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Encyclopedia > S.M. Stirling

Stephen Michael Stirling is a Canadian-American science fiction and fantasy author. His novels often describe military situations and militaristic cultures. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... // For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... Militarism or militarist ideology is the doctrinal view of a society as being best served (or more efficient) when it is governed or guided by concepts embodied in the culture, doctrine, system, or people of the military. ...


Stirling was born in Metz, France on 1953-09-30 to an English mother and Canadian father. He has lived in several countries and currently resides in New Mexico in the United States with his wife Jan. City motto: Si paix dedans, paix dehors (French: If peace inside, peace outside) City proper (commune) Région Lorraine Département Moselle (57) Mayor Jean-Marie Rausch Area 41. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1953 calendar). ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 92 days remaining. ... Official language(s) None Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq. ...


Aside from the military, adventure & exploration focus of his books, he often describes societies with cultural values significantly different from modern western views, especially with a more liberal attitude to sexuality (lesbian characters often figure), in a sympathetic or at least neutral way. One of his recurring topics is the influence of the culture on an individual's outlook and values, with a particular emphasis that most people and societies consider themselves to be (mostly) moral.


In the past he has frequently collaborated with other authors, including David Drake, Jerry Pournelle and Anne McCaffrey. David Drake (born September 24, 1945) is a successful author of science fiction and fantasy literature. ... Jerry Pournelle, (born August 7, 1933) is an American essayist, journalist and science fiction author who contributed for many years to the computer magazine Byte. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Anne Inez McCaffrey (born April 1, 1926) is an American science fiction author best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series. ...


Stirling is probably best-known for his Draka series of alternate history novels and the more recent Island in the Sea of Time time travel/alternate history trilogy. His novels Go Tell The Spartans and Prince of Sparta are set in Jerry Pournelle's "CoDominium" future history. The Domination is a dystopian alternate history series of four novels written by S. M. Stirling. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... Alternate history (fiction) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ...


Stirling, along with Eric Flint, was tuckerized as a Secret Service agent in John Birmingham's alternate history WWII novel Weapons of Choice (2004). Eric Flint (born California, USA, 1947) is an American science fiction and fantasy author and editor. ... Tuckerization is the act of using a persons name in an original story as an in-joke (i. ... USSS redirects here. ... John Birmingham (born 1964) is an Australian author. ... Alternative history or alternate history can be: A History told from an alternative viewpoint, rather than from the view of imperialist, conqueror, or explorer. ... Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, China, Canada, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...

Contents


Bibliography

The Lords of Creation

What if Mars and Venus really were inhabitable and inhabited, like in many SF stories from the early sixties and before? In this series Mars and Venus have been terraformed a long time ago and "seeded" with Earth life, including several different human species. On Earth everything is the same until the start of space exploration, but then the Cold War turns into a real space race... The Sky People is set on Venus, In the Halls of the Crimson Kings on Mars. This is the current Astronomy collaboration of the week! Please help improve it to featured article standard. ... Adjective Venusian or (rarely) Cytherean (*min temperature refers to cloud tops only) Atmospheric characteristics Atmospheric pressure 9. ... Artists conception of a terraformed Mars in three stages of development. ... The Cold War was the protracted geopolitical, ideological, and economic struggle that emerged after World War II between the global superpowers of the Soviet Union and the United States, supported by their military alliance partners. ...

  • The Sky People (forthcoming)
  • In the Halls of the Crimson Kings (forthcoming)

Nantucket series

In Island in the Sea of Time the island of Nantucket is transported by an unknown phenomenon ("The Event"/"The Change", in the series) back in time into the Bronze Age circa 1250s BC (corresponding to the late Heroic Age of Greek mythology). The trilogy describes the conflict between the different factions of the island's population — some trying to dominate the world for their own benefit, others trying to better it — and the different Bronze Age civilizations. Settled: 1641 â€“ Incorporated: 1671 Zip Code(s): 02554 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Centuries: 14th century BC - 13th century BC - 12th century BC Decades: 1300s BC 1290s BC 1280s BC 1270s BC 1260s BC - 1250s BC - 1240s BC 1230s BC 1220s BC 1210s BC 1200s BC Events and trends September 7, 1251 BC - A solar eclipse at this date might mark the birth... The Heroic Age was the period of Greek mythological history that lay between the purely divine events of the Theogony and Titanomachy and the advent of historical time after the Trojan War. ... // Greek mythology consists in part in a large collection of narratives that explain the origins of the world and detail the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, and heroines. ...

By the end of the third book, Nantucket is the dominant member of a sizeable and expanding network of allies, rather reminiscent of the British Empire (though Britain itself is here but one of Nantucket's protectorates and a source of "warrior tribes" to be enrolled as mercenaries in its armies), and the "Nantuckars" seem well on their way to re-enact Manifest Destiny three thousand years earlier. The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps. ... Protectorate of Oliver Cromwell See The Protectorate. ... This painting (circa 1872) by John Gast called American Progress is an allegorical representation of Manifest Destiny. ...

1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (61st in leap years). ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... April 1 is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 274 days remaining. ...

The Emberverse series

Dies the Fire (2004) shows the effects of The Event on the rest of the planet, the world Nantucket left behind — a world where electricity, guns, combustion engines, and steam power no longer work.

  • Dies the Fire (2004-07-01)
  • The Protector's War (2005-09-06)
  • A Meeting at Corvallis (2006 Sep/Oct)

2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ...

Fifth Millennium series

These are a collection of post-holocaust fantasy novels, in which civilization was destroyed (probably by a nuclear war) in something near our present time and new civilizations have grown to take their place. The novels are set in about the year AD 5000. There are elements of magic or psionics present, but they are fairly low powered. Two additional novels in this series (Lion's Heart and Lion's Soul both by Karen Wehrstein) overlap these novels but were not authored or co-authored by Stirling. Shadow's Daughter by Shirley Meier is also part of the series. Post-holocaust is a sub-genre of science fiction dealing with the aftermath of a catastrophe---usually nuclear war, but not invariably. ... // For other meanings see Fantasy (disambiguation) Fantasy is a genre of art that uses magic and other supernatural forms as a primary element of plot, theme, or setting. ... The Titan II ICBM carried a 9 Mt W53 warhead, making it one of the most powerful nuclear weapons fielded by the United States during the Cold War. ... Magic(k) or sorcery are terms referring to the alleged influencing of events and physical phenomena by supernatural, mystical, or paranormal means. ... Psionics means the pseudoscience of psychic abilities. ...

  • Snowbrother (1985)
  • The Sharpest Edge (1986) (with Shirley Meier) (Later re-written and expanded as Saber and Shadow)
  • The Cage (1989) (with Shirley Meier)
  • Shadow's Son (1991) (with Shirley Meier and Karen Wehrstein)
  • Saber and Shadow (1992) (with Shirley Meier)

Draka series

Main article: The Domination

The Draka novels postulate a dystopian slave-holding militaristic (white) African empire (founded by American Loyalists escaped to South Africa after the American Revolution and later joined by defeated Confederates after the American Civil War) and follows its historical development through the 19th and 20th centuries. The Draka culture is remarkable for combining a strictly race- and class-based hierarchical society with near-complete gender-equality (including female soldiers in integrated military units in combat roles). Compared to current western society, nudity and sexuality are much less taboo among Draka. The Domination is a dystopian alternate history series of four novels written by S. M. Stirling. ... A dystopia (alternatively, cacotopia[1], kakotopia or anti-utopia) is a fictional society that is the antithesis of utopia. ... Loyalists (often capitalized L) were British North American colonists who remained loyal subjects of the British crown during the American Revolution. ... The American Revolution was an upheaval that ended British control of middle North America, resulting ultimately in the formation of the United States of America. ... Motto: Deo Vindice (Latin: With God As Our Vindicator) Anthem: God Save the South (unofficial) Dixie (popular) The Bonnie Blue Flag (popular) Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederate) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties Killed in action: 110,000 Total dead: 360,000 Wounded: 275,200 Killed in action: 93,000 Total dead: 258... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the... Line art depictions of a man and a woman designed to educate extraterrestrials about the appearance of the human body. ... This article is about the issues and phenomena pertaining to human sexual function and behavior. ... A taboo is a strong social prohibition (or ban) relating to any area of human activity or social custom declared as sacred and forbidden; breaking of the taboo is usually considered objectionable or abhorrent by society. ...


The first three books chronicle the Draka expansion, starting with their invasion and conquest of Europe during the end of WWII (up to that point, the European part of the alternate history is pretty much unchanged) and leads over into a cold war/covert war scenario where they face off against an American-led free World. The final book (The Stone Dogs) takes this war into space (and thereby into Science Fiction), and describes the final, apocalyptic nuclear battle between the two antagonist factions. World map showing Europe Political map Europe is one of the seven continents of Earth which, in this case, is more a cultural and political distinction than a physiographic one, leading to various perspectives about Europes borders. ... Combatants Allies: Soviet Union, United Kingdom, France/Free France, United States, China, Canada, India, Australia, Poland, New Zealand, South Africa, Greece, and others Axis Powers: Germany, Italy, Japan, Bulgaria, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Burma, Slovakia Casualties Military dead: 17 million Civilian dead: 33 million Total dead: 50 million Military dead: 8... A cold war is a state of battle between nations that does not involve direct military action but is pursued primarily through economic and political actions, acts of espionage or conflict through surrogates. ...

  • Marching Through Georgia (1988)
  • Under the Yoke (1989)
  • The Stone Dogs (1990)
  • Drakon (1995) (Alternate Earth scenario, Drakas try to invade our world)
  • The Domination (2000) (Omnibus edition of first 3 works)
  • Drakas! (2000) (Anthology edited by Stirling)

General series

Main article: The General series

These are a retelling of the life of Belisarius, set on a colony planet with roughly late 19th century technology. These novels are currently available in omnibus editions. (2005). The General (also known as the Raj Whitehall series after the lead character) is a set of military science fiction books written by S.M. Stirling from an outline by David Drake. ... Belisar as a beggar, as depicted in popular legend, in the painting by Jacques-Louis David (1781). ...


with David Drake David Drake (born September 24, 1945) is a successful author of science fiction and fantasy literature. ...

  • The Forge (1991)
  • The Hammer (1992)
  • The Anvil (1993)
  • The Steel (1993)
  • The Sword (1995)
  • The Chosen (1996)
  • The Reformer (1999)

Falkenberg's Legion series

Note that earlier volumes in this series, starting with The Mercenary, were solely the work of Jerry Pournelle. These form part of the larger "CoDominium" series, that also includes The Mote in God's Eye and The Gripping Hand by Pournelle and Larry Niven. (In 2002, all the Falkenberg books, including these two, were published in a single volume, The Prince.) Jerry Pournelle, (born August 7, 1933) is an American essayist, journalist and science fiction author who contributed for many years to the computer magazine Byte. ... The fictional CoDominium universe is a future history (now alternate history) setting for the books in the CoDominium Series by Jerry Pournelle. ... Cover of 1991-03-01 paperback edition The Mote in Gods Eye, by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle, was called possibly the finest science fiction novel I have ever read by Robert A. Heinlein. ... The Gripping Hand is a 1993 novel by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. ... Larry Niven Laurence van Cott Niven (born April 30, 1938) is a US science fiction author. ... The Prince is a Science Fiction compilation novel by Jerry Pournelle and S.M. Stirling. ...


with Jerry Pournelle

  • Go Tell the Spartans (1991)
  • Prince of Sparta (1993)

Flight Engineer series

with James Doohan Doohan in an episode of The Twilight Zone (1963) James Montgomery Doohan (March 3, 1920 – July 20, 2005) was an Irish-Canadian character and voice actor best known for his portrayal of Scotty in the television and film series Star Trek. ...

  • The Rising (1996)
  • The Privateer (1999)
  • The Independent Command (2000)

Terminator 2 series

  • T2: Infiltrator (2001)
  • T2: Rising Storm (2002)
  • T2: The Future War (2003)

Other Novels

belonging to series by other authors

  • The Children's Hour (1991) (with Jerry Pournelle) (Part of the "Man/Kzin wars" series)
  • Blood Feuds (1993) (with Judith Tarr and Susan Shwartz and Harry Turtledove (Part of the "War World" sub-series in the "Co-dominium" series, originally created by Jerry Pournelle.)
  • The City who Fought (1993) (with Anne McCaffrey) (Part of the "Ship who Sang" series)
  • Blood Vengeance (1994) (with Susan Shwartz and Judith Tarr and Harry Turtledove and Jerry Pournelle (Also part of the "War World" sub-series)
  • The Ship Avenged (1997) (Part of the "Ship who Sang" series)
  • Jimmy the Hand (2003) (with Raymond E. Feist)

not part of any series Jerry Pournelle, (born August 7, 1933) is an American essayist, journalist and science fiction author who contributed for many years to the computer magazine Byte. ... Known Space is the fictional setting of many of Larry Nivens science fiction stories. ... Judith Tarr, (1955 - ) has a B.A. in Latin and English from Mount Holyoke College, an M.A. in Classics from Cambridge University, and an M.A. and Ph. ... Susan Shwartz (1949 - ) is an American author. ... Harry Turtledove at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow Harry Norman Turtledove (born June 14, 1949), is a historian and prolific novelist who has written historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction works. ... At the 63rd World Science Fiction Convention in Glasgow, August 2005 Anne Inez McCaffrey (born April 1, 1926) is an American science fiction author best known for her Dragonriders of Pern series. ... Raymond E. Feist (born 1945, Los Angeles, California) is an American author, mostly specialising in fantasy fiction. ...

The Peshawar Lancers The Peshawar Lancers is an alternate history adventure novel by S. M. Stirling, with its point of divergence set in 1878. ...

Criticism of Stirling

Stirling is known to be outspoken and drastic when it comes to his political opinions. He agrees with the conservative "hawk" position on the Middle East and supports market-radical socioeconomic theory. He has also uttered the opinion that the state of the world would improve if Islam would disappear, which has been interpreted by some as approving genocide of all Muslims. However, he has made it clear that he is not a Christian and is not to be put in a basket with the evangelical faction of American neo-conservatives. Hawkishness or Hawkism is an informal term used to describe a political stance of preparedness for aggression, by diplomatic and ultimately military means, against others to improve the standing of their own government, country or organization. ... For other uses, including people named Islam, see Islam (disambiguation). ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ...


Especially outside the U.S., Stirling has been exposed to criticism concerning his Draka series, which in the eyes of some seems to glorify (or at least exaggerate the effectiveness of) a totalitarian, racist and genocidal society. Certainly, the Draka society in the books has unrealistically few drawbacks and weaknesses (except from a moral viewpoint) apart from a stated slower scientific progress (which does not really figure in or reduce their success in the novels). Also, their protagonists are described in a very positive light, as men and women of honor, even as they conquer and brutally subjugate a whole world.


Stirling's critics also accuse him of giving the Draka unfair advantages. For example, the WW2 Draka have weapons far too advanced for that time period. Stirling in no way sufficiently explains how the Draka could get so far ahead technologically from the rest of the world. For example, the Hond III main battle tank was described as having a 120mm smoothbore, high velocity gun firing a depleted uranium APFSDS round (armor piercing, fin stabilized, self discarding sabot). This description very closely resembles the American M1A1 which did not come into being until the late 1980s. The Draka also has an assault rifle with a 5mm round and a three round burst mode with a 75 round ammo drum. Consider that the US M16A2 has a 5.56mm round, a three round burst mode, and a 90 round drum magazine. The Draka also have their version of the American MLRS (multiple launch rocket system) which fire massive rockets filled with grenade sized submunitions which scatter over the kill box. All of these technologies are very advanced and don't belong in World War 2.


Stirling also tied up the Americans in Asia in World War 2 by making all of Japan's Asian territory heavily industrially developed, thus making the war in the Pacific much tougher, longer, and costlier than in reality.


He is known to be dismayed by this analysis of his work. He describes the Draka series as dystopias based on "suppos[ing that] everything had turned out as badly as possible, these last few centuries"[1]. The title page of one of his novels (Conquistador) has the quotation "There is a technical term for someone who confuses the opinions of a character in a book with those of the author. That term is idiot." A dystopia (alternatively, cacotopia[1], kakotopia or anti-utopia) is a fictional society that is the antithesis of utopia. ...

The main single reason that such criticism and accusations continue to be leveled at Stirling despite his repeated rebuttals seems to be the shocking way in which "The Stone Dogs" ends, with the Draka victorious and all but a small handful of humanity facing no other options than committ suicide or becoming chattel slaves for the rest of their lives, without the sligtest prospect or release and with their children genetiacllay altered so that the very thought of rebellion would be inconceivable to them.


Of course, there is no rule which says that every book must have a happy end, and certainly not books defined as dystopias. However, the classical structure of most well-known dystopias (such as Zamiatin's "We", Huxley's "Brave New World" and Orwell's "Nineteen Eighty-Four") is to start off with the opressive regime already long since in place, and have a single dissident or at most a small handful of them courageously rebelling - in which case their being finally broken is hardly a surprise (if if the reader is still shcoked). To the contrary Stirling, througout the book, presents the Alliance for Democracy, the Drakas' arch-enemy, as a strong vibrant power, fully their match, whose victory would have been an entirely plausible result and the one which an averge reader would expect. Yevgeny Zamyatin Yevgeny Ivanovich Zamyatin (Евге́ний Ива́нович Замя́тин sometimes translated into English as Eugene Zamyatin) (February 1, 1884 – March 10, 1937) was a Russian author, most famous for his novel We, a story of dystopian future which influenced George Orwells Nineteen Eighty-Four and Aldous Huxleys Brave New World. ... We is the nominative case of the first-person plural pronoun in English. ... Huxley may refer to one of: Thomas Henry Huxley, British biologist, supporter of Darwin and inventor of the term agnosticism Leonard Huxley, British writer and editor, son of Thomas Henry Leonard Huxley Australian physicist Aldous Leonard Huxley, British writer, son of Leonard Sir Julian Sorell Huxley, British biologist and author... Book cover of Brave New World. ... Orwell (or Orwellian) can refer to: The writer Eric Blairs pen name, George Orwell and his books The River Orwell in Suffolk, England The village of Orwell in Cambridgeshire, England A number of places in the United States: Orwell Township, Minnesota Orwell, New York Orwell, Ohio Orwell Township, Pennsylvania... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


This makes the actual result presented by this writer all the more shocking to the reader, and opens Stirling - fairly or not - to the repeated accusation that he actualy wanted The Bad Guys (and Gals) to win becuase he likes them and is actually on their side (an accusation never hurled at Huxley or Orwell). Some of Stirling's critics in this respect also cite his earlier and lesser-known Fifth Millenium Series, which also depicts some struggles where homicidal sadists and rapists gain a devastating final victory over far more decent and sympathetic characters.

Stirling has also been accused of being markedly anti-Christian in his writing, particularly vis à vis Christians and Wicca (re: "Dies the Fire" series). This accusation is questionable, however, in that there are numerous positive depictions of Christian characters in the "DTF" series, e.g., the Hutton family, and positive references to surviving Christian communities, e.g., the monks of the Benedictine Abbey at Mount Angel. Furthermore, one of the heroic figures in his Draka trilogy was Sr. Marya Sokolowska, a devout Polish nun who was a major perspective character and resistance figure in "Under The Yoke."


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