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Encyclopedia > Russell T. Davies
Russell T Davies, interviewed for the documentary series Doctor Who Confidential in 2005.

Russell T Davies (real name: Russell Davies, born April 27, 1963) is a British television producer and writer. He is best known for writing ground-breaking and sometimes controversial drama serials such as Queer as Folk and The Second Coming, and for spearheading the revival of the popular science-fiction television series Doctor Who. Uploaded to illustrate Russell T. Davies. ... Uploaded to illustrate Russell T. Davies. ... The Doctor Who Confidential logo Doctor Who Confidential is a documentary series created by the British Broadcasting Corporation to complement the revival of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 248 days remaining. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Queer as Folk Series 1 DVD Cover Queer as Folk is a 1999 British television series that chronicles the lives of three gay men let loose in Manchesters gay village around Canal Street. ... The opening titles of The Second Coming. ... A broadcast of the long-running and popular British science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme (and a 1996 television movie) produced by the BBC. The programme shows the adventures of a mysterious time-traveller known as the Doctor, who explores time and space in his TARDIS time ship with his companions, solving problems and...


In May 2007, the Independent on Sunday Pink List named him the most influential gay person in Britain from the 18th position the previous year. [1] May 2007 is the fifth month of that year. ... The Independents old (pre-compact) masthead. ...

Contents

Early career

Davies was born in Swansea, Wales, where he attended Olchfa School.[1] He was then educated at Worcester College, Oxford, from which he graduated with a degree in English Literature in 1984. After initially working in the theatre back in Swansea, he joined the staff of BBC Television, working as a floor manager and production assistant before taking the in-house director's course in the late 1980s.[1] He briefly moved in front of the cameras to present a single episode of the BBC's famous young children's show Play School in 1987, before deciding that his abilities lay in production rather than presenting.[1] It was around this point that he began adding the "T" to his name on credits — he in fact has no middle name, but decided to add the letter to distinguish himself from the well-known radio presenter Russell Davies. For other places with the same name, see Swansea (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... Olchfa School is the largest comprehensive school in Swansea, south Wales. ... College name Worcester College Collegium Vigorniense Named after Sir Thomas Cookes, Worcestershire Established 1714 Sister College St Catharines College Provost Richard Smethurst JCR President Minesh Tanna Undergraduates 408 MCR President Tom Marshall Graduates 167 Homepage Worcester College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... Production assistant is a movie term for a person responsible for various odd jobs, such as stopping traffic, acting as couriers, getting items from craft service, etc. ... Play School was a long-running British series. ... This article refers to the Radio 2 presenter and journalist. ...


Working for the children's department at BBC Manchester from 1988 to 1992, he was a producer for summertime activity show Why Don't You? which ironically showcased various things children could be doing rather than sitting at home watching the television. While serving as the producer of Why Don't You? he also made his first forays into writing for television, scripting the comedy dubbed version of The Flashing Blade for the On the Waterfront Saturday morning programme (1989) and creating a children's sketch show for early Saturday mornings on BBC One entitled Breakfast Serials (1990). In the early 1990s, Davies also wrote three episodes of the slapstick comedy children's TV show ChuckleVision. Why Dont You? or Why Dont You Just Switch Off Your Television Set and Go and Do Something Less Boring Instead? or WDYJSOYTSAGADSLBI was a BBC childrens television series broadcast in 42 series between 20 August 1973 and 21 April 1995. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... ChuckleVision is a popular British childrens television series, shown on CBBC, first shown in 1987. ...


Children's television

In 1991 he wrote his first television drama, a six-part serial for children entitled Dark Season for BBC One, which comprised two linked three-part stories based around a science-fiction / adventure theme. Davies had written the first episode — with the provisional title The Adventuresome Three — on-spec, and submitted it to the BBC's Head of Children's Programming Anna Home via the Corporation's internal mail system. Home liked the script, and after initially commissioning a second episode to see if Davies could handle the scripting, she eventually commissioned the entire serial when a gap opened up in the schedule for later in the year. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... Dark Season title screen. ...


The production was extremely successful, and noteworthy for showcasing the acting talents of a young Kate Winslet. Two years later he wrote another equally well-received science-fiction drama in a similar vein, entitled Century Falls. Although transmitted, as Dark Season had been, in an afternoon children's slot, Century Falls explored more mature themes than its predecessor, and gave some indication of where Davies' future career lay in adult television writing. Kate Elizabeth Winslet (born October 5, 1975) is a five time Academy Award-nominated Emmy Award-nominated BAFTA, Grammy and Screen Actors Guild Award winning English actress. ... Century Falls is a British science-fiction television serial for children broadcast in six twenty-five minute episodes on BBC One in early 1993. ...


In 1992 he moved to Granada Television, producing and writing for their successful children's hospital drama Children's Ward, screened on the ITV network. One of the episodes Davies wrote for this series won a BAFTA Children's Award for Best Drama in 1996. At Granada he also began to break into working for adult television, contributing an episode to the crime quiz show Cluedo, a programme based on the popular board game of the same name, in 1993, and also working on the daytime soap opera Families. He continued working on Children's Ward until 1995, by which time he was already consolidating his position outside of children's programming with the comedy The House of Windsor and camp, short-lived soap opera Revelations (both 1994), the latter of which he also created. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Childrens Ward (briefly retitled The Ward in 1995) was a British childrens television drama series produced by Granada Television and broadcast on the ITV network as part of its Childrens ITV strand on weekday afternoons. ... It has been suggested that Channel 3 (UK) be merged into this article or section. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Cluedo was a television game show in the United Kingdom and Australia based on the board game of the same name. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For Philippine soap opera, see Teleserye. ... Families was a daytime soap opera produced by Granada Television and created by Kay Mellor. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ...


Adult television & Queer as Folk

After a brief stint as a storyliner on ITV's flagship soap opera Coronation Street (for which he later wrote the straight-to-video spin-off Viva Las Vegas!) and contributions to Springhill in 1996, the following year he was commissioned to write for the hotel-set mainstream period drama The Grand for prime time ITV. However, the creator and main writer of the series left the production, as did another writer due to contribute, leaving Davies with the task of having to script the entire series single-handedly. This he did, winning a reputation for good writing and high audience figures. He also contributed to the first series of the acclaimed ITV drama Touching Evil, before leaving the staff at Granada and beginning his fruitful collaboration with the independent Red Production Company. Coronation Street is an award winning British soap opera. ... A film that is released direct-to-video (also straight-to-video) is one which has been released to the public on home video formats first rather than first being released in movie theaters. ... It has been suggested that Channel 3 (UK) be merged into this article or section. ... Touching Evil was a 1997 British television drama serial, produced by Granada Television and screened on the ITV network. ... Red Production Company is a British independent television production company, formed in 1998 by Nicola Shindler, an experienced television producer who had worked on such prestige dramas as Our Friends in the North and Cracker. ...


His first series for Red was the ground-breaking Queer as Folk, which caused much comment when screened on Channel 4 in early 1999. A short sequel followed in 2000 and a US version, which ran from 2000–2005, was commissioned by the Showtime cable network there. In 2001 he followed this up with another gay-themed mini-series for Red, Bob and Rose, this time screened on the mainstream ITV channel in prime time. He also contributed an episode for a Red series created by Paul Abbott, Linda Green (shown on BBC One). The same year, he was awarded Writer of the Year at the British Comedy Awards. Queer as Folk Series 1 DVD Cover Queer as Folk is a 1999 British television series that chronicles the lives of three gay men let loose in Manchesters gay village around Canal Street. ... It has been suggested that Channel Four Television Corporation be merged into this article or section. ... Queer as Folk was an American television series produced by Showtime, which was based on the British series of the same name created by Russell T. Davies. ... Showtime is a subscription television brand used by a number of channels and platforms around the world, but primarily refers to a group of channels in the United States. ... Bob and Rose is a British television drama, originally screened in six one-hour episodes on the ITV network in the UK in the autumn of 2001. ... now. ... Linda Green was a British television comedy-drama series that lasted for two seasons, screened in 2001 and 2002. ... Date: December 15, 2001 Host: Jonathan Ross Broadcaster: ITV1 Television, radio and film Winners first; nominees indented Best New TV Comedy The Office Human Remains The Sketch Show Best TV Comedy One Foot In The Grave Coupling The Office Best TV Comedy Drama Bob and Rose Cold Feet Happiness Best...


In early 2003 he wrote the religious telefantasy drama The Second Coming starring Christopher Eccleston, which cemented his position as one of the UK's foremost writers of television drama, winning him a Royal Television Society Award. The opening titles of The Second Coming. ... Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor, best known as the ninth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who and for other television roles, as well as for his roles in several high-profile low-budget films. ... The Royal Television Society is a British-based society for the discussion, analysis and preservation of television in all its forms, past, present and future. ...


Doctor Who

Davies had long claimed that, independent of productions such as his episode of Linda Green aside, he would only return to working for the BBC if he could be placed in charge of their famous, but then out-of-production, science-fiction series Doctor Who, of which he had been a fan since childhood. He had in fact been sounded out for such a venture by the BBC One Controller of the time, Peter Salmon, in 1999. Although nothing came of this due to BBC Worldwide's desire to make a film version of the programme, by late 2003 the new Controller of BBC One, Lorraine Heggessey, had persuaded Worldwide to surrender their film ambitions so that she could commission a new television version. Doctor Who is a long-running British science fiction television programme (and a 1996 television movie) produced by the BBC. The programme shows the adventures of a mysterious time-traveller known as the Doctor, who explores time and space in his TARDIS time ship with his companions, solving problems and... Peter Salmon (born 1956 in Burnley, Lancashire, UK) is a British television producer and executive. ... BBC Worldwide Limited is the wholly-owned commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation, formed out of a restructuring of its predecessor BBC Enterprises in 1995. ... Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... Lorraine Heggessey (born November 16, 1956) is the Controller of BBC One, the UKs oldest and frequently most-watched television channel. ...


Davies was approached to head-up the revival by Heggessey and the BBC's Head of Drama Jane Tranter in early September 2003, and an official announcement of the programme's return was made on the 26th of that month. A BBC Wales production for BBC One, Davies is executive producer and chief writer of the series, which is produced in Cardiff. The new series began on March 26, 2005 and was an immediate ratings success. A second series was commissioned mere days later and a third series begun on the 31 March 2007, with a fourth series also confirmed. Davies is the first writer to clearly introduce LGBT characters in the series, the theme of homosexuality being one that has cropped up in a number of his works. Jane Tranter (born March 17, 1963 in Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, UK) is a British television drama executive, who as of August 2004 is currently the Head of Drama at BBC Television. ... BBC Wales (Welsh: ) is a division of the British Broadcasting Corporation for Wales. ... Cardiff (English:  Welsh: ) is the capital, largest and core city of Wales. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Davies said in an interview with BBC News in June 2005 that he was initially concerned about producing the new series of Doctor Who because he believed that, after the series' absence from television since 1989, it was considered "a joke" with its budget special effects. However, unlike the past, they now had the budget to match the imagination of the writing. Davies has later stated that most of the new Doctor Who stories are purposely set on Earth as the cost of creating alien worlds is too high and he claims that audiences have not responded (ratings-wise) as favourably to the alien-set adventures in the series.[2] The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in June June 27: Shelby Foote June 27: John T. Walton June 26: Richard Whiteley June 25: John Fiedler June 25: Chet Helms June 24: Paul Winchell June 21: Jaime Cardinal Sin June 20: Jack Kilby...


Davies has also defended his decision to cast Christopher Eccleston for only one season as the Doctor, and how it weighed in with the casting of his successor, David Tennant, stating that an actor of Eccleston's calibre had salvaged new respect for the role and made it possible to attract good actors like Tennant to the part. In addition, Eccleston's departure made it possible to present the concept of regeneration to a new generation of viewers. Christopher Eccleston (born 16 February 1964) is an English stage, television and film actor, best known as the ninth incarnation of the Doctor in Doctor Who and for other television roles, as well as for his roles in several high-profile low-budget films. ... David Tennant is the stage name of David John McDonald (born 18 April 1971), a Scottish actor from Bathgate in West Lothian, best known as the tenth actor to portray the Doctor in the television series Doctor Who. ... Doctor Who or, see History of Doctor Who. ...


Davies has garnered awards and acclaim in connection with his work on Doctor Who. In April 2006 he was given the Siân Phillips Award for Outstanding Contribution to Network Television at the BAFTA Cymru Awards, the premier industry awards for Wales. The following month, at the main UK-wide 2006 BAFTAs, Davies received the Dennis Potter Award for Outstanding Writing for Television, for his work including Doctor Who; the programme also won "Best Drama Series" and the Pioneer Audience Award, the latter voted on by members of the public.[3] Davies was also nominated for "Best Writer" in the BAFTA Television Craft Awards, but did not win.[4] In the wake of the critical and popular success of Doctor Who, The Independent named Davies "the saviour of Saturday night drama".[5] In August 2006, Davies was named "industry player of the year" at the Edinburgh International Television Festival. [6] Siân Phillips (pronounced IPA: ), CBE is a Welsh actress who was born Jane Elizabeth Ailwên Phillips in Betws, Carmarthenshire, Wales, on May 14, 1933. ... BAFTA Cymru (or BAFTA Wales) is the regional organisation for Wales of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts. ... The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... Liber Amoris Dennis Christopher George Potter (17 May 1935—7 June 1994) was a controversial British dramatist who is best known for several widely acclaimed television dramas which mixed fantasy and reality, the personal and the social. ... The British Academy Television Award for Best Drama Series is one of the major categories of the British Academy Television Awards (BAFTAs), the primary awards ceremony of the British television industry. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Founded in 1976 and now in its 30th year the Festival is held annually over the August bank holiday weekend at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre. ...


In October 2005 it was announced that Davies would write and produce a spin-off from Doctor Who for the BBC, a more adult-oriented sci-fi drama called Torchwood (an anagram of Doctor Who). The programme, whose first series has now finished airing (see List of Torchwood episodes), follows the exploits of a team of investigators sanctioned by the British government to look into alien threats, led by Jack Harkness, ex-companion of the Ninth Doctor, and is set in modern-day Cardiff. Like the new Doctor Who, the series runs for 13 45-minute episodes. Davies has described the programme as "a dark, clever, wild, sexy, British crime/sci-fi paranoid thriller cop show with a sense of humour — The X-Files meets This Life." The series eventually premiered, amidst much hype, on digital channel BBC3 in October 2006 (with a repeat showing on BBC2 later in the week). It garnered impressive ratings for its first two episodes (which were shown on the same night), though they fell as the series progressed and reviews were mixed. The BBC announced that it had commissioned a second series to be screened in late 2007 - this time to be shown first on BBC2. The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... For the eponymous fictional institute, see Torchwood Institute. ... An anagram (Greek ana- = back or again, and graphein = to write) is a type of word play, the result of rearranging the letters of a word or phrase to produce other words, using all the original letters exactly once; e. ... This following is an episode list for the science fiction drama television series Torchwood to date. ... Jack Harkness, also known as Captain Jack (an alias; his real name is, as yet, unrevealed), is a fictional character played by John Barrowman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and one of its spin-offs, Torchwood. ... The Ninth Doctor refers to the ninth official incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor, in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... Cardiff (English:  Welsh: ) is the capital, largest and core city of Wales. ... The X-Files is a Peabody- and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on September 10, 1993, and ended on May 19, 2002. ... This Life was a BBC television drama, produced by World Productions and screened on BBC Two, running for two series in 1996 and 1997 and a reunion special in 2007. ...


Davies and Gareth Roberts have co-written another Doctor Who spin-off for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen as investigative reporter Sarah Jane Smith. This programme, The Sarah Jane Adventures, debuted with a 60-minute special on 1st January 2007, and a full series is to follow later this year.[7] Davies has written the following episodes of Doctor Who: Gareth John Pritchard Roberts (born 1968) is a British television writer and novelist, best known for his work related to the science-fiction television series Doctor Who. ... CBBC - short for Childrens BBC - is the brand-name for the BBCs childrens television programmes aimed at children aged between 6 and 12 years old. ... Elisabeth Sladen on BBC Ones Breakfast, 27 April 2006. ... Sarah Jane Smith is a fictional character played by Elisabeth Sladen in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and related spin-offs. ... The Sarah Jane Adventures is a British childrens television series, produced by BBC Wales for CBBC, starring Elisabeth Sladen and created by Russell T. Davies. ...

   

Rose is an episode in the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on 26 March 2005. ... The End of the World is an episode in the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on April 2, 2005. ... Aliens of London is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on April 16, 2005. ... World War Three is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on April 23, 2005. ... The Long Game is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on May 7, 2005. ... Boom Town is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on June 4, 2005. ... Bad Wolf is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on June 11, 2005. ... The Parting of the Ways is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, which was first broadcast on June 18, 2005. ... The Christmas Invasion is a 60-minute special episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Star Trek novels, see Pocket Books Star Trek novels. ... Tooth and Claw is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who that was first broadcast on 22 April 2006. ... Love & Monsters is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Army of Ghosts is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who which was first broadcast on 1 July 2006. ... Doomsday is an episode in the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Runaway Bride is a special episode of the long running British science fiction television series Doctor Who, starring David Tennant as the Tenth Doctor. ... Smith and Jones is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Gridlock is the third episode from the third series of the revived British science fiction television series Doctor Who which aired on April 14, 2007. ... Utopia is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Sound of Drums is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Last of the Time Lords is an episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ...

Other work

His most recent work before moving on to Doctor Who was another Red mini-series for ITV, Mine All Mine, screened in November and December 2004. Set in Davies' home town of Swansea, it was an attempt to bring a portrayal of Welsh family life to a mass audience, and although the black comedy / drama was well-received by critics, viewing figures were unspectacular.


Other recent projects include Casanova (also starring David Tennant), a Red production for BBC Wales in association with Granada, for whom it was originally commissioned before Davies took it to the BBC. This was broadcast on BBC Three in March 2005, with a showing on BBC One a few weeks later. In 2003, Davies had been announced as writing the screenplay for a film version of the Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? cheating scandal involving Charles Ingram, but this project has yet to materialise. David Tennant as Giacomo Casanova. ... ← - 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Deaths in March • 31 – Terri Schiavo • 30 – Mitch Hedberg • 29 – Johnnie Cochran • 27 – Wilfred Bigelow • 26 – Paul Hester • 26 – James Callaghan • 21 – Jeff Weise • 21 – Bobby Short • 19 – John De Lorean • 18 – Gary Bertini • 17 – George F... In the United Kingdom, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? is a television game show which offers a maximum cash prize of one million pounds for correctly answering successive multiple-choice questions of increasing difficulty. ... Diana and Charles Ingram. ...


Davies has referred to his next project after Doctor Who and Torchwood as "MGM (More Gay Men)". This will be a "big gay series", revisiting some of the themes of Queer as Folk, but "a bit more 40-year-old".[5][8]


In July 2004, in a poll of industry experts conducted by Radio Times magazine, he was voted the 17th Most Powerful Person in Television Drama. In December 2005, Davies came in at #1 as "the clear winner" in The Stage magazine's Top Ten list for artists working in British television. Said The Stage, "The triumphant return of the Time Lord and the gloriously camp Casanova to boot, has cemented Davies' position at the head of the holy trinity of British scriptwriters alongside Paul Abbott and Jimmy McGovern." Current Radio Times logo Radio Times is the BBCs weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. ... The Stage is a weekly British newspaper founded in 1880, available nationally and published on Thursdays. ... Doctor Who. ... Jimmy McGovern (born 1949 in Liverpool, England, UK) is a British television scriptwriter, known for his powerful and thought-provoking dramas often based around hard-hitting social issues or controversial real-life events. ...


Outside of television and film, his prose work has included the novelisation of Dark Season for BBC Books in 1991 and an original Doctor Who novel, Damaged Goods, for Virgin Publishing's Doctor Who New Adventures range in 1996. BBC Books is the book publishing division of BBC Worldwide, the commercial subsidiary of the British Broadcasting Corporation. ... The cover of Damaged Goods, with artwork by Bill Donohoe. ... Virgin Books is the book publishing arm of Virgin Enterprises, the company originally set up by Richard Branson as a record company. ... The Virgin New Adventures (often referred to simply as NAs within fandom) were a series of novels from Virgin Publishing based on the British science-fiction television series Doctor Who, which had been cancelled in 1989, continuing the story of the series from where the television programme had left off. ...


Repeated names and themes

Davies has a tendency to reuse names in his work. Century Falls and The Grand both featured characters named Esme Harkness, while Jack Harkness first appeared in Doctor Who; characters with the surname Tyler appear in Revelations, Damaged Goods, Queer as Folk, The Second Coming and Doctor Who, and the female protagonists of Bob and Rose and Doctor Who share the first name Rose. The character of Tricia Delaney is mentioned in Doctor Who and Philip Delaney appeared in Queer as Folk. The town of Ipswich is another favourite, being casually referenced in Dark Season, Doctor Who (in an identical line of dialogue in these two) and Queer as Folk. Gareth David-Lloyd plays Ianto Jones in Torchwood, after playing Yanto Jones in Davies' 2004 comedy/drama Mine All Mine. [9] Jones is also the surname of Doctor Who companion Martha Jones, as well as the prime minister for the first and second series of the show Harriet Jones and Queer as Folk's Stuart Alan Jones. Davies has said that the reuse of names helps him get a grip on the blank page.[10] He took the surname "Harkness" from Agatha Harkness, a supporting character in the Fantastic Four comic book series.[11] Jack Harkness, also known as Captain Jack (an alias; his real name is, as yet, unrevealed), is a fictional character played by John Barrowman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who and one of its spin-offs, Torchwood. ... Timber framed buildings in St Nicholas Street The Ancient House is decorated with a particularly fine example of pargeting Ipswich (pronounced ) is the county town of Suffolk and a non-metropolitan district in East Anglia, England on the estuary of the River Orwell. ... Gareth David-Lloyd is a Welsh actor best known for his role as Ianto Jones in the British science fiction television programme Torchwood. ... Ianto Jones (IPA: ) is a fictional character and a regular in the BBC television series Torchwood, a spin-off from the long-running series Doctor Who, played by Gareth David-Lloyd. ... For the eponymous fictional institute, see Torchwood Institute. ... Martha Jones is a fictional character played by Freema Agyeman in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Harriet Jones is a fictional character played by Penelope Wilton in the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... Agatha Harkness is a fictional character, a powerful witch in the Marvel Comics universe. ... The Fantastic Four is a fictional American team of comic-book superheroes in the Marvel Comics universe. ...


Davies' work also contains some repeated moments and themes: for example Damaged Goods featured a character's meal being laced with poison, which was also featured in The Second Coming. The theme of personal sacrifice and criticism of religion (he is an atheist) also feature in his other works. Davies himself identified the juxtaposition of grand, impossible events and everyday human life as a recurring theme in his work: "I like taking big, high-concept ideas and pulling them down and making them real. The impossible can become very believable. Every story is ordinary people in extraordinary circumstances. Even if you take falling in love, which, although it's very common, feels extraordinary when it happens to you."[10] The opening titles of The Second Coming. ... For information about the band, see Atheist (band). ...


Personal life

Davies is 6 feet 6 inches (1.98 m) tall.[1] He divides his time between his home in Manchester, England and a flat in Cardiff Bay, where he stays while Doctor Who is filming.[12] He has been with partner Andrew Smith, a customs officer, for several years.[10] This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... Cardiff Bay Cardiff Bay (Welsh: Bae Caerdydd) is the regeneration area created by the Cardiff Barrage which impounded two rivers (Taff and Ely) to form a new freshwater lake around the former dockland area south of the city centre of Cardiff in south Wales // The Cardiff Bay Development Corporation was...


He is also a Patron of the Cardiff-Wales Mardi Gras.


Bibliography

  • Dark Season (BBC Books, 1991) ISBN 0-563-36265-0
  • Doctor Who: Damaged Goods (Doctor Who Books, 1996) ISBN 0-426-20483-2
  • Queer As Folk: The Scripts (Channel 4 Books, 1999) ISBN 0-7522-1858-1

Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... The cover of Damaged Goods, with artwork by Bill Donohoe. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...

References

Television:

Newspapers: BBC Four Ident BBC Four is a BBC television channel available to digital television (Freeview, satellite and cable) viewers in the UK. The successor to an earlier digital channel called BBC Knowledge, BBC Four began on March 2, 2002 – its first evenings programmes being simulcast on BBC Two. ... April 11 is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Webpages: Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... October 17 is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 11 is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Alternate newspaper: The Daily Mirror (Australia) The Daily Mirror is a popular British tabloid daily newspaper. ... November 21 is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b c d Johnson, Richard. "Master of the universe", The Sunday Telegraph, 2007-03-11, p. 2. Retrieved on 2007-03-12. 
  2. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/5359552.stm
  3. ^ Gibson, Owen. "Doctor Who finally materialises on red carpet as TV series scoops drama prize", The Guardian, 2006-05-08. Retrieved on 2006-05-08. 
  4. ^ Latest winners and nominees. British Academy of Film and Television Arts (2006-05-19). Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  5. ^ a b Byrne, Clar. "Russell T Davies: The saviour of Saturday night drama" (fee required for full article), The Independent, 2006-04-10. Retrieved on 2006-10-22. 
  6. ^ "Channel 4 crowned top TV network", BBC News, bbc.co.uk, 2006-08-26. Retrieved on 2006-08-28. 
  7. ^ BBC (2006-09-14). Russell T Davies creates new series for CBBC, starring Doctor Who's Sarah Jane Smith. Press release. Retrieved on 2006-09-14.
  8. ^ "28. Russell T. Davies", The Guardian, 2006-07-17. Retrieved on 2006-10-22. 
  9. ^ Mine All Mine: Episode 5. TV.com. Retrieved on 2006-10-29.
  10. ^ a b c Pryor, Cathy. "Russell T Davies: One of Britain's foremost television writers", The Independent, 2006-10-22. Retrieved on 2006-10-22. 
  11. ^ Barrowman, John. Interview with Jonathan Ross. Jonathan Ross. BBC Radio 2. 2006-10-21.
  12. ^ Johnson, Richard. "Master of the universe", The Sunday Telegraph, 2007-03-11, p. 3. Retrieved on 2007-03-12. 

This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (129th in leap years). ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 10 is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... The URL bbc. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 26 is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A news release, press release or press statement is a written or recorded communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing something claimed as having news value. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 14 is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... July 17 is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... TV.com is a website belonging to the CNET Games and Entertainment family of websites. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... October 22 is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... John Barrowman (born 11 March 1967 in Glasgow) is a Scottish-American actor, musical performer, dancer, singer, and TV presenter who has lived and worked both in the United Kingdom and the United States. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and is the most popular station in the UK. It broadcasts throughout the UK on FM radio between 88 and 91 MHz from its studios in Western House, adjacent to Broadcasting House in central London. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 11 is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (71st in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 12 is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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