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Encyclopedia > Ryanair
Ryanair
IATA
FR
ICAO
RYR
Callsign
RYANAIR
Founded 1985
Focus cities
Fleet size 165 plus 137 on order
Destinations 132
Headquarters Flag of Ireland Dublin, Ireland
Key people Michael O'Leary (CEO)
Michael Cawley (Deputy Chief Executive and Chief Operating Officer)
Website: http://www.ryanair.com

Ryanair' (ISEQ: RYA, LSE: RYA, NASDAQRYAAY) is an Irish airline with headquarters in Dublin and its biggest operational base at London Stansted Airport in the UK. It is Europe's largest low-cost carrier. As of 31 July 2007, Ryanair operates 516 routes across 26 countries from 26 bases[1]. Ryanair has been characterised by rapid expansion, a result of the deregulation of the air industry in Europe in 1997. Ryanair is the third largest airline in Europe in terms of passenger numbers.[2] For the unrelated European low-cost carrier, see Ryanair. ... Image File history File links Ryanair_Logo. ... IATA airline designators, sometimes called IATA reservation codes, are two-character codes assigned by the International Air Transport Association (IATA) to the worlds airlines in accordance with the provisions of Resolution 762. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with ICAO airline code. ... Most airlines employ a distinctive and internationally recognised call sign that is normally spoken during airband radio transmissions as a prefix to the flight number. ... In the airline industry, a focus city is a location that is not a hub, but from which the airline has flights to at least several destinations other than its hubs. ... Dublin Airport (IATA Airport Code; DUB, ICAO Airport Code; EIDW) is Irelands main airport. ... The lawn in front of Stansted Airport used to attract large numbers of people waiting for their flight during the summer. ... Orio al Serio International Airport (IATA: BGY, ICAO: LIME) is an airport located in Bergamo, near Milan, Italy and it serves the low-cost traffic of Milan. ... Ciampino Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Roma-Ciampino) or Giovan Battista Pastine Airport (IATA: CIA, ICAO: LIRA) is a joint civilian, commercial and military airport near Rome in Italy. ... Shannon Airport (IATA Airport Code; SNN, ICAO Airport Code; EINN) is Irelands main transatlantic airport. ... Galileo Galilei International Airport (IATA: PSA, ICAO: LIRP) is an airport located in Pisa, Italy. ... Charleroi Brussels South, also called Brussels South Airport or Brussels South Charleroi Airport (BSCA), is located near Charleroi, 46 km from central Brussels, Belgium. ... For the NATO Military use of this facility, see Hahn Air Base Frankfurt-Hahn Airport (German: Flughafen Frankfurt-Hahn) (IATA: HHN, ICAO: EDFH) is a commercial airport located 10 km (6. ... Cork Airport (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) or Aerfort Chorcaí in Irish. ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is an airport serving the English city of Liverpool. ... Glasgow Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick Airport (Scottish Gaelic: ) (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is an international airport serving Glasgow, situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately north of London. ... Girona-Costa Brava Airport (IATA: GRO, ICAO: LEGE) is an airport located twelve kilometres south from the city of Girona, next to the small village of Vilobí dOnyar, in the north-east of Catalonia, Spain. ... Stockholm Skavsta Airport (IATA: NYO), Skavsta Flygplats, is located 100km south of Stockholm, Sweden in the municipality of Nyköping, spoken Nueschoeping. ... East Midlands Airport[1] (IATA: EMA, ICAO: EGNX) is an airport in the East Midlands of England, near Castle Donington in Leicestershire. ... New Terminal 4 Interior Madrid Barajas International Airport (IATA: MAD, ICAO: LEMD), located northeast of Madrids city center, is the most important international and domestic gateway in Spain, the Iberian Peninsula and southern Europe. ... , Marseille Provence Airport or Aéroport de Marseille Provence (IATA: MRS, ICAO: LFML) is an airport located 27 km northwest of Marseille[1], on the territory of Marignane, both communes of the Bouches-du-Rhône département in the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... Bremen Airport or Flughafen Bremen (IATA: BRE, ICAO: EDDW) serves the city of Bremen, Germany. ... Airport Weeze or Niederrhein Airport (IATA: NRN, ICAO: EDLV) is an airport situated in the small municipality of Weeze in the Niederrhein (Lower Rhineland) of western Germany. ... The passenger terminal at Bristol International Airport, Lulsgate Bristol International Airport (IATA airport code: BRS) is the main commercial airport serving Bristol and its surrounding lands in England, UK. History In 1927 a group of local businessmen raised £6,000 through public subscriptions to inaugurate a flying club at Filton... Valencia Airport on Manises (IATA: VLC, ICAO: LEVC) is the main airport for business travellers to Valencia and summer travellers to the Costa del Azahar. ... Alicante International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Alicante), (IATA: ALC, ICAO: LEAL), originally named El Altet, is the main airport for the regions of Alicante and Murcia in Spain. ... Belfast City Tower George Best Belfast City Airport (IATA: BHD, ICAO: EGAC) is an airport in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Shown within Dorset. ... There is also a airport located on the border of the city of Birmingham and borough of Solihull (and mostly in the latter) in the West Midlands, England. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Edinburgh Airport (IATA: EDI, ICAO: EGPH) is located in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was the busiest airport in Scotland in 2007, handling 9,037,200 passengers. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Ireland. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Michael OLeary, see Michael OLeary (disambiguation). ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... ... The Irish Stock Exchange (ISE) is Irelands stock exchange and can trace its history to 1793. ... The Source by Greyworld, in the new LSE building Paternoster Square. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... An Airbus A380 of Emirates Airline An airline provides air transport services for passengers or freight. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... The lawn in front of Stansted Airport used to attract large numbers of people waiting for their flight during the summer. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A Ryanair Boeing 737-800 A low-cost carrier or low-cost airline (also known as a no-frills or discount carrier / airline) is an airline that offers generally low fares in exchange for eliminating many traditional passenger services. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Deregulation is the process by which governments remove, reduce, or simplify restrictions on business and individuals in order to (in theory) encourage the efficient operation of markets. ...

Contents

Financials and history

Financial overview

Ryanair passenger numbers
Ryanair passenger numbers

Ryanair has grown massively since its establishment in 1985, from a small airline flying a short hop from Waterford to London, into one of Europe's largest carriers. After taking the rapidly growing airline public in 1997 the money raised was used to expand the airline into a pan-European carrier. Revenues have risen from 231 million in 1998 to some €843 million in 2003, and net profits have increased from €48 million to €239 million over the same period. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference S604123 Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 41. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For the tax agency in Ireland of the same name, see Revenue Commissioners. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ...


Half year profits for the period ended October 31, 2007 included ancillary revenue of €252 million.[3] This activity was associated with the sale of car hire, hotels, travel insurance, as well as on board sales and excess baggage revenues. Ancillary revenue now accounts for just over 16% of total revenues.


Early years

Ryanair was founded in 1985 by Cathal and Declan Ryan (after whom the company is named), Liam Lonergan (owner of an Irish tour operator named Club Travel), and noted Irish businessman Tony Ryan, founder of Guinness Peat Aviation and father of Cathal Ryan and Declan. [4] The airline began with a 15-seat Embraer Bandeirante turboprop aircraft flying between Waterford and London Gatwick [5]with the aim of breaking the duopoly on London-Ireland flights at that time held by British Airways and Aer Lingus. Dr. Tony Ryan (born 2 February 1936) is an Irish multi-millionaire and founder of Guinness Peat Aviation (GPA) and Ryanair. ... Guinness Peat Aviation was a company set up in 1975 by Dr. Tony Ryan to lease aircraft. ... EMB 110 Bandeirante The Embraer EMB 110 Bandeirante (Portuguese: Scout) is a general purpose 15-21 passenger twin-turboprop light transport aircraft suitable for military and civil duties. ... A schematic diagram showing the operation of a turboprop engine. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: , Irish Grid Reference S604123 Statistics Province: Munster County: Area: 41. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA Airport Code: LGW, ICAO Airport Code: EGKK) is Londons second airport and the second largest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... A true duopoly is a specific type of oligopoly where only two producers exist in one market. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ...


In 1986 the company added a second route – flying Dublin-London Luton in direct competition to the Aer Lingus / BA duopoly for the first time. Under partial EU Deregulation, airlines could begin new international intra-EU services as long as at least one of the two governments gave approval (the so-called "double-disapproval" regime). The Irish government at the time refused its approval in order to protect Aer Lingus, but Britain, under Margaret Thatcher's pro-free-market Conservative government, approved the service. With two routes and two planes, the fledgling airline carried 82,000 passengers in one year. For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately north of London. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ... Margaret Hilda Thatcher, Baroness Thatcher, LG, OM, PC, FRS (née Roberts; born 13 October 1925) served as British Prime Minister from 1979 to 1990 and leader of the Conservative Party from 1975 until 1990, being the first and only woman to hold either post. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...

Boeing 737-200 landing at Bristol International Airport, the type operated by the company through the 1990s and up to 2005
Boeing 737-200 landing at Bristol International Airport, the type operated by the company through the 1990s and up to 2005

Passenger numbers continued to increase, but the airline generally ran at a loss, and by 1991 was in need of restructuring. Michael O'Leary was charged with the task of making the airline profitable. Ryan encouraged him to visit the USA to study the 'low fares/no frills' model being used by Southwest Airlines. O'Leary quickly decided that the key to low fares was to implement quick turn-around times for aircraft, "no frills", and no business class, as well as operating a single model of aircraft. O'Leary returned - convinced that Ryanair could make huge inroads into the European air market, at that time dominated by national carriers which were subsidised to various degrees by their parent countries. He competed with the major airlines by providing a "no-frills", low-cost service. Flights were scheduled into regional airports, which offered lower landing and handling charges than larger established international airports. O'Leary as Chief Executive did a publicity stunts where he helped out with baggage handling on Ryanair flights at Dublin airport. By 1995, after the consistent pursuit of its low-cost business model, Ryanair celebrated its 10th birthday by carrying 2.25 million passengers.
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1193, 684 KB) Ryanair Boeing 737-200 landing at Bristol International Airport, Bristol, England. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1800x1193, 684 KB) Ryanair Boeing 737-200 landing at Bristol International Airport, Bristol, England. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... Bristol International Airport (IATA: BRS, ICAO: EGGD) is the commercial airport serving the city of Bristol and the south west of England. ... For other persons named Michael OLeary, see Michael OLeary (disambiguation). ... This article is about the American airline. ...


1992 - 1999

EU deregulation of the air industry in Europe in 1992 gave carriers from one EU country the right to operate scheduled services between other EU states, and represented a major opportunity for Ryanair. After a successful flotation on the Dublin Stock Exchange and the NASDAQ Stock exchanges, the airline launched services to Stockholm, Oslo (Sandefjord Airport, Torp, 110 km south of Oslo), Paris and Charleroi near Brussels. Flush with new capital, the airline placed a massive $2 billion order for 45 new Boeing 737-800 series aircraft in 1998. Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ... The Irish Stock Exchange (ISE) is Irelands stock exchange and can trace its history to 1793. ... NASDAQ in Times Square, New York City. ... For other uses, see Stockholm (disambiguation). ... This article is about the capital of Norway. ... Sandefjord Airport, Torp (IATA: TRF, ICAO: ENTO) (Norwegian (language): Sandefjord lufthavn, Torp) is an international airport in the municipality of Sandefjord, Vestfold south of Oslo, Norway. ... This article is about the capital of France. ... Charleroi (Walloon: TchÃ¥lerwè) is the first city and municipality of Wallonia in population. ... This article is about the settlement itself. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ...


2000-2006

The airline launched its website in 2000, with online booking initially said to be a small and unimportant part of the software supporting the site. Increasingly the online booking contributed to the aim of cutting flight prices by selling direct to passengers and excluding the costs imposed by travel agents. Within a year the website was handling three-quarters of all bookings, and now accounts for 100% of the total. The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ...


Ryanair launched a new hub of operation in Brussels South Charleroi Airport in 2001. Later that year, the airline ordered 155 new Boeing 737-800 series aircraft from Boeing at what was believed to be a substantial discount, (taking full advantage of the downturn in aeroplane orders after the slump in air travel following the September 2001 aircraft attacks in the United States) to be delivered over eight years from 2002 to 2010. Approximately 100 of these aircraft had been delivered by the end of 2005, although there were slight delays in late 2005 caused by production disruptions arising from a Boeing machinists' strike. Charleroi Brussels South, also called Brussels South Airport or Brussels South Charleroi Airport (BSCA), is located near Charleroi, 46 km from central Brussels, Belgium. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Edward Boeing. ... The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Edward Boeing. ...


In 2002 Ryanair launched 26 new routes and established a hub in Frankfurt-Hahn Airport, its European expansion firmly on track. For the NATO Military use of this facility, see Hahn Air Base Frankfurt-Hahn Airport (German: Flughafen Frankfurt-Hahn) (IATA: HHN, ICAO: EDFH) is a commercial airport located 10 km (6. ...


In 2003, Ryanair announced the order of a further 100 new Boeing 737-800 series aircraft, and in February a third continental base was opened at Milan-Bergamo in Italy. The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... Orio al Serio International Airport (IATA: BGY, ICAO: LIME) is an airport located in Bergamo, near Milan, Italy and it serves the low-cost traffic of Milan. ...

Boeing 737-800s at Frankfurt-Hahn Airport
Boeing 737-800s at Frankfurt-Hahn Airport

In April 2003 Ryanair acquired its ailing competitor Buzz from KLM, at a knock-down price. Expansion continued apace with the launch of a base at Stockholm (Skavsta), Sweden. By the end of 2003, the airline flew 127 routes, of which 60 had opened in the previous 12 months. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x846, 817 KB) Beschreibung Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ryanair Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x846, 817 KB) Beschreibung Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Ryanair Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... For the NATO Military use of this facility, see Hahn Air Base Frankfurt-Hahn Airport (German: Flughafen Frankfurt-Hahn) (IATA: HHN, ICAO: EDFH) is a commercial airport located 10 km (6. ... buzz BAe 146-300 buzz was a low-cost airline based at London Stansted operating services to Europe. ... KLM can also refer to KLM (Human Computer Interaction) KLM Royal Dutch Airlines (Dutch: Koninklijke Luchtvaart Maatschappij, literally Royal Aviation Company; usual English: Royal Dutch Airlines) is an airline subsidiary of Air France-KLM based in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. ... Stockholm Skavsta Airport (IATA: NYO, ICAO: ), Skavsta Flygplats, is located 100km south of Stockholm, Sweden in the municipality of Nyköping. ...


The airline launched two more bases in the first half of 2004, at Rome (Ciampino) and Barcelona (Girona), increasing the total to 11 hubs. During 2004, Michael O'Leary warned of a 'bloodbath' during the winter from which only two or three low-cost airlines would emerge, the expectation being that these would be Ryanair and EasyJet. A modest loss of 3.3 million in the second quarter of 2004 was the airline's first recorded loss for 15 years. However, the airline immediately bounced back to ever greater profits afterwards. The enlargement of the European Union on 1 May 2004 opened the way to more new routes as Ryanair and other budget airlines tapped the markets of the EU accession countries. Ciampino Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Roma-Ciampino) or Giovan Battista Pastine Airport (IATA: CIA, ICAO: LIRA) is a joint civilian, commercial and military airport near Rome in Italy. ... The Girona-Costa Brava airport (GRO) is located twelve kilometres south from the city of Girona, in the north-east of Spain. ... EasyJet (LSE: EZJ), styled as easyJet, is a low cost airline officially known as easyJet Airline Company Limited, based at London Luton Airport. ... For other uses, see Euro (disambiguation). ... The European Union (EU) was created by six founding states in 1957 (following the earlier establishment by the same six states of the European Coal and Steel Community in 1952) and has grown to 27 member states. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: European Union The European Union On-Line Official EU website, europa. ...


In February 2005, Ryanair announced an order for a further 70 Boeing 737-800 aircraft along with an option for a further 70. This was expected at the time to allow Ryanair to increase passenger numbers from the 34 million expected in 2005 to 70 million in 2011. Some of these aircraft would be deployed at Ryanair's 12 European hubs, others to 10 new hubs the company intended to establish over the next seven years. In an example of the airline's relentless prioritising of cost over all other factors, the aircraft will be delivered without window shades (rumoured in media, although regulations of the Irish Aviation Authority mean that Ryanair's newest airplanes still do contain window blinds), seat back recline and seat back pockets, which result in savings of several hundred thousand dollars per aircraft and give continued savings through reduced cleaning and repair costs.


Some slight delays in Boeing airline deliveries in late 2005 (ordered in 2001) were caused by production disruptions arising from a Boeing machinists' strike. The Boeing Company (NYSE: BA, TYO: 7661) is a major aerospace and defense corporation, originally founded by William Edward Boeing. ...

Ryanair cabin, with advertising on overhead lockers and safety cards on seatbacks
Ryanair cabin, with advertising on overhead lockers and safety cards on seatbacks

In June 2006 the company announced that in the quarter ending 30 June 2006 its average yields were 13% higher than the same quarter of the previous year[6] and its passenger numbers were up by 25% to 10.7 million, although year-on-year comparison was difficult because of the movement of Easter from first quarter 2005 to second quarter 2006. Net profits (€115.7m) increased by 80% over the same quarter in 2005. Management indicated that this level of growth may not be sustained for the remainder of this year, despite adding 27 new aircraft and opening new routes. is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ryanair's passenger numbers have grown by up to 25% a year for most of the last decade. Carrying under 0.7 million annually in its early years, passenger figures grew to 21.4 million in 2003. The rapid addition of new routes and new hubs has enabled this growth in passenger numbers, and Ryanair is now among the largest carriers on European routes. In August 2004, the airline carried 20% more passengers within Europe than British Airways.


Ryanair posted record half-year profits of €329 million for the six months ending 30 September 2006. Over the same period passenger traffic grew by more than a fifth to 22.1m passengers and revenues rose by a third to €1.256 billion[7] is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Boeing 737-800 shortly after takeoff
Boeing 737-800 shortly after takeoff

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1512x1086, 1321 KB) Ryanair Boeing 737-800 (registration EI-DCK) taking off from Bristol International Airport, Bristol, England. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1512x1086, 1321 KB) Ryanair Boeing 737-800 (registration EI-DCK) taking off from Bristol International Airport, Bristol, England. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ...

Aer Lingus takeover bid

On 5 October 2006 Ryanair launched a €1.48bn (£1bn; $1.9bn) bid to buy fellow Irish carrier Aer Lingus. Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary said the move was a “unique opportunity” to form an Irish airline. The "new" airline would carry over 50 million passengers a year. For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ...


Aer Lingus floated on the Irish Stock Exchange on 2 October 2006 following a decision by the Irish government to sell more than 50% of its 85.1% share in the company. Workers retained a 15% stake. The shares began trading at €2.20 each, valuing the firm at €1.13bn. Ryanair said it had bought a 16% stake in Aer Lingus and was offering €2.80 per share for remaining shares.[8] On the same day Aer Lingus rejected Ryanair's takeover bid, saying the bid was contradictory.[9] With a total of 47% of Aer Lingus in the hands of the Irish Government, the employee share ownership trust, and other entities that have publicly rejected the bid, and a further 4% in the hands of Bank of Ireland and AIB who are considered highly unlikely to sell, the takeover bid is now effectively dead. The Ryanair website describes the attempted take over as, "In October...we make an all cash offer for the small regional airline, Aer Lingus". [10] The Irish Stock Exchange (ISE) is Irelands stock exchange and can trace its history to 1793. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... My wife and I went to visit our daughter in the UK. I used my Ulster Bank credit card and wasnt charged any extra fees. ... Allied Irish Banks plc (AIB) (Irish: Bainc-Aontas Éireann),ISEQ: ALBK, LSE:ALBK, NYSE: AIB, FWB:AIB is a commercial bank based in Ireland not to be mistaken for Anglo Irish Bank. ...


2007

Fourth quarter 2006 profits far exceeded analyst expectations, and over the period from October 2006 to February 2007, the stock rose by some 50%. The press suggested that Ryanair is now selling on its 737-800s at higher prices than the cost of acquisition from Boeing.[11] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2134 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2848 × 2134 pixel, file size: 1. ... 737 in new Boeing Colors. ... Manchester Airport (IATA: MAN, ICAO: EGCC) is an airport in Manchester, England. ... October 2006 is the tenth month of that year and has yet to occur. ... February 2007 is the second month of the year. ...


In January Ryanair conceded, following a BBC investigation, that a claim it had cut its CO2 emissions by half in recent years was "an error".[12]


In the meantime, Ryanair started its flight operation to the island of Malta, from Dublin, Luton and Pisa. New bases have been created at Bremen (April), Weeze (June), Bristol (November), Alicante, Valencia and Belfast George Best.


In May, Ryanair launched BING[13]. This application brings daily fare specials to the user's computer.


On 16 May, Ryanair launched a seat sale with fees, taxes and charges waived. A small number of destinations, including Dublin, were offered with 1 million seats for 1 penny or 1 Euro cent. Ryanair's website crashed as it received four million hits from bargain hunters. The sale lasted until the following Monday with just over half a million free seats taken up. is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On 18 July The Advertising Standards Agency ordered Ryanair not to repeat a claim that airline industry "accounts for just 2% of carbon dioxide emissions".[14] The ASA ruled it breached rules on truthfulness by not explaining the figure was based on global rather than UK emissions (which are 5.5% of the total) and exclude incoming flight figures. is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


On the 6th of September Ryanair announced that it will establish a 23rd base at George Best Belfast City Airport Belfast City Tower George Best Belfast City Airport (IATA: BHD, ICAO: EGAC) is an airport in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ...

In August it announced it would start charging passengers to check-in at the airport, therefore reversing its policy of paying for online check-in. It says that by cutting airport check-in it reduces overhead costs.[15] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1408 × 935 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 531 pixelsFull resolution (1408 × 935 pixel, file size: 1. ... 737 in new Boeing Colors. ... Bristol International Airport (IATA: BRS, ICAO: EGGD) is the commercial airport serving the city of Bristol and the south west of England. ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


In October 2007 Ryanair began to decommission some of its older 737-800 series aircraft that were originally purchased in 1998. The aircraft are to be sold off to Brazilian airline Varig.[citation needed] Varig Boeing 737-300 Varig (Viação Aérea RIo Grandense) is an airline owned by Gol Transportes Aéreos based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. ...


New long haul airline

Ryanair's CEO, Michael O'Leary, revealed in April 2007 that Ryanair plan to launch a new long haul airline around 2009[16]. The new airline would be separate from Ryanair and operate under a different branding. It would offer both low cost and a first class service, intended to rival airlines like Virgin Atlantic. The new airline would operate from Ryanair's existing bases in Europe to approximately six new bases in the United States. The new American bases will not be main hubs such as New York's JFK airport, but smaller airports located outside major cities. It is planned that the new airline will eventually operate a fleet of 40 to 50 new Airbus A350 XWB or Boeing 787 aircraft. Since the Boeing 787 is sold out of production until at least 2012, and the Airbus A350 XWB will not enter service until 2013, this would contribute a delay to the airline's launch. It was not stated if other aircraft would be operated in the Interim. O'Leary indicated that he intends to purchase the aircraft when market prices for new aircraft recede according to demand. It is said that the name of the new Airline will be RyanAtlantic and sell tickets through the Ryanair website under an alliance agreement[3]. “A350” redirects here. ... The Boeing 787 Dreamliner is a mid-sized, wide-body, twin engine jet airliner currently under development by Boeing Commercial Airplanes. ... It is said that RyanAtlantic will be the new name for the Long Haul srvice offered by Ryanair. ...


Criticism and complaints

Ryanair has been criticised for some of its practices. Ryanair was voted the "least favourite airline" in a 2006 poll by TripAdvisor.[17] [18] [19] One reason cited relative to other airlines was unfriendly and complacent staff. Despite their unpopularity, Ryanair carried 42.5 million passengers in 2006. Irish airlines, primarily Ryanair, attracted 24% of all complaints about EU airlines in 2006. [20]


Its supporters praise its commitment to low fares, radical management, and its willingness to challenge what it calls the 'establishment' within the airline industry (similar to its American counterpart, Southwest Airlines). Critics have attacked its hidden "taxes" and fees, and limited customer services, and charged that it practises deceptive advertising. In October 2006, Ryanair was voted the world's most disliked airline in a survey by the TripAdvisor website, with easyJet second. In November 2006, it was revealed as the subject of more complaints than any other airline in the EU.[21] 60% of all complaints to Ireland's Commission for Aviation Regulation were about Ryanair, amounting to 4 complaints per million passengers per year. [22] This article is about the American airline. ... // Advert redirects here. ... TripAdvisor screenshot. ... EasyJet (LSE: EZJ), styled as easyJet, is a low cost airline officially known as easyJet Airline Company Limited, based at London Luton Airport. ... 67 die and about 300,000 people are affected by floods in Ethiopias Somali Region of Ogaden after the Shabelle River bursts its banks. ...


Advertising

Perceived offensiveness of advertising

Ryanair's advertising has been considered offensive, occasionally even finding sanction from the courts.[23][24][25]. Ryanair was ordered by courts to pay damages to Carla Bruni, and French president Nicolas Sarkozy for using their images in advertising without permission [26]. Carla Bruni Tedeschi (born Turin, Italy, 23 December 1967), is an Italian supermodel, songwriter and singer. ... Nicolas Sarkozy at Paris, May 2005. ...


One of their ads used a picture of the Manneken Pis, a famous Belgian statue of a urinating urchin, with the words: "Pissed off with Sabena's high fares? Low fares have arrived in Belgium." Sabena sued and the court ruled that the ads were misleading and offensive. Ryanair was ordered to discontinue the ads immediately or face fines. Ryanair was also obliged to publish an apology and publish the court decision on their website. Ryanair used the apologies for further advertising, primarily further price comparisons.[4] Manneken Pis of Brussels in the nude Manneken Pis (little man piss in English), is a Brussels landmark. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Another of their ads featured a model dressed up as a school girl accompanied by the words "Hottest back to school fares". After receiving 13 complaints, the British Advertising Standards Agency told them to withdraw the advert in the United Kingdom, saying that it "appeared to link teenage girls with sexually provocative behaviour and was irresponsible and likely to cause serious or widespread offence". Ryanair said that they would "not be withdrawing this ad" and would "not provide the ASA with any of the undertakings they seek", on the basis that they found it abstract that "a picture of a fully-clothed model is now claimed to cause 'serious or widespread offence', when many of the UK's leading daily newspapers regularly run pictures of topless or partially-dressed females without causing any serious or widespread offence".[27]


Misleading advertising

Ryanair was ordered by the ASA to stop claiming that its flights from London to Brussels are faster than the rail connection Eurostar on the grounds that the claim was misleading due to required travel times to the airports mentioned. Ryanair stood by its claims, noting that their flight is shorter than the train trip and that travel time is also required to reach Eurostar's train stations.[28] [29] [30] This article is about high-speed trains between London and Brussels / Paris. ...


In April 2008 Ryanair faced a probe by the UK Office of Fair Trading after a string of complaints about its adverts. It was found to have breached advertising rules 7 times in 2 years. Formal referrals to the OFT were rare, said the ASA's director general Christopher Graham - the last occurring in 2005, "We would prefer to work with advertisers within the self-regulatory system rather than call in a statutory body, but Ryanair's approach has left us with no option," he added. Ryainair said 'The ASA had "demonstrated a repeated lack of independence, impartiality and fairness". [31].

Boeing 737-800 takes off
Boeing 737-800 takes off

The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ...

Customer service

Ryanair has been criticised for many aspects of its customer service. The Economist journal wrote that Ryanair's "cavalier treatment of passengers" had given Ryanair "a deserved reputation for nastiness" and that the airline "has become a byword for appalling customer service… and jeering rudeness towards anyone or anything that gets in its way". [32] In 1997,Jane O'Keefe claimed Ryanair reneged on a free travel prize. The matter was referred to Managing Director Michael O'Leary, who was described as aggressive and hostile.[33] The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ...


Ryanair staff have been accused of behaving rudely to passengers. They have been accused of using foul and offensive language and attempting to grab a boarding card from a passenger[34], behaving in a menacing manner towards passengers[35] and rudeness towards a passenger who asked for a non-alcoholic drink after passengers were kept in a plane for three hours due to a delay [36].


The airline has come under heavy criticism in the past for its poor treatment of disabled passengers. In 2002 it refused to provide wheelchairs for disabled passengers at Stansted Airport, greatly angering disabled rights groups.[37] The airline argued that this provision was the responsibility of the airport authority stating that wheelchairs were provided by 80 of the 84 Ryanair destination airports[38] at that time. A court ruling in 2004 judged that the responsibility should be shared by the airline and the airport owners;[39] Ryanair responded by adding a surcharge of £0.50 to all its flight costs. Wheelchair seating in a theater. ... Terminal building, designed by Sir Norman Foster Stansted Airport is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ...


Specific incidents involving disabled passengers include the following:

  • In 2005, the airline was criticised for ejecting nine blind and partially sighted passengers from a flight at Stansted, because the group meant the plane would be carrying more than the four disabled passengers permitted by the airline's safety regulations.[40]
  • In 2005, Ryanair were forced to pay Bob Ross £1,336 in damages after charging him £18 to use a wheelchair.[41]
  • In 2006 Ryanair apologised after refusing to provide an elderly injured passenger with a wheelchair.[42][43]
  • In 2006 Ryanair apologised after refusing to provide a sick cancer sufferer with a wheelchair.[44]
  • In 2007 Ryanair apologised after forcing a 14-year old with a broken leg to stand on a flight, despite the boy being in pain. Ryanair cabin crew and captain were described as cruel.[45]
  • In 2007 Ryanair ordered a group of visually impaired passengers to disembark from a flight before take-off on the excuse that the flight had exceeded the permitted number of "mobility-impaired" passengers and refused to pay compensation required by law, claiming that they had disembarked voluntarily. Ryanair paid compensation before court proceedings took place [46] [47].
  • In 2008 Ryanair were ordered to pay £1,116 to each member of the London-based Caribbean Steel International Orchestra who had been denied access to the plane for security reasons despite having been cleared by the police on December 31, 2006. The band had previously been escorted off the plane by armed police because of passengers' concerns that the members were seated separately and one of the members who was blind appeared to have been reading the newspaper. The judge ruled that the ethnicity of the band members as well as "irrational fears" of some passengers were factors in Ryanair's actions[48] [49].

Ryanair does not offer customers the possibility of contacting them by email or Webform, only through a premium rate phone line. An Early Day Motion in the British Parliament which was put forward in 2006 criticized Ryanair for this reason and called on the company to provide customers with a means to contact the company by e-mail.[50]. Ryanair is therefore flouting UK E-commerce Regulations, which state that the email address of the service provider must be given. It is not sufficient to include a 'contact us' form without also providing an email address. [51] Air safety is a broad term encompassing the theory, investigation and categorization of flight failures, and the prevention of such failures through appropriate regulation, as well as through education and training. ... Early day motion is a phrase used in the Westminster system for motions tabled by Members of Parliament for debate on an early day. In practice, they are never debated but are mostly used for MPs to publicise and express support for their own pet projects. ...


Dispatches programme

On 13 February 2006, Channel 4 broadcast a documentary as part of its Dispatches series, "Ryanair caught napping". Two undercover reporters obtained jobs as cabin crew based at Ryanair's operations at London Stansted Airport and secretly recorded the training programme, and cabin crew procedures. The documentary criticised Ryanair's training policies, security procedures, aircraft hygiene, and highlighted poor staff morale. It filmed Ryanair cabin crew sleeping on the job; using aftershave to cover the smell of vomit in the aisle rather than cleaning it up; ignoring warning alerts on the emergency slide; encouraging staff to falsify references for airport security passes; and asking staff not to recheck passengers' passports before they board flights. Staff in training were falsely told that any Boeing 737-200 (no longer in service with Ryanair) impact would result in the death of the passenger sitting in seat 1A, and that they should not pass this information on to the passenger. [5] is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Dispatches is a long running British television documentary series on Channel 4. ... Vomiting (or emesis) is the forceful expulsion of the contents of ones stomach through the mouth. ... The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ...


Ryanair denied the allegations[6] and published its correspondence with Dispatches on its website.[52] It claims to have forwarded all 20 allegations to the UK and Irish aviation authorities, both of whom agreed that there was no substance to them. It also alleged that the programme was misleading and that promotional materials, in particular a photograph of a stewardess sleeping, had been faked by Dispatches. [7] Much of the subsequent coverage of the programme in the media considered that the documentary was overblown and failed to make substantive claims against the airline, with some going so far as to label the attempted exposé as a vindication for Ryanair. [8] Following the documentary, Ryanair launched new services and a free flights offer.[53]


Hidden charges

Ryanair has been described by the consumer magazine Holiday Which? as being the "worst offender" for adding extra charges to tickets [54]. These hidden charges include airport taxes, a fee to use airport check-in facilities, a charge for each piece of luggage checked in, and additional fees to pay by credit/debit card on a per passenger rather than per card basis. Ryanair was set a deadline of 31 January 2008 by the Office of Fair Trading to include these charges in headline prices, but failed to meet this deadline[55], even after an upgrade of its web site on 25 February 2008. The Office of Fair Trading or OFT is a UK statutory body established by the Fair Trading Act 1973, which enforces both consumer protection and competition law, acting as the UKs economic regulator. ...


Environmental concerns

Michael O'Leary, Ryanair's CEO, claimed that a recession would put an end to the "environmental bullshit among the chattering classes that has allowed Gordon Brown to double air passenger duty. We need a recession if we are going to see off some of this environmental nonsense." [56]


Ryanair's general stance on environmental matters has led a UK government minister to label the airline the "irresponsible face of capitalism" in early 2007. [57]


Competitors

Ryanair's now has a number of low-cost competitors. In 2004 approximately 60 new low-cost airlines were formed. Despite traditionally being a full-service airline, Aer Lingus moved to a low-fares strategy from 2002, leading to much more intense competition with Ryanair on Irish routes. A Ryanair Boeing 737-800 A low-cost carrier or low-cost airline (also known as a no-frills or discount carrier / airline) is an airline that offers generally low fares in exchange for eliminating many traditional passenger services. ... . ... Aer Lingus is the flag carrier of Ireland. ...


Airlines which attempt to compete directly with Ryanair are treated harshly, with Ryanair reducing fares to significantly undercut their competitors. In response to MyTravelLite, who started to compete with Ryanair on the Birmingham to Dublin route in 2003, Ryanair set up competing flights on some of MyTravelLite's routes until they pulled out. Go was another airline which attempted to offer services from Ryanair's hub at Dublin to Glasgow and Edinburgh in Scotland. A fierce battle ensued, which ended with Go withdrawing its service from Dublin.[58] Go Fly Boeing 737 Go Fly was the registered name of a British airline, usually trading as Go, now merged into easyJet. ... This article is about the country. ...


In September 2004, Ryanair's biggest competitor, EasyJet, announced routes to the Republic of Ireland for the first time, beginning with the Cork to London Gatwick route – until then easyJet had never competed directly with Ryanair on its home ground. Easyjet announced in July 2006 that it was withdrawing its Gatwick-Cork, Gatwick-Shannon and Gatwick-Knock services; within two weeks Ryanair also announced it would withdraw its own service on the Gatwick-Knock and Luton-Shannon routes. EasyJet (LSE: EZJ), styled as easyJet, is a low cost airline officially known as easyJet Airline Company Limited, based at London Luton Airport. ...


DFDS Seaways cited competition from low-cost air services, especially Ryanair (which now flies to Glasgow Prestwick and London Stansted from Gothenburg City Airport), as being the reason for its scrapping the Newcastle-Gothenburg ferry service in October 2006.[59] It was the only dedicated passenger ferry service between Sweden and the United Kingdom, and had been running since the 19th century (under various operators). DFDS Headquarters in Copenhagen, Denmark. ... Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick International Airport (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Terminal building, designed by Sir Norman Foster Stansted Airport is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ... Gothenburg City Airport or Göteborg City Airport (IATA: GSE, ICAO: ESGP), formerly (and still informally) known as Säve Flygplats, is Gothenburgs second international airport located 14 kilometres north-west from the centre of Gothenburg (Swedish:  ) on the island of Hisingen, Bohuslän, Sweden. ... , Newcastle upon Tyne (usually shortened to Newcastle) is a large city in Tyne and Wear, England. ... For other uses, see Gothenburg (disambiguation). ...


Choosing destinations

Ryanair negotiates extremely aggressive contracts with its airports, demanding very low landing and handling fees as well as financial assistance with marketing and promotional campaigns. In subsequent contract renewal negotiations, the airline plays airports off against each other, threatening to withdraw services and deploy the aircraft elsewhere if the airport does not make further concessions. In April 2006, a failure to reach agreement on a new commercial contract resulted in Ryanair announcing that it would withdraw service on the Dublin-Cardiff route at short notice.[60] The airport management rebutted Ryanair's assertion that airport charges were unreasonably high, noting that Cardiff charges were already below Ryanair's average, and claimed that Ryanair had recently adopted the same negotiating approach with Cork Airport and London Stansted Airport [9].Ryanair was forced to give up its Rome Ciampino-Alghero route after the route was allocated to Air One as a Public Service Obligation (PSO) route. The European Commission is investigating the actions of the Italian Government in assigning PSO routes and thus restricting competition. Cork Airport, (Irish: Aerfort Chorcaí) (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) is one of the three principal international airports in the Republic of Ireland (along with Dublin and Shannon). ... The lawn in front of Stansted Airport used to attract large numbers of people waiting for their flight during the summer. ... Ciampino Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Roma-Ciampino) or Giovan Battista Pastine Airport (IATA: CIA, ICAO: LIRA) is a joint civilian, commercial and military airport near Rome in Italy. ... Alghero (lAlguer in Catalan and SAlighèra in Sardinian), is a town of about 42,000 inhabitants (down from 54,300 inhabitants since early 20th century) in Italy. ... Air One is an independent airline based in Rome, Italy. ... This article refers to Public Service Obligations in the field of Transportation. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... Competition is the act of striving against others for the purpose of achieving gain, such as income, pride, amusement, or dominance. ...


Destinations

For the full list of destinations see Ryanair destinations.

Ryanair serves 516 routes from 27 hubs. Its main hub is London Stansted Airport, with 88 routes. Ryanair has other hubs throughout Europe, at Dublin, Brussels South Charleroi Airport, Cork, Frankfurt-Hahn, Girona, London Luton, Liverpool, Milan Orio al Serio, Pisa, East Midlands, Glasgow Prestwick, Rome Ciampino, Shannon, Stockholm Skavsta, Marseille Provence, Madrid Barajas, Bremen, Weeze, Belfast City, Bournemouth, Valencia, Alicante, Bristol, Reus, Edinburgh and Birmingham. This is a list of airports to which Ryanair flies. ... The lawn in front of Stansted Airport used to attract large numbers of people waiting for their flight during the summer. ... Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... Charleroi Brussels South, also called Brussels South Airport or Brussels South Charleroi Airport (BSCA), is located near Charleroi, 46 km from central Brussels, Belgium. ... Cork Airport, (Irish: Aerfort Chorcaí) (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) is one of the three principal international airports in the Republic of Ireland (along with Dublin and Shannon). ... For the NATO Military use of this facility, see Hahn Air Base Frankfurt-Hahn Airport (German: Flughafen Frankfurt-Hahn) (IATA: HHN, ICAO: EDFH) is a commercial airport located 10 km (6. ... Girona-Costa Brava Airport (IATA: GRO, ICAO: LEGE) is an airport located twelve kilometres south from the city of Girona, next to the small village of Vilobí dOnyar, in the north-east of Catalonia, Spain. ... London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately north of London. ... Liverpool John Lennon Airport (IATA: LPL, ICAO: EGGP) is an airport serving the English city of Liverpool. ... Orio al Serio International Airport (IATA: BGY, ICAO: LIME) is an airport located in Bergamo, near Milan, Italy and it serves the low-cost traffic of Milan. ... Galileo Galilei International Airport (IATA: PSA, ICAO: LIRP) is an airport located in Pisa, Italy. ... East Midlands Airport[1] (IATA: EMA, ICAO: EGNX) is an airport in the East Midlands of England, near Castle Donington in Leicestershire. ... Glasgow Prestwick Airport from the air Glasgow Prestwick Airport (Scottish Gaelic: ) (IATA: PIK, ICAO: EGPK) is an international airport serving Glasgow, situated north of the town of Prestwick in South Ayrshire, Scotland. ... Rome Ciampino Airport (Italian: Aeroporto di Roma-Ciampino or Giovan Battista Pastine Airport) (IATA: CIA, ICAO: LIRA) is a joint civilian, commercial and military airport near Rome in Italy. ... Shannon International Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN), or Aerfort na Sionna in Irish is one of Irelands primary three airports (along with Dublin Airport and Cork Airport). ... Stockholm Skavsta Airport (IATA: NYO), Skavsta Flygplats, is located 100km south of Stockholm, Sweden in the municipality of Nyköping, spoken Nueschoeping. ... , Marseille Provence Airport or Aéroport de Marseille Provence (IATA: MRS, ICAO: LFML) is an airport located 27 km northwest of Marseille[1], on the territory of Marignane, both communes of the Bouches-du-Rhône département in the Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur région of France. ... New Terminal 4 Interior Madrid Barajas International Airport (IATA: MAD, ICAO: LEMD), located northeast of Madrids city center, is the most important international and domestic gateway in Spain, the Iberian Peninsula and southern Europe. ... Bremen Airport or Flughafen Bremen (IATA: BRE, ICAO: EDDW) serves the city of Bremen, Germany. ... Airport Weeze or Niederrhein Airport (IATA: NRN, ICAO: EDLV) is an airport situated in the small municipality of Weeze in the Niederrhein (Lower Rhineland) of western Germany. ... Belfast City Tower George Best Belfast City Airport (IATA: BHD, ICAO: EGAC) is an airport in Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Shown within Dorset. ... Valencia Airport in Manises (IATA: VLC, ICAO: LEVC) is the main airport for business travellers to Valencia and summer travellers to the Costa del Azahar. ... Alicante International Airport (Spanish: Aeropuerto Internacional de Alicante), (IATA: ALC, ICAO: LEAL), originally named El Altet, is the main airport for the regions of Alicante and Murcia in Spain. ... Bristol International Airport (IATA: BRS, ICAO: EGGD) is the commercial airport serving the city of Bristol and the south west of England. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Edinburgh Airport (IATA: EDI, ICAO: EGPH) is located in Edinburgh, Scotland, and was the busiest airport in Scotland in 2007, handling 9,037,200 passengers. ... For the Birmingham, Alabama, United States airport, see Birmingham International Airport (U.S.). Birmingham International Airport (IATA: BHX, ICAO: EGBB) is an international airport located 5. ...


The airline's first new routes outside Europe began in October 2006 when Ryanair planned to begin flying from Frankfurt-Hahn to Marrakech and Fez, both in Morocco. These non-European routes were meant to be further complemented from November 2006 when Ryanair flights were to begin from Marseille to Fez, Marrakech and Oujda (all in Morocco). But, all of these flights (to France and Morocco) were cancelled until further notice on 17 November 2006. Flights were booked for these routes even though an Open Skies agreement was not secured with the EU. Thus, many customers who booked these flights months ahead were forced to cancel or seek a refund. For the record label, see Marrakesh Records. ... City flag Coat of arms Motto: By her great deeds, the city of Massilia shines The Old Port of Marseille Location Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Coordinates Administration Country Region Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur Department Bouches-du-Rhône (13) Subdivisions 16 arrondissements (in 8 secteurs) Intercommunality Urban... Fes redirects here. ... For the record label, see Marrakesh Records. ... Oujda is a city in eastern Morocco with an estimated population of half a million inhabitants. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ryanair also announced it would begin flying 10 other routes from Marseille and that it would make Marseille its 16th operational base, with two Boeing 737-800 to be based there. But as of November 16, 2006, Ryanair has postponed service from Marseille to Morocco until further notice. New flights to Morocco News Release The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ...


Of all Ryanair's routes, the Dublin-London city pair remains both the busiest and the most profitable. This is largely due to the number of Irish people who live in the UK, the amount of business between the two cities, and increasingly the number of Irish who use the route to make connecting flights to other points in Europe. In terms of air passenger traffic, London-Dublin is the busiest international city pair in the world after Hong Kong-Taipei.[citation needed]


Ryanair also flies to ten cities in Poland (Bydgoszcz, Gdańsk, Łódź, Katowice, Kraków, Poznań, Rzeszów, Szczecin, Warsaw, Wrocław), and has been a significant facilitator of Polish workforce migration to Ireland (over 200,000 Poles as of 2006) and the UK. Katowice, to be served from Bristol, will be the company's 10th Polish destination from November 2007. Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Kuyavian-Pomeranian Powiat city county Gmina Bydgoszcz Established before 1238 City Rights 1346/1349 Government  - Mayor Konstanty Dombrowicz Area  - City 174. ... For alternative meanings of GdaÅ„sk and Danzig, see GdaÅ„sk (disambiguation) and Danzig (disambiguation) Motto: Nec temere, nec timide (No rashness, no timidness) Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina GdaÅ„sk Established 10th century City Rights 1263 Government  - Mayor PaweÅ‚ Adamowicz Area  - City 262 km²  (101. ... Motto: Ex navicula navis (From a boat, a ship) Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina Łódź City Rights 1423 Government  - Mayor Jerzy Kropiwnicki Area  - City 293. ... Osiedle TysiÄ…clecia at night Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina Katowice Established 16th century City Rights 1865 Government  - Mayor Piotr Uszok Area  - City 164. ... For other uses, see Krakow (disambiguation). ... Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina PoznaÅ„ Established 8th century City Rights 1253 Government  - Mayor Ryszard Grobelny Area  - City 261. ... Rzeszów ( ) is a city in south-eastern Poland with a population of 164,000 (2005), granted a town charter in 1354, the capital of the Subcarpathian Voivodeship (since 1999), previously of Rzeszów Voivodeship (1945-1998). ... Stettin redirects here. ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... Motto: Miasto spotkaÅ„ (the meeting place) Coordinates: , Country Poland Voivodeship Lower Silesian Powiat city county Gmina WrocÅ‚aw Established 10th century City Rights 1262 Government  - Mayor RafaÅ‚ Dutkiewicz Area  - City 292. ...


On October 2nd 2007, Ryanair announced it is launching 70 new routes in October as part of a "massive expansion across Europe."


In 2007 Ryanair inaugurated services to many airports, including

On December 18th 2007, Ryanair announced that it will be launching 50 new routes during 2008. The airline also announced new routes from Birmingham, Durham Tees Valley, Edinburgh, Liverpool, London, Manchester and Newquay. Ryanair will also fly to three new airports: Angouleme (France), Arad and Constanta (Romania) and open new bases at Bournemouth Airport and Birmingham International Airport. For other uses, see Zadar (disambiguation). ... Dalmatia, highlighted, on a map of Croatia. ... For other uses, see Pula (disambiguation). ... This article is about the French city. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ... Rimini is a city in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy and capital city of the Province of Rimini. ... Luqa or Ħal Luqa (meaning poplar in Aramaic) is a village located in the south east of Malta (Europe). ... For other uses, see Warsaw (disambiguation) and Warszawa (disambiguation). ... Osiedle TysiÄ…clecia at night Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina Katowice Established 16th century City Rights 1865 Government  - Mayor Piotr Uszok Area  - City 164. ... Area: 147. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ...


Fleet

The Ryanair fleet consists of the following aircraft as of March 2008:[61][62] 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

Ryanair Fleet
Aircraft Total Passengers
Boeing 737-800 165
(137 orders and 173 options)
189

As of May 2007 the Ryanair fleet average age was 2.8 years[63] All aircraft in the Ryanair fleet have either been retro-fitted with performance enhancing Winglets or the more recent deliveries have them fitted during build.[64] 737 in new Boeing Colors. ... A winglet is a device used to improve the efficiency of aircraft by lowering the lift-induced drag caused by wingtip vortices. ...

Standard new livery: EI-DCB [10] Rather unusually, these Angels wear white hart (deer) badges, with the personal livery of King Richard II of England, who commissioned this, the Wilton diptych, about 1400 A livery is a uniform or other sign worn in a non-military context on a person or object (such as an airplane...


Standard old livery: EI-CSN [11]


Dreamliner Scheme: EI-DCL [12]


Pride of Scotland: EI-DAO [13]


Nein Zum Lufthansa Kerosinzuschlag: EI-DAD [14] Deutsche Lufthansa AG (ISIN: DE0008232125) (pronounced ) is the largest airline in Europe in terms of overall passengers carried (second is Air France - KLM), and the flag carrier of Germany. ...

Boeing 737-800, named Nykoping, takes off from London Luton Airport
Boeing 737-800, named Nykoping, takes off from London Luton Airport

Say NO to BA fuel Levy: EI-CTB [15] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 549 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,617 × 1,109 pixels, file size: 138 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ryanair Boeing 737-800 (EI-CSV), marked Nykoping, takes off from London Luton Airport, England. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 549 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,617 × 1,109 pixels, file size: 138 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Ryanair Boeing 737-800 (EI-CSV), marked Nykoping, takes off from London Luton Airport, England. ... 737 in new Boeing Colors. ... Nyköping is a Municipality in Södermanland County, in central Sweden. ... London Luton Airport (IATA: LTN, ICAO: EGGW) (previously called Luton International Airport)[3] is an international airport located on the edge of the town of Luton, Bedfordshire, England approximately north of London. ... For the 1930s airline of similar name, see British Airways Ltd. ... The Fossil Fuel Levy (FFL) is a levy paid by suppliers of electricity from non-renewable energy sources in the United Kingdom. ...


Arrivederci Alitalia: EI-CSZ [16] Airbus A321-100 lands at London Heathrow airport Alitalia - Linee Aeree Italiane (Italian for Alitalia - Italian Air Lines) (BIT: AZA10) is the flag carrier airline of Italy. ...


Bye Bye SkyEurope: EI-DLF [17] SkyEurope (officially SkyEurope Airlines) is a low-cost airline with its main base at M. R. Stefanik Airport (BTS) in Bratislava, Slovakia, and other bases in Kraków, Prague and Budapest. ...


Nyköping: EI-CSV [18] This page deals with both Nyköping Municipality and the urban area (tätort) Nyköping Nyköping (Pron: Neeshuhping) is a municipality in Södermanland County, Svealand, Sweden. ...


Catalunya: EI-CSW [19]


Żegnamy PLL LOT: EI-DLG [20] Boeing 737-500 LOT redirects here. ...


Bye Bye EasyJet : EI-DLO [21] EasyJet (LSE: EZJ), styled as easyJet, is a low cost airline officially known as easyJet Airline Company Limited, based at London Luton Airport. ...


Bye Bye Baby : EI-DLN [22] bmibaby is a British low-cost airline and a subsidiary of British Midland PLC. It flies to destinations in Europe from its main bases at East Midlands, Manchester, Cardiff, and Birmingham. ...


Past fleet

Ryanair have in the past operated the following types:

EMB 110 Bandeirante The Embraer EMB 110 Bandeirante (pioneer in Portuguese) is a general purpose 15-21 passenger twin-turboprop light transport aircraft suitable for military and civil duties. ... The Avro 748 was a small short-range turboprop airliner designed by Avro in the late 1950s as a replacement for the now-aged DC-3s then in widespread service as feederliners. ... The British Aircraft Corporation One-Eleven, also known as the BAC 1-11, the BAC-111 or the BAC-1-11, was a British short-range jet airliner of the 1960s and 1970s. ... The ATR 42 is a twin-turboprop, short-haul regional airliner built in France by ATR. The name 42 comes from the aircrafts seating, which varies from 40 to 50. ... 737 in new Boeing Colors. ...

Accidents and incidents

The Boeing 737-800 aircraft operating Ryanair Flight 296 from Dublin to London Stansted caught fire shortly after landing on 27 February 2002. Subsequent investigations found that although the aircraft was fully evacuated within 90 seconds, the cabin crew struggled to open the emergency doors, and some passengers opened the over wing exits and evacuated onto the right wing of the aircraft where the fire crews were directing their firefighting efforts. The UK Air Accident Investigation Board recommended changes to training procedures for air-crew to allow better handling of similar situations in future. [23] The Boeing 737 is a short to medium range, single aisle, narrow body jet airliner. ... Ryanair Flight 296 is a flight between Dublin International Airport and London Stansted Airport, Essex. ... Private spiral ramp access to the main terminal building of Dublin (Áth Cliath) Airport Dublin Airport (IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), or Aerfort Bhaile Átha Cliath in Irish, is operated by the Dublin Airport Authority plc. ... The lawn in front of Stansted Airport used to attract large numbers of people waiting for their flight during the summer. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


There have been four cases of alleged mishandled hazardous landing approaches by Ryanair pilots between July 2004 and June 2006 and in February 2007 the Irish transport minister demanded a report on the final incident. The report said the captain failed to comply with standard operating procedures and ignored the advice of the co-pilot. Ryanair has been criticized for demanding turnaround times of 25 minutes, putting pilots and cabin crews under severe pressure [65] [66].


See also

This is a list of airlines in operation (by continents and country). ... The following page lists Irish companies or subsidiaries according to their sector. ... . ... It is said that RyanAtlantic will be the new name for the Long Haul srvice offered by Ryanair. ...

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.ryanair.com/site/about/invest/docs/2008/q1_2008_doc.pdf
  2. ^ List of largest airlines in Europe
  3. ^ “Ryanair’s Half Year Profits Rise 24% to Record €408M”, Press release dated November 5, 2007, Ryanair.com.
  4. ^ Fottrell, Quentin. “The rise and rise of Ryanair”, June 6, 2004, at THE POST.IE; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  5. ^ Tony Ryan Obituary
  6. ^ “RYANAIR ANNOUNCE RECORD Q.1 RESULTS NET PROFIT RISES 80% TO €116m - TRAFFIC GROWS 25% TO 10.7m”, August 1, 2006, at Ryanair.com; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  7. ^ Airliner World January 2007
  8. ^ “Aer Lingus rejects Ryanair offer”, October 5, 2006, at BBC.co.uk; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  9. ^ “Aer Lingus says no as Ryanair ups stake”, October 5, 2006, at RTE Business; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  10. ^ http://www.ryanair.com/site/EN/about.php
  11. ^ Financial Times, 7 February 2007>
  12. ^ BBC NEWS | Business | Ryanair retracts emissions claim
  13. ^ http://www.ryanair.com/site/EN/feeds.php?partner=BING&view=email&pos=HOME_MID_SIDE
  14. ^ BBC NEWS | Business | Ryanair's green claims criticised
  15. ^ "Ryanair to charge for airport check-in" Flight Global, 24/08/07
  16. ^ Boston Globe, 12 April 2007>
  17. ^ Ryanair - the world's least favourite airline | Business | The Guardian
  18. ^ Ryanair voted least liked airline in the world [MaltaMedia.com]
  19. ^ BBC NEWS | Business | Ryanair 'is least liked airline'
  20. ^ "Quarter of all gripes about Irish airlines", Herald AM, Independent News & Media, 2007-12-07, p. 4. 
  21. ^ Irish Examiner, 2006-11-28
  22. ^ "Ryanair involved in 60 per cent of complaints to Irish regulator," Monsters and Critics
  23. ^ brandchannel.com | Ryanair | Irish Airlines| brands | brand | branding news
  24. ^ “Ryanair advert dubbed 'offensive'“, February 4, 2004, at BBC.co.uk; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  25. ^ BBC NEWS | UK | Northern Ireland | New Ryanair Army advert 'crass'
  26. ^ Carla Bruni awarded damages from Ryanair - Telegraph
  27. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/7216926.stm
  28. ^ Channel 4 - News - Not so fast, Ryanair
  29. ^ BBC NEWS | Business | Ryanair's Eurostar claim banned
  30. ^ BBC NEWS | Business | Ryanair's Eurostar claim banned
  31. ^ Ryanair faces probe over adverts
  32. ^ "Snarling all the way to the bank", The Economist, 2007-08-23. ISSN 0013-0613. Retrieved on 2008-04-13. 
  33. ^ “Woman claims Ryanair reneged on free travel prize”, February 28, 2002, at RTE Business; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  34. ^ Expat, living abroad, Spanish news, Spanish features, Spanish classifieds, Spanish yellow Pages, Spanish housing, Spanish jobs - Expatica
  35. ^ Ryanair staff were menacing: passenger - National News, Frontpage - Independent.ie
  36. ^ Flight International : One day Ryanair is going to have to be liked
  37. ^ “Appeal Court rules airport and airline jointly responsible for disabled passengers”, December 21, 2004, Disability Rights Commission, reported by Archive.org; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  38. ^ BBC Radio 4 - You and Yours - transcript
  39. ^ Adams-Spink, Geoff. “Wheelchair users' rights upheld”, December 21, 2004, at BBC.co.uk; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  40. ^ Hickman, Martin. “Ryanair is attacked for ejecting blind passengers”, October 13, 2005, at Independent.co.uk; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  41. ^ Steel band were taken off flight on suspicion of being terrorists - Crime, UK - Independent.co.uk
  42. ^ Village - Politics, Media and Current Affairs in Ireland - Fragments 2006-09-28
  43. ^ Blather: An apology from Ryanair
  44. ^ Irish Post: Sick passenger refused wheelchair at Knock
  45. ^ Injured young footballer's flight ordeal, Herts 24
  46. ^ Lovells wins payout for visually impaired Ryanair passengers - 13 August 2007
  47. ^ Ryanair deboards blind passengers - Times Online
  48. ^ Ryanair ordered to pay damages to steel band ‘terrorists’ thrown off jet - Times Online
  49. ^ Steel band 'terrorists' win Ryanair case - Home News, UK - Independent.co.uk
  50. ^ http://edmi.parliament.uk/EDMi/EDMDetails.aspx?EDMID=31232&SESSION=875
  51. ^ http://www.out-law.com/default.aspx?page=431
  52. ^ “RYANAIR & DISPATCHES... THE TRUTH”, at Ryanair.com; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  53. ^ Smith, Michael. “Ryanair shrugs off TV claims with latest promotion”, February 14, 2006, at Scotsman.com; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  54. ^ Ryanair the 'worst offender' for extra charges on fares - Ireland - Breaking News - Belfast Telegraph
  55. ^ Warning over airlines' hidden extras - Telegraph
  56. ^ Ryanair warns high oil prices could slash its profits by 50% next year | Business | guardian.co.uk
  57. ^ Ryanair: climate campaigners hitting sales | Business | guardian.co.uk
  58. ^ Quinn, Eamonn. “No competitors for Ryanair in Dublin, says Cassani”, November 30, 2003, at THE POST.IE; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  59. ^ Savage, James. “DFDS scraps Newcastle-Gothenburg line”, September 6, 2006, at The Local; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  60. ^ “Cardiff to Dublin flight is ended”, April 25, 2006, at BBC.co.uk; last accessed 18 December 2006.
  61. ^ http://www.jethros.i12.com/fleets/fleet_listings/ryanair.htm
  62. ^ Ryanair - Details and Fleet History - Planespotters.net
  63. ^ Ryanair's Fleet Age Details
  64. ^ Aviation Partners Boeing - Ryanair places largest single order in APB’s history announcing that they will purchase 225 shipsets of 737-800 Blended Winglets.
  65. ^ “Ryanair threatens to sack pilots over 'danger' incidents“, February 8, 2007, at [1]
  66. ^ “Irish minister demands report on dangerous landings by Ryanair“, February 20, 2007, at [2]

This is a list of largest airlines in Europe: TUI Group airlines flew 25. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Airliner World is an aviation magazine that is published by Key Publishing LTD from Lincs, United Kingdom and distributed by Seymour Distribution LTD in London. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Creaton, Siobhán (2007). Ryanair: The full story of the controversial low-cost airline. ISBN 1-84513-293-9. 
  • Creaton, Siobhán (2004). Ryanair: How a Small Irish Airline Conquered Europe. ISBN 1-85410-992-8. 
  • Calder, Simon (2002). No Frills: The Truth Behind the Low Cost Revolution in the Skies. ISBN 1-85227-932-X. 
  • Guardian Unlimited. Ryanair ... the low-fare airline with the sky-high insurance levy. Retrieved on 2006-05-29.
  • Telegraph. Disabled groups attack 33p Ryanair levy. Retrieved on 2006-05-29.
  • alfb.net. All we need is low. Ryanair is cheaper as two one-ways than as a return ticket. Retrieved on 2007-10-12.
  • Ruddock, Alan (2007). Michael O'Leary - A Life in Full Flight. ISBN 9781844880553. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Official website
  • The Ryanair inflight magazine
  • Fleet
  • Fleet Age
  • Ryanair web page at Flightattitude.com
  • The financial operations of Ryanair
  • A site critical of Ryanair

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ryanair Holdings Information | Business.com (198 words)
The Group plans to continue developing this activity by expanding its low fares formula on new and existing routes.
Find information on Ryanair Holdings plc with operations and products, financials, officers, competitors and more at Hoover's.
New York Times - October 04, 2007 6:04 PM Ryanair pioneer Tony Ryan dies at age 71 ')"> Ryanair pioneer Tony Ryan dies at age 71
Ryanair raises stake in rival Aer Lingus | KOMO 1000 News Radio - News, Weather and Sports - Seattle, WA Seattle, ... (732 words)
Ryanair raises stake in rival Aer Lingus
Ryanair could wield a blocking vote at extraordinary general meetings, when Aer Lingus chiefs could be seeking shareholder approval to buy airlines, expand route networks or make other strategic decisions to improve its head-to-head competition with Ryanair.
Ryanair rose 21 euro cents (28 U.S. cents), or 2.2 percent, to 9.65 euros ($12.71).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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