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Encyclopedia > Ry Cooder
Ry Cooder
Background information
Birth name Ryland Peter Cooder
Born March 15, 1947 (1947-03-15) (age 60) Los Angeles
Genre(s) Rock, roots music, folk, blues, Tex-Mex, soul, gospel,
Occupation(s) Solo artist, songwriter, bandleader, session musician
Instrument(s) Singer, guitar, slide guitar, composer
Years active 1960s-present
Associated
acts
Taj Mahal, Captain Beefheart, Rolling Stones, Van Morrison, Nicky Hopkins, Buena Vista Social Club

Ryland "Ry" Peter Cooder (born 15 March 1947, in Los Angeles, California) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries. Cooder was ranked number 8 on Rolling Stone's "The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time." is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Rock is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars, and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles, however saxophones have been omitted from newer subgenres of rock music since the 90s. ... Traditional Music is a quasi-synonym for folk music. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... “Blues music” redirects here. ... Tejano[1] (Spanish for Texan) or Tex-Mex[2] music is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Hispanic-descended Tejanos of Central and South Texas. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... A songwriter is someone who writes the lyrics to songs, the musical composition or melody to songs, or both. ... A bandleader is the director of a band of musicians. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sideman. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified with the purpose of making music. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Example of a bottleneck, with fingerpicks and resonator guitar. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Henry Saint Clair Fredericks, better known by the stage name Taj Mahal (born May 17, 1942), is an American blues musician. ... Don Van Vliet (born Don Glen Vliet on January 15, 1941, in Glendale, California, USA) is a musician and visual artist, best known by the pseudonym Captain Beefheart. ... This article is about the rock band. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a singer-songwriter from Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Nicholas Nicky Hopkins (February 24, 1944 in Ealing, West London – September 6, 1994 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) was an English musician who featured on scores of the most important British and American popular music recordings of the 1960s and 1970s, playing piano and organ. ... Buena Vista Social Club is an album featuring Cuban music. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... the very definition of a guitarist is cody allen and taylor hines because of there un ending guitar skills and awsomnes. ... A singer is a musician who uses their voice to produce music. ... A composer is a person who writes music. ... Example of a bottleneck, with fingerpicks and resonator guitar. ... American folk music, also known as Americana, is a broad category of music including Native American music, Bluegrass, country music, gospel, old time music, jug bands, Appalachian folk, blues, Tejano and Cajun. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Jimi Hendrix ranked #1 and appeared on the cover The 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time was the cover story of a special issue of Rolling Stone magazine, published in August 2003. ...

Contents

Career

Cooder first attracted attention in the 1960s, playing with Captain Beefheart and the Magic Band, after previously having worked with Taj Mahal in The Rising Sons. The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... Don Van Vliet (born Don Glen Vliet on January 15, 1941, in Glendale, California, USA) is a musician and visual artist, best known by the pseudonym Captain Beefheart. ... Henry Saint Clair Fredericks, better known by the stage name Taj Mahal (born May 17, 1942), is an American blues musician. ... Rising Sons was a Los Angeles, California-based band in the 1960s that featured Ry Cooder, Taj Mahal, Kevin Kelly (later in The Byrds, and even Ed Cassidy, later found of Spirit. ...


He was a guest session guitarist on various recording sessions with the Rolling Stones in 1968 and 1969, and Cooder's contributions appear on the Stones' Let It Bleed (mandolin on "Love in Vain"), and Sticky Fingers, on which he contributed the slide guitar to "Sister Morphine". During this period, Cooder joined with Mick Jagger, Charlie Watts, Bill Wyman, and longtime Rolling Stones sideman Nicky Hopkins to record "Jamming with Edward". Shortly after the sessions, Cooder accused Keith Richards of musical plagiarism, but has since refused to comment on his accusations. Cooder also played slide guitar for the 1970 movie, Performance, which contained Mick Jagger's first solo single, "Memo from Turner" on which Cooder played slide guitar. The 1975 Rolling Stones compilation album Metamorphosis features an uncredited Cooder on Bill Wyman's "Downtown Suzie", which is also the first Rolling Stones song played and recorded in the open G tuning. Ry Cooder is credited on Van Morrison's critically acclaimed 1979 album, Into the Music for slide guitar on the song, "Full Force Gale". It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sideman. ... “Sound recorder” redirects here. ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Let It Bleed is an album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1969. ... Love in Vain is a 1937 blues song written by Robert Johnson, and can be found on a number of compilation albums of Johnsons work (most notably on the vinyl album , that, along with Vol. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Michael Phillip Mick Jagger CBE (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Charles Robert Charlie Watts (born 2 June 1941) is the drummer of The Rolling Stones. ... Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1993. ... A sideman is a professional musician who is hired to perform or record with a group of which he is not formally a member. ... Nicholas Nicky Hopkins (February 24, 1944 in Ealing, West London – September 6, 1994 in Nashville, Tennessee, USA) was an English musician who featured on scores of the most important British and American popular music recordings of the 1960s and 1970s, playing piano and organ. ... Jamming with Edward is a Rolling Stones album, recorded in Keith Richards private studio in France during the Let It Bleed sessions of 1969, and released on Virgin Records in 1972. ... “Moving picture” redirects here. ... Performance is a British film made in 1968 but not released until (1970). ... Michael Phillip Mick Jagger CBE (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... In music, a solo is a piece or a section of a piece played or sung by a single performer (solo is an Italian word literally meaning alone). ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A compilation album is an album (music or spoken-word) featuring tracks from one or multiple recording artists, often culled from a variety of sources (such as studio albums, live albums, singles, demos and outtakes. ... Metamorphosis is the third compilation album of Rolling Stones music released by former manager Allen Kleins ABKCO Records (who usurped control of the bands Decca/London material in 1970) after the bands departure from Decca and Klein. ... Bill Wyman (born William George Perks on 24 October 1936) was the bassist for the English rock and roll band The Rolling Stones from its founding in 1962 until 1993. ... In guitar playing, an open tuning is one where the strings are tuned so that a chord is achieved without fretting, or pressing any of the strings. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a singer-songwriter from Belfast, Northern Ireland. ... Into the Music is a 1990 album by Van Morrison. ...


Throughout the 1970s, Cooder released a series of Warner Bros. Records albums that showcased his guitar work, to some degree. Cooder has been compared to a musicologist, exploring bygone musical genres with personalized and sensitive, updated reworkings of revered originals.[citation needed] Cooder's '70s albums (with the exception of Jazz) do not fall under a single genre description, but — to generalize broadly — it might be fair to call Cooder's self titled first album blues; Into the Purple Valley, Boomer's Story, and Paradise and Lunch, folk + blues; Chicken Skin Music and Showtime, a unique melange of Tex-Mex and Hawaiian; Jazz, 1920s jazz; Bop Till You Drop '50's R&B; and Borderline and Get Rhythm, eclectic rock based excursions.[citation needed] Cooder's 1979 album Bop Till You Drop was the first popular music album to be recorded digitally. It yielded his biggest hit, an R&B cover version of Elvis Presley's 1960s recording "Little Sister". The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Warner Bros. ... A musicologist is someone who studies musicology. ... A genre is any of the traditional divisions of art forms from a single field of activity into various kinds according to criteria particular to that form. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “Blues music” redirects here. ... Into the Purple Valley is the second album by roots rock legend Ry Cooder, released in 1971. ... Boomers Story is an album by Ry Cooder. ... Paradise And Lunch was the fourth album by roots rock legend Ry Cooder, released in 1974. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... “Blues music” redirects here. ... Showtime is a subscription television brand used by a number of channels and platforms around the world, but primarily refers to a group of channels in the United States. ... Tejano[1] (Spanish for Texan) or Tex-Mex[2] music is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Hispanic-descended Tejanos of Central and South Texas. ... Hawaiian music refers to the musical style native to the Hawaiian Islands of the United States. ... The 1920s is a decade that is sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rhythm and blues (disambiguation). ... Look up borderline in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Get Rhythm is a song written and recorded by Johnny Cash. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and are disseminated by one or more of the mass media. ... In digital recording, the analog signal of a motion-picture/sound is converted into a stream of discrete numbers, representing the changes in air pressure (chroma and luminace values in case of video) through time; thus making an abstract template for the original sound. ... In popular music, a chart-topper is an extremely popular recording, identified by its inclusion in a ranked list—a chart—of top selling or otherwise judged most popular releases. ... In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ...


Cooder has worked as a studio musician and has also scored many film soundtracks, of which perhaps the best known is that for the 1984 Wim Wenders film Paris, Texas. Cooder based this soundtrack, and the haunting title song "Paris, Texas" on Blind Willie Johnson's "Dark Was the Night (Cold Was the Ground)", which he described as "The most soulful, transcendent piece in all American music." His other film work includes Walter Hill's The Long Riders (1980), Southern Comfort (1981), Brewster's Millions (1985), Last Man Standing (1996), and Mike Nichols' Primary Colors (1998). Cooder also dubbed all guitar parts of Ralph Macchio in the 1986 film Crossroads except for the final composition with which Macchio wins the guitar duel. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Sideman. ... A film soundtrack is the music that is from or inspired by a feature film. ... Ernst Wilhelm (Wim) Wenders (born August 14, 1945) is a German film director, photographer, and producer. ... Harry Dean Stantin Nastassja Kinski Paris, Texas (1984) is a movie directed by Wim Wenders and is probably his most well-known and critically acclaimed work (in the English speaking world, at least). ... The only known photograph of Blind Willie Johnson Blind Willie Johnson (1897-1945) was an African-American singer and guitarist whose music straddled the border between blues and spirituals. ... Walter Hill (born California 1942) is a prominent American film director. ... The Long Riders is a Western, produced by James Keach, Stacy Keach and Tim Zinnemann, and directed by Walter Hill, which told part of the story of the Jesse James gang. ... Southern Comfort is a film from 1981 that was directed by Walter Hill, working from a script by Hill, longtime collaborator David Giler, and Michael Kane. ... Brewsters Millions is a 1985 film starring Richard Pryor based on the 1902 novel of the same name by George Barr McCutcheon. ... Last Man Standing is a 1996 action film written and directed by Walter Hill, starring Bruce Willis, Christopher Walken, and Bruce Dern. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Primary Colors, a 1996 novel by Anonymous (later revealed by Donald Foster to be journalist Joe Klein), is a roman à clef about U.S. President Bill Clintons first presidential campaign in 1992. ... Crossroads is a 1986 cult film inspired by the legend of Robert Johnson. ...


In recent years, Cooder has played a role in the increased appreciation of traditional Cuban music, due to his collaboration as producer in the Buena Vista Social Club (1997) recording, which was a worldwide hit. Wim Wenders directed a documentary film of the musicians involved, Buena Vista Social Club (1999) which was nominated for an Academy Award in 2000. Cooder worked with Tuvan throat singers for the score to the 1993 film Geronimo: An American Legend. Cooder also stepped in for the recording of the slide guitar parts in the 1986 film Crossroads, a take on the infamous tale of the blues legend, Robert Johnson. In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Buena Vista Social Club is an album featuring Cuban music. ... Ernst Wilhelm (Wim) Wenders (born August 14, 1945) is a German film director, photographer, and producer. ... Buena Vista Social Club (1999) is a documentary film by Wim Wenders about the music of Cuba. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Tuvans or Tuvinians (Tuvan: Тывалар, Tyvalar) are a group of Turkic people who make up about two thirds of the population of Tuva, Russia. ... Physical representation of first (O1) and second (O2) overtones. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Crossroads is a 1986 cult film inspired by the legend of Robert Johnson. ... For other persons named Robert Johnson, see Robert Johnson (disambiguation). ...


Cooder's solo work has been an eclectic mix, taking in dust bowl folk, blues, Tex-Mex, soul, gospel, rock, and almost everything else. He has collaborated with many important musicians, including The Rolling Stones, Little Feat, Trevor Whittaker, Captain Beefheart, The Chieftains, John Lee Hooker, Pops and Mavis Staples, Gabby Pahinui, Flaco Jimenez and Ali Farka Toure. He formed the Little Village supergroup with Nick Lowe, John Hiatt, and Jim Keltner. Dust storm approaching Stratford, Texas, in 1935. ... Folk music can have a number of different meanings, including: Traditional music: The original meaning of the term folk music was synonymous with the term Traditional music, also often including World Music and Roots music; the term Traditional music was given its more specific meaning to distinguish it from the... “Blues music” redirects here. ... Tejano[1] (Spanish for Texan) or Tex-Mex[2] music is the name given to various forms of folk and popular music originating among the Hispanic-descended Tejanos of Central and South Texas. ... For other uses, see Soul music (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... “Rolling Stones” redirects here. ... ...and then I met Lowell George. ... Trevor Michael Whittaker (23 July 1942 – 13 January 2007) was a British rock musician. ... Don Van Vliet (born Don Glen Vliet on January 15, 1941, in Glendale, California, USA) is a musician and visual artist, best known by the pseudonym Captain Beefheart. ... The Chieftains are a Grammy-winning Irish musical group founded in 1963, known for performing and popularizing Irish traditional music. ... John Lee Hooker (August 22, 1917 – June 21, 2001) was an influential American post-war blues singer, guitarist, and songwriter born in Coahoma County near Clarksdale, Mississippi. ... Roebuck Pops Staples (1914-2000) was a Mississippi gospel musician. ... Mavis Staples (born July 10, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American rhythm and blues singer. ... Charles Philip Gabby or Pops Pahinui (April 22, 1921 - October 13, 1980) was a slack-key guitarist. ... Flaco Jimenez is a Tejano musician from San Antonio, New Mexico. ... Ali Farka Toure (born 1939 in Niafunke, Mali) is an African blues singer and guitarist, known throughout the continent as one of its most famous performers. ... Little Village was formed in 1992 by Ry Cooder (guitar), John Hiatt (guitar, piano, vocal), Nick Lowe (bass) and Jim Keltner (drums). ... For other uses, see Supergroup (disambiguation). ... Bowi EP sleeve (1977). ... John Hiatt (born August 20, 1952 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an American rock guitarist, pianist, singer, and songwriter. ... Jim Keltner (born April 27, 1942 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a distinguished session drummer who has contributed to the work of many well-known artists. ...


In 1995 he performed in The Wizard of Oz in Concert: Dreams Come True a musical performance of the popular story at Lincoln Center to benefit the Children's Defense Fund. The performance was originally broadcast on Turner Network Television (TNT), and issued on CD and video in 1996. The Childrens Defense Fund is a child advocacy group. ...


His 2005 album Chávez Ravine was touted by his record label as being "a post-World War II-era American narrative of “cool cats,” radios, UFO sightings, J. Edgar Hoover, red scares, and baseball" — the record is a tribute to the long-gone Los Angeles Latino enclave known as Chávez Ravine. Using real and imagined historical characters, Cooder and friends created an album that recollects various aspects of the poor but vibrant hillside Chicano community, which was bulldozed by developers in the 1950s in the interest of “progress;” Dodger Stadium ultimately was built on the site. Cooder says, “Here is some music for a place you don’t know, up a road you don’t go. Chávez Ravine, where the sidewalk ends.” Drawing from the various musical strains of Los Angeles, including conjunto, corrido, R&B, Latin pop, and jazz, Cooder and friends conjure the ghosts of Chávez Ravine and Los Angeles at mid-century. On this fifteen-track album, sung in Spanish and English, Cooder is joined by East L.A. legends like Chicano music patriarch Lalo Guerrero, Pachuco boogie king Don Tosti, Three Midniters front man Little Willie G, and Ersi Arvizu, of The Sisters and El Chicano. Chávez Ravine is a concept album and historical album by Ry Cooder which tells the story of Chávez Ravine, a town demolished in the 1950s in order to lure the Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Dodger Stadium is a large outdoor baseball stadium in Los Angeles, California at Chávez Ravine. ... Eduardo Lalo Guerrero (December 24, 1916 – March 17, 2005), credited as being the father of Chicano music, was a Mexican-American guitarist, singer and farm labor activist best known for his strong influence on todays Latin artists. ... Don Tosti (1923 - August 2, 2004) was a Musician and Composer. ...


His next record was released in 2007. Entitled My Name Is Buddy, it tells the story of a cat who travels and sees the world. My Name Is Buddy was accompanied by a booklet featuring a story and illustration (by Vincent Valdez) for each track, providing additional context to Buddy's adventures.


Trivia

The World is a news radio program produced by the BBC World Service of the United Kingdom, and Public Radio International and WGBH of the United States. ... PRI logo Public Radio International, or PRI, is a Minneapolis-based American public radio organization. ... Ali Ibrahim Farka Touré (October 31, 1939 in Timbuktu, Mali - March 6, 2006 in Bamako, Mali) was a Malian singer and guitarist, and one of the African continents most internationally renowned musicians. ... Talking Timbuktu is the 1994, Grammy award-winning collaboration between Malian guitarist Ali Farka Toure and American guitarist/producer Ry Cooder. ... The Tragically Hip are a Canadian rock band from Kingston, Ontario, consisting of Gordon Downie (lead vocals and occasional acoustic guitar), Paul Langlois (guitar), Rob Baker (guitar), Gord Sinclair (bass) and Johnny Fay (drums). ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City  234. ... The term post-rock was coined by Simon Reynolds in issue 123 of The Wire (May 1994) to describe a sort of music using rock instrumentation for non-rock purposes, using guitars as facilitators of timbres and textures rather than riffs and powerchords. ... Tortoise, an instrumental rock band, formed in Chicago, Illinois in 1990. ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ...

Awards

This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Buena Vista Social Club is an album featuring Cuban music. ... This article is about the magazine. ...

Discography

Into the Purple Valley is the second album by roots rock legend Ry Cooder, released in 1971. ... Boomers Story is an album by Ry Cooder. ... Paradise And Lunch was the fourth album by roots rock legend Ry Cooder, released in 1974. ... Chicken Skin Music is Ry Cooders fifth album, released in 1976 (see 1976 in music). ... Bop Till You Drop is Ry Cooders ninth album, released in 1979 (see 1979 in music). ... The film score to the 1993 movie Trespass, was heavily influenced by experimental jazz. ... Pandit Vishwa Mohan Bhatt (b. ... Talking Timbuktu is the 1994, Grammy award-winning collaboration between Malian guitarist Ali Farka Toure and American guitarist/producer Ry Cooder. ... Ali Ibrahim Farka Touré (October 31, 1939 in Timbuktu, Mali - March 6, 2006 in Bamako, Mali) was a Malian singer and guitarist, and one of the African continents most internationally renowned musicians. ... Buena Vista Social Club is an album featuring Cuban music. ... Chávez Ravine is a concept album and historical album by Ry Cooder which tells the story of Chávez Ravine, a town demolished in the 1950s in order to lure the Brooklyn Dodgers to Los Angeles. ... Nonesuch Records is currently allied with Warner Bros. ... The Chieftains are a Grammy-winning Irish musical group founded in 1963, known for performing and popularizing Irish traditional music. ... Van Dyke Parks (born January 3, 1943) is an American composer, arranger, producer, musician, singer and actor noted for his collaborations with Brian Wilson of The Beach Boys on the song Heroes and Villains and the recently released cult-legend album, Smile. ... Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919), almost universally known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer, political activist, and author. ... Flaco Jimenez is a Tejano musician from San Antonio, New Mexico. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Jim Keltner (born April 27, 1942 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a distinguished session drummer who has contributed to the work of many well-known artists. ... Jacques-Laurent Terrasson(November 27, 1966 in Berlin) is a jazz pianist better known as Jacky Terrasson. ... Not to be confused with The Libertiness bassist John Hassall Jon Hassell (born March 22, 1937, Memphis, Tennessee) is an American musician and trumpet player. ...

External links

  • Fan Site
  • My Name Is Buddy
  • Easy Guitar Chords Homepage

  Results from FactBites:
 
Ry_Cooder_-_Biography_Background (857 words)
Cooder enjoyed a brief, but fruitful, association with Captain Beefheart And His Magic Band; his distinctive slide work is apparent on the group's debut album, Safe As Milk, but the artist declined an offer to join on a permanent basis.
Cooder also contributed to the Rolling Stones' album Let It Bleed, and was tipped as a likely replacement for Brian Jones until clashes with Keith Richard, primarily over the authorship of the riff to "Honky Tonk Woman", precluded further involvement.
Cooder recorded one further album in Cuba with local guitarist Manuel Galban, of popular doo wop ensemble Los Zafiros, for which he was granted a special exemption from state department rules by outgoing US president Bill Clinton.
Ry Cooder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (684 words)
Ryland "Ry" Peter Cooder (born on March 15, 1947) is an American guitarist, singer and composer, known for his slide guitar work, his interest in the American roots music and, more recently, for his collaborations with traditional musicians from many countries.
Cooder has worked as a studio musician and has also scored many film soundtracks, of which perhaps the best known is that for the 1984 Wim Wenders film Paris, Texas.
Cooder is mentioned in one of The Tragically Hip's songs entitled "At the 100th Meridian".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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