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Encyclopedia > Ryutaro Hashimoto
Ryutaro Hashimoto
Ryutaro Hashimoto

In office
January 11, 1996 – July 30, 1998
Monarch Akihito
Preceded by Tomiichi Murayama
Succeeded by Keizo Obuchi

Born July 29, 1937(1937-07-29)
Soja, Okayama Prefecture Japan
Died July 1, 2006 (aged 68)
Tokyo, Japan
Nationality Japanese
Political party Liberal Democratic Party
Religion Buddhism and Shinto

Ryutaro Hashimoto (橋本龍太郎 Hashimoto Ryūtarō, July 29, 1937 - July 1, 2006) was a Japanese politician who served as the 82nd and 83rd Prime Minister of Japan from January 11, 1996 to July 30, 1998. He was the leader of one of the largest factions within the ruling LDP through most of the 1990s and remained a powerful back-room player in Japanese politics until scandal forced him to resign his leadership position in 2004. Disgraced, he chose not to stand in the general election of 2005, and effectively retired from politics. He died on July 1, 2006 at a Tokyo hospital. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Emblem of the Office of Prime Minister of Japan Kantei, Official residence of PM The Prime Minister of Japan ) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... For Prince Komatsu, see Prince Komatsu Akihito. ... Tomiichi Murayama Tomiichi Murayama (村山 富市 Murayama Tomiichi, born March 3, 1924) was the 81st Prime Minister of Japan from June 30, 1994 to January 11, 1996 and was replaced by Ryutaro Hashimoto. ... Keizo Obuchi Keizo Obuchi (小渕恵三; Obuchi Keizō June 25, 1937–May 14, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 84th Prime Minister of Japan from July 30, 1998 to April 5, 2000. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sōja (総社市; -shi) is a city located in Okayama, Japan. ... Okayama Prefecture ) is located in the ChÅ«goku region on HonshÅ« island, Japan. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tokyo (東京; Tōkyō, lit. ... This section needs to be updated. ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... Shinto ) is the native religion of Japan and was once its state religion. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Emblem of the Office of Prime Minister of Japan Kantei, Official residence of PM The Prime Minister of Japan ) is the usual English-language term used for the head of government of Japan, although the literal translation of the Japanese name for the office is Prime Minister of the Cabinet. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), also known as Jiyū Minshutō (自由民主党, more often abbreviated to Jimin-tō 自民党) is the largest Japanese political party as of 2004. ... For a breakdown of the results by block district with maps, see Results of Japan general election, 2005 Japan held a nationwide election to the House of Representatives, the more powerful lower house of the National Diet, on 11 September 2005, about two years before the end of the term... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Early political life

He was born in Sōja City, Okayama Prefecture. His father, Hashimoto Ryogo, was a cabinet minister under Prime Minister Nobusuke Kishi. Following his father's lead, Ryutaro received his degree in political science from Keio University in 1960, and was elected to the House of Representatives of Japan in 1963. Map showing location of Soja in Okayama Prefecture (as of 2006). ... Okayama Prefecture ) is located in the ChÅ«goku region on HonshÅ« island, Japan. ... Nobusuke Kishi Nobusuke Kishi (岸 信介 Kishi Nobusuke, November 13, 1896–August 7, 1987) was a Japanese politician and the 56th and 57th Prime Minister of Japan from February 25, 1957 to June 12, 1958 and from then to July 19, 1960. ... Keio University ) is one of the oldest private universities in Japan. ... The House of Representatives ) is the lower house of the Diet of Japan. ...


He moved through the ranks of the Liberal Democratic Party over the next twenty years, landing a spot as Minister of Health and Welfare under premier Ohira Masayoshi in 1978, and in 1980 became the LDP's director of finance and public administration. He again became a cabinet minister in 1986 under Nakasone Yasuhiro, and in [1989 became secretary general of the LDP, the highest rank short of prime minister. This section needs to be updated. ... Masayoshi Ōhira (大平 正芳 Ōhira Masayoshi March 12, 1910–June 12, 1980) was a Japanese politician and the 68th and 69th Prime Minister of Japan from December 7, 1978 to June 12, 1980. ... Yasuhiro Nakasone Yasuhiro Nakasone (中曽根 康弘 Nakasone Yasuhiro, b. ...


Hashimoto became a key figure in the strong LDP faction founded by Tanaka Kakuei in the 1970s, which later fell into the hands of Takeshita Noboru, who then was tainted by the Recruit scandal of 1988. The LDP momentarily lost power following the collapse of the bubble economy, and in 1991, the press discovered that one of Hashimoto's secretaries had been involved in an illegal financial dealing. Hashimoto retired as Minister of Finance, but was almost immediately brought back to the cabinet, this time under coalition premier Murayama Tomiichi as Minister of International Trade and Industry. As the chief of MITI, Hashimoto made himself known at meetings of APEC and at summit conferences. Tanaka shook hands with his similarly-embattled contemporary, U.S. President Richard Nixon, during a Washington visit in July of 1973. ... Noboru Takeshita (竹下 登 Takeshita Noboru February 26, 1924–June 19, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 74th Prime Minister of Japan from November 6, 1987 to June 3, 1989. ... The Recruit Scandal was an insider trading and corruption scandal that forced many prominent Japanese politicians to resign in 1988. ... An economic bubble occurs when speculation in a commodity causes the price to increase, thus producing more speculation. ... Tomiichi Murayama (村山 富市 Murayama Tomiichi) (born March 3, 1924) was the 81st Prime Minister of Japan from June 30, 1994 to January 11, 1996 and was replaced by Ryutaro Hashimoto. ... The Ministry of International Trade and Industry (通商産業省 Tsūsho-sangyō-shō or MITI) was the single most powerful agency in the Japanese government during the 1950s and 1960s. ... APEC may refer to: Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Action Programme on the Elimination of Child Labour Advanced Placement European Civilization Atlantic Provinces Economic Council This article consisting of a 4-letter acronym or initialism is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ...


Prime Minister

Bill Clinton meets Hashimoto at the Akasaka Palace.
Bill Clinton meets Hashimoto at the Akasaka Palace.

When Murayama stepped down in 1996, the LDP elected Hashimoto to become Japan's next prime minister. Image File history File links Clinton_Hashimoto_1996. ... Image File history File links Clinton_Hashimoto_1996. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... State Guest-House Akasaka Palace The State Guest-House ) is a facility in which the government of Japan accommodates visiting state dignitaries. ...


Hashimoto's popularity was largely based on his attitude. When asked about why Japanese car dealerships did not sell American cars, he answered, "Why doesn't IBM sell Fujitsu computers?" When Japan's economy did not seem to be recovering from its 1991 collapse, Hashimoto ordered a commission of experts from the private sector to look into improving the Japanese market for foreign competition, and eventually opening it completely. This gave Hashimoto the political capital he needed to dissolve the Diet in 1996 and win re-election. For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... For the district in Saga, Japan, see Fujitsu, Saga. ... The National Diet of Japan ) is Japans legislature. ...


During the Upper House elections 1998, the LDP lost its majority. Hashimoto resigned to take responsibility for this failure, and was succeeded as Prime Minister by Foreign Minister Keizo Obuchi. The House of Councillors chamber, in the National Diet Building in Tokyo. ... Keizo Obuchi Keizo Obuchi (小渕恵三; Obuchi Keizō June 25, 1937–May 14, 2000) was a Japanese politician and the 84th Prime Minister of Japan from July 30, 1998 to April 5, 2000. ...


Later political life

Hashimoto remained in the upper echelons of the LDP and led his faction for several more years. In 2001, he was one of the main candidates in the running to replace Yoshiro Mori as prime minister, but he lost the primary election to the more popular Junichiro Koizumi. Yoshiro Mori Yoshiro Mori (森 喜朗 Mori Yoshirō, born July 14, 1937) is a Japanese politician who served as the 85th and 86th Prime Minister of Japan from April 5, 2000 to April 26, 2001. ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. ...


Hashimoto's faction began to collapse late in 2003 while debating over whether to re-elect Koizumi. In 2004, Hashimoto stepped down as faction leader when he was found to have accepted a ¥100 million check from the Japan Dental Association, and announced that he would not run for re-election in his lower house district.


Family

The current governor of Kōchi Prefecture, Daijiro Hashimoto, is his half-brother. Kōchi Prefecture ) is located on the south coast of Shikoku, Japan. ...


House of Representatives member Gaku Hashimoto is his second son. Gaku Hashimoto born February 5, 1974) is a Japanese politician of the Liberal Democratic Party, a member of the House of Representatives in the Diet (national legislature). ...


Trivia

Ryutaro Hashimoto achieved the level of sixth degree black belt (6th dan) in Kendo, the art of Japanese fencing. On World Water Day (March 22) in 2004, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan established a global Advisory Board on Water and Sanitation, and appointed Mr. Ryutaro Hashimoto as its Chairman. Just prior to his death, Ryutaro Hashimoto submitted a letter addressed to "The People of the World," for publication in the book Water Voices from Around The World (October 2007), which is a book affiliated with the United Nations' decade of water (2005-2015). In his letter, Mr. Hashimoto addresses water-related disasters around the world, with an urgent appeal to the United Nations to halve the number of deaths caused by water disasters by 2015. Mr. Hashimoto closes this letter by writing: "An old proverb says 'Dripping water wears away the stone.' I humbly suggest, that through steadfast efforts, we can overcome any osbtacle our civilization may encounter in the coming decade." This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Kendo ), or way of the sword, is the martial art of Japanese fencing. ...


External links

  • Reuters. (July 1, 2006). Former Japan PM Hashimoto dies at 68. In Chinadaily.com. Retrieved on July 23, 2006.
  • Water Voices from Around The World. (October 17, 2007). Hashimoto's letter addressed To People of the World.
  • Junichiro Koizumi. August 8, 2006. Memorial Address at the Joint Memorial Service by the Cabinet and Liberal Democratic Party for the Late Mr. Ryutaro Hashimoto. [1] Retrieved on February 9, 2007.
Preceded by
Tomiichi Murayama
Prime Minister of Japan
1996-1998
Succeeded by
Keizo Obuchi

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ryutaro Hashimoto - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (691 words)
Ryutaro Hashimoto (橋本龍太郎 Hashimoto Ryūtarō, July 29, 1937 - July 1, 2006) was a Japanese politician who served as the 82nd and 83rd Prime Minister of Japan from January 11, 1996 to July 30, 1998.
Hashimoto become a key figure in the strong LDP faction founded by Kakuei Tanaka in the 1970s, which later fell into the hands of Noboru Takeshita, who then was tainted by the Recruit scandal of 1988.
In 2004, Hashimoto stepped down as faction leader when he was found to have accepted a ¥100 million check from the Japan Dental Association, and announced that he would not run for re-election in his lower house district.
Printable Version on Encyclopedia.com (190 words)
Hashimoto became LDP leader in 1995 and soon assumed the post of deputy prime minister in Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama 's cabinet.
Hashimoto resigned in 1998 after LDP losses in elections for the upper house of parliament; he was succeeded by Keizo Obuchi.
In April, after Mori resigned, Hashimoto made a bid for the prime ministership but was defeated by Junichiro Koizumi, an insurgent supported by the LDP rank and file.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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