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Encyclopedia > Russenorsk

Russenorsk or Russonorsk (Norwegian for "Russo-Norwegian") was a pidgin language combining elements of Russian and Norwegian, created by traders and whalers from northern Norway and the Russian Kola peninsula, and also used in Svalbard. Another name for the language was Moja på tvoja that parodied a perverted Russian phrase, meaning something like "I can speak in your language" (from the Russian words моя (moya) "my", по (po) here used to mean "in" (по-русски (po russki) means "in Russian" in Russian) твоя (tvoya) "your") A pidgin is a simplified language that develops as a means of communication between two or more groups who do not share a common language, in situations such as trade. ... The crew of the oceanographic research vessel Princesse Alice, of Albert Grimaldi (later Prince Albert I of Monaco) pose while flensing a catch. ... Location of Kola south of the Barents Sea. ...


As is common in the development of pidgins and trade languages, the interaction of seamen, fishermen, and traders with no common language necessitated the creation of some minimal form of communication. Like all pidgins, Russenorsk was not a complex system of communication. It had a rudimentary grammar and a restricted vocabulary mostly composed of words essential to Arctic fishing and trade (fish, weather, etc.) and did not particularly deal with unrelated issues (music, politics, etc.). A Pidgin, or contact language, is the name given to any language created, usually spontaneously, out of a mixture of other languages as a means of communication between speakers of different tongues. ... A pidgin, or contact language, is the name given to any language created, usually spontaneously, out of a mixture of other languages as a means of communication between speakers of different tongues. ... The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, commonly used to define the Arctic region border Satellite image of the Arctic surface The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic region around the South Pole. ... For other uses, see Fish (disambiguation). ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ...

Contents

Classification

Some scholars do not classify Russenorsk as a pidgin. For example, Frederik Kortlandt (professor of linguistics at Leiden University) argues that Russenorsk was essentially a variant of Norwegian with Russian loan words [1]. A pidgin is a simplified language that develops as a means of communication between two or more groups who do not share a common language, in situations such as trade. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... Leiden University, located in the city of Leiden, is the oldest university in the Netherlands[1]. It is a member of the Coimbra Group, the Europaeum and the League of European Research Universities. ... A loanword (or a borrowing) is a word taken in by one language from another. ...


Examples

"R" marks Russian origin, "N" marks Norwegian.

  • "Moja på tvoja" - "I speak in your language" (wordwise: R: "My in your")
  • "Kak sprek? Moje niet forsto." - What are you saying? I don't understand. (How (R) speak (N)? My (R) not (R) understand (N).)
  • å råbbåte - to work (R: rabotat’)
  • klaba - bread (R: khleb)

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History

The history of Russenorsk is mainly limited to 18th and 19th centuries. The Russian Revolution of 1917 brought about an end to its use; it is reported that the last Norwegian–Russian trade occurred in 1923, marking the last use of Russenorsk. (17th century - 18th century - 19th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 18th century refers to the century that lasted from 1701 through 1800. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Bibliography

  • Broch, I. & Jahr, E. H. 1984. Russenorsk: Et pidginspråk i Norge (2. utgave), Oslo: Novus.
  • Kortlandt, F. 2000. On Russenorsk. Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik 54, 123–127.
  • Lunden, S. S. 1978. Tracing the ancestry of Russenorsk. Slavia Orientalis 27/2, 213–217.
  • Peterson, R. E. 1980. Russenorsk: A little known aspect of Russian-Norwegian relations, Studies in language 4/2, 249–256.

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