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Encyclopedia > Russian conquest of Siberia
Russian conquest of Siberia
Irtysh River – Chuvash Cape – Wagay River – Irmen River

The Russian conquest of Siberia took place in the 16th century, when the Siberian Khanate had become a loose political structure of vassalages which were becoming undermined by the activities of Russian explorers who, though numerically outnumbered, coerced the various family-based tribes into changing their loyalties and establishing distant forts from which they conducted raids. To counter this Küçüm Khan attempted to centralise his rule by imposing Islam on his subjects and reforming his tax collecting apparatus. Combatants Yermaks expedition Siberia Khanate Commanders Yermak Mametqul Strength 800 men several thousands Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Chuvash Cape (October 23, 1582) led to the victory of a Russian expedition under Yermak Timofeyevich and the fall of Siberia Khanate and the end of Khan Kuchums power. ... In the 1440s, the Golden Horde was racked by civil war. ... Look up vassal in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Kuchum khan (Tatar: Küçüm, Russian: Кучум) (? - ca. ... Islam (Arabic:  ) is a monotheistic religion based upon the teachings of Muhammad, a 7th century Arab religious and political figure. ...


The conquest of Siberia began in July 1580 when some 540 Cossacks under Yermak Timofeyevich invaded the territory of the Voguls, subjects to Küçüm, the Khan of Siberia. They were accompanied by 300 Lithuanian and German slave labourers, whom the Stroganovs had purchased from the Tsar. Throughout 1581 this force traversed the territory known as Yugra and subdued Vogul and Ostyak towns. At this time they also captured a tax collector of Küçüm. Yermak Yermak Timofeyevich (Russian: Ерма́к Тимофе́евич, also Ermak) (born between 1532 and 1542 – August 5 or 6, 1585), Cossack leader and explorer of Siberia. ... Mansi (obsolete: Voguls) are an endangered ethnic group living in Khantia-Mansia, an autonomous region within the Russian Federation, together with Khants. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock... Stroganovs or Strogonovs (Строгановы, Строгоновы in Russian), also spelled in French manner as Stroganoffs, was a family of highly successful Russian merchants, industrialists, landowners, and statesmen of the 16th - 20th centuries that eventually earned nobility. ... Events January 16 - English Parliament outlaws Roman Catholicism April 4 - Francis Drake completes a circumnavigation of the world and is knighted by Elizabeth I. July 26 - The Northern Netherlands proclaim their independence from Spain in the Oath of Abjuration. ... Khanty-Mansi Autonomous Okrug, a territory formerly known as Yugra Yugra (Russian: ) was the name of the lands between the Pechora River and Northern Urals in the Russian annals of the 12th–17th centuries, as well as the name of the Khanty and partly Mansi tribes inhabiting these territories. ... Mansi (obsolete: Voguls) are an endangered ethnic group living in Khantia-Mansia, an autonomous region within the Russian Federation, together with Khants. ...


Following a series of Tatar raids in retaliation against the Russian advance Yermak's forces prepared for a campaign to take the Siberian capital. The force embarked in the May 1582. After a three day battle on the banks of the River Irtysh Yermak was victorious against a combined force of Küçüm Khan and six allied Tatar princes. On June 29th the Cossack forces were attacked by the Tatars but again repelled them. Historically, the term Tatar (or Tartar) has been ambiguously used by Europeans to refer to many different peoples of Inner Asia and Northern Asia. ... Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks to Sultan Mehmed IV of Ottoman Empire. ...


Throughout September 1582 the Khan gathered his forces for a defence of his capital of Qashliq. A horde of Siberian Tatars, Voguls and Ostyaks massed at Mount Chyuvash to defend against invading Cossacks. On October 1st a Cossack attempt to storm the Tatar fort at Mount Chyuvash was held off. On October 23rd the Cossacks attempted to storm the Tatar fort at Mount Chyuvash for a fourth time when the Tatars counterattacked. Over a hundred Cossacks were killed but their gunfire forced a Tatar retreat and allowed the capture of two Tatar cannons. The forces of the Khan retreated and Yermak entered the Siberian capital of Qashliq on the 26th October 1582. Qashliq (Tatar language: Qaşlıq, İskär, Sibir) was a medieval (14th-16th century) Siberian Tatar city near the right bank of Irtysh river (ruins are situated near the modern Tobolsk). ... The Native Western Siberian Tatars (200,000) are an ethnic group or a sub-group of the Tatars. ... Mansi (obsolete: Voguls) are an endangered ethnic group living in Khantia-Mansia, an autonomous region within the Russian Federation, together with Khants. ... Combatants Yermaks expedition Siberia Khanate Commanders Yermak Mametqul Strength 800 men several thousands Casualties unknown unknown The Battle of Chuvash Cape (October 23, 1582) led to the victory of a Russian expedition under Yermak Timofeyevich and the fall of Siberia Khanate and the end of Khan Kuchums power. ... Qashliq (Tatar language: Qaşlıq, İskär, Sibir) was a medieval (14th-16th century) Siberian Tatar city near the right bank of Irtysh river (ruins are situated near the modern Tobolsk). ...


Küçüm Khan retreated into the steppes and over the next few years regrouped his forces. He suddenly attacked Yermak on August 6, 1584 in the dead of night and killed most of his army. The details are disputed with Russian sources claiming Yermak was wounded and tried to escape by swimming across the Wagay River (Irtysh's tributary), but drowned under the weight of his own chainmail. Tatar sources claim this story was invented to save his honour, and in fact he was slaughtered with the rest of his soldiers and suffered an anonymous death. The remains of Yermak's forces under the command of Mescheryak retreated from Qashliq destroying the city as they left. In 1586 the Russians returned and after subdueing the Khanty and Mansi people through the use of their artillery they established a fortress at Tyumen close to the ruins of Qashliq. The Tatar tribes that were submissive to Küçüm Khan suffered from several attacks by the Russians between 1584-1595; however, Küçüm Khan would not be caught. Finally, in August 1598 Küçüm Khan was defeated at the Battle of Urmin near the River Ob. In the course of the fight the Siberian royal family were captured by the Russians. However, Küçüm Khan escaped yet again. The Russians took the family members of Küçüm Khan to Moscow and there they remained as hostages. The descendants of the khan's family became known as the Princes Sibirsky and the family is known to have survived until at least the late 19th Century. The steppe of Western Kazakhstan in early spring In physical geography, steppe (from Slavic step) is a plain without trees (apart from those near rivers and lakes); it is similar to a prairie, although a prairie is generally reckoned as being dominated by tall grasses, while short grasses are said... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Mansi (obsolete: Voguls) are an endangered ethnic group living in Khantia-Mansia, an autonomous region within the Russian Federation, together with Khants. ... Tymen in the 1680s Tyumen (Тюме́нь) is a city in Russia, administrative center of Tyumen Oblast in the Urals Federal District . ... Qashliq (Tatar language: QaÅŸlıq, Ä°skär, Sibir) was a medieval (14th-16th century) Siberian Tatar city near the right bank of Irtysh river (ruins are situated near the modern Tobolsk). ... Ob (also Obi, Russian Обь) is a river in West Siberia, Russia, the countrys fourth longest. ... Sibirsky (Russian:Сибирский, pl. ...


Despite his personal escape, the capture of his family ended the political and military activities of Küçüm Khan and it is understood that he retreated to the territories of the Nogay Horde in southern Siberia. It has been known that he had been in contact with the Tsar and had requested that a small region on the banks of the Irtish River would be granted as his dominion. This was rejected by the Tsar who proposed to Küçüm Khan that he to come to Moscow and "comfort himself" in the service of the Tsar. However, the old khan did not want to suffer from such contempt and preferred staying in his own lands to "comforting himself" in Moscow. It is thought that Küçüm Khan then went to Bokhara and as an old man became blind, dying in exile with distant relatives sometime around 1605. The Nogai Horde was the horde that controlled the Caucasus Mountain region after the Mongol invasion. ... For other uses, see Bukhara (disambiguation). ...


Following the khan's death and the dissolution of any organised Siberian resistance the Russians advanced first towards Lake Baikal and then the Sea of Okhotsk and the Amur River. However, when they first reached the Chinese borders they encountered people that were equipped with artillery pieces and here they halted. Lake Baikal (Russian: Байка́л, pronounced ; Buryat and Mongol: Dalai-Nor) lies in Southern Siberia in Russia between Irkutsk Oblast to the northwest and Buryatia to the southeast near the city of Irkutsk. ... Map of the Sea of Okhotsk. ... The Amur (Russian: Амур) (Simplified Chinese: 黑龙江; Traditional Chinese: 黑龍江; Hēilóng Jiāng, literally meaning Black Dragon River) (Mongolian: Хара-Мурэн, Khara-Muren or Black River) (Manchu: Sahaliyan Ula, literal meaning Black...


The Russians reached the Pacific Ocean at 1639. After the conquest of the Siberian Khanate the whole of northern Asia - an area much larger than the old khanate - became known as Siberia and by 1640 the eastern borders of Russia had expanded more than several million square kilometres. Many modern Russian cities in West Siberia were founded during the Siberia Khanate period, including Tyumen and Tobolsk. In a sense, the khanate lived on in the subsidiary title "Tsar of Siberia" which became part of the full imperial style of the Russian Autocrats. Events December 1 - Portugal regains its independence from Spain and João IV of Portugal becomes king. ... Tymen in the 1680s Tyumen (Тюме́нь) is a city in Russia, administrative center of Tyumen Oblast in the Urals Federal District . ... View of Tobolsk in the 1910s Tobolsk (Russian: ; Tatar: Tubıl) is a historic capital of Siberia, now an ordinary town in Tyumen Oblast, Russia. ... Tsar (Bulgarian, Serbian and Macedonian цар, Russian  , Croatian car, in scientific transliteration respectively car and car ), occasionally spelled Czar or Tzar and sometimes Csar or Zar in English, is a Slavonic term designating certain monarchs. ... An autocrat is generally speaking any ruler with absolute power; the term is now usually used in a negative sense (cf. ...


 
 

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