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Encyclopedia > Ryman Auditorium
The Ryman Auditorium
The Ryman Auditorium

The Ryman Auditorium is a 2,362-seat live performance venue located at 116 Fifth Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee, and is best-known as the one-time home of the Grand Ole Opry. Download high resolution version (1200x1426, 337 KB)The Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Download high resolution version (1200x1426, 337 KB)The Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nickname: Music City Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area    - City 1362. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The Grand Ole Opry is a weekly Saturday night country music radio program broadcast live on WSM radio in Nashville, Tennessee, and televised on Great American Country network. ...


The auditorium was first opened as the Union Gospel Tabernacle in 1892. It was built by Thomas Ryman (1843–1904), a riverboat captain and Nashville businessman. After his death, the Tabernacle was renamed Ryman Auditorium in his honor. A first class tourist riverboat High speed planing riverboat High speed hydrofoil riverboat Local passenger transport craft Riverboat specialized for cargo truck transport Self propelled gravel barge M.V. Splendid China layout A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ...


The Ryman was also the home of Trevecca Nazarene University for several years.[citation needed]


It was used for Grand Ole Opry broadcasts from 1943 until 1974, when the Opry built a larger venue just outside Nashville at the Opryland USA theme park. The Ryman then sat mostly vacant until 1994 when it was restored and reopened as a performance venue and museum. Audiences at the Ryman find themselves sitting in pews, the 1994 renvovation notwithstanding. The seating is a reminder of the auditorium's origins as a house of worship. See also: 1942 in music, other events of 1943, 1944 in music and the list of years in music. // Events January 1, 1943 - Frank Sinatra appears at The Paramount causing a mob scene of hysterical bobby-soxers to flood Times Square and blocking midtown New York City traffic for hours... See also: 1973 in music, other events of 1974, 1975 in music, 1970s in music and the list of years in music // January - The Ramones form. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Many of the greats of country music have performed at the Ryman over the years, including Roy Acuff, Johnny Cash, Garth Brooks, Patsy Cline, Tennessee Ernie Ford, Emmylou Harris, George Jones, Loretta Lynn, Glen Campbell, Reba McEntire, Dolly Parton, Marty Robbins, Ernest Tubb, Dottie West, Hank Williams, and Tammy Wynette. This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Roy Acuff on the cover of The Great Roy Acuff (1964) Roy Claxton Acuff (15 September 1903 – 23 November 1992) was an American country musician. ... Johnny Cash (born J. R. Cash, February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was an influential American country and rock and roll singer and songwriter. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Patsy Cline (born Virginia Patterson Hensley September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963) was a Country music/Pop music singer, who enjoyed Pop music cross-over success during the era of the Nashville Sound in the early 1960s. ... Ernest Jennings Ford (February 13, 1919 -October 17, 1991), better known by the stage name Tennessee Ernie Ford, was a pioneering U.S. recording artist and television host who enjoyed success in the country & western, pop, and gospel musical genres. ... Emmylou Harris, ca. ... George Glenn Jones (born September 12, 1931), is an American country music artist known for his distinctive voice and phrasing that frequently evoke the raw emotions caused by grief, unhappy love, and emotional hardship. ... Loretta Lynn (born April 14, 1934) is an American country singer who was the leading country female vocalist during much of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Glen Campbell, December 2004 This article is about the singer. ... Reba Nell McEntire (b. ... Dolly Rebecca Parton (born January 19, 1946) is an American Grammy-winning and Academy Award-nominated country singer, songwriter, composer, author, actress, and philanthropist. ... Marty Robbins, (September 26, 1925, Glendale, Arizona - December 8, 1982), was an American Country & Western Hall of Fame musician. ... Ernest Dale Tubb (February 9, 1914 - September 6, 1984), nicknamed the Texas Troubadour, was an American singer and songwriter and one of the pioneers of country music. ... Dottie West, born Dorothy Marie Marsh (October 11, 1932 in McMinnville, Tennessee–September 4, 1991 in Nashville, Tennessee) was a United States country music singer. ... Hiram Hank King Williams (September 17, 1923 – January 1, 1953) was an American singer, guitarist, and songwriter, who has become an icon of country music and Rock n Roll, and one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. ... Tammy Wynette (May 5, 1942 – April 6, 1998) was a country singer and songwriter. ...


Besides country, the venue also features alternative, bluegrass, blues, classical, gospel, jazz, pop, and rock, as well as musical theatre. Alternative rock (also called alternative music[1] or simply alternative) is a genre of rock music that emerged in the 1980s and became widely popular in the 1990s. ... Bluegrass music is considered a form of American roots music with its own roots in English, Irish and Scottish traditional music. ... The blues is a vocal and instrumental form of music based on the use of the blue notes and a repetitive pattern that typically follows a twelve-bar structure. ... Classical music is a broad, somewhat imprecise term, referring to music produced in, or rooted in the traditions of, European art, ecclesiastical and concert music, encompassing a broad period from roughly 1000 to the present day. ... Gospel music may refer to the religious music that first came out of African-American churches in the first quarter of the twentieth century or, more loosely, to both black gospel music and to the religious music composed and sung by predominately white Southern Gospel artists. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Musical theater (or theatre) is a form of theatre combining music, songs, dance, and spoken dialogue. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ...


Among the countless other artists who have performed on the Ryman stage are Elvis Presley, Tallulah Bankhead, Ethel Barrymore, Sarah Bernhardt, Victor Borge, Ryan Adams, Bright Eyes, Fanny Brice, James Brown, The Byrds, Enrico Caruso, Carol Channing, Charlie Chaplin, Neil Diamond, The String Cheese Incident, W.C. Fields, Betty Grable, Helen Hayes, Katharine Hepburn, Bob Hope, Anna Pavlova, and Van Morrison. Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... Tallulah Brockman Bankhead (January 31, 1902 - December 12, 1968) was an American actress, talk-show host and bon vivant. ... Ethel Barrymore (August 15, 1879 - June 18, 1959) was an Academy Award-winning American actress and a member of the famous Barrymore family. ... Sarah Bernhardt (portrait by Nadar) Sarah Bernhardt (October 23, 1844 – March 26, 1923) was a French stage actress. ... Musician/Comedian Victor Borge For the Cape Verdean politician, see Víctor Borges. ... Not to be confused with Bryan Adams Ryan Adams (born David Ryan Adams on November 5, 1974) is an alt-country/rock singer-songwriter from Jacksonville, North Carolina. ... Bright Eyes is a band consisting of singer-songwriter/guitarist Conor Oberst, multi-instrumentalist/producer Mike Mogis, Nate Walcott, and a rotating lineup of collaborators drawn primarily from Omahas indie music scene. ... Fanny Brice, early Ziegfeld Follies portrait photograph // Biography Fanny Brice (October 29, 1891 – May 29, 1951) was a United States comedienne, singer, and entertainer. ... James Brown, known variously as: Soul Brother Number One, the Godfather of Soul, Mr. ... The Byrds (formed in Los Angeles, California, in 1964) were an American rock band. ... Enrico Caruso (February 25, 1873–August 2, 1921) was one of the most famous tenors in the history of opera. ... Carol Channing, ca. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... Essential Neil Diamond album cover. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... W. C. Fields (January 29, 1880 - December 25, 1946) was an American comedian and actor. ... Betty Grable Ruth Elizabeth Betty Grable (December 18, 1916 – July 3, 1973) was an American actress, singer, and pin-up girl whose famous bathing-suit poster was an icon of the World War II era. ... Helen Hayes (October 10, 1900 – March 17, 1993) was a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress whose successful and award-winning career spanned almost 70 years. ... Katharine Houghton Hepburn (May 12, 1907 – June 29, 2003) was an iconic four-time Academy Award-winning American star of film, television and stage, widely recognized for her sharp wit, New England gentility and fierce independence. ... Bob Hope, KBE (May 29, 1903 – July 27, 2003), born Leslie Townes Hope, was an English-born American entertainer who appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway, on radio and television, in movies, and in performing tours for U.S. Military personnel. ... Photographic postcard of Anna Pavlova as Aspicia in The Pharoahs Daughter, circa 1910 Anna Pavlova as Nikiya in the Grand Pas Classique of the Shades from Act III of La Bayadere, circa 1902 Anna Pavlova is also the name of an Olympic gymnast. ... Van Morrison OBE (born August 31, 1945 as George Ivan Morrison) is a singer and songwriter from Belfast, Northern Ireland. ...


Ryman Auditorium has been featured in several movies, including Robert Altman's Nashville (1975) starring David Arkin, Barbara Baxley, Ned Beatty, and Karen Black; Coal Miner's Daughter (1980) starring Sissy Spacek and Tommy Lee Jones; and Sweet Dreams (1985) starring Jessica Lange and Ed Harris. Neil Young used the venue in his powerful 2006 film Heart Of Gold This article is about motion pictures. ... Robert Bernard Altman (February 20, 1925 – November 20, 2006) was an American film director known for making films that are highly naturalistic, but with a stylized perspective. ... Nashville is a 1975 film which mixes themes of U.S. presidential politics with those of the country music and gospel music businesses in Nashville, Tennessee. ... // January 28 - George Lucas creates the second draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... David Arkin (b. ... Ned Beatty Ned Thomas Beatty (born July 6, 1937) is an American character actor. ... Black in Five Easy Pieces, 1970 Karen Black (born July 1, 1939) is an Oscar-nominated American actress, screenwriter, singer and songwriter. ... DVD cover Loretta Lynn published her autobiography, Coal Miners Daughter, in the mid-70s. ... // Events April 30 - The Roger Daltrey film, McVicar, opens in London. ... Mary Elizabeth Sissy Spacek (born December 25, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning American actress and singer. ... For the musician, see Tommy Lee. ... Sweet Dreams is a 1985 biographical film which tells the life story of country music singer Patsy Cline. ... // Back to the Future, starring Michael J. Fox, Christopher Lloyd and Lea Thompson Rambo: First Blood Part II, starring Sylvester Stallone Rocky IV, starring Sylvester Stallone The Color Purple, starring Whoopi Goldberg, Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey, Margaret Avery, Rae Dawn Chong, Adolph Caesar Out of Africa, starring Meryl Streep and... Jessica Lange in The Glass Menagerie (2005) Jessica Phyllis Lange (born April 20, 1949 in Cloquet, Minnesota) is a two-time Academy Award-winning American actress. ... Ed Harris as Richard Brown in The Hours Edward Allen Ed Harris (born November 28, 1950) is a four-time Academy Award-nominated American actor, director and producer. ... Neil Percival Young OM (born November 12, 1945, Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, guitarist and film director who grew up during his teen years in Winnipeg, Manitoba. ... Fuck wiki This article is about the fictional spaceship. ...


In 2001, the Ryman Auditorium was designated National Historic Landmark No. 71000819 and included in the National Register of Historic Places. USS Constitution. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


The Ryman Auditorium was named Pollstar Magazine's National Theatre of the Year for both 2003 and 2004, beating out such venues as New York's Radio City Music Hall and Hollywood's Gibson Universal Amphitheater. Radio City Music Hall at Christmas 2005 Radio City Music Hall is an entertainment venue located in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... The Gibson (formerly Universal) Amphitheatre is a theater located in Universal City, California, USA. It was originally built in 1972 as an outdoor venue, but was remodeled and converted into an indoor theater in 1982. ...


Each dressing room behind the stage is dedicated to a legendary performer, including Johnny Cash and Minnie Pearl (among others). Johnny Cash (born J. R. Cash, February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was an influential American country and rock and roll singer and songwriter. ... Minnie Pearl Minnie Pearl was the stage name of Sarah Ophelia Colley Cannon (October 25, 1912 – March 4, 1996). ...


The visitor tour claims that the Ryman Auditorium has been rated as having the second best acoustics in the world (after the Mormon Tabernacle Choir's home, the Salt Lake Tabernacle). Acoustics is a branch of physics and is the study of sound (mechanical waves in gases, liquids, and solids). ... The Mormon Tabernacle Choir is a large choir of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (the Mormons). ... The Salt Lake Tabernacle, known worldwide as the Mormon Tabernacle, is located in Temple Square in Salt Lake City, Utah along with the Salt Lake Assembly Hall and Salt Lake Temple. ...


See also

The Academy of Country Music (ACM) was founded in 1964 in Los Angeles, California. ... The Country Music Association (CMA) was founded in 1958 in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This official history of the Country Music Hall of Fame skirts the scandals well-documented by veteran Music Row historian Stacy Harris. ... This is an alphabetical list of country music performers. ...

External links

Screenshot from MapQuest MapQuest is a map publisher and free online Web Map Service, owned by AOL. The company was founded in 1967 as Cartographic Services , a division of R.R. Donnelley & Sons in Chicago, Illinois. ...

References

  • Eiland, William. Nashville's Mother Church: The History of the Ryman Auditorium. Nashville, 1992.
  • Graham, Eleanor, ed. Nashville, A Short History and Selected Buildings. Hist. Comm. of Metro-Nashville-Davidson Co., 1974.
  • Hagan, Chet. Grand Ole Opry. New York, 1989.
  • Henderson, Jerry. "A History of the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee, 1892-1920." (Ph. D. Diss., Louisiana State University) Baton Rouge, Louisiana, 1962.

Coordinates: 36°09′40.56″N, 86°46′42.63″W Nickname: Music City Location in Davidson County and the state of Tennessee Coordinates: Country United States State Tennessee Counties Davidson County Founded: 1779 Incorporated: 1806  - Mayor Bill Purcell (D) Area    - City 1362. ... Originally, a landmark literally meant a geographic feature used by explorers and others to find their way back or through an area. ... The BellSouth Building The BellSouth Building (also known as BellSouth Tower) is a 188-meter (617-foot), 33-story skyscraper at 333 Commerce Street in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Bicentennial Mall State Park is a state park is located in the shadow of the State Capitol in downtown Nashville, TN. The 19-acre park is designed to complement the Tennessee Capitol Building, give visitors a taste of Tennessees history and natural wonder, and to serve as a lasting... Centennial Park (Nashville) is a large urban park located approximately two miles (three km) west of downtown Nashville, Tennessee, across West End Avenue (U.S. Highway 70S) from the campus of Vanderbilt University and adjacent to the headquarters campus of the Hospital Corporation of America. ... Nashvilles Cheekwood. ... Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum 2001 - Present The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum is a museum at 222 Fifth Avenue South in Nashville, Tennessee, United States. ... Fort Nashborough was the original stockade for the settlement that became Nashville, Tennessee. ... Fort Negley was a fortification built for the American Civil War, located approximately two miles (three km) south of downtown Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Frist Center for the Visual Arts is an art museum in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Gaylord Entertainment Center (originally named Nashville Arena) is an all-purpose venue in downtown Nashville, Tennessee which was completed in 1996. ... Gaylord Opryland Resort & Convention Center, formerly known as Opryland Hotel, is a large hotel and convention center owned by Gaylord Entertainment Company and located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Herschel Greer Stadium is a minor league baseball stadium located in Nashville, Tennessee on the grounds of Fort Negley, an American Civil War fortification located approximately two miles (three km) south of downtown Nashville. ... LP Field is a football stadium in Nashville, Tennessee, used primarily as the home stadium of the NFLs Tennessee Titans, but also used by Tennessee State University. ... Memorial Gymnasium is a multi-purpose facility located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nashville City Cemetery is the oldest public cemetery in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Nashville International Airport (IATA: BNA, ICAO: KBNA) is an airport in southeastern Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Nashville Zoo at Grassmere is a zoo located six miles (10 km) southeast of downtown Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Parthenon in Nashvilles Centennial Park is a full-scale reconstruction of the original Greek Parthenon A full-scale replica of the Parthenon in Athens was built in 1897 in Nashville, Tennessee in the United States, as part of Tennessees Centennial Exposition; Nashville has long been dubbed the... The Schermerhorn Symphony Center is a symphony center in downtown Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Shelby Street Bridge (sometimes called the Shelby Avenue Bridge) spans the Cumberland River in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Starwood Amphitheatre is the primary outdoor music venue in the Nashville, Tennessee area. ... The revamped façade of the Tennessee Performing Arts Center in Nashville opened in 2003. ... The Tennessee State Capitol, located in Nashville, Tennessee, is the home of the Tennessee legislature. ... The image of Andrew Jackson exhibited at Nashville museum in 1823 Tennessee State Museum is a large museum in Nashville depicting the history of Tennessee. ... The Hermitage The Tomb of Andrew and Rachel Jackson is located in the Hermitage garden. ... Nashvilles Union Station is a former railroad terminal opened in 1900 to serve the passenger operations of the eight railroads then providing passenger service to Nashville, Tennessee. ... Vanderbilt Stadium (originally known as Dudley Field) is a football stadium located in Nashville, Tennessee. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Sulphur Dell is the name of a former Minor League Baseball park in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
GHOSTS OF THE RYMAN AUDITORIUM INVESTIGATION (1376 words)
In later years, as crowds began to come to the auditorium for entertainment, the folks who sat in the gallery were known for their rowdy behavior...
It was during the funeral that a change of name was proposed for the place and it became the Ryman Auditorium.
In the early 1990's, the Ryman was closed to the public for a period while it was undergoing renovations.
Ryman Auditorium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (438 words)
The Ryman Auditorium is a 2,362-seat live performance venue located at 116 Fifth Avenue North in Nashville, Tennessee, and is best-known as the one-time home of the Grand Ole Opry.
It was built by Thomas Ryman (1843–1904), a riverboat captain and Nashville businessman.
The Ryman Auditorium was named Pollstar Magazine's National Theatre of the Year for both 2003 and 2004, beating out such venues as New York's Radio City Music Hall and Hollywood's Universal Amphitheater.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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