria[1]. Asian cuisine is a term for the various cuisines of South, East and Southeast Asia and for fusion dishes based on combining them. ... See the individual entries for: // Belarusian cuisine Bulgarian cuisine Czech cuisine Hungarian cuisine Jewish cuisine Polish cuisine Romanian cuisine Russian cuisine Slovak cuisine Slovenian cuisine Ukrainian cuisine British cuisine English cuisine Scottish cuisine Welsh cuisine Anglo-Indian cuisine Modern British cuisine Nordic cuisine Danish cuisine Finnish cuisine Icelandic cuisine Lappish... Caribbean cuisine is a fusion of African, Amerindian, French, Indian, and Spanish cuisine. ... South Asian cuisine includes the cuisines of the South Asia. ... Latin American cuisine is a phrase that refers to typical foods, beverages, and cooking styles common to many of the countries and cultures in Latin America. ... The term Middle Eastern cuisine refers to the various cuisines of the Middle East. ... North American cuisine is a term used for foods native to or popular in countries of North America. ... Cuisine of Africa reflects indigenous traditions, as well as influences from Arabs, Europeans, and Asians. ... Cooking is the act of preparing food. ... This is a list of food preparation utensils, also known as kitchenware. ... In recipes, quantities of ingredients may be specified by mass (weight), by volume, or by count. ... A kitchen is a room used for food preparation and sometimes entertainment. ... For the coarsely ground flour, see flour. ... Spice can mean many things: Geography/History: Spice Islands Spice trade People/Things: Scaly-breasted Munia aka Spice Finch Spice Girls, The: Spice World (game) Texas tuberose aka Spice lily SPICe, the Scottish Parliament Information Centre, is the research and information service of the Scottish Parliament. ... Look up Pungency in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Fruit (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Root (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of bark, see Bark (disambiguation). ... The updated USDA food pyramid, published in 2005, is a general nutrition guide for recommended food consumption for humans. ... Food additives are substances added to food to preserve flavor or improve its taste and appearance. ... Flavouring (or flavoring) is a product which is added to food in order to change or augment its taste. ...


Many of the same substances have other uses in which they are referred to by different terms, e.g. in food preservation, medicine, religious rituals, cosmetics, perfumery or as vegetables. For example, turmeric is also used as a preservative; licorice as a medicine; garlic as a vegetable and nutmeg as a recreational drug. Various preserved foods Food preservation is the process of treating and handling food in such a way as to stop or greatly slow down spoilage to prevent foodborne illness while maintaining nutritional value, density, texture and flavor. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Rituals was an American soap opera that ran in syndication from September 1984 to September 1985 in 260 25 minutes episodes. ... “Make-up” redirects here. ... For the book Perfume by Patrick Süskind, see Perfume (book). ... A plate of vegetables Vegetable is a culinary term which generally refers to an edible part of a plant. ... Binomial name Linnaeus Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae which is native to tropical South Asia. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Species Glycyrrhiza acanthocarpa Glycyrrhiza aspera Glycyrrhiza astragalina Glycyrrhiza bucharica Glycyrrhiza echinata Glycyrrhiza eurycarpa Glycyrrhiza foetida Glycyrrhiza glabra Glycyrrhiza iconica Glycyrrhiza korshinskyi Glycyrrhiza lepidota Glycyrrhiza pallidiflora Glycyrrhiza triphylla Glycyrrhiza uralensis Glycyrrhiza yunnanensis Ref: ILDIS Version 6. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... A plate of vegetables Vegetable is a culinary term which generally refers to an edible part of a plant. ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ...


Spices are distinguished from herbs, which are leafy, green plant parts used for flavoring purposes.[citation needed] Herbs, such as basil or oregano, may be used fresh, and are commonly chopped into smaller pieces; spices, however, are dried and usually ground into a powder. Herbs: basil Herbs (IPA: hə()b, or əb; see pronunciation differences) are seed-bearing plants without woody stems, which die down to the ground after flowering. ... Look up foliage in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about flavor as a sensory impression. ... For other uses, see Basil (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Origanum vulgare L. Oregano or Pot Marjoram (Origanum vulgare) is a species of Origanum, native to Europe, the Mediterranean region and southern and central Asia. ... Powder is a substance that has been crushed into very fine grains. ...

Contents

Classification and types

See also: List of herbs and spices
Shop with spices in Morocco
Shop with spices in Morocco

Salt is a very common seasoning, often mistakenly considered as a spice, but it is in fact a mineral product. –List of herbs and spices Spices on sale in India // Aglaophotis (fictional) Agnus Castus Agrimony Ajwain Alino crio Alfalfa Alkanet Allspice Aloe Vera Ambrosia herbs Amchur (mango powder) Amaranth Angelica (Angelica archangelica) Anise Aniseed myrtle (Syzygium anisatum) Annatto Apple mint Arrowroot Artemisia vulgaris Arugula (Rocket) Asafoetida Asarum europaeum Ashwagandha (Withania... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 552 KB) Morocco, Spices File links The following pages link to this file: Spice List of herbs and spices Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 552 KB) Morocco, Spices File links The following pages link to this file: Spice List of herbs and spices Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... For other uses, see Salt (disambiguation). ... Seasoning is the process of adding flavours, or enhancing natural flavour of any type of food. ... For other uses, see Mineral (disambiguation). ...


The basic classification of spices is as follows:

Leaves are an Icelandic five-piece alternative rock band who came to prominence in 2002 with their debut album, Breathe, drawing comparisons to groups such as Coldplay and Doves. ... For other uses, see Basil (disambiguation). ... bay leaves Bay leaf in Greek Daphni (plural bay leaves) is the aromatic leaf of several species of the Laurel family (Lauraceae). ... This article is about the herb. ... For other uses, see Rosemary (disambiguation). ... This article is about the herb; for the Freedom Call CD see Taragon. ... Species About 350 species, including: Thymus adamovicii Thymus altaicus Thymus amurensis Thymus bracteosus Thymus broussonetii Thymus caespititius Thymus camphoratus Thymus capitatus Thymus capitellatus Thymus camphoratus Thymus carnosus Thymus cephalotus Thymus cherlerioides Thymus ciliatus Thymus cilicicus Thymus cimicinus Thymus comosus Thymus comptus Thymus curtus Thymus disjunctus Thymus doerfleri Thymus glabrescens Thymus... Réseaux IP Européens (RIPE, French for European IP Networks) is a forum open to all parties with an interest in the technical development of the Internet. ... Popular Japanese fashion magazine throughout the 1990s; the photography of which has recently been reissued in two collections from Phaidon press. ... A ripe red jalapeño cut open to show the seeds For other uses, see Seed (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Dill (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Foeniculum vulgare Mill. ... Mustard seeds Black Mustard seeds close-up Mustard seeds are the proverbially small seeds of the various mustard plants. ... Binomial name L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... For other uses, see Root (disambiguation). ... Shallot bulbs A bulb is an underground vertical shoot that has modified leaves (or thickened leaf bases) that is used as food storage organs by a dormant plant. ... Binomial name L. Allium sativum L., commonly known as garlic, is a species in the onion family Alliaceae. ... For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ...

History

Spices have been prominent in human history virtually since their inception. Spices were among the most valuable items of trade in the ancient and medieval world. The culinary use of spices originated in the Indian Sub continent and South-East Asia. In the story of Genesis, Joseph was sold into slavery by his brothers to spice merchants. In the biblical poem Song of Solomon, the male speaker compares his beloved to many forms of spices. Generally, Egyptian, Chinese, Indian and Mesopotamian sources do not refer to known spices. This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... Genesis (Greek: Γένεσις, having the meanings of birth, creation, cause, beginning, source and origin) is the first book of the Torah (five books of Moses) and hence the first book of the Tanakh, part of the Hebrew Bible; it is also the first book of the Christian Old Testament. ... Joseph interprets the dream of the Pharaoh. ... Poetry (ancient Greek: poieo = create) is an art form in which human language is used for its aesthetic qualities in addition to, or instead of, its notional and semantic content. ... For other uses, see Song of Solomon (disambiguation). ... This is an article about the ancient middle eastern region. ...


The spice trade developed throughout the Middle East in around 2000 BC with cinnamon, Indonesian cinnamon and pepper. A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ...


A recent archaeolgical discovery suggests that the clove, indigineous to the Indonesian island of Ternate in the Maluku Islands, could have been introduced to the Middle East very early on. Digs found a clove burnt onto the floor of a burned down kitchen in the Mesopotamian site of Terqa, in what is now modern-day Syria, dated to 1700 BC [2]. The ancient Indian epic of Ramayana mentions cloves. In any case, it is known that the Romans had cloves in the 1st century AD because Pliny the Elder spoke of them in his writings. Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... Indigenous may refer to objects and people with origins in particular location(s), specifically: Look up indigenous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A 1720 depiction of Ternate. ... Maluku redirects here. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... The ancient Sanskrit epics, the Ramayana and Mahabharata, laid the cornerstone for much of Hindu religion. ... For the television series by Ramanand Sagar, see Ramayan (TV series). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ...


In South Asia, nutmeg, which originates from the Banda Islands in the Moluccas, has a Sanskrit name. Sanskrit is the language of the sacred Hindu texts, this shows how old the usage of this spice is in this region. Historians estimate that nutmeg was introduced to Europe in the 6th century BC [3]. Map of South Asia (see note on Kashmir). ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... The Banda Islands (Indonesian: Kepulauan Banda) are a group of ten small volcanic islands in the Banda Sea, about 140km south of Seram island and about 2000km east of Java, and are part of the Indonesian province of Maluku. ... This page is about the geography and history of the island group in Indonesia — for the political entities encompassing the islands, see Maluku (Indonesian province) and North Maluku. ... Sanskrit ( , for short ) is a classical language of India, a liturgical language of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, and Jainism, and one of the 23 official languages of India. ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Indonesian merchants went around China, India, the Middle East and the east coast of Africa. Arab merchants controlled the routes through the Middle East and India until Roman times with the discovery of new sea routes. This made the city of Alexandria in Egypt the main trading centre for spices because of its port. Merchants function as professional traders, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves. ... For other uses, see Arab (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... This article is about the city in Egypt. ...


Middle Ages

Harvesting pepper. Illustration from a French edition of The Travels of Marco Polo.
Harvesting pepper. Illustration from a French edition of The Travels of Marco Polo.

Spices were among the most luxurious products available in the Middle Ages, the most common being black pepper, cinnamon (and the cheaper alternative cassia), cumin, nutmeg, ginger and cloves. They were all imported from plantations in Asia and Africa, which made them extremely expensive. From the 8th until the 15th century, the Republic of Venice had the monopoly on spice trade with the Middle East, and along it with the neighboring Italian city-states. The trade made the region phenomenally rich. It has been estimated that around 1,000 tons of pepper and 1,000 tons of the other common spices were imported into Western Europe each year during the Late Middle Ages. The value of these goods was the equivalent of a yearly supply of grain for 1.5 million people.[4] While pepper was the most common spice, the most exclusive was saffron, used as much for its vivid yellow-red color as for its flavor. Spices that have now fallen into some obscurity include grains of paradise, a relative of cardamom which almost entirely replaced pepper in late medieval north French cooking, long pepper, mace, spikenard, galangal and cubeb. A popular modern-day misconception is that medieval cooks used liberal amounts of spices, particularly black pepper, merely to disguise the taste of spoiled meat. However, a medieval feast was as much a culinary event as it was a display of the host's vast resources and generosity, and as most nobles had a wide selection of fresh or preserved meats, fish or seafood to choose from, the use of ruinously expensive spices on cheap, rotting meat would have made little sense.[5] Image File history File links Le_livre_des_merveilles_de_Marco_Polo-pepper. ... Image File history File links Le_livre_des_merveilles_de_Marco_Polo-pepper. ... A page of The Travels of Marco Polo The Travels of Marco Polo is the usual English title of Marco Polos travel book, Il Milione. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Binomial name L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name J.Presl Cassia (Chinese cinnamon) is also commonly called (and sometimes sold as) cinnamon. ... Binomial name Cinnamomum aromaticum Nees Cassia (Cinnamomum aromaticum, synonym ), also called Chinese cinnamon, is an evergreen tree native to southern China and mainland Southeast Asia west to Myanmar. ... Geerah redirects here. ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ... Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin, Italian Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... Look up ton in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dante by Michelino The Late Middle Ages is a term used by historians to describe European history in the period of the 14th to 16th centuries (AD 1300–1500). ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Binomial name Aframomum melegueta K. Schum. ... This article is about the herbs. ... Binomial name Piper longum L. Long pepper (Piper longum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... Binomial name Nardostachys grandiflora DC. Spikenard (also nard and muskroot) is a flowering plant of the Valerian family that grows in the Himalayas of India and Nepal. ... Kaempferia galanga Galangal, Malay lengkuas, Mandarin (Traditional: 南薑/Simplified: 南姜, also termed as: T:高良薑/S:高良姜), Cantonese lam keong (藍薑, also known as blue ginger), is a rhizome with culinary and medicinal uses, best known in the west today for its appearance in Southeast Asia cuisine but also common in recipes from medieval Europe. ... Binomial name Piper cubeba L. Cubeb (Piper cubeba), or tailed pepper, is a plant in genus Piper, cultivated for its fruit and essential oil. ...


Early modern period

The control of trade routes and the spice-producing regions were the main reasons that Portuguese navigator Vasco Da Gama sailed to India in 1499. Spain and Portugal were not happy to pay the high price that Venice demanded for spices. At around the same time, Christopher Columbus returned from the New World, he described to investors the many new, and then unknown, spices available there. For other uses, see Vasco da Gama (disambiguation). ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and colonialist who is one of the first Europeans to discover the Americas, after the Vikings. ... Frontispiece of Peter Martyr dAnghieras De orbe novo (On the New World). Carte dAmérique, Guillaume Delisle, 1722. ... Investment is a term with several closely related meanings in finance and economics. ...


It was Afonso de Albuquerque (1453–1515) who allowed the Portuguese to take control of the sea routes to India. In 1506, he took the island of Socotra in the mouth of the Red Sea and, in 1507, Ormuz in the Persian Gulf. Since becoming the viceroy of the Indies, he took Goa in India in 1510, and Malacca on the Malay peninsula in 1511. The Portuguese could now trade directly with Siam, China and the Moluccas. The Silk Road complemented the Portuguese sea routes, and brought the treasures of the Orient to Europe via Lisbon, many of which are coveted spices. Afonso de Albuquerque Afonso de Albuquerque (or Afonso dAlbuquerque - disused) (pron. ... Map of the Socotra archipelago Socotra or Soqotra (Arabic سقطرى ; ) is a small archipelago of four islands and islets in the Indian Ocean off the coast of the Horm Africa some 350 km south of the Arabian peninsula. ... Location of the Red Sea The Red Sea is an inlet of the Indian Ocean between Africa and Asia. ... Ormus (also Ohrmuzd, Hormuz, Ohrmazd) was a kingdom in the 16th to 17th centuries around the Persian Gulf, in particular the Strait of Hormuz. ... Map of the Persian Gulf. ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ... The Indies, on the display globe of the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois The Indies or East Indies (or East India) is a term used to describe lands of South and Southeast Asia, occupying all of the former British India, the present Indian Union, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Myanmar, Sri Lanka, the Maldives... For other uses, see Goa (disambiguation). ... This article is about the state in Malaysia. ... The Malay Peninsula (Malay: Semenanjung Tanah Melayu) is a major peninsula located in Southeast Asia. ... For the country formerly called Siam see Thailand SIAM is an acronym for Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. ... This page is about the geography and history of the island group in Indonesia — for the political entities encompassing the islands, see Maluku (Indonesian province) and North Maluku. ... The Silk Road extending from Southern Europe through Arabia, Egypt, Persia, India till China. ... The term the Orient - literally meaning sunrise, east - is traditionally used to refer to Near, Middle, and Far Eastern countries. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Lisbon (disambiguation). ...


Common spice mixes

A kitchen shelf of spice.
A kitchen shelf of spice.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (982 × 738 pixel, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A kitchen shelf of spice. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 798 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (982 × 738 pixel, file size: 124 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A kitchen shelf of spice. ... Capsicum fruit which comes in various shapes and colours can be used to make paprika. ... Geerah redirects here. ... Binomial name L. Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults. ... It has been suggested that Legal drugs#Nutmeg be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Ginger (disambiguation). ... Binomial name L. Black pepper (Piper nigrum) is a flowering vine in the family Piperaceae, cultivated for its fruit, which is usually dried and used as a spice and seasoning. ... Binomial name Illicium verum Hook. ... This article is about the herbs. ... Binomial name (L.) Merrill & Perry A single dried clove flower bud Cloves (Syzygium aromaticum, syn. ... Mustard seeds Black Mustard seeds close-up Mustard seeds are the proverbially small seeds of the various mustard plants. ... Binomial name Crocus sativus L. Saffron (IPA: ) is a spice derived from the flower of the saffron crocus (Crocus sativus), a species of crocus in the family Iridaceae. ... Curry powder in a jar Curry powder is a mixture of spices of widely varying composition developed by the British during their colonial rule of India. ... Five-spice powder (五香粉, wǔxiāngfěn in hanyu pinyin) is a convenient seasoning for Chinese cuisine, particularly Cantonese cuisine. ... Garam masala is a blend of ground spices common in the Indian cuisine, whose literal meaning is hot (or warm) spice. There are many variants: most traditional mixes use just cinnamon, roasted cumin, cloves, nutmeg (and/or mace) and green cardamom seed or black cardamom pods. ... Quatre épices is a spice blend used mainly in French cooking, but also found in the Middle Eastern kitchen. ... Ras el hanout, also called Moroccan seasoning, is a popular blend of herbs and spices that originated in Morocco and used in other parts of North Africa. ... Zaatar manakish, the spices spread onto the dough Zaatar (Arabic زعتر , Hebrew זעתר, Armenian զահթար) is a popular mixture of spices that originated in the Middle East. ...

Production

Wikibooks
Wikibooks Cookbook has an article on
Spice
Look up Spice in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Spice

Production in tonnes. Figures 2003-2004
Researched by FAOSTAT (FAO) Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo-en. ... Wikibooks logo Wikibooks, previously called Wikimedia Free Textbook Project and Wikimedia-Textbooks, is a wiki for the creation of books. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wiktionary (a portmanteau of wiki and dictionary) is a multilingual, Web-based project to create a free content dictionary, available in over 150 languages. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Possible meanings: Faro Airport (Portugal) Federation of Astrobiology Organizations Financial Aid Office Food and Agriculture Organization This page expands a three-character combination which might be any or all of: an abbreviation, an acronym, an initialism, a word in English, or a word in another language. ...

India 1 600 000 86 % 1 600 000 86 %
China 66 000 4 % 66 000 4 %
Bangladesh 48 000 3 % 48 000 3 %
Pakistan 45 300 2 % 45 300 2 %
Turkey 33 000 2 % 33 000 2 %
Nepal 15 500 1 % 15 500 1 %
Other countries 60 900 3 % 60 910 3 %
Total 1 868 700 100 % 1 868 710 100 %

Further reading

  • Turner, Jack (2004). Spice: The History of a Temptation. Knopf. ISBN 0-375-40721-9. 
  • Food Bacteria-Spice Survey Shows Why Some Cultures Like It Hot Quote: “...Garlic, onion, allspice and oregano, for example, were found to be the best all-around bacteria killers (they kill everything)...Top 30 Spices with Antimicrobial Properties...”
  • August 18, 1998, Common Kitchen Spices Kill E. Coli O157:H7 Quote: “...The study is the first in the United States that looks at the effect of common spices on E. coli O157:H7. Previous studies have concluded spices kill other foodborne pathogens. “In the first part of our study, we tested 23 spices against E. coli O157:H7 in the laboratory,” Fung said. “We found that several spices are good at killing this strain of E. coli.”...”
  • The Lure and Lore of Spices Quote: “If the appearance of spices were to reflect their real importance in the history of the world, the bottles of spices would be filled with bright glittery substances, diamonds, rubies, emeralds or gold would be appropriate. When you opened the bottle, a poof of vibrantly colored, mystically fragrant, magical smoke would slowly billow softly throughout the room.”

Jack Charles Turner (born 1968 in Sydney, Australia) is a non-fiction writer and television documentary host. ...

Notes

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Buccellati et Buccellati (1983)
  3. ^ Burkill (1966)
  4. ^ Adamson, p. 65
  5. ^ Scully, pp. 84-86.

Sources

  • Adamson, Melitta Weiss (2004), Food in Medieval Times. ISBN 0-313-32147-7.
  • Scully, Terence (1995), The Art of Cookery in the Middle Ages. ISBN 0-85115-611-8.

See also

–List of herbs and spices Spices on sale in India // Aglaophotis (fictional) Agnus Castus Agrimony Ajwain Alino crio Alfalfa Alkanet Allspice Aloe Vera Ambrosia herbs Amchur (mango powder) Amaranth Angelica (Angelica archangelica) Anise Aniseed myrtle (Syzygium anisatum) Annatto Apple mint Arrowroot Artemisia vulgaris Arugula (Rocket) Asafoetida Asarum europaeum Ashwagandha (Withania... Indian Spices In Indian cuisine, curry refers not to a spice, but to any dish eaten with rice, or more commonly, any dish with a gravy base. ... Spices at the central market of Agadir, Morocco in May 2005 The spice trade has been of major economic importance throughout human history and it particularly helped spur the Age of Exploration. ... Run is one of the smallest islands of the Banda Islands which are a part of Indonesia. ... International Spicy Food Day is celebrated annually on January 21st. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Spice - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (413 words)
A spice is a dried seed, fruit, root, bark or vegetative substance used in nutritionally insignificant quantities as a food additive for the purpose of flavouring.
Spices are distinguished from herbs, which refer to leafy, green plant parts used for flavoring purposes.
Spices were the primary reason that Portuguese navigator Vasco Da Gama sailed to India.
Cookbook:Spices and herbs - Wikibooks, collection of open-content textbooks (304 words)
Spices and herbs are used in many different ways in the art of cooking.
Most spices and herbs are available in either a finely ground form for cooking or in the raw form as a seed, nut, leaf, or tuber.
Garam masala, which depending on the recipe is either put in early or late in the cooking process, is a blend of roasted aromatic spices.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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