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Encyclopedia > Russell Senate Office Building
This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E.
This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E.
This article is part of the series:
United States Senate
Members
Current
(by seniority · by age · by class)

Former
Hill committees (DSCC, NRSC)
President pro tempore (list)
Dean · Presiding officer
Party leaders and Assistants

Democratic Caucus
Republican Conference Russell Senate Office Building, from http://www. ... Russell Senate Office Building, from http://www. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Image File history File links Senate_cap. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of members in the 110th United States Congress. ... This is a classification of current U.S. Senators by seniority. ... This is a list of current U.S. Senators sorted by age. ... The three classes of US Senators, each currently including 33 or 34 Senators (since Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959, and until another state is admitted), are a means used by the United States Senate for describing the schedules of Senate seats elections, and of the expiration of the... This is an incomplete list of all people who previously served in the United States Senate. ... The Hill committees are a set of four political party committees, controlled by the Republican and Democratic caucuses in each house of the United States Congress, which work to elect members of their own party to Congress (located on Capitol Hill, the source of the name). ... DSCC can also refer to Defense Supply Center, Columbus. ... The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... This is a complete List of Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... The Dean of the United States Senate is the longest-serving (in consecutive terms) United States Senator. ... The Presiding Officer is majority-party Senator who presides over the United States Senate and is charged with maintaining order and decorum, recognizing Members to speak, and interpreting the Senates rules, practices and precedents. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators... The Assistant Majority and Minority Leaders of the United States Senate (commonly called Senate Majority and Minority Whips) are the second-ranking members of their parties in the United States Senate. ... The Senate Democratic Caucus is the formal organization of the (currently) 44 Democratic Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 55 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ...

Politics and procedure
Advice and consent
Closed session (list)
Cloture · Committees (list)
Executive session · Filibuster
History · Quorum  · Quorum call
Recess appointment · Salaries
Seal  · Standing Rules · Traditions
Unanimous consent
VPs' tie-breaking votes
Places
United States Capitol
Senate office buildings
(Dirksen · Hart · Russell)
The rotunda of the Russell Building featuring the sculpture by Frederick Hart.
The rotunda of the Russell Building featuring the sculpture by Frederick Hart.
View of Russell from United States Capitol dome.
View of Russell from United States Capitol dome.

The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux-Arts style of architecture. In 1972, it was named for former Senator Richard Brevard Russell, Jr. of Georgia. It occupies a site north of the Capitol bounded by Constitution Avenue, First Street, Delaware Avenue, and C Street N.E. US Capitol Building. ... In the Congress of the United States, a closed session (formally a session with closed doors) is a parliamentary procedure for the Senate or the House of Representatives to discuss matters requiring secrecy. ... The United States Senate has the authority for meeting in closed session, as described in the Standing Rules of the Senate. ... In parliamentary procedure, cloture (pr: KLO-cher) (also called closure, and sometimes a guillotine) is a motion or process aimed at bringing debate to a quick end. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... The Senate Committee on Budget (ca. ... An executive session is a portion of the Senates daily session in which it considers executive business. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... Debate over Compromise of 1850 in the Old Senate Chamber. ... Look up quorum in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A quorum call or call to quorum is a parliamentary procedure used to delay a vote or otherwise slow down the deliberations of a parliamentary body. ... A recess appointment occurs when the President of the United States fills a vacant Federal position during a recess of the United States Senate. ... Historical information on the salaries that United States Senators have been paid: 1789-1815 -- $6. ... The Seal of the Senate, based on the Great Seal of the United States, includes a scroll inscribed with E Pluribus Unum floating across a shield with thirteen stars on top and thirteen vertical stripes on the bottom. ... The Standing Rules of the Senate detail the rules of order of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate observes a number of traditions, some formal and some informal. ... Unanimous consent, in parliamentary procedure, refers to situations in which a motion can pass if no one present objects. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate and votes only to break a tie. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The largely ceremonial space within the United States Capitol is augmented by office, meeting and service spaces within the Congressional office buildings. ... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... Russell Senate Office Building rotunda, from http://www. ... Russell Senate Office Building rotunda, from http://www. ... Frederick Hart Frederick Hart (1943 – 1999) was an American sculptor, best known for his public monuments and works of art in bronze, marble, and clear acrylic (a technique he coined as sculpting with light). // Biography Hart was born in Atlanta in 1943 while his father was serving in World War... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A statue of Russell is placed in the rotunda of the Russell Senate Office Building. ... In Washington, D.C., Constitution Avenue is a major east-west street running just north of the United States Capitol in the citys Northwest and Northeast quadrants. ...


History

The first congressional office buildings were constructed immediately after the turn of the 20th century to relieve overcrowding in the United States Capitol. Previously, members who wanted office space had to rent quarters or borrow space in committee rooms. In March 1901 Congress authorized Architect of the Capitol Edward Clark to draw plans for fireproof office buildings adjacent to the Capitol grounds. In March 1903 the acquisition of sites and construction of the buildings were authorized, and the Senate Office Building Commission selected a site. Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States... This article concerns the Confederate governor of Texas. ...


In April 1904, the prominent New York City architectural firm of Carrère and Hastings was retained. John Carrère took charge of the Senate Office Building project, while Thomas Hastings oversaw the construction of an almost identical office building (now named the Cannon House Office Building) for the United States House of Representatives. Their Beaux Arts designs were restrained complements to the Capitol. Architecturally, their elevations are divided into a rusticated base and a colonnade with an entablature and balustrade. The colonnades with thirty-four Doric columns that face the Capitol are echoed by pilasters on the sides of the buildings. Both buildings are faced with marble and limestone; the Russell Building's base and terrace are gray granite. Modern for their time, they included such facilities as forced-air ventilation systems, steam heat, individual lavatories with hot and cold running water and ice water, telephones, and electricity. Both are connected to the Capitol by underground passages. Originally there were 98 suites and eight committee rooms in the Russell Building; the First Street Wing, completed in 1933, added two committee rooms and 28 suites. This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... New York Public Library, central block, built 1897–1911, Carrère and Hastings, architects (June, 2003) Carrere and Hastings, the firm of John Mervin Carrère (November 9, 1858 - March 1, 1911) and Thomas Hastings (1860 - 1929), sited in New York City, was one of the outstanding Beaux-Arts architectural... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Beaux-Arts architecture[1] denotes the academic classical architectural style that was taught at the École des Beaux Arts in Paris. ...


Of special architectural interest is the rotunda. Eighteen Corinthian columns support an entablature and a coffered dome, whose glazed oculus floods the rotunda with natural light. Twin marble staircases lead from the rotunda to an imposing Caucus Room, which features Corinthian pilasters, a full entablature, and a richly detailed ceiling; the Russell Caucus Room retains its original 1910 benches and settles with carved eagles. This space has been used for many hearings on subjects of national significance, from the sinking of Titanic in 1912 to Watergate in 1974, the Iran Contra scandal in 1987, and the nomination of United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in 1991. The Russell Building was occupied in 1909 by the Senate of the 61st Congress. The growth of staff and committees in the twenty years following its completion resulted in the addition of a fourth side, the First Street Wing, to the originally U-shaped building. Nathan Wyeth and Francis P. Sullivan were the consulting architects for the new wing, which was completed in 1933. Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... RMS Titanic was a British Olympic class passenger liner that became famous for her collision with an iceberg on 14 April 1912 and dramatic sinking on 15 April 1912. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Watergate building. ... A blonde haired, very skilled worker with a 70s look. ... In the Iran-Contra Affair, United States President Ronald Reagans administration secretly sold arms to Iran, which was engaged in a bloody war with its neighbor Iraq from 1980 to 1988 (see Iran-Iraq War), and diverted the proceeds to the Contra rebels fighting to overthrow the leftist and... Year 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays 1987 Gregorian calendar). ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C., (large image) The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


List of Current U.S. Senators in the Russell Senate Office Building

Source: [1] Birch Evans Evan Bayh III (last name pronounced buy) (born December 26, 1955) is an American politician who has served as the junior U.S. Senator from Indiana since 1999 and a former Governor of Indiana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Area  Ranked 38th  - Total 36,418 sq mi (94,321 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 270 miles (435 km)  - % water 1. ... Joseph Robinette Joe Biden, Jr. ... Official language(s) None Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Area  Ranked 49th  - Total 2,491 sq mi (6,452 km²)  - Width 30 miles (48 km)  - Length 100 miles (161 km)  - % water 21. ... Christopher Bond (fl. ... Official language(s) English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City Largest metro area St Louis[1] Area  Ranked 21st  - Total 69,709 sq mi (180,693 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 300 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... Sherrod Campbell Brown (born November 9, 1952) is the Democratic Junior United States Senator from the state of Ohio. ... Official language(s) None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Largest metro area Cleveland Area  Ranked 34th  - Total 44,825 sq mi (116,096 km²)  - Width 220 miles (355 km)  - Length 220 miles (355 km)  - % water 8. ... Richard Mauze Burr (born November 30, 1955) is a United States Senator from Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Robert Patrick Casey, Jr. ... Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Area  Ranked 33rd  - Total 46,055 sq mi (119,283 km²)  - Width 280 miles (455 km)  - Length 160 miles (255 km)  - % water 2. ... Clarence Saxby Chambliss (born November 10, 1943) is the senior United States Senator from Georgia. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... NY redirects here. ... Thomas Allen Tom Coburn, M.D. (born March 14, 1948) is a medical doctor and a Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... James Warren DeMint (born September 2, 1951) has been a U.S. Senator from South Carolina since 2005. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N... Christopher John Dodd (born May 27, 1944), is an American politician. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... John Eric Ensign (born March 25, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Nevada. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Michael Bradley Mike Enzi (born February 1, 1944) is a United States senator from Wyoming. ... Official language(s) English Capital Cheyenne Largest city Cheyenne Area  Ranked 10th  - Total 97,818 sq mi (253,348 km²)  - Width 280 miles (450 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 0. ... Lindsey Olin Graham (born July 9, 1955) is an American politician from South Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston(1670-1789) Columbia(1790-present) Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32°430N to 35°12N... Judd Gregg (born February 1947) is a former Governor of New Hampshire and current United States Senator were he serves as ranking member of the Senate Budget Committee. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... Charles Timothy Chuck Hagel (born October 4, 1946) is the senior United States Senator from Nebraska. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ... Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison Kay Bailey Hutchison (born July 22, 1943) is the senior United States Senator from Texas. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... James Mountain Inhofe, usually known as Jim Inhofe (born November 17, 1934) is an American politician from Oklahoma. ... Official language(s) None Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Area  Ranked 20th  - Total 69,960 sq mi (181,196 km²)  - Width 230 miles (370 km)  - Length 298 miles (480 km)  - % water 1. ... John Hardy Johnny Isakson (born December 28, 1944), American politician, has been a Republican United States Senator from Georgia since 2005. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  Ranked 44th  - Total 10,555 sq mi (27,360 km²)  - Width 183 miles (295 km)  - Length 113 miles (182 km)  - % water 13. ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ... Official language(s) None Capital Montpelier Largest city Burlington Area  Ranked 45th  - Total 9,620 sq mi (24,923 km²)  - Width 80 miles (130 km)  - Length 160 miles (260 km)  - % water 3. ... Carl Milton Levin (born June 28, 1934) is a Democratic United States Senator from Michigan and is the Chairman of the Senate Committee on Armed Services. ... Official language(s) None (English, de-facto) Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Area  Ranked 11th  - Total 97,990 sq mi (253,793 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 491 miles (790 km)  - % water 41. ... Chester Trent Lott, Sr. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Melquíades Rafael Mel Martínez (born October 23, 1946) is a Cuban-American, who is currently the junior United States Senator from Florida and the General Chairman of the Republican Party. ... Official language(s) English Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Largest metro area Miami Area  Ranked 22nd  - Total 65,795[1] sq mi (170,304[1] km²)  - Width 361 miles (582 km)  - Length 447 miles (721 km)  - % water 17. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Patricia Lynn Murray (known as Patty Murray) (born October 11, 1950) is a Democratic United States Senator from Washington. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... Jefferson Beauregard Jeff Sessions III (born December 24, 1946) is the junior United States Senator from Alabama. ... Official language(s) English Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Area  Ranked 30th  - Total 52,419 sq mi (135,765 km²)  - Width 190 miles (306 km)  - Length 330 miles (531 km)  - % water 3. ... Gordon Harold Smith (born May 25, 1952) is Oregons junior United States Senator, currently serving his second term. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Olympia Jean Bouchles Snowe (born February 21, 1947 in Augusta, Maine) is a Republican politician and the senior United States Senator from Maine. ... Official language(s) None (English and French de facto) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... John Edward Sununu (born September 10, 1964) is a Republican United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... Official language(s) English Capital Concord Largest city Manchester Area  Ranked 46th  - Total 9,359 sq mi (24,239 km²)  - Width 68 miles (110 km)  - Length 190 miles (305 km)  - % water 3. ... Jonathan Jon Tester (born August 21, 1956) is the Democratic Senator-elect from Montana. ... Official language(s) English Capital Helena Largest city Billings Area  Ranked 4th  - Total 147,165 sq mi (381,156 km²)  - Width 255 miles (410 km)  - Length 630 miles (1,015 km)  - % water 1  - Latitude 44°26N to 49°N  - Longitude 104°2W to 116°2W Population  Ranked... John Randolph Thune (born January 7, 1961) is the junior U.S. Senator from the state of South Dakota. ... Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,163 sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... James Henry Jim Webb, Jr. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... John William Warner (born February 18, 1927) is an American statesman and politician, who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1972-1974 and has served as the Republican senior U.S. Senator from Virginia since 1979. ... This article contains a trivia section. ...


References

http://www.aoc.gov/cc/cobs/rsob.htm, a public-domain publication of the Architect of the Capitol United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States...

United States Capitol Complex
  United States Capitol
House: Cannon | Ford | Longworth | O'Neill | Rayburn
Senate: Dirksen | Hart | Russell
Library of Congress: Adams Building | Jefferson Building | Madison Building
Others: Botanic Garden | Power Plant | Reflection Pool | Supreme Court | Visitor Center

Coordinates: 38°53′34″N, 77°00′25″W Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... United States Capitol (2002) // The One Hundred Tenth United States Congress is the current meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, comprised of the Senate and the House of Representatives. ... The 110th United States Congress consists of 540 elected officials from fifty states, four territories, and the District of Columbia. ... This is an incomplete list of notable former members of the United States House of Representatives. ... This is a list of current U.S. Senators sorted by age. ... This is a classification of current U.S. Senators by seniority. ... This is an incomplete list of all people who previously served in the United States Senate. ... The United States Constitution gives the Senate the power to expel any member by a two-thirds vote. ... The three classes of US Senators, each currently including 33 or 34 Senators (since Hawaii became the 50th state in 1959, and until another state is admitted), are a means used by the United States Senate for describing the schedules of Senate seats elections, and of the expiration of the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      Party leaders of the United States House of Representatives are elected by their respective parties in... A whip in the United States House of Representatives is a member of the party leadership who comes second in line after the partys floor leader, which in the house is the House Majority Leader or the House Minority Leader. ... The House Democratic Caucus, nominates and elects the Democratic Party leadership in the United States House of Representatives. ... The House Republican Conference, sometimes known as the House Republican Leadership Conference, is an organization for Republicans in the United States House of Representatives. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia the current President pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... This is a complete List of Presidents pro tempore of the United States Senate. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Senate Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators... The Assistant Majority and Minority Leaders of the United States Senate (commonly called Senate Majority and Minority Whips) are the second-ranking members of their parties in the United States Senate. ... The Senate Democratic Caucus is the formal organization of the (currently) 44 Democratic Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Democratic caucus of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairman. ... The United States Senate Democratic Conference Secretary, also called the Caucus Secretary, is a ranking leadership position within the Democratic Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Democratic members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ... The Senate Republican Conference is the formal organization of the (currently) 55 Republican Senators in the United States Senate. ... The Republican conference of the United States Senate chooses a conference chairperson. ... The United States Senate Republican Conference Vice-Chair, also known previously as the Conference Secretary, is the third-ranking leadership position within the U.S. Republican Party in the United States Senate. ... Since 1947, the Republican members of the United States Senate have elected a policy committee chairman. ... The Dean of the United States Senate is the longest-serving (in consecutive terms) United States Senator. ... Joseph Rainey, first black member of the US House of Representatives Since 1870 there have been 106 African American members of the United States Congress. ... This is a list of Asian Pacific Americans in the U.S. Congress. ... A Congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress which meets to pursue common legislative objectives. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... The Congress of the United States has demographics that are different from America as a whole in a number of ways. ... This is a list of Hispanic Americans who have served in the U.S. Congress. ... There have been 35 women in the United States Senate since the establishment of that body in 1789, meaning that out of the 1,895 Americans [1] who have served in the United States Senate since that time, 1. ... Throughout the history of the United States House of Representatives, there have been 214 women serving in that body. ... United States Capitol The Architect of the Capitol is responsible to the United States Congress for the maintenance, operation, development, and preservation of the United States Capitol Complex, which includes the Capitol, the congressional office buildings, the Library of Congress buildings, the United States Supreme Court building, the United States... The United States Capitol Guide Service is a guide service charged by the United States Congress to provide guided tours of the interior of the United States Capitol Building for the education and enlightenment of the general public, without charge for such tours. ... The Capitol Guide Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Guide Service. ... The United States Capitol Police (USCP) is a police force charged with protecting the United States Congress within the District of Columbia and throughout the United States and its territories. ... The Capitol Police Board is a group of three members who have jurisdiction over the United States Capitol Police. ... A U.S. Congressional Chief of Staff is the top executive in the office of a member of the United States Congress. ... General Accounting Office headquarters, Washington, D.C. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) is the non-partisan audit, evaluation, and investigative arm of Congress, and an agency in the Legislative Branch of the United States Government. ... The logotype of the United States Government Printing Office In the United States, the Government Printing Office (GPO) prints and provides access to documents produced by and for all three branches of the federal government, including the Supreme Court, the Congress, and all executive branch agencies like the FCC and... The Office of the Law Revision Counsel prepares and publishes the United States Code, which is a consolidation and codification by subject matter of the general and permanent laws of the United States. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... The election of William Linn as Chaplain of the House on May 1, 1789, continued the tradition established by the Continental Congresses of each days proceedings opening with a prayer by a chaplain. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Clerk of the U.S. House of Representatives is an employee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Doorkeeper of the United States House of Representatives office was abolished during the 104th Congress. ... The Office of Emergency Planning, Preparedness and Operations (OEPPO) provides emergency planning and operational support to the United States House of Representatives. ... The Historian of the United States House of Representatives is an official appointed by that legislative body to study and document its past. ... The United States House of Representatives Page Program is a program run by the United States House of Representatives in which appointed high school juniors act as non-partisan federal employees in the House of Representatives, providing supplemental administrative support to House operations in a variety of capacities in Washington... House Page Board is a the oversight group of elected official who oversee the United States House of Representatives Page. ... The office of the Parliamentarian of the United States House of Representatives is an office managed, supervised and administered by a non-partisan Parliamentarian appointed by the Speaker. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Reading Clerk of the United States House of Representatives reads bills, motions, and other papers before the House and keeps track of changes to legislation made on the floor. ... The House Recording Studio provides radio and television recording services to Members, Committees, and Officers of the United States House of Representatives. ... The United States House of Representatives Sergeant at Arms is an officer of the House with law enforcement, protocol, and administrative responsibilities. ... // Job description and selection Among his or her duties, the chaplains job is to open each session of the United States Senate with a prayer. ... The United States Senate Curator is an employee of the United States Senate who is responsible for developing and implementing the museum and preservation programs for the Senate Commission on Art. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with United States Senate Historical Office. ... The Senate Library is an administrative office that reports into the Secretary of the United States Senate. ... A United States Senate Page (Senate Page or simply Page) is a non-partisan federal employee serving the United States Senate in Washington, DC. In many ways, Senate Pages are similar to their House counterparts. ... The Parliamentarian of the United States Senate serves at the pleasure of the Senate Majority Leader, and functions under the direction of the Secretary of the Senate as a non-partisan employee of the Senate. ... The Secretary of the Senate, as an elected officer of the United States Senate, supervises an extensive array of offices and services to expedite the day-to-day operations of that body. ... The Sergeant at Arms and Doorkeeper of the Senate is the law enforcer for the United States Senate. ... An Act of Vaginapenis is a bill or resolution adopted by both houses of the United States Congress to which one of the following events has happened: Acceptance by the President of the United States, Inaction by the President after ten days from reception (excluding Sundays) while the Congress is... This is a partial list of notable United States federal legislation, in chronological order. ... A Congressional caucus is a group of members of the United States Congress which meets to pursue common legislative objectives. ... A Congressional committee is a legislative sub-organization in the United States Congress that handles a specific duty (rather than the general duties of Congress). ... Congressional hearings are the principal formal method by which committees collect and analyze information in the early stages of legislative policymaking. ... Joint Sessions of the United States Congress are the gathering together of both House and Senate which occur on special occasions such as the State of the Union Address and Presidential Inauguration. ... Congress, in addition to its lawmaking duties, has oversight authority over the Executive Branch. ... The following table lists the party divisions for each United States Congress: U.S. Senate: Party Divisions Office of the House Clerk: Party Divisions of the House of Representatives Categories: | | ... In legislative practice, a rider is an additional provision annexed to a bill under the consideration of a legislature, having little connection with the subject matter of the bill. ... Members of the Committee on Financial Services sit in the tiers of raised chairs (R), while those testifying and audience members sit below (L). ... George W. Bush delivered his annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on January 28, 2003, in the House chamber. ... Jeffersons Manual of Parliamentary Practice is a book of parliamentary procedure and additional guidelines for the United States House of Representatives, written by Thomas Jefferson in 1801. ... At a hearing during the 109th Congress, then-Chairman Vernon J. Ehlers greets then-Ranking Member Juanita Millender-McDonald. ... The Senate Committee on Budget (ca. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... Debate over Compromise of 1850 in the Old Senate Chamber. ... The United States Senate observes a number of traditions, some formal and some informal. ... The Vice President of the United States is, ex officio, the President of the United States Senate and votes only to break a tie. ... The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden run by the Congress of the United States. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Aerial view of the United States Capitol Complex from the northweat The United States Capitol Complex is group of about a dozen buildings and facilities in Washington D.C. that are used by the Federal government of the United States. ... The largely ceremonial space within the United States Capitol is augmented by office, meeting and service spaces within the Congressional office buildings. ... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The Ford House Office Building is one of the four office buildings containing U.S. House of Representatives staff on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. It is the only House Office Building that is not connected underground to either one of the other office buildings or to the Capitol itself. ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ... The ONeill House Office Building is the name of a former Congressional Office Building, located near the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. It was named after former Speaker of the House Thomas Tip ONeill (December 9, 1912 – January 5, 1994). ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... Congressional Quarterly (CQ) produces a number of publications that report primarily on the United States Congress. ... The Congressional Record is the official record of the proceedings and debates of the United States Congress. ... The Congressional Research Service is the public policy research arm of the United States Congress. ... The Library of Congress is the de facto national library of the United States and the research arm of the United States Congress. ... The Hill is a non-partisan, non-ideological newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It is written for and about the U.S. Congress. ... Published Monday to Thursday when the United States Congress is in session and Mondays only during recess, Roll Call provides its readers with up-to-the-minute news of the legislative and political maneuvers that happen every day on Capitol Hill. ... Thomas was not a Biblical given name, but originated from the Aramaic designation תום or Tôm. ... Congressional districts for representation in the United States House of Representatives are determined after each census. ... This is a complete list of congressional districts by area for current representation in the United States House of Representatives. ... The Mace of the US House of Representatives The Mace of the United States House of Representatives is one of the oldest symbols of the United States government. ... A number of amendments to the United States Constitution include a Congressional power of enforcement. ... The Congressional Softball League is a softball league organized by the non-profit Congressional Athletic Association consisting of teams of United States Congresspeople as well as other federal agencies and Washington D.C. companies and organizations. ... Aerial view of the United States Capitol Complex from the northweat The United States Capitol Complex is group of about a dozen buildings and facilities in Washington D.C. that are used by the Federal government of the United States. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress; the other is the Senate. ... The Cannon House Office Building, completed in 1908, is the oldest congressional office building as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture. ... The Ford House Office Building is one of the four office buildings containing U.S. House of Representatives staff on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. It is the only House Office Building that is not connected underground to either one of the other office buildings or to the Capitol itself. ... The Longworth House Office Building The Longworth House Office Building (LHOB) is one of three office buildings used by the United States House of Representatives. ... The ONeill House Office Building is the name of a former Congressional Office Building, located near the United States Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. It was named after former Speaker of the House Thomas Tip ONeill (December 9, 1912 – January 5, 1994). ... The Rayburn House Office Building (RHOB), named after former Speaker of the House Sam Rayburn, is located between South Capitol Street and First Street in Southwest Washington, D.C. // History The newest of three U.S. House of Representatives office buildings, the Rayburn House Office Building was completed in early... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... This Washington, DC congressional office building is named for former Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL). ... Located on Constitution Avenue, between 1st and 2nd Streets, NE The Hart Senate Office Building, the third U.S. Senate office building, was built in the 1970s. ... Library of Congress, Jefferson building The Library of Congress is one of four official national libraries of the United States (along with the National Library of Medicine, National Agricultural Library, and National Archives and Records Administration). ... The John Adams Building of the Library of Congress The John Adams Building is one of three library buildings of the Library of Congress in the United States. ... The Thomas Jefferson Building at the Library of Congress The oldest of the three United States Library of Congress buildings, the Thomas Jefferson Building opened in 1897. ... The James Madison Memorial Building The James Madison Memorial Building is one of three buildings that make up the Library of Congress and is part of the United States Capitol Complex. ... The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden run by the Congress of the United States. ... The Capitol Power Plant The Capitol Power Plant is power plant which provides steam, and cooled water for the United States Capitol and other buildings in the Capitol Complex. ... Capitol Reflection Pool The Capitol Reflection Pool lies to the west of the United States Capitol Building, and is the western most element of the Capitol Grounds. ... Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C. The buildings facade underwent renovation during the summer of 2006. ... ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Russell Senate Office Building - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (558 words)
This photograph, taken from southwest of the building, shows the main entrance along Constitution Avenue, N.E. The Russell Senate Office Building (built 1903-1908) is the oldest of the United States Senate office buildings as well as a significant example of the Beaux Arts style of architecture.
John Carrère took charge of the Senate Office Building project, while Thomas Hastings oversaw the construction of an almost identical office building (now named the Cannon House Office Building) for the United States House of Representatives.
The Russell Building was occupied in 1909 by the Senate of the 61st Congress.
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