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Encyclopedia > Rutgers University
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Motto: Sol Iustitiae et Occidentem Illustra (Sun of righteousness, shine upon the West also)
Established: November 10, 1766
Type: Public, research university
Endowment: US $654.184 million [1]
President: Richard L. McCormick
Faculty: 2,636[2]
Undergraduates: 36,888[2]
Postgraduates: 12,872[2]
Location: New Brunswick/Piscataway
Camden
Newark
, New Jersey, USA
Campus: Urban
Alma Mater: On the Banks of the Old Raritan
Sports: 27 sports teams
Colors: Scarlet            
Nickname: Old Queen's
Mascot: Scarlet Knights (New Brunswick)
Scarlet Raptors (Camden)
Scarlet Raiders (Newark)
Affiliations: Association of American Universities,
Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools,
Big East Conference
Website: http://www.Rutgers.edu/

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University), is the largest institution for higher education in the state of New Jersey. It was originally chartered as Queen's College in 1766 and is the eighth-oldest college in the United States. Rutgers was originally a private university affiliated with the Dutch Reformed Church and admitting only male students, but evolved into and is presently a nonsectarian, coeducational public research university that makes no religious demands of its students. Rutgers is one of only two colonial colleges that later became public universities. (The other is the College of William and Mary.) [3] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x1000, 28 KB)Current Rutgers University seal, in Rutgers red, with The State University of New Jersey instead of Latin Rutgersensis wording. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Richard Levis McCormick (born 26 December 1947 in New Brunswick, New Jersey) is a historian, professor and university administrator currently serving as the nineteenth president of Rutgers University. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... On the Banks of the Old Raritan is the alma mater of Rutgers University. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers, built between 1809-1825. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Scarlet Knights are the athletic teams for Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University). ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is a voluntary, peer based, non-profit association dedicated to the educational excellence and improvement through peer evaluation and accreditation. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Rutgers is a family name from the Dutch Rutger, the same as Roger and Rodgarus. People whose family name is Rutgers include: Henry Rutgers Institutions named Rutgers include: Rutgers University, the state university of New Jersey that was originally Queens College but was renamed after Henry Rutgers Rutgers Preparatory... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... The Dutch Reformed village church of St. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...


Rutgers was designated The State University of New Jersey by acts of the New Jersey Legislature in 1945 and 1956.[4] The campuses of Rutgers University are located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Newark and Camden. The Newark campus was formerly the University of Newark, which merged into the Rutgers system in 1946, and the Camden campus was created in 1950 from the College of South Jersey.[citation needed] Rutgers is the leading university within New Jersey's state university system, and it was ranked 46th in the world academically in a 2006 survey conducted by the Institute of Higher Education at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.[5] The university offers more than 100 distinct bachelor, 100 master, and 80 doctoral and professional degree programs across 175 academic departments, 29 degree-granting schools and colleges, 16 of which offer graduate programs of study.[6] The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ... quagmire:For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course that generally lasts three or four years. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ... A professional degree or professional membership is an academic degree designed to prepare the holder for a particular career or profession, fields where scholarly research and academic activity are not the work, but rather a profession such as law, medicine, logistics, optometry, architecture, accounting, engineering, religious ministry, or education. ...

Contents

History

Shortly after the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) was established in 1766, ministers of the Dutch Reformed Church, seeking autonomy in ecclesiastical affairs in the American colonies sought to establish a college to train those who wanted to become ministers within the church.[7][8] Through several years of effort by Rev. Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen (1691–1747) and Rev. Jacob Rutsen Hardenbergh (1736–1790), later the college's first president, Queen's College was chartered on 10 November 1766.[7] Established as the trustees of Queen's College, in New-Jersey in honor of King George III's Queen-consort, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1744–1818).[8] The charter was signed and the young college was supported by William Franklin (1730–1813), the last Royal Governor of New Jersey and illegitimate son of Benjamin Franklin. The original charter specified the establishment both of the college, and of an institution called the Queen's College Grammar School, intended to be a preparatory school affiliated and governed by the college.[8] This institution, today the Rutgers Preparatory School, was a part of the college community until 1959.[8][9] Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University) is an institution of higher learning with campuses across the State of New Jersey its main flagship campus in New Brunswick and Piscataway, and two other campuses in the cities of Newark and Camden, New Jersey. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... The Dutch Reformed village church of St. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ... Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen (1691-c1747) cenotaph in Elm Ridge Cemetery Theodorus Jacobus Frelinghuysen (1691 – c. ... Rev. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... George III redirects here. ... Queen Charlotte, (née Duchess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz; 19 May 1744 – 17 November 1818) was the queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom (1738–1820). ... William Franklin (1731-1813) William Franklin (1731 – November 16, 1813) was the last Colonial Governor of New Jersey. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... This article is about the American political figure. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Rutgers Preparatory School (also known as Rutgers Prep or RPS) is a private, co-educational day school located in the Somerset section of Franklin Township, New Jersey. ...

Early nineteenth century drawing of Old Queen's (1809), the oldest building on the Rutgers University campus in New Brunswick, New Jersey.
Early nineteenth century drawing of Old Queen's (1809), the oldest building on the Rutgers University campus in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

The original purpose of Queen's College was to "educate the youth in language, liberal, the divinity, and useful arts and sciences" and for the training of future ministers for the Dutch Reformed Church[10][8][9] The college admitted its first students in 1771—a single sophomore and a handful of first-year students taught by a lone instructor—and granted its first degree in 1774, to Matthew Leydt.[8][9] Despite the religious nature of the early college, the first classes were held at a tavern called the Sign of the Red Lion.[11] When the Revolutionary War broke out and taverns were suspected by the British as being hotbeds of rebel activity, the college abandoned the tavern and held classes in private homes.[8][9] Old Drawing of Old Queens, Rutgers University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Old Drawing of Old Queens, Rutgers University File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Matthew Leydt was the first graduate of Rutgers University, then Queens College. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


In its early years, due to a lack of funds, Queen's College was closed for two extended periods. Early trustees considered merging the college with the College of New Jersey, in Princeton (the measure failed by one vote) and later considered relocating to New York City.[8][9] In 1808, after raising $12,000, the college was temporarily reopened and broke ground on a building of its own, affectionately called "Old Queens" designed by architect John McComb, Jr.[12] The college's third president, the Rev. Ira Condict, laid the cornerstone on April 27, 1809. Shortly after, the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, founded in 1784, relocated from Brooklyn, New York, to New Brunswick, and shared facilities with Queen's College (and the Queen's College Grammar School, as all three institutions were then overseen by the Reformed Church in America).[8][9] During those formative years, all three institutions fit into Old Queens. In 1830, the Queen's College Grammar School moved across the street, and in 1856, the Seminary relocated to a seven-acre (28,000 m²) tract less than one-half mile (800 m) away.[8][9] New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers, built between 1809-1825. ... John McComb, Jr. ... Rev. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1809 (MDCCCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... New Brunswick Theological Seminary is a professional and graduate school founded in 1784, in New York City, to educate ministers for the congregations of the Reformed Church in America. ... For other meanings, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Rutgers Preparatory School (also known as Rutgers Prep or RPS) is a private, co-educational day school located in the Somerset section of Franklin Township, New Jersey. ... The Reformed Church in America (RCA) is a mainline Reformed Protestant denomination that was formerly known as the Dutch Reformed Church. ...

Revolutionary war hero and philanthropist, Colonel Henry Rutgers (1745–1830), early benefactor and namesake of Rutgers University.
Revolutionary war hero and philanthropist, Colonel Henry Rutgers (1745–1830), early benefactor and namesake of Rutgers University.

After several years of closure resulting from an economic depression after the War of 1812, Queen's College reopened in 1825 and was renamed Rutgers College in honor of American Revolutionary War hero Colonel Henry Rutgers (1745–1830). According to the Board of Trustees, Colonel Rutgers was honored because he epitomized Christian values, although it should be noted the Colonel was a wealthy bachelor known for his philanthropy. A year after the school was renamed, it received 2 donations from its namesake: a $200 bell still hanging from the cupola of Old Queen's and a $5,000 bond which placed the college on sound financial footing.[8][9] File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Henry Rutgers (October 7, 1745 - February 17, 1830) was a United States Revolutionary War hero from New York. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... This article is about military actions only. ... Henry Rutgers (October 7, 1745 - February 17, 1830) was a United States Revolutionary War hero from New York. ...


Rutgers College became the land-grant college of New Jersey in 1864 under the Morrill Act of 1862, resulting in the establishment of the Rutgers Scientific School, featuring departments of agriculture, engineering, and chemistry.[8][9] The Rutgers Scientific School would expand over the years to grow into the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station (1880) and divide into the College of Engineering (1914) and the College of Agriculture (1921).[8][9] Shortly after, Rutgers created several new divisions, the College of Pharmacy (1892), New Jersey College for Women (1918), and the School of Education (1924).[8][9] With the development of graduate education, and the continued expansion of the institution, Rutgers College was renamed Rutgers University in 1924.[9] Later, University College (1945), founded to serve part-time, commuting students and Livingston College (1969), emphasizing the urban experience, were created.[8][9] Morrill Act redirects here. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Martin Hall from Passion Puddle One of Cook College Fields The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS) is a constituent school within Rutgers Universitys flagship New Brunswick-Piscataway campus. ... Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy is a part of Rutgers University. ... Douglass College is the womens college of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... The School of Arts and Sciences is an undergraduate constituent school at the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus of Rutgers University. ... The School of Arts and Sciences is an undergraduate constituent school at the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus of Rutgers University. ...


Rutgers was designated the State University of New Jersey by acts of the New Jersey Legislature in 1945 and 1956.[4] Shortly after, the University of Newark (1935) was merged with Rutgers in 1946, as was the College of South Jersey in 1950, and these two institutions were transformed into Rutgers University's campuses in Newark and Camden. In light of the civil rights and women's movements of the 1960s, Rutgers, along with many of the older American institutions (including Princeton and Yale) became co-educational. On September 10, 1970, after much debate, the Board of Governors voted to admit women into the previously all-male Rutgers College.[8][9] The New Jersey Legislature convene at the State House building in Trenton. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Yale redirects here. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Formerly Queens College The school now called Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, was chartered on November 10, 1766 as Queens College, in honor of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1744–1818), Queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom. ...


Prior to 1982, the faculties at Rutgers were split among separate residential colleges and departments, which posed significant disparaties between programs at the undergraduate level. In 1982, under president Edward J. Bloustein, the faculties were centralized. The last aspects of this will be finalized in fall 2007, when the several of the undergraduate liberal arts colleges are scheduled to be merged into a School of Arts and Sciences which will allow Rutgers to drive forward with one set of admissions criteria, curriculum and graduation requirements where previously there were several disparate, confusing and often contrary standards. Currently, New Jersey Governor Jon Corzine has expressed interest in reviving a plan to merge Rutgers University with New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ), a plan which has received support from Rutgers University president Richard L. McCormick. A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... Edward J. Bloustein (1925-1989) Edward J. Bloustein (born 1925, in New York City New York—9 December 1989 in the Bahamas) was the seventeenth President of Rutgers University) serving from 1971 to 1989. ... The School of Arts and Sciences is an undergraduate constituent school at the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus of Rutgers University. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... New Jersey Institute of Technology is a public research university in Newark, New Jersey. ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ... Richard Levis McCormick (born 26 December 1947 in New Brunswick, New Jersey) is a historian, professor and university administrator currently serving as the nineteenth president of Rutgers University. ...


Organization

Campuses

The College Avenue Student Center at Rutgers New Brunswick campus.
The College Avenue Student Center at Rutgers New Brunswick campus.
The University of Newark was established in 1935 in Newark, New Jersey and later merged with Rutgers University in 1946.
The University of Newark was established in 1935 in Newark, New Jersey and later merged with Rutgers University in 1946.
The Bloustein School in New Brunswick
The Bloustein School in New Brunswick
See also: Rutgers-New Brunswick, Rutgers-Newark, and Rutgers-Camden

Rutgers University has three campuses across the state of New Jersey, with its flagship campus located mainly in the cities of New Brunswick and Piscataway, and two smaller campuses in the cities of Newark and Camden. These campuses comprise 27 degree-granting schools and colleges, offering undergraduate, graduate and professional levels of study. The university is centrally administered from New Brunswick, although Provosts at the Newark and Camden campuses hold significant autonomy for some academic issues. Rutgers Fact Book Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2240 × 1680 pixel, file size: 491 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The image is a picture of the Rutgers University-New Brunswick College Avenue Student Center taken by myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2240 × 1680 pixel, file size: 491 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The image is a picture of the Rutgers University-New Brunswick College Avenue Student Center taken by myself. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 677 KB) Summary Photo of Rutgers-Newark campus, taken November 2005 by User:Darkcore. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 677 KB) Summary Photo of Rutgers-Newark campus, taken November 2005 by User:Darkcore. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ...


The New Brunswick-Piscataway Campus (or Rutgers-New Brunswick) is the largest campus of Rutgers; it is the flagship campus, due to its history as the site of the original Rutgers College. It is spread across six municipalities in Middlesex County, New Jersey, chiefly located in the City of New Brunswick and Piscataway Township. It is actually comprised of five smaller campuses: the original and historic College Avenue campus is adjacent to downtown New Brunswick, and includes the seat of the University, Old Queens; Douglass Campus and Cook Campus are adjacent and intertwined with each other so much so that they are normally referred to as the Cook/Douglass Campus and is treated as one campus, Cook has extensive farms and woods that extend into North Brunswick and East Brunswick Townships; separated by the Raritan river are Busch Campus, in Piscataway; and Livingston Campus, also mainly in Piscataway but includes remote lands extending into Edison Township and the Borough of Highland Park. Middlesex County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


As of the Fall 2007 semester, the New Brunwick-Piscataway campuses include 19 undergraduate, graduate and professional schools, including the School of Arts and Sciences, the School of Communication, Information and Library Studies, the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, the School of Engineering, the School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, the Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, the Graduate School, the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology, the Graduate School of Education, the School of Management and Labor Relations, the Mason Gross School of the Arts, the College of Nursing, the Rutgers Business School and the School of Social Work. As of 2007, 26,691 undergraduates and 7,701 graduate students (total 34,392) are enrolled at the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus.[2] The School of Arts and Sciences is an undergraduate constituent school at the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus of Rutgers University. ... Martin Hall from Passion Puddle One of Cook College Fields The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS) is a constituent school within Rutgers Universitys flagship New Brunswick-Piscataway campus. ... Rutgers Business School is the graduate and undergraduate business school tied to the Newark and New Brunswick campuses of Rutgers University Rutgers Business School Categories: | ...


The Newark Campus (or Rutgers-Newark), consists of 8 undergraduate, graduate and professional schools, including: Newark College of Arts and Sciences, University College, School of Criminal Justice, Graduate School, College of Nursing, School of Public Affairs and Administration, Rutgers Business School and Rutgers School of Law - Newark. As of 2007, 6,503 undergraduates and 3,700 graduate students (total 10,203) are enrolled at the Newark campus.[2]
The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... Rutgers Business School is the graduate and undergraduate business school tied to the Newark and New Brunswick campuses of Rutgers University Rutgers Business School Categories: | ... Rutgers School of Law - Newark is one of two law schools of Rutgers University, the other being Rutgers School of Law - Camden. ...

Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, built between 1808–1825. Old Queens currently houses much of the Rutgers University administration.
Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey, built between 1808–1825. Old Queens currently houses much of the Rutgers University administration.

The Camden Campus (or Rutgers-Camden) consists of five undergraduate, graduate and professional schools, including: Camden College of Arts and Sciences, University College, Graduate School, Rutgers School of Business - Camden and Rutgers School of Law - Camden. As of 2006, 3,696 undergraduates and 1,471 graduate students (total 5,165) are enrolled at the Camden campus.[2] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 836 KB) Summary Old Queens, at Rutgers University, on a wintry day, as photographed by User:Rickyrab. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 836 KB) Summary Old Queens, at Rutgers University, on a wintry day, as photographed by User:Rickyrab. ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ... The School of Business in Camden teaches accounting, management, organizational behavior, marketing, and related arts of the business world in Camden, NJ, not too far from Adventure Aquarium, the River Line and the Benjamin Franklin Bridge. ... Rutgers School of Law-Camden is one of two law schools of Rutgers University. ...

Governance

Governance at Rutgers University rests with a Board of Trustees consisting currently of 59 members and a Board of Governors consisting of 11 members: six appointed by the Governor of New Jersey and five chosen by the Board of Trustees.[13][14][15] The trustees constitute chiefly an advisory body to the Board of Governors and are the fiduciary overseers of the property and assets of the University that existed before the institution became the State University of New Jersey in 1945. The initial reluctance of the trustees (still acting as a private corporate body) to cede control of certain business affairs to the state government for direction and oversight caused the state to establish the Board of Governors in 1956.[16] Today, the Board of Governors maintains much of the corporate control of the University. Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ...


The members of the Board of Trustees are voted upon by different constituencies or appointed. "Two faculty and two students are elected by the University Senate as nonvoting representatives. The 59 voting members are chosen in the following way as mandated by state law: 28 charter members (of whom at least three shall be women), 20 alumni members nominated by the Nominating Committee of the Board of Trustees, and five public members appointed by the governor of the state with confirmation by the New Jersey State Senate. The six members of the Board of Governors appointed by the governor also serve as members of the Board of Trustees. Of the 28 charter seats, three are reserved for students with full voting rights."[17]


The president of Rutgers University, chosen by and answerable to the Trustees and Governors, sits as an ex-officio member of both governing boards. He, as the chief administrator of the university, is charged with its day-to-day operations. Since 2002, the president of Rutgers University is Richard Levis McCormick (born 1947). The President of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University) is the chief administator of Rutgers University and—in an ex officio capacity—a presiding officer within the Universitys 59-member Board of Trustees and its eleven-member Board of Governors. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Richard Levis McCormick (born 26 December 1947 in New Brunswick, New Jersey) is a historian, professor and university administrator currently serving as the nineteenth president of Rutgers University. ...


Academics

Profile

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey is a leading national research university and is unique as the only university in the nation that is a colonial chartered college (1766), a land-grant institution (1864), and a state university (1945/1956).[18] Rutgers is accredited by the Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools (1921), and in 1989, became a member of the Association of American Universities, an organization of the 62 leading research universities in North America.[19] The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are American institutions which have been designated by a Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... quagmire:For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is a voluntary, peer based, non-profit association dedicated to the educational excellence and improvement through peer evaluation and accreditation. ... The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools is a voluntary, peer based, non-profit association dedicated to the educational excellence and improvement through peer evaluation and accreditation. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... North American redirects here. ...


A Public Ivy, Rutgers University was ranked 39th worldwide and 43rd within the United States in the 2005 Academic Ranking of World Universities by the Institute of Higher Education at Shanghai Jiao Tong University.[20] According to the Washington Monthly's 2006 rankings, Rutgers ranks 53rd in the United States.[21] The Top American Research Universities an annual statistical report by The Center at the University of Florida ranks Rutgers 39th.[22] In the 2007 U.S. News & World Report ranking of American national universities, Rutgers is ranked as the third best public university in the Northeastern United States and 59th in the ranking's "National Universities" category.[23] Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a flagship public land-grant, sea-grant[3] major research university located on a 2,000 acre campus in Gainesville, Florida, United States of America. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Map of the US northeast. ...


Eleven of Rutgers' graduate departments are ranked by the National Research Council in the top 25 among all universities: Philosophy (2nd), Geology Ranked 9th Nationally based on NSF funding 9th ,Geography (13th), Statistics (17th), English (17th), Mathematics (19th), Art History (20th), Physics (20th), History (20th) Comparative Literature (22nd), French (22nd), and Materials Science Engineering (25th).[24][25][26][27][28] For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... Comparative literature (sometimes abbreviated Comp. ... The Materials Science Tetrahedron, which often also includes Characterization at the center Materials science or Materials Engineering is an interdisciplinary field involving the properties of matter and its applications to various areas of science and engineering. ...


Both Rutgers School of Law - Newark and Rutgers School of Law - Camden are ranked as Top 100 Law Schools by U.S. News and World Report.[29] Rutgers School of Law - Newark is one of two law schools of Rutgers University, the other being Rutgers School of Law - Camden. ... Rutgers School of Law-Camden is one of two law schools of Rutgers University. ...


The Rutgers Business School is ranked 39th in the Wall Street Journal's Regional Ranking of Top Business Schools.[30] Rutgers Business School is the graduate and undergraduate business school tied to the Newark and New Brunswick campuses of Rutgers University Rutgers Business School Categories: | ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ...


The Philosophy Department ranked first in 2002–04 tied with New York University and Princeton University, and second in 2004–06 (NYU was first, Princeton 3rd, Oxford 4th) in the Philosophical Gourmet's biennial report on Philosophy programs in the English-speaking world.[31][32] New York University (NYU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in New York City. ... The Philosophical Gourmet Report (also known as the Leiter Report) attempts to score and rank the university philosophy departments in the English-speaking world, based on a survey of philosophers who are nominated as evaluators by the Advisory Board of the Report. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ...


According to U.S. News & World Report, in the top 25 among all universities: Food Science (2nd)Library Science (6th), Drama/Theater (12th), Mathematics (16th), English (18th), History (19th, with the subspecialty of African-American History ranked 4th and Women’s History ranked 1st), Applied Mathematics (21st) and Physics (24th).[13] Also in the 2006 U.S. News & World Report ranking of Computer Science Ph.D. programs, Rutgers was ranked 29th.[33] Library science is an interdisciplinary science incorporating the humanities, law and applied science to study topics related to libraries, the collection, organization, preservation and dissemination of information resources, and the political economy of information. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... Applied mathematics is a branch of mathematics that concerns itself with the mathematical techniques typically used in the application of mathematical knowledge to other domains. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...


Admissions and financial aid

U.S. News & World Report considers the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus of Rutgers University to be a "more selective" school in terms of the rigour of its admissions processes.[34] 56% of undergraduate applicants are accepted. In comparison, 62% of applicants to nearby Pennsylvania State University (for the University Park campus) and 47% of applicants to the University of Delaware are accepted. Average scores for the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores of enrolling students at Rutgers range from 530–630 on the critical reading section, 560–670 for the mathematics section, and 530-640 for the writing section. Admitted applicants to nearby Pennsylvania State University average scores between from 530–640 on the verbal section and 570–680 on the math section; the University of Delaware's student body averages between 550–640 verbal and 560–660 math.[35] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... This article is about the state-related university. ... The University of Delaware (UD) is the largest university in the U.S. state of Delaware. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ...


As a state university, Rutgers charges two separate rates for tuition and fees depending on whether an enrolled student is a resident of the State of New Jersey (in-state) or not (out-of-state). The Office of Institutional Research and Academic Planning estimates that costs in-state student of attending Rutgers would amount to $18,899 for an undergraduate living on-campus and $22,395 for a graduate student. For an out-of-state student, the costs rise to $26,497 and $27,476 respectively.[2] Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Undergraduate students at Rutgers, though a combination of federal (50%), state (22%), university (22%), and private (6%) scholarship, loans, and grants, received $291,956,597 of financial aid in the 2004–2005 academic year. Of 37,429 undergraduate students at Rutgers, 30,398 (or 81.2%) receive financial aid. During the same period, 73.2%, or 9,604 graduate students out of a population of 13,124, received assistance in the total of $121,269,211 in financial aid sourced chiefly from federal (33%) and university (65%) funds.[2] Financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ...


Faculty

For the August 2005 to May 2006 academic year. Rutgers University had 2,261 full-time and part-time academic faculty members.[2] Among Rutgers notable former professors are John Ciardi, George H. Cook, Michael Curtis, Ralph Ellison, Paul Fussell, Robert Trivers, Francis Fergusson, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Mason W. Gross, Leonid Khachiyan, David Levering Lewis, Roy Lichtenstein, George Segal and Selman Waksman. During his 20 year tenure at Rutgers, David Levering Lewis (born 1936), a professor in the Department of History was twice awarded the Pultizer Prize for Biography or Autobiography (1994 and 2001) for both volumes of his biography of W.E.B. DuBois (1868–1963) and was also the winner of the Bancroft and Parkman prizes. This is an enumeration of notable people affiliated with Rutgers University, including graduates of the undergraduate and graduate and professional programs, former students who did not graduate or receive their degree, presidents of the university, current and former professors, as well as members of the board of trustees and board... John Anthony Ciardi (June 24, 1916 - March 30, 1986) was an American poet, translator, and etymologist. ... George H. Cook, born in 1818, was a professor of chemistry at Rutgers University in 1853. ... Michael Curtis is a television producer and writer. ... Ralph Ellison (March 1, 1913[1] – April 16, 1994) was a scholar and writer. ... Paul Fussell (born 1924, Pasadena, California) is a cultural historian and a professor emeritus of English literature of the University of Pennsylvania. ... Robert L. Trivers, (born 19 February 1943) is an American evolutionary biologist and sociobiologist, most noted for proposing the theories of reciprocal altruism (1971), parental investment (1972), and parent-offspring conflict (1974). ... Francis Fergusson (1904–1986) was an American academic and critic, known as a theorist of drama, and for his interest in mythology. ... Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933, Brooklyn, New York) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Mason Welch Gross (1911 in Hartford, Connecticut – 11 October 1977 in Red Bank, New Jersey) was the sixteenth President of Rutgers University serving from 1959 to 1971. ... Leonid Khachiyan Leonid Khachiyan (May 3, 1952 - April 29, 2005) was a Russian-born mathematician who taught Computer Science at Rutgers University. ... David Levering Lewis is an American historian and winner in 1994 and 2001 of the Pulitzer Prize for part one and part two of his biography of W.E.B. Du Bois. ... Roy Lichtenstein (27 October 1923–29 September 1997) was a prominent American pop artist, whose work borrowed heavily from popular advertising and comic book styles, which he himself described as being as artificial as possible. // Roy Lichtenstein was born on 27 October 1923 into an upper-middle-class family in... George Segal was originally a painter, who later moved into sculpture. ... Selman Abraham Waksman (22 July 1888 – 16 August 1973) was an Ukrainian-American biochemist and microbiologist whose research into organic substances—largely into organisms that live in soil—and their decomposition lead to the discovery of Streptomycin, and several other antibiotics. ... David Levering Lewis is an American historian and winner in 1994 and 2001 of the Pulitzer Prize for part one and part two of his biography of W.E.B. Du Bois. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... For other uses, see Biography (disambiguation). ... W. E. B. Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced ) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was a civil rights activist, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, and scholar, and socialist. ... The Bancroft Prize was established in 1948 with a bequest from Frederic Bancroft and is awarded by Columbia University for books about diplomacy or about the history of the Americas which were first published the year before. ...


Five Nobel laureates have been affiliated with Rutgers as either faculty or students (Milton Friedman, Toni Morrison, David A. Morse, Heinrich Rohrer and Selman Waksman). Nobel Prizes have always been a source of pride for universities, suggesting their excellence in teaching or in providing research opportunities. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... David Morse was born in New York on May 31, 1907. ... Heinrich Rohrer (born June 6, 1933) is a Swiss physicist who, with Gerd Binnig, received half of the 1986 Nobel Prize for Physics for their joint invention of the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). ... Selman Abraham Waksman (22 July 1888 – 16 August 1973) was an Ukrainian-American biochemist and microbiologist whose research into organic substances—largely into organisms that live in soil—and their decomposition lead to the discovery of Streptomycin, and several other antibiotics. ...


Many members of the faculty at Rutgers have achieved top honors in their disciplines, including Michael R. Douglas, a prominent string theorist and the director of the New High Energy Theory Center and winner of the Sackler Prize in theoretical physics in 2000. Jerry Fodor, Zenon Pylyshyn and Stephen Stich were awarded the Jean Nicod Prize in philosophy and cognitive science. Michael R. Douglas is a prominent string theorist and the director of the New High Energy Theory Center at Rutgers University. ... This box:      String theory is a still developing mathematical approach to theoretical physics, whose original building blocks are one-dimensional extended objects called strings. ... The Raymond and Beverly Sackler International Prize in Biophysics is a $40,000 prize in physics or chemistry awarded by Tel Aviv University each year for scientists aged 40 years and under. ... Jerry Alan Fodor (born 1935) is a philosopher at Rutgers University, New Jersey. ... Zenon Pylyshyn (born 1937) is a Canadian cognitive scientist and philosopher. ... Stephen Stich is a professor of Philosophy at Rutgers University. ... The Jean Nicod Prize is awarded annually in Paris to a leading philosopher of mind or philosophically oriented cognitive scientist. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Cognitive science is usually defined as the scientific study either of mind or of intelligence (e. ...


Rutgers is also home to Melville scholar H. Bruce Franklin, whose academic tenure was revoked by Stanford University for actions that were arguably the exercise of his First Amendment right to free speech. Franklin was a visiting professor at Wesleyan and Yale for a few years, then was offered a tenured post by Rutgers. He now holds an endowed chair at Rutgers. H. Bruce Franklin (born 1934) is an American professor of English and radical Marxist. ... Stanford redirects here. ... First Amendment may refer to the: First Amendment to the United States Constitution First Amendment of the Constitution of Ireland Categories: ... Freedom of speech is the right to freely say what one pleases, as well as the related right to hear what others have stated. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ... YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


Furthermore, Rutgers ranks among the top three public AAU institutions in the overall percentage of women faculty.[36]


Libraries and museums

The Rutgers University library system consists of 26 libraries and centers located on the University's three campuses, housing a collection of over 10.5 million holdings, including 3,522,359 volumes, 4,517,726 microforms, 2,544,126 documents, and subscriptions to 42,875 periodicals, and ranking among the nation's top research libraries.[37] The American Library Association ranks the Rutgers University Library system as the 44th largest library in the United States in terms of volumes held.[38] ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ...


The Archibald S. Alexander Library, in New Brunswick, is the oldest and the largest library in Rutgers.[39] It houses several million volumes focusing on an extensive humanities and social science collection. It mainly supports the sort of research done in the School of Arts and Sciences, the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning & Public Policy, the Graduate School of Education, the Graduate School of Social Work, and the School of Communication, Information, and Library Studies. Alexander Library also maintains a large collection of government document, which contains United States, New Jersey, foreign, and international government publications.[39] The Library of Science and Medicine on the Busch Campus in Piscataway houses the University's collection in behavioral, biological, earth, and pharmaceutical sciences and engineering. The LSM also serves as a designated depository library for government publication regarding science, and owns a U.S. patent collection and patent search facility.[40] It was officially established as the Library of Science and Medicine in July of 1964 although the beginning of the development of a library for science started in 1962. The LSM currently has two administrative structures since it is a joint library serving both Rutgers and the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ). UMDNJ, which was briefly known as Rutgers Medical School, separated from Rutgers in 1970. The current character of the LSM is a university science library also serving a medical school.[41] On the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus, in addition to Alexander Library, many individual disciplines have their own libraries, including alcohol studies, art history, Chemistry, Mathematical studies, Music, and Physics. Special Collections and University Archives houses the Sinclair New Jersey Collection, manuscript collection, and rare book collection, as well as the University Archives. Although located in the Alexander Library building, Special Collections and University Archives actually comprises a distinct unit unto itself. Located within the Alexander Library is the East Asian Library which holds a sizable collection of Chinese, Japanese and Korean monographs and periodicals. In Newark, the John Cotton Dana Library (which also houses the Institute of Jazz Studies) and the Robeson Library in Camden, serve their respective campuses with a broad collection of volumes. Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The social sciences are groups of academic disciplines that study the human aspects of the world. ... Piscataway Township is a township located in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ... Behaviorism (or behaviourism) is an approach to psychology based on the proposition that behavior is interesting and worthy of scientific research. ... For the song by Girls Aloud see Biology (song) Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: Βιολογία - βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, speech lit. ... Earth science (also known as geoscience, the geosciences or the Earth Sciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... The pharmaceutical sciences are a group of interdisciplinary areas of study involved with the design, action, delivery, disposition, and use of drugs. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... The University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, an umbrella designation used to refer to one of eight New Jersey state institutions of higher education in medicine. ... This article is about the academic discipline of art history. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Incorrect shortening of Mathematics. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For alternate uses see: Archive (disambiguation). ... Special Collections (often abbreviated to or ) is the name applied to the department within a public or academic library that houses rare or old materials including books, theses, incunabula, handwritten manuscripts and other documents. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... The Institute of Jazz Studies is the largest and most comprehensive library and archive of jazz and jazz-related materials in the world, located at the Newark campus of Rutgers University. ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ...


Rutgers oversees several museums and collections that are open to the public, including the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum, on the College Avenue Campus in New Brunswick, maintains a collection of over 50,000 works of art, focusing on Russian and Soviet art, French 19th-century art and American 19th- and 20th-century art with a concentration on early-20th-century and contemporary prints.[42] The Rutgers University Geology Museum—located in Geology Hall next to the Old Queens Building—features exhibits on geology and anthropology, with an emphasis on the natural history of New Jersey. The largest exhibits include a dinosaur trackway from Towaco, New Jersey; a mastodon from Salem County; and a Ptolomaic era Egyptian mummy.[43] On the campus of Cook College, the New Jersey Museum of Agriculture houses an extensive collection of agricultural, scientific and household tools that spans 350 years of New Jersey's history. The bulk of the collection rests on the 8,000-item Wabun C. Krueger Collection of Agricultural, Household, and Scientific Artifacts, and over 30,000 glass negatives and historic photographs.[44] Also located on the Cook College campus is Rutgers Gardens, which features 50 acres (20 hectares) of horticultural, display, and botanical gardens, as well as arboretums.[45] Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... CCCP redirects here. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... This article is about the social science. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... Towaco is an unincorporated area within Montville Township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. ... This article is about the prehistoric elephant-like animal. ... Salem County is a county located in the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... The Ptolemaic dynasty was a Greek royal family which ruled over Egypt for nearly 300 years, from 305 BC to 30 BC. Ptolemy, a Macedonian and one of Alexander the Greats generals, was appointed satrap of Egypt after Alexanders death in 323 BC. In 305 BC he declared... For other uses, see Mummy (disambiguation). ... Martin Hall from Passion Puddle One of Cook College Fields The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences (SEBS) is a constituent school within Rutgers Universitys flagship New Brunswick-Piscataway campus. ... Photography [fÓ™tÉ‘grÓ™fi:],[foÊŠtÉ‘grÓ™fi:] is the process of recording pictures by means of capturing light on a light-sensitive medium, such as a film or electronic sensor. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants both for scientific purposes and for the enjoyment and education of visitors. ... This article is about a type of botanical garden. ...


Research

Prof. Selman A. Waksman (B.Sc. 1915), who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for developing 22 antibiotics—most notably Streptomycin—in his laboratory at Rutgers University.
Prof. Selman A. Waksman (B.Sc. 1915), who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine for developing 22 antibiotics—most notably Streptomycin—in his laboratory at Rutgers University.

It was at Rutgers that Selman Waksman (1888–1973) discovered several antibiotics, including actinomycin, clavacin, streptothricin, grisein, neomycin, fradicin, candicidin, candidin, and others. Waksman, along with graduate student Albert Schatz (1920–2005), discovered streptomycin—a versatile antibiotic that was to be the first applied to cure tuberculosis. For this discovery, Waksman received the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1952. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2403x3000, 647 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rutgers University Selman Waksman User:ExplorerCDT/RutgersRewrite ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2403x3000, 647 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Rutgers University Selman Waksman User:ExplorerCDT/RutgersRewrite ... Selman Abraham Waksman (22 July 1888 – 16 August 1973) was an Ukrainian-American biochemist and microbiologist whose research into organic substances—largely into organisms that live in soil—and their decomposition lead to the discovery of Streptomycin, and several other antibiotics. ... Staphylococcus aureus - Antibiotics test plate. ... Actinomycin is any of a class of polypeptide antibiotics isolated from soil bacteria of the genus Streptomyces. ... Neomycin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that is found in many topical medications such as creams, ointments and eyedrops. ... Albert Schatz (2 February 1920 – 17 January 2005) was a scientist who was eventually named the co-discoverer of streptomycin, an antibiotic remedy used to treat tuberculosis and a number of other diseases. ... Streptomycin is an antibiotic drug, the first of a class of drugs called aminoglycosides to be discovered, and was the first antibiotic remedy for tuberculosis. ... Tuberculosis (abbreviated as TB for tubercle bacillus or Tuberculosis) is a common and deadly infectious disease caused by mycobacteria, mainly Mycobacterium tuberculosis. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rutgers continues to be on the frontlines of science and innovation, and has given birth to discoveries and inventions such as water-soluble sustained release polymers, Tetraploids, robotic hands, artificial bovine insemination, and development of the ceramic tiles for the heat shield on the Space Shuttle. In health related field, Rutgers has the Environmental & Occupational Health Science Institute (EOHSI). This article is about the space vehicle. ...


Rutgers is also home to the RCSB Protein Data bank [2], 'an information portal to Biological Macromolecular Structures' cohosted with the San Diego Supercomputer center. This database is the authoritative research tool for bioinformaticists using protein primary, secondary and tertiary structures world wide.'


Rutgers is home to the Rutgers Cooperative Research & Extension office, which is run by the Agricultural and Experiment Station with the support of local government. The institution provides research & education to the local farming and agro industrial community in 19 of the 21 counties of the state and educational outreach programs offered through the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Office of Continuing Professional Education. The New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station Office of Continuing Professional Education (OCPE) seeks to measurably improve the quality of life of the residents of New Jersey and beyond through education and public service. ...


Student life

Residential life

Rutgers Inter-Campus shuttle bus
Rutgers Inter-Campus shuttle bus

Rutgers University offers a variety of housing options. On the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus, students are given the option of on-campus housing in both traditional dorms or apartments. Despite some overcrowding, any student seeking on-campus housing will usually be accommodated with a space. Many Rutgers students opt to rent apartments or houses off-campus within the city of New Brunswick. Similar setups are to be found in Rutgers-Newark and Rutgers-Camden, however a substantial portion of the students on those campuses commute and are enrolled on a part-time basis. This article is about the Canadian province. ... A typical American college dorm room A dormitory or dorm is a place to sleep. ...


Rutgers University's three campuses are located in the culturally-diverse, redeveloping urban areas (Newark, Camden, and New Brunswick) with convenient access to New York City and Philadelphia by either automobile, Amtrak or New Jersey Transit. US News & World Report ranked Rutgers-Newark the most diverse university campus in the United States.[46] Because the area of Rutgers' New Brunswick-Piscataway campus—which is composed of several constituent colleges and professional schools—is sprawled across six municipalities, the individual campuses are connected by an inter-campus bus system. Nickname: Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: , Country State County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836 Government  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]  - Total 26. ... The City of Camden is the county seat of Camden County, New Jersey in the United States. ... Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Car redirects here. ... Vermonter at the Brattleboro, Vermont, station, 18 March 2004. ... The New Jersey Transit Corporation (usually shortened to New Jersey Transit or NJ Transit) is a statewide public transportation system serving the state of New Jersey, and Orange and Rockland counties in New York. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... Autobus redirects here. ...


Traditions and symbols

The alma mater of Rutgers University is the song entitled On the Banks of the Old Raritan, written by Howard Fullerton (Class of 1874) in 1873.[9] It is often sung at University occasions, including concerts of the Rutgers University Glee Club, at Convocation and Commencement exercises, and especially at the conclusion of athletic events. The university's fight song is The Bells Must Ring, which features the school's spirit chant: "R-U Rah Rah, R-U Rah Rah, Hoo-Rah! Hoo-Rah Rutgers Rah! Upstream Red Team, Red Team Upstream, Rah Rah Rutgers Rah!." // In its early days, Rutgers athletes were known as Queensmen in reference to the institutions first name, Queens College. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... On the Banks of the Old Raritan is the alma mater of Rutgers University. ... Founded in 1872, the Rutgers University Glee Club (RUGC) is the eighth oldest Glee Club in United States of America, as well as a world-renowned mens chorus based at Rutgers University, in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... For the single by Marilyn Manson, see The Fight Song. ... The Bells Must Ring is the fight song (or spirit song) of the Rutgers University Scarlet Knights. ...


Scarlet was made the official school color of Rutgers University in 1900. Initially, students sought to make orange the school color, citing Rutgers' Dutch heritage and in reference to the Prince of Orange. The Daily Targum first proposed that scarlet be adopted in May 1869, claiming that it was a striking color and because scarlet ribbon was easily obtained. During the first intercollegiate football game with Princeton on 6 November 1869, the players from Rutgers wore scarlet-colored turbans and handkerchiefs to distinguish them as a team from the Princeton players.[47] The current mascot is the Scarlet Knight. In its early days, Rutgers athletes were known as "Queensmen" in reference to the institution's first name, Queen's College. However, in 1925, the mascot was changed to Chanticleer, a fighting rooster from the medieval fable Reynard the Fox (Le Roman de Renart) which was used by Geoffrey Chaucer's in the Canterbury Tales. However, this mascot was often the subject of ridicule because of its association with "being chicken." In 1955, the mascot was changed to the Scarlet Knight after a campus-wide election.[47] The names (and mascots) of the athletic teams at Rutgers-Newark and Rutgers-Camden are the "Scarlet Raiders" and the "Scarlet Raptors," respectively. Scarlet or Scarlett (often used interchangeably) may refer to a number of things or people: Things Scarlet (color), a bright shade of beauty boldness individuality or red Scarlet (cloth), a type of woollen cloth common in mediaeval England Scarlet (magazine), a womens magazine in the UK. Scarlett (novel), a... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The orange, the fruit from which the modern name of the orange colour comes. ... Prince of Orange is a title of nobility, originally associated with the principality of Orange in southern France. ... The Daily Targum is the official student newspaper of Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey. ... Scarlet or Scarlett (often used interchangeably) may refer to a number of things or people: Things Scarlet (color), a bright shade of beauty boldness individuality or red Scarlet (cloth), a type of woollen cloth common in mediaeval England Scarlet (magazine), a womens magazine in the UK. Scarlett (novel), a... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about headwear. ... Linen handkerchief A handkerchief or hanky is a square of fabric, usually carried in the pocket, for personal hygiene purposes such as wiping ones hands or blowing ones nose, but also used as a decorative accessory in a suit pocket. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Chanticleer can refer to: Chanticleer, a rooster appearing in fables surrounding the fables of Reynard the Fox. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... For other uses, see Fable (disambiguation). ... Reynard the Fox, also known as Renard, Renart, Reinard, Reinecke, Reinhardus, and by many other spelling variations, is a trickster figure whose tale is told in a number of anthropomorphic fables from medieval Europe. ... Chaucer redirects here. ... Canterbury Tales Woodcut 1484 The Canterbury Tales is a collection of stories written by Geoffrey Chaucer in the 14th century (two of them in prose, the rest in verse). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Rutgers' motto, Sol iustitiae et occidentem illustra (translated as "Sun of righteousness, shine upon the West also") is derived from the motto of the University of Utrecht in The Netherlands, which is Sol Iustitiae Illustra Nos (translated as "Sun of Justice, shine upon us"). It is a reference to the biblical texts of Malachi 4:2 and Matthew 13:43.[48] This motto appears in the University's seal (pictured above), which is also derived from that of the University of Utrecht, and depicts a multi-pointed sun.[49] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Utrecht University (Universiteit Utrecht in Dutch) is a university in Utrecht, The Netherlands. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... Malachi (or Malachias, מַלְאָכִי, Malʾaḫi, Málakhî) is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh, written by the prophet Malachi. ... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... This article is about the authentication means. ... Sol redirects here. ...


At Commencement exercises in the Spring, tradition leads undergraduates to break clay pipes over the Class of 1877 Cannon monument in front of Old Queens, symbolizing the breaking of ties with the college, and leaving behind the good times of one's undergraduate years. This symbolic gesture dates back to when pipe-smoking was fashionable among undergraduates, and many college memories were of evenings of pipe smoking and revelry with friends. During commencement exercises, graduating seniors walk in academic procession under the Class of 1902 Memorial Gateway (erected in 1904) on Hamilton Street leading to the Voorhees Mall where the ceremonies are held for Rutgers College. Traditionally, students are warned to avoid walking beneath the gate before commencement over a superstition that one who does will not graduate. A smoking pipe is a device used for smoking combustible substances such as tobacco. ... Winter at Old Queens, the oldest building at Rutgers, built between 1809-1825. ... Academic procession on the occasion of the conferment of doctoral degrees at the University of Lund in southern Sweden (1990). ... Statue of Prince William the Silent on the Voorhees Mall Voorhees Mall is a grassy area of about 28 acres (0. ... Formerly Queens College The school now called Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, was chartered on November 10, 1766 as Queens College, in honor of Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (1744–1818), Queen consort of George III of the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Superstition (disambiguation). ...


Student organizations and activities

Rutgers hosts over 700 student organizations, covering a wide range of interests. Among the first student groups was the first college newspaper in the United States of America. The Political Intelligencer and New Jersey Adviser began publication at Queen's College in 1783, and ceased operation in 1785.[9] Continuing this tradition is the university's current college newspaper, The Daily Targum, established in 1869, which is the second-oldest college newspaper currently published in the United States, after The Dartmouth (1843). Both poet Joyce Kilmer and economist Milton Friedman served as editors. Also included are the Rutgers Centurion, a conservative newspaper, the Rutgers University Glee Club, a male choral singing group established in 1872 (among the oldest in the country), as well as the Rutgers University Debate Union. Governed by the Student Activities Council, and funded by student fees disbursed through student government associations, students can organize groups for practically any political ideology or issue, ethnic or religious affiliation, academic subject, activity, or hobby. Rutgers University hosts over 700 student organizations, covering a wide range of interests. ... Rutgers University is home to chapters of many Greek organizations, and a significant percentage of the undergraduate student body is active in Greek life. ... A student organization is a voluntary association of students at institutions of secondary and higher education for a specific legal purpose. ... A student newspaper is a newspaper run by university or high or middle school students that covers local and in particular school/university news. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The Daily Targum is the official student newspaper of Rutgers University, the State University of New Jersey. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... Alfred Joyce Kilmer (6 December 1886 – 30 July 1918) was an American journalist, poet, literary critic, lecturer and editor. ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... The Rutgers Centurion is a conservative magazine at Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, founded in September of 2004 by retired Daily Targum columnist James OKeefe, astrophysicist Matthew Klimek and artist Justine Mertz. ... Founded in 1872, the Rutgers University Glee Club (RUGC) is the eighth oldest Glee Club in United States of America, as well as a world-renowned mens chorus based at Rutgers University, in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... This article is about choirs, musical ensembles containing singers. ... Year 1872 (MDCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ...


Rutgers University is home to chapters of many Greek organizations, and a significant percentage of the undergraduate student body is active in Greek life.Several fraternities and sororities maintain houses for their chapters in the area of Union Street (known familiarly as "Frat Row") in New Brunswick, within blocks of Rutgers' College Avenue Campus. Chapters of Zeta Psi and Delta Phi organized at Rutgers as early as 1845. There are over 50 fraternities and sororities on the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus, ranging from traditional to historically African-American, Hispanic, Multicultural, and Asian interest organizations.[50] Greek organizations are governed by the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs. Twelve organizations maintain chapters in New Brunswick without sanction by the University's administration.[51] The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... The Zeta Psi Fraternity of North America Inc. ... Delta Phi (ΔΦ) is a fraternity was founded in 1827 at Union College in Schenectady, New York. ... 1845 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... The term multiculturalism generally refers to a state of both cultural and ethnic diversity within the demographics of a particular social space. ... Asian people[1] is a demonym for people from Asia. ...


In the late 1800s, the University banned fraternities because of their unusual hazing practices. This caused them to go underground as secret societies. It also sparked the interest of some students to create their own societies. Cap and Skull, Order of the Bull's Blood, and Order of the Red Lion were all founded at Rutgers before the turn of the century. Cap and Skull is a senior-year honor society at Rutgers University, founded on January 18, 1900. ... For the Hungarian red wine called Bull’s Blood, see Egri Bikavér . ...


Alumni

Since 1774, when the entire graduating class consisted of one student, Matthew Leydt, there have been over 335,000 graduates, or alumni, of Rutgers University.[6] Many alumni remain active through alumni associations—including the Rutgers Alumni Association founded in 1831—annual Reunions and Homecomings, and other events. Rutgers alumni are often known as "Loyal Sons", a term of affection dating from the days when Rutgers offered admission only to men. This term, since the dawn of coeducation has been extended to include Rutgers' "Loyal Daughters".[citation needed] This is an enumeration of notable people affiliated with Rutgers University, including graduates of the undergraduate and graduate and professional programs, former students who did not graduate or receive their degree, presidents of the university, current and former professors, as well as members of the board of trustees and board... Matthew Leydt was the first graduate of Rutgers University, then Queens College. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... An alumni association is an association of former students (alumni). ...


One of Rutgers' most famous alums was Paul Robeson. Robeson, an African American, won an academic scholarship to Rutgers University. When he went out for the Rutgers University football team, other players beat him up and pulled out his fingernails. He bore the abuse to prove his worth and when he graduated he was a two-time All-American and the school valedictorian, exhorting his classmates to "catch a new vision." Robeson was the third African-American student accepted at Rutgers, and was the only Black student during his time on campus. Robeson was one of three classmates at Rutgers accepted into Phi Beta Kappa. He was valedictorian of his graduating class and one of four students selected in 1919 to Cap and Skull, Rutgers' honor society. A noted athlete, Robeson earned fifteen varsity letters in football, baseball, basketball, and track and field. For his accomplishments as an end in football, he was twice named a first-team All-American in (1917 and 1918). Football coach Walter Camp described him as "the greatest to ever trot the gridiron." Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898 – January 23, 1976) was a multi-lingual American actor, athlete, bass-baritone concert singer, writer, civil rights activist, fellow traveler, Spingarn Medal winner, and Stalin Peace Prize laureate. ...


Rutgers has graduated three Nobel Laureates, including Selman A. Waksman (A.B. 1915) in Medicine, Milton Friedman (A.B. 1932) in Economics,[52] and David A. Morse (A.B. 1929), Director-General of the International Labour Organization, who won the Peace Prize in 1969. Several alumni have been awarded the Pulitzer Prize, including Michael Shaara (A.B. 1951), author of The Killer Angels and other historical fiction, in Fiction (1975), journalist Richard Aregood (B.A. 1965) in editorial writing (1985), and Roy Franklin Nichols (A.B. 1918) in history (1949). Selman Waksman (1888-1973) Selman Abraham Waksman (July 22, 1888 - August 16, 1973) was a biochemist who is most famous for his research into organic substances and their decomposition, which in 1943 eventually led to his discovery of streptomycin. ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... David Morse was born in New York on May 31, 1907. ... The International Labour Organization (ILO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that deals with labour issues. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Michael Shaara (June 23, 1928 - May 5, 1988) was an American writer of science fiction, sports fiction, and historical fiction. ... The Killer Angels (1974) is a historical novel by Michael Shaara that was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1975. ... Look up historical fiction in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Fiction has been awarded since 1948 for distinguished fiction by an American author, preferably dealing with American life. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Writing has been awarded since 1917 for distinguished editorial writing, the test of excellence being clearness of style, moral purpose, sound reasoning, and power to influence public opinion in what the writer conceives to be the right direction. ... The Pulitzer Prize for History has been awarded since 1917 for a distinguished book upon the history of the United States. ...


Alumni of Rutgers have had a considerable impact in the arts, including those by two noted modern sculptors, George Segal (M.A. 1963) and Alice Aycock (B.A. 1968). Many notable buildings in Boston (the Copley Plaza Hotel), and New York City including the The Dakota, Plaza Hotel, the Waldorf and Astoria Hotels (demolished in 1929 to make way for the Empire State Building) as well as several of the oldest buildings on the Rutgers University campus in New Brunswick, were designed by architect Henry Janeway Hardenburgh (A.B. 1871). Poet Joyce Kilmer (Class of 1908), attended Rutgers for two years before transferring to Columbia University, was famous for his poem "Trees" and later died in World War I, and Robert Pinsky (B.A. 1962), was appointed Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress in 1997. Filmmaker and critic Wheeler Winston Dixon (Ph.D. 1982) has written more than twenty five books on film history, theory and criticism, and his collected films are housed at The Museum of Modern Art in New York City. George Segal George Segal (born February 13, 1934) is a well-known Jewish American film and stage actor who was born in Great Neck, Long Island, New York. ... Alice Aycock (born November 20, 1946) is an American sculptor. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Copley Plaza Hotel in downtown Boston, Massachusetts was founded in 1912. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Dakota, constructed from October 25, 1880 to October 27, 1884,[3] is an apartment building located on the northwest corner of 72nd Street and Central Park West in New York City. ... The Plaza Hotel in New York City is a landmark 19-story luxury hotel with a height of 250 feet (76 m) and length of 400 feet that (122 m) occupies the west side of Grand Army Plaza, from which it derives its name, and extends along Central Park South... This article is about the hotel. ... This article is about the hotel. ... The Empire State Building is a 102-story Art Deco skyscraper in New York City, New York at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and West 34th Street. ... Henry Janeway Hardenbergh (February 6, 1847 - March 18, 1918) was a U.S. architect, best known for having designed The Dakota luxury-apartment building, The Copley Plaza Hotel in Boston Massachusetts, and the Plaza Hotel, both near Central Park in Manhattan. ... Alfred Joyce Kilmer (6 December 1886 – 30 July 1918) was an American journalist, poet, literary critic, lecturer and editor. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Robert Pinsky (born October 20, 1940) is an American poet, essayist, literary critic, and translator who served in the post of Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress (known popularly as the Poet Laureate of the United States) from 1997 to 2000. ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... Wheeler Winston Dixon in 1969 Wheeler Winston Dixon was born March 12, 1950 in New Brunswick, New Jersey, and is best known as a writer of film history, theory and criticism. ... General Electric GE90-115B fanblade, on display at MOMA. The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is an art museum located in Midtown Manhattan in New York City. ...


Many Rutgers graduates have gone on to careers in public service, including former U.S. Secretary of State and Senator Frederick T. Frelinghuysen (A.B. 1836), former U.S. Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary (J.D. 19??), former FBI director Louis Freeh (B.A. 1971), Vice President of the United States Garret A. Hobart (A.B. 1863), and former Representative and Senator Clifford P. Case (A.B. 1925). Among the first students enrolled at Rutgers (when it was Queen's College), Simeon DeWitt (A.B. 1776) became the Surveyor-General for the Continental Army (1776–1783) during the American Revolution and classmate James Schureman (A.B. 1775), served in the Continental Congress and as a United States Senator. Seven Rutgers graduates have served as Governor of New Jersey: Charles C. Stratton (A.B. 1814), William A. Newell (A.B. 1836; A.M. 1839), George C. Ludlow (A.B. 1850, A.M. 1850), Foster M. Voorhees (A.B. 1876, A.M. 1879), A. Harry Moore (J.D. 1922), Richard Hughes (J.D. 1931), and James J. Florio (J.D. 1967). Alumnus Joseph P. Bradley (A.B. 1836) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States (1870–1891) and cast the tie-breaking vote on the bipartisan commission that decided the contested American presidential election in 1876. The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Frederick Theodore Frelinghuysen (August 4, 1817–May 20, 1885) was a member of the United States Senate from New Jersey and a United States Secretary of State. ... The United States Secretary of Energy is the head of the United States Department of Energy, concerned as the name suggests, with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Hazel OLeary Hazel Rollins OLeary (born May 17, 1937) was the seventh United States Secretary of Energy from 1993 to 1997. ... F.B.I. and FBI redirect here. ... Louis Freeh was the fifteenth director of the FBI. He oversaw the agency for nearly 10 years during one of the most difficult periods of its history. ... The Vice President of the United States[1] (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS,[2] Veep, or VP) is the first person in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Garret Augustus Hobart (June 3, 1844–November 21, 1899) was the twenty-fourth Vice President of the United States. ... Clifford P. Case on the cover of Time Magazine (18 October 1954) Clifford Phillip Case (16 April 1904 in Franklin Park, New Jersey – 5 March 1982 in Washington, DC) was an American lawyer political figure, serving in the U.S. House of Representatives (1945–1953) and United States Senate (1955... Simeon De Witt (1756-1834) was the Geographer and Surveyor-General of the Continental Army during the American Revolution and Surveyor General of the State of New York for the fifty years from 1884 until his death, a time of rapid expansion into the Indian lands of the central and... This article is about military actions only. ... James Schureman (February 12, 1756– January 22, 1824) was an American merchant and statesman from New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... The Continental Congress resulted from the American Revolution and was the de facto first national government of the United States. ... Jon Corzine 54th Governor of New Jersey; Incumbent Christine Christie Todd Whitman, the first female governor of New Jersey The Governor of New Jersey is the chief executive of the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Charles C. Stratton (1796-1850) For the little person of the same name, see General Tom Thumb. ... William Augustus Newell (September 5, 1817 - August 8, 1901), was a physician, a three-term Congressman, and the Governor of New Jersey from 1857 to 1860, and of the Washington Territory from 1880-1884. ... George Craig Ludlow (April 6, 1830 - December 18, 1900) was a U.S. politician who served as Governor of New Jersey from . ... Foster MacGowan Voorhees (November 5, 1856 – June 14, 1927) was a Republican governor of New Jersey. ... Moores photo from bioguide. ... Richard Hughes, British writer Richard Hughes, musician, drummer of Keane Richard Hughes, a football (soccer) player Richard Hughes, a homeopathic doctor Richard cyreve Hughes, Miranda IM lead developer for the 0. ... James Joseph Florio (born August 29, 1937) was the Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of New Jersey from 1990 to 1994, the first Italian-American to hold the position. ... Joseph Philo Bradley (March 14, 1813-January 22, 1892), was an American jurist. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... (Redirected from 1876 U.S. presidential election) Summary In perhaps the most disputed presidential election in American history, Samuel Tilden handily defeated Ohios Rutherford Hayes in the popular vote, and had 184 electoral votes to Hayes 165. ...


Alumni have founded or headed businesses, including Robert Kriendler (A.B. 1936), owner of the 21 Club in New York City, Leonor F. Loree (A.B. 1877), President of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Bernard Marcus (B.S. 1951), Founder of the Home Depot, Ernest Mario (B.S. 1961), former Chief Executive Officer of GlaxoSmithKline, Duncan McMillan (B.S. 1966), co-founder of Bloomberg L.P., and Barry Schuler (B.A. 1976), former Chairman and CEO of AmericaOnline (AOL). The 21 Club is a restaurant and former prohibition-era speakeasy, located at 21 West 52nd Street in New York City. ... Leonor Fresnel Loree (1858-1940) was an executive of many railroads in the United States. ... Bernard Marcus (born 1929 in Newark, New Jersey) is a co-founder of Home Depot. ... The Home Depot (NYSE: HD) is an American retailer of home improvement and construction products and services. ... GlaxoSmithKline plc (LSE: GSK NYSE: GSK) is a United Kingdom based pharmaceutical, biological, and healthcare company. ... Bloomberg L.P. is the largest financial news and data company in the world, controlling 33% of market share. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see AOL (disambiguation). ...


Graduates of Rutgers have gone on to make advances in medicine, mathematics and science, most notably Nobel Laureate Selman A. Waksman (B.Sc. 1915), but also including Peter C. Schultz (B.S. 1967), co-inventor of fiber optics, geneticist Stanley N. Cohen (B.Sc. 1956) who pioneered in the field of gene splicing, Louis Gluck (B.S. 1930) the "father of neonatology," computer pioneer Nathan M. Newmark (B.S. 1948) who won the National Medal of Science, and Matthew Golombek (B.S. 1976) who was the project scientist in charge of NASA's Pathfinder mission to Mars. Selman Waksman (1888-1973) Selman Abraham Waksman (July 22, 1888 - August 16, 1973) was a biochemist who is most famous for his research into organic substances and their decomposition, which in 1943 eventually led to his discovery of streptomycin. ... Fiber Optic strands An optical fiber in American English or fibre in British English is a transparent thin fiber for transmitting light. ... Stanley N. Cohen is an American geneticist. ... Genetic engineering, genetic modification (GM), and gene splicing (once in widespread use but now deprecated) are terms for the process of manipulating genes in an organism, usually outside of the organisms normal reproductive process. ... Neonatology is a subspecialty of pediatrics defined as the care of the ill or premature newborn infant. ... Nathan M. Newmark (September 22, 1910 - January 25, 1981) was an American engineer and academic. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ...


Rutgers alumni have entertained Americans on the silver screen as well as the small screen, including most notably James Gandolfini (B.A. 1983), known for his role on The Sopranos, and Oswald "Ozzie" Nelson (B.A. 1927), fondly remembered for The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. Film star Asia Carrera (B.A. 1996) became the most famous adult actress of her generation. The Food Network has rocketed Chef and Restaurateur Mario Batali (B.A. 1982) into America's homes. Other notable thespian alumni include Avery Brooks (B.A. 1973) (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine), Alan Semok (B.A. 1975) (Shining Time Station, K.I.D.S.-TV), Kristin Davis (B.F.A. 1987), (Sex and the City), and Calista Flockhart (B.F.A. 1988) (The Birdcage, Ally McBeal). James R. Gandolfini (born September 18, 1961) is a three-time Emmy award winning American actor known for multifaceted portrayals of conscientious yet often inherently sinister characters. ... This article is about the television series. ... The Nelson family The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet, an American radio and television series, was once the longest-running, live-action situation comedy on American television, having aired on ABC from 1952 to 1966 after a ten-year run on radio. ... Asia Carrera (born Jessica Steinhauser[1][2] on August 6, 1973 in New York City) is a former American pornographic actress. ... Mario Batali (b. ... Brooks as Sisko Avery Franklin Brooks (born October 2, 1948 in Evansville, Indiana) is an American actor. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... Shining Time Station was an American television spin-off of Thomas the Tank Engine and Friends series co-created by Britt Allcroft and Rick Siggelkow. ... Kristin Landen Davis (also listed as Kristin Lee Davis) (born February 23 or February 24,[1] 1965 depending on the source) is an American Golden Globe and Emmy award-nominated actress best known for the role of Charlotte York on HBOs Sex and the City. ... This article is about the television series. ... Calista Kay Flockhart (born on November 11, 1964) is an Emmy Award-nominated and Golden Globe-winning American actress, primarily on soap operas and television. ... The Birdcage is a 1996 comedy film directed by Mike Nichols, and stars Robin Williams, Nathan Lane, Gene Hackman, Dianne Wiest, Dan Futterman, Calista Flockhart, Hank Azaria and Christine Baranski. ... For the character, see Ally McBeal (character). ...


In athletics, graduates of Rutgers have won Olympic gold medals, been inducted into sports halls of fame, and led numerous teams as general managers and coaches including including Major League Baseball manager Jeff Torborg (B.A. 1963), Eddie Jordan (B.A. 1977), coach of the Washington Wizards, Sonny Werblin (A.B. 1932), founder of the New York Jets, and David Stern (B.A. 1963), Commissioner of the National Basketball Association. Major Leagues redirects here. ... Jeffrey Allen Torborg (born November 26, 1941 in Plainfield, New Jersey) is a former catcher and manager in Major League Baseball. ... Eddie Jordan - NBA head basketball coach of the Washington Wizards - courtesy of Mitchell Layton/NBAE/Getty Images Edward Montgomery Eddie Jordan (born January 29, 1955 in Washington, D.C.) is the current head coach of the Washington Wizards of the NBA. // Collegiate and pro career Jordan attended Rutgers University in... Washington Bullets redirects here. ... David A. Sonny Werblin (March 17, 1907 - November 21, 1991) was an owner of the New York Jets. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Gang Green, the Green and White, Jersey Jets Team colors Hunter green and white Head Coach Eric Mangini Owner Woody Johnson General manager Mike Tannenbaum League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Eastern Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... For other persons named David Stern, see David Stern (disambiguation). ... NBA redirects here. ...


Yasser Latif Hamdani, Pakistani writer, lawyer, and constitutional scholar is also a Rutgers alumnus. Yasser Latif Hamdani (b. ...


Quincy Magoo (degree and class unknown), a lovable cartoon character from the 1950s and 1960s, was among the proudest of Rutgers' "Loyal Sons." Mr. ...


Athletics

Rutgers was among the first American institutions to engage in intercollegiate athletics, and participated in a small circle of schools that included Yale University, Columbia University and long-time rival, Princeton University (then called The College of New Jersey). The four schools met at the Fifth Avenue Hotel in Manhattan on 19 October 1873 to establish a set of rules governing their intercollegiate competition, and particularly to codify the new game of football. Though invited, Harvard chose not to attend.[53] In the early years of intercollegiate athletics, the circle of schools that participated in these athletic events were located solely in the American Northeast. However, by the turn of the century, colleges and universities across the United States began to participate. The Scarlet Knights are the athletic teams for Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University). ... Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University) is an institution of higher learning with campuses across the State of New Jersey its main flagship campus in New Brunswick and Piscataway, and two other campuses in the cities of Newark and Camden, New Jersey. ... Yale redirects here. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... This article is about the borough of New York City. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Harvard redirects here. ...

The Rutgers College football team in 1882.
The Rutgers College football team in 1882.

In 1864, rowing became the first organized sport at Rutgers. Six mile races were held on the Raritan River among six-oared boats. In 1870, Rutgers held its first intercollegiate competition, against the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard, the then top-ranked amateur crew of the time. Since the start in 1864, Rutgers has built a strong crew program consisting of heavyweight and lightweight men. Women’s crew was added to the program in 1974. picture of 1882 Rutgers College Football team File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... picture of 1882 Rutgers College Football team File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


The first intercollegiate athletic event at Rutgers was a baseball game on 2 May 1866 against Princeton in which they suffered a 40-2 loss.[9] Rutgers University is often referred to as The Birthplace of College Football as the first intercollegiate football game was held on College Field between Rutgers and Princeton on 6 November 1869 in New Brunswick, New Jersey on a plot of ground where the present-day College Avenue Gymnasium now stands. Rutgers won the game, with a score of 6 runs to Princeton's 4.[9][54][47] According to Parke Davis, the 1869 Rutgers football team shared the national title with Princeton.[55] (This game is believed to have been closer to soccer than to modern American football.)[3] is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Nickname: Location of New Brunswick in Middlesex County Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Established December 30, 1730 Incorporated September 1, 1784 Government  - Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)  - Mayor James Cahill Area  - City  5. ... The College Avenue Gymnasium is an athletic facility on the campus of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ...


Since 1866, Rutgers remained unaffiliated with any formal athletic conference and was classified as "independent". From 1946 to 1951, the university was a member of the Middle Three Conference, and from 1958 to 1961, was a member of the Middle Atlantic Conference.[56] In 1978, Rutgers became a member of the Atlantic 10 conference. In 1991, it joined the Big East Conference for football. All sports programs at Rutgers subsequently became affiliated with the Big East in 1995.[57] The Middle Atlantic Corporation (formerly the Middle Atlantic Conference) is an athletic conference which competes in the NCAAs Division III. Member teams are located in the Eastern United States. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The Atlantic 10 Conference (A10) is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in the eastern United States; it also has two member schools in Ohio. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ...


The first intercollegiate competition in Ultimate Frisbee (now called simply "Ultimate") was held between students from Rutgers and Princeton on November 6, 1972 to mark the one hundred third anniversary of the first intercollegiate football game. Rutgers won 29-27.[58] Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The Rutgers Men's Basketball Team was among the "Final Four" and ended the 1976 season ranked fourth in the United States, after an 86-70 loss against the University of Michigan in the semifinals, and a 106-92 loss against UCLA in the consolation round of the 1976 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament.[59] The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The 1976 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 32 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...

Rutgers Scarlet Knights fullback No. 23 Brian Leonard (class of 2007), conducts the band as it plays the alma mater, 'On the Banks of the Old Raritan' after his last home game against Syracuse University on November 25 2006.
Rutgers Scarlet Knights fullback No. 23 Brian Leonard (class of 2007), conducts the band as it plays the alma mater, 'On the Banks of the Old Raritan' after his last home game against Syracuse University on November 25 2006.

Since 1991, Rutgers is a member of the Big East Conference, a collegiate athletic conference consisting of 16 colleges and universities from the East Coast and Midwestern regions of the United States. The Big East Conference is a member of the Bowl Championship Series. Rutgers currently fields 27 intercollegiate sports programs and is a Division I school as sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The Rutgers-Newark and Rutgers-Camden campuses compete within NCAA Division III. Rutgers fields thirty teams in NCAA Division I sanctioned sports, including Football, Baseball, Basketball, Crew, Cross Country, Fencing, Field Hockey, Golf, Gymnastics, Lacrosse, Soccer, Softball, Tennis, Track and Field, Swimming and Diving, Wrestling, Volleyball.[60] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (453 × 604 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (453 × 604 pixel, file size: 118 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men, women and children in many countries around the world. ... This article is about the game. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... Soccer redirects here. ... Softball is a team sport popular especially in the United States. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... This article is about collegiate wrestling. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...


Since joining the Big East, the Scarlet Knights have won five Big East Conference tournament titles: men's soccer (1997), men's track & field (2005), baseball (2000, 2007), women's basketball (2007). Several other teams have won regular season titles but failed to win the conference's championship tournament.[61] Soccer redirects here. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Most recently, the Rutgers Scarlet Knights' football team has achieved success on the gridiron after several years of losing seasons, being invited to the Insight Bowl on 27 December 2005 in which they lost 45 to 40 against Arizona State University.[62] This was Rutgers' first bowl appearance since the 16 December 1978 loss against Arizona State, 34-18, at the Garden State Bowl. The Insight Bowl is an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A post-season American college football bowl game played in Arizona since 1989. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The Garden State Bowl was an annual post-season college football bowl game played at Giants Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, from 1978-1981. ...


The 2006 football season also saw Rutgers being ranked within the Top 25 teams in major college football polls. After the 9 November 2006 victory over the #3 ranked, undefeated Louisville Cardinals, Rutgers jumped up to seventh in the AP Poll, eighth in the USA Today/Coaches poll, seventh in the Harris Interactive Poll, and sixth in the Bowl Championship Series rankings. These were Rutgers' highest rankings in the football polls since they were ranked fifteenth in 1961. Rutgers ended the season 11-2 after winning the inaugural Texas Bowl on 28 December 2006, defeating the Wildcats of Kansas State University by a score of 37-10 and finishing the season ranked twelfth in the final Associated Press poll of sportswriters, the team's highest season-ending ranking.[63] is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Louisville (also known as U of L) is a public, state-supported university located in Louisville, Kentucky, United States. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ... The USA Today Coaches Poll is the current name for a weekly ranking of the top 25 NCAA Division I-A college football and Division I college basketball teams. ... The Harris Interactive College Football Poll is a weekly ranking of the top 25 NCAA Division I-A college football teams. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ... The Texas Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been held for the first time in 2006 in Houston, Texas. ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kansas State Universitys athletic teams are called the Wildcats, and their official color is royal purple; white and silver are generally used as complementary colors. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


Under Head Coach C. Vivian Stringer, the Women's Basketball program is among the elite programs in the country as they remain consistently ranked in the Top 25, consistently making the NCAA Women's Championship Tournament, and sometimes winning the Big East regular season championship. In 2006-2007, Rutgers won their first ever Big East Conference Tournament Championship. The program has been highly competitive since its inception, winning the 1982 AIAW National Championship, reaching the 2000 Final Four, and reaching the Final Four and national championship game in 2007. Charlaine Vivian Stringer (born March 16, 1948) is a prominent African American basketball coach, with one of the best records in the history of womens basketball. ...


Rutgers maintains athletic rivalries with other collegiate institutions. The university has a historic rivalry with Princeton University and Columbia University (formerly King's College) originating from the early days of college football. While they maintain this rivalry in other sports, neither of them have met in football since 1980. Rutgers has a basketball rivalry with Seton Hall University,[64] and has developed a growing three-way rivalry with the University of Connecticut and Syracuse University, both fellow Big East Conference members. Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... “Seton Hall” redirects here. ... The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticuts land-grant university. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York. ...


With the fall 2007 semester, six of Rutgers New Brunswick/Piscataway's NCAA Division I Olympic sports will become club teams, including men's swimming and diving, men's heavyweight and lightweight crew, men's tennis, and men's and women's fencing.


Trivia

  • Rutgers hosted as faculty the influential circle of 1960s artists called the "Rutgers Group" which included Roy Liechtenstein and George Segal.

Roy Lichtenstein (October 27, 1923 - September 29, 1997) was a prominent American pop artist, whose work borrowed heavily from popular advertising and comic book styles, which he himself described as being as artificial as possible. ... George Segal was originally a painter, who later moved into sculpture. ...

Points of interest

The Grease Trucks at Rutgers University. ... The Louis Brown Athletic Center, also known as the Rutgers Athletic Center (RAC), is a 8,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Piscataway, New Jersey on the Universitys Livingston Campus. ... Rutgers Stadium is the venue for the football program at Rutgers University. ... Statue of Prince William the Silent on the Voorhees Mall Voorhees Mall is a grassy area of about 28 acres (0. ... The Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum is located on the Voorhees Mall of the campus of Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. ... Rutgers Gardens (50 acres) are horticultural, display, and botanical gardens, including arboretums, located at on the campus of Cook College, Rutgers University, 112 Ryders Lane, New Brunswick in Middlesex County, New Jersey. ...

See also

The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... Henry Rutgers (October 7, 1745 - February 17, 1830) was a United States Revolutionary War hero from New York. ... This is an enumeration of notable people affiliated with Rutgers University, including graduates of the undergraduate and graduate and professional programs, former students who did not graduate or receive their degree, presidents of the university, current and former professors, as well as members of the board of trustees and board... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The Philoclean Society at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey is one of the oldest collegiate literary societies in the United States, and among the oldest student organizations at Rutgers University. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... The Newark campus of Rutgers University was formerly known as the University of Newark, which was merged with Rutgers in 1946 by an act of the New Jersey legislature. ... The Camden campus of Rutgers University is located in Camden, New Jersey, and was formerly known as the South Jersey Law School and the College of South Jersey (founded 1926 and 1927, respectively) which were merged with Rutgers in 1950 by an act of the New Jersey Legislature. ... In the dark of night on 25 April 1875 a group of ten sophomores from Rutgers College (now Rutgers University) in New Brunswick, New Jersey travelled sixteen miles south to the campus of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) in Princeton, New Jersey and stole a cannon in...

References

Notes and citations

H.M. Berman, J. Westbrook, Z. Feng, G. Gilliland, T.N. Bhat, H. Weissig, I.N. Shindyalov, P.E. Bourne: The Protein Data Bank. Nucleic Acids Research, 28 pp. 235-242 (2000).

  1. ^ National Association of College and University Business Officers 2007 NACUBO Endowment Study, accessed 22 February 2008.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i 2006–2007 Factbook. Rutgers University. Retrieved on 2007-08-23.
  3. ^ Note: Of the nine colonial colleges, seven (Harvard, Yale, Pennsylvania, Princeton, Columbia, Brown and Dartmouth) remained private, and of the two remaining, William and Mary was taken over by the Commonwealth of Virginia and reincorporated as a public institution in 1888, and Rutgers became the State University of New Jersey by acts of the state legislature in 1945 (Public Law 1945, chapter 49, page 115) and 1956 (Public Law, chapter 61) now enshrined as New Jersey Statute 18A:65-1 et seq.
  4. ^ a b N.J.S.A. 18A:65-1 et seq. (Public Law 1956, chapter 61) repealing and succeeding P.L. 1945, c.49, p.115. accessed 8 August 2006.
  5. ^ Top 500 World Universities (2006) Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Accessed 31 December 2006.
  6. ^ a b Getting to Know Rutgers from the Office of Undergraduate Admissions website, published by Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (no further authorship information available), accessed 25 January 2007.
  7. ^ a b And then there was Rutgers... in The Daily Targum 8 November 2002, accessed 12 August 2006.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p A Historical Sketch of Rutgers University by Thomas J. Frusciano, University Archivist, accessed 12 August 2006.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Rutgers Through the Years Timeline at Rutgers University, accessed 12 August 2006.
  10. ^ A Charter for Queen's College in New Jersey (1770) in Special Collections and University Archives, Archibald S. Alexander Library, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey.
  11. ^ Rutgers College and the American Revolution, accessed July 12, 2006
  12. ^ Paths to Historic Rutgers: A Self-Guided Tour, at Rutgers University, accessed 9 August 2006.
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  17. ^ Rutgers:Governing Boards of the University accessed 15 August 2006.
  18. ^ Note: Rutgers is the only one of the original nine colonial colleges to satisfy all three categories. Seven of the colonial colleges remained private institutions. Of the two that became state institutions, Rutgers and College of William and Mary, only Rutgers was named a land-grant college.
  19. ^ Association of American Universities, AAU, Retrieved on 2006-08-06
  20. ^ Top 500 World Universities. Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Accessed on 15 August 2006.
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  24. ^ National Research Council: 1995 National Research Council ranking of Graduate Research Programs. (most recent edition)
  25. ^ http://www.english.ucsb.edu/undergrad/aftermajor/gradrankings.asp UCSB website] citing 2001 U.S. News & World Report Data, accessed 15 August 2006.
  26. ^ UVA website citing April 1, 2005 U.S. News & World Report data and rankings, accessed 15 August 2006.
  27. ^ St. Olaf College webpage citing 1998 U.S. News & World Report data and rankings, accessed 15 August 2006.
  28. ^ SUNY Stony Brook webpage citing Nov./Dec. 1998 issue of Science Watch and other data, accessed 15 August 2006.
  29. ^ Law Rankings Accessed 27 July 2007.
  30. ^ Rutgers Business School News Accessed 12 November 2006.
  31. ^ The Philosophical Gourmet Report accessed 15 August 2006.
  32. ^ "Philosophy Department rated number one" by Steve Manas, article from 18 November 2002, accessed 15 August 2006.
  33. ^ George Mason University webpage
  34. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007 from U.S. News and World Report, accessed 18 November 2008.
  35. ^ CollegeBoard.com college comparison, accessed 22 October 2006.
  36. ^ http://oirap.rutgers.edu/msa/Documents/gender_summary.pdf
  37. ^ Rutgers University Libraries: Library Facts & Figures accessed 8 August 2006.
  38. ^ ALA:The Nation's Largest Libraries accessed 15 August 2006.
  39. ^ a b Archibald S. Alexander Library Collection Description Accessed 10 January 2007
  40. ^ LSM Collection Description accessed 10 January 2007
  41. ^ LSM History accessed 10 January 2007
  42. ^ Zimmerli Art Museum: Collections accessed 8 August 2006.
  43. ^ Rutgers University Geology Museum accessed 8 August 2006.
  44. ^ New Jersey Museum of Agriculture accessed 14 August 2006.
  45. ^ Rutgers Gardens: A Message from the Director accessed 10 September 2006.
  46. ^ [1] from U.S. News & World Report accessed 9 September 2006
  47. ^ a b c Tradition at www.scarletknights.com (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University). Accessed 10 September 2006.
  48. ^ King James Bible, Book of Malachi, Chapter 4 verse 2: "But unto you that fear my name shall the Sun of righteousness arise with healing in his wings; and ye shall go forth, and grow up as calves of the stall." and King James Bible, Gospel According to St. Matthew, Chapter 13, verse 43: "Then shall the righteous shine forth as the sun in the kingdom of their Father. Who hath ears to hear, let him hear."
  49. ^ Presidential Inauguration: Inauguration Pageantry and Color accessed 9 September 2006.
  50. ^ Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs at Rutgers University, accessed 9 September 2006.
  51. ^ Registered Fraternities and Sororities Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs, Rutgers University, accessed 9 September 2006.
  52. ^ "Milton Friedman" at Alumni News & Events: Rutgers Hall of Distinguished Alumni, published by Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (no further authorship information available). Accessed 25 January 2007.
  53. ^ A History of American Football until 1889 accessed 10 September 2006.
  54. ^ NFL History at the National Football League website, accessed 10 September 2006.
  55. ^ College Football Past National Championships at the National Collegiate Athletic Association website, accessed 29 December 2006.
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  57. ^ Rutgers at BigEast.org (Official Site of the Big East Conference. Published by the Big East Conference (no further authorship information available). Accessed 12 January 2007.
  58. ^ "Discography" from Failure Magazine, accessed 4 August 2006.
  59. ^ 1976 NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament at shrpsports.com, accessed 29 December 2006.
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  62. ^ Insight Bowl - December 27, 2005, accessed September 24, 2006
  63. ^ Rutgers ends up No. 12 in final AP poll: Ranking is highest finish in program history, Courier-News, January 9, 2007
  64. ^ "Rivalry Rising: With both teams lagging behind in the Big East, a new coach looks to revitilize Rutgers-Seton Hall" by Brian Johnson in The Daily Targum (26 January 2007). Accessed 28 January 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The colonial colleges are nine institutions of higher education chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day of the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Courier-News, headquartered in Bridgewater Township, is a daily newspaper serving Hunterdon County and Somerset County areas in New Jersey. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Books and printed materials

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Rutgers University
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Demarest, William Henry Steele. History of Rutgers College: 1776–1924. (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers College, 1924). (No ISBN)
  • History of Rutgers College: or an account of the union of Rutgers College, and the Theological Seminary of the General Synod of the Reformed Dutch Church. Prepared and published at the request of several trustees of the College, by a trustee. (New York: Anderson & Smith, 1833). (No ISBN)
  • Lukac, George J. (ed.), Aloud to Alma Mater. (New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1966), 70–73. (No ISBN)
  • McCormick, Richard P. Rutgers: a Bicentennial History. (New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1966). ISBN 0-8135-0521-6
  • Schmidt, George P. Princeton and Rutgers: The Two Colonial Colleges of New Jersey. (Princeton, NJ: Van Nostrand, 1964). (No ISBN)

Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rutgers University Libraries (1838 words)
Current students, faculty, and staff of Rutgers University may also access electronic reserve documents off campus by logging-in to the Libraries website for access to Rutgers restricted resources.
RUcore is an open access institutional repository that makes the significant intellectual property of Rutgers University faculty and Rutgers University departments, centers, and institutes permanently and freely accessible for scholars and researchers around the globe.
Rutgers University faculties are invited to deposit the results of their research and professional activity.
Rutgers University Libraries: Special Collections and University Archives: University Archives Main page (7391 words)
Narrative history of Rutgers University, including its founding as Queen's College in 1766; renaming to Rutgers College in 1824; transformation of the 19th century college; Rutgers and its relationship with the State of New Jersey; the Depression and World War II years; postwar expansion and the State University; and the research university.
Chronicles the development of these institutions in Newark, the growth of the University of Newark and its relationship to the city and state, and documents the delicate negotiations that led to the merger of the University with Rutgers University in 1946.
Rutgers University during the critical years of the Depression, World War II, and immediate postwar years is thoroughly documented in the records of the Office of President during the administration of Robert C. Clothier.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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