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Encyclopedia > Russ Feingold
Russ Feingold
Russ Feingold

Incumbent
Assumed office 
January 5, 1993
Serving with Herb Kohl
Preceded by Bob Kasten
Succeeded by Incumbent

Born March 02, 1953 (1953-03-02) (age 54)
Janesville, Wisconsin
Political party Democratic
Spouse 1) Sue Feingold (divorced)

2) Mary Feingold (divorced)
Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (682x864, 204 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Russ Feingold Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This article refers to Sen. ... Robert Walter Bob Kasten Jr. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... Downtown Janesville looking south on Main Street (2004) Janesville is a city in southern Wisconsin. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic...

Alma mater University of Wisconsin-Madison
Religion Jewish

Russell Dana "Russ" Feingold (born March 2, 1953) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Wisconsin. He has served as a Democratic member of the U.S. Senate and the junior Senator from Wisconsin since 1993. A recipient of the John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award, Feingold is best known for his maverick voting and cosponsorship of the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act ("McCain-Feingold Bill"), a major piece of campaign finance reform legislation. He had been mentioned as a possible candidate in the 2008 Presidential election, but chose not to run following the November midterm elections of 2006.[1] University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - President Harry S. Truman announces the United States has developed a hydrogen bomb. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      Politics of the United States takes place in a framework of a presidential... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Largest metro area Greater Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42° 30′ N to 47° 05′ N  - Longitude 86° 46′ W to... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... The Profile in Courage Award is an award given to someone who displays the type of courage that John F. Kennedy described in his book of the same name. ... The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA) is U.S. Congressional legislation which regulates the financing of political campaigns. ... Political campaign Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... Look up Candidate in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The United States presidential election of 2008, scheduled to be held on November 4, 2008, will be the 55th consecutive quadrennial president and vice president of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The 2006 United States midterm elections were held on Tuesday, November 7, 2006. ...

Contents

Early life and education

Feingold was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, to a Jewish family that had settled in the area in 1917. His grandparents were immigrants from Russia and Galicia.[2] His father, Leon Feingold (1912–1980), was an attorney, and his mother, Sylvia Feingold née Binstock (1918–2005), was a worker at a title company. Russ was one of four children. He has publicly noted that his older brother David, along with his father, were the major influences in his political development as a youth.[citation needed] He was also involved with BBYO and AZA as a boy. Downtown Janesville looking south on Main Street (2004) Janesville is a city in southern Wisconsin. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... Immigration is the act of moving to or settling in another country or region, temporarily or permanently. ... For other uses, see Galicia. ... Title is a legal term for an owners interest in a piece of property. ... Bnai Brith Youth Organization (BBYO) is an worldwide youth-led organization for high-school age Jewish teens. ... AZA Menorah The International Order of Aleph Zadik Aleph (AZA) is the mens Order of Bnai Brith Youth Organization (BBYO), an international youth-led high school fraternity for Jewish teens. ...


In 1972, Feingold volunteered for the presidential campaign of New York City mayor John Lindsay. Later on, he would support the presidential campaigns of Mo Udall and Ted Kennedy.[3] Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Mayor of New York City is the chief executive of the government of New York City, as stipulated by the Charter of the City of New York. ... This article is about the American politician. ... Morris Udall Morris King Udall (June 15, 1922 – December 12, 1998), better known as Mo, was an American politician who served as a U.S. Representative from Arizona from May 2, 1961 to May 4, 1991. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


After graduating from Joseph A. Craig High School, Feingold attended the University of Wisconsin-Madison and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree with honors in 1975, a member of the Phi Beta Kappa honor society. He went to Magdalen College at the University of Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship in 1977, where he earned another Bachelor of Arts. Upon returning to the U.S., he attended Harvard Law School, receiving his J.D. with honors in 1979.[4] Image from girls basketball game with crosstown rival Parker during the 2004-2005 season Joseph A. Craig High School is a comprehensive public secondary school located in the city of Janesville, Wisconsin. ... University of Wisconsin redirects here. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Latin honors are Latin phrases used to indicate the level of academic distinction with which an academic degree was earned. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an academic honor society with the mission of fostering and recognizing excellence in the undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... In the United States, an honor society is an organization of rank, the induction into which recognizes excellence among ones peers. ... College name Magdalen College Latin name Collegium Beatae Mariae Magdalenae Named after Mary Magdalene Established 1458 Sister college Magdalene College, Cambridge President Professor David Clary FRS JCR President Jessica Jones Undergraduates 395 MCR President Eloise Scotford Graduates 230 Location of Magdalen College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Magdalen College (pronounced... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... Harvard Law School (colloquially, Harvard Law or HLS) is one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... J.D. redirects here; for alternate uses, see J.D. (disambiguation) J.D. is an abbreviation for the Latin Juris Doctor, also called a Doctor of Law or Doctorate of Jurisprudence, and is the law degree typically awarded by an accredited U.S. law school after successfully completing three years...


Career

Feingold worked as an attorney at the private law firms of Foley & Lardner and La Follette & Sinykin from 1979 until 1985.[5] In 1982 he was elected to the Wisconsin State Senate where he served until his election to the United States Senate. In 1987, he joined the "Bowtie Brigade," a coalition of grassroots activists and local-level politicians who backed the presidential candidacy of bowtie-clad Senator Paul Simon of Illinois. Foley & Lardner LLP is an international general practice law firm started in 1842 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. ... The Wisconsin State Senate, based off of the U.S. Senate, is the upper house of the Wisconsin State Legislature, smaller than the Wisconsin State Assembly. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... A grassroots political movement is one driven by the constituents of a community. ... Paul Martin Simon (November 29, 1928 – December 9, 2003) was an American politician from Illinois. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ...


Family & Personal life

He has been married twice, to Sue Levine and Mary Speerschneider. Russ and Sue Feingold married in 1977 and had two children, Jessica and Ellen, before divorcing nine years later. He then married Mary Speerschneider (also previously divorced) on January 20, 1991. Mary (née Erpenbach) had previously been married to Timm Speerschneider, a Madison attorney, with whom she had two children: Sam and Ted. Feingold's 2003 income tax return showed two home mortgages and ownership of an $8,000 1998 Buick.[6] On April 11, 2005, Russ and Mary Feingold jointly announced that they would be seeking a divorce.[7] When not in Washington, D.C., Feingold resides in Middleton, Wisconsin. is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Nickname: Location of Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin Coordinates: , Municipality City Incorporated 1848 Government  - Mayor Dave Cieslewicz Area  - City 219. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Buick is a brand of automobile built in the United States, Canada, China and in Spain by General Motors Corporation. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... Middleton is a city in Dane County, Wisconsin, United States. ...


Campaigns

Senate

1992 race

Feingold's senatorial career began in 1992 with a victory over incumbent Republican Senator Bob Kasten. Feingold, who had little name recognition in the state and was campaigning in a primary against a pair of millionaire opponents, adopted several proposals to gain the electorate's attention. The most memorable of these was a series of five promises written on Feingold's garage door in the form of a contract. These were: The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Robert Walter Bob Kasten Jr. ... Millionairess redirects here. ... A contract is a legally binding exchange of promises or agreement between parties that the law will enforce. ...

  1. I will rely on the Wisconsin citizens for most of my contributions.
  2. I will live in Middleton, Wisconsin. My children will go to school here and I will spend most of my time here in Wisconsin.
  3. I will accept no pay raise during my six-year term in office.
  4. I will hold a "Listening Session" in each of Wisconsin's 72 counties each year of my six-year term in office.
  5. I will hire the majority of my Senate staff from individuals who are from Wisconsin or have Wisconsin backgrounds.[8]

Also noted was Feingold's advertising campaign, which was widely compared to that used by progressive candidate Paul Wellstone in his victorious Senate campaign in Minnesota. Shot in the form of home movies, the ads attempted to portray Feingold, who always referred to himself as "the underdog running for U.S. senate," as a down-to-earth, Capra-esque figure, taking the audience on a guided tour of the candidate's home and introducing them to his children, all of whom were enrolled in public school.[9] An advertising campaign is a series of advertisement messages that share a single idea and theme which make up an integrated marketing communication (IMC). ... For other uses, see Progressivism (disambiguation). ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Home Movies is a dialogue-driven animated series about 8-year-old Brendon Small (voiced by the creator, head writer, and lead musician of Home Movies Brendon Small), who makes films with his friends, Melissa and Jason, in his spare time. ... An underdog is a person or group in a competition, frequently in electoral politics, sports, and creative works, who is popularly expected to lose. ... This article is about the film director. ... —24. ...


The ads also contained a significant amount of humor. One featured Feingold meeting with an Elvis Presley impersonator, who offered Feingold his endorsement.[10] (Bob Kasten responded to the Elvis endorsement with an advertisement featuring an Elvis impersonator attacking Feingold's record.[11]) Another showed Feingold, standing next to a pair of half-sized cardboard cut-outs of his opponents, refusing to "stoop to their level" as the two were shown literally slinging mud at one another.[9] In still another, Feingold was shown conclusively demonstrating that there were no skeletons in any of his closets.[12] “Elvis” redirects here. ... Robert Walter Bob Kasten Jr. ...


During the primary campaign, Feingold unveiled an 82-point plan to eliminate the deficit by the end of his first term.[13] The plan, which called for, among other things, a raise in taxes and cuts in the defense budget, was derided as "extremist" by Republicans and "too liberal" by his Democratic opponents. Feingold also announced his support for strict campaign finance reform and a national health care system and voiced his opposition to term limits and new tax cuts.[14] A budget deficit occurs when an entity (often a government) spends more money than it takes in. ... “Taxes” redirects here. ... Department of Defense redirects here. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Political campaign Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... Universal health care is a situation in which all residents of a geographic or political region have access to most types of health care. ... This article is about constitutional law; for the book by Vince Flynn see Term Limits (book). ... A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ...


Feingold won by positioning himself as a quirky underdog who offered voters an alternative to the negative campaigning of opponents Jim Moody and Joe Checota.[15] On primary day, Feingold, whose support had shown in the single digits throughout much of the campaign, surged to victory with 70 percent of the vote.[14] Seven weeks later, while Bill Clinton, George H. W. Bush, and Ross Perot split the Wisconsin presidential vote 41%-37%-21%, Feingold beat Kasten by a margin of 53 percent to 46 percent.[15] William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930) is an American businessman from Texas, who is best known for seeking the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ...


1998 race

During his 1998 re-election campaign, Feingold once again eschewed big-money campaigning, despite the fact that the National Republican Senatorial Committee had targeted him for defeat.[16][17] Feingold placed a cap on his own fundraising, refusing to raise or spend more than $3.8 million (one dollar for every citizen of Wisconsin) during the campaign.[18] In addition, he placed the same limits on his fundraising that he would have faced under the McCain-Feingold bill. He refused to allow his party to raise any soft money to air ads favoring him and he requested that several special interest groups, including the AFL-CIO and the League of Conservation Voters, refrain from airing pro-Feingold "issue ads."[19] His Republican opponent, Congressman Mark Neumann, also limited himself to $3.8 million in spending, but allowed soft money to be used in his favor by a variety of pro-Republican groups.[18] Other Democrats and supporters were angry at Feingold for "putting his career at risk" with these self-imposed limits.[19] On election day, an extraordinarily strong showing in the Democratic strongholds of Milwaukee and Madison allowed Feingold to win by around two percent.[20] The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... Fundraising is the process of soliciting and gathering money or other gifts in-kind, by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ... Soft money refers to money used to advance a particular political campaign in such a manner as to skirt the legal limits on how much money individuals or organizations are allowed to contribute to political campaigns (termed hard money). ... A special interest is a person or political organization established to influence governmental policy or legislators in a specific area of policy. ... American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, commonly AFL-CIO, is a national trade union center, the largest federation of unions in the United States, made up of 54 national and international unions (including Canadian), together representing more than 10 million workers. ... The League of Conservation Voters is an American environmentalist lobby. ... Mark Neumann Mark W. Neumann (born February 27, 1954) is an American politician and former Congressman from the state of Wisconsin. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location of Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin Coordinates: , Municipality City Incorporated 1848 Government  - Mayor Dave Cieslewicz Area  - City 219. ...


2004 race

In the 2004 Senate election, Feingold defeated the Republican candidate and construction magnate Tim Michels, by 12 percent (56 percent-44 percent), earning a third term. During the campaign, Feingold refrained from imposing spending caps on himself as he had in the past, and raised and spent almost $11 million. Although Republicans attempted to use that fact to paint him as a hypocrite, Feingold's records showed that more than 90 percent of the money came from individuals, that the average contribution was only $60, and that, once again, a majority of it was raised from Wisconsin residents.[21] Feingold even won counties that supported a second term for Republican President George W. Bush.[22] Results -- light red represents Republican holds, dark red Republican pickups, light blue Democratic holds, dark blue Democratic pickups. ... Tim Michels is a member of the Wisconsin Republican Party. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ...


In late December 2004, Feingold was appointed to be one of four deputy whips for the Senate Democrats. Feingold pledged that the new role would not sway his maverick stance within the party or the chamber.[23] In politics, a whip is a member of a political party in a legislature whose task is to ensure that members of the party attend and vote as the party leadership desires. ...


Declines 2008 Presidential bid

Feingold on the campaign trail, stumping for Maria Cantwell (D-WA), October 2006.
Feingold on the campaign trail, stumping for Maria Cantwell (D-WA), October 2006.

In late January 2005, Feingold told the Tiger Bay Club of Volusia County, Florida that he intended to travel around the country before deciding whether or not to run in 2008.[24] In March 2005, his Senate campaign staff registered the domain www.russfeingold08.com, as well as the .org and .net versions; Feingold will not face reelection to the Senate until the 2010 election.[25] On June 1, 2005, Feingold launched a political action committee, the Progressive Patriots Fund; launching a PAC is seen as an important step in running for President. On the heels of the November 2006 midterm elections, in which the Democrats regained their majorities in both houses of Congress, a "draft Feingold" movement was established, independent of the senator's campaign.[26] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (399x645, 115 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Russ Feingold ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (399x645, 115 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Russ Feingold ... Maria E. Cantwell (born October 13, 1958) is the junior United States Senator from Washington state and is a member of the Democratic Party. ... Volusia redirects here. ... Elections to the United States Senate will be held on November 2, 2010, with thirty four of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... In the United States, a political action committee, or PAC, is the name commonly given to a private group organized to elect or defeat government officials in order to promote legislation, often supporting the groups special interests. ...


On August 17, 2005, Feingold became the first U.S. senator of either party to suggest a firm date for American withdrawal from the Iraq war, saying that he favored a complete withdrawal by no later than December 31, 2006.[27] is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On September 22, 2005, during the hearing on Judge John Roberts's nomination for Chief Justice of the United States, Feingold became one of three Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee to vote in favor of sending Roberts's nomination to the floor for a full vote. He also announced that he would vote to confirm Roberts. (Feingold graduated in the same Harvard Law School class (1979) as did Roberts, as well as Spencer Abraham, former U.S. senator from Michigan and former United States Secretary of Energy.) Many members of the Democratic blogosphere predicted that this vote would have a negative impact on his presidential aspirations, but Feingold's supporters pointed out that this was not the first time Feingold voted in favor of Bush's judicial nominees. However, Feingold voted against Samuel Alito in committee and voted against cloture of debate on his nomination on the Senate floor.[28] is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... John Roberts, 17th Chief Justice of the United States The Senate hearings on the nomination of John Roberts to the Supreme Court, began on September 12, 2005, with U.S. Senators posing questions to Roberts, who was nominated by President George W. Bush to fill the vacancy of Chief Justice... This article is about the Chief Justice of the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      The Chief Justice of the United States is the head of the judicial branch... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Edward Spencer Abraham (born June 12, 1952 in East Lansing, Michigan) is an a former United States Senator of Lebanese descent. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The United States Secretary of Energy is the head of the United States Department of Energy, concerned as the name suggests, with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Blogosphere is a collective term encompassing all blogs and their interconnections. ... Samuel Anthony Alito, Jr. ... In parliamentary procedure, cloture (pr: KLO-cher) (also called closure, and sometimes a guillotine) is a motion or process aimed at bringing debate to a quick end. ...


Although Feingold usually received support in the single digits in opinion polls featuring various potential Democratic presidential candidates, he became highly popular among Democratic grassroots activists. An opinion poll is a survey of opinion from a particular sample. ... Grassroots democracy is a tendency towards designing political processes where as much decision-making authority as practical is shifted to the organizations lowest geographic level of organization. ... Activism, in a general sense, can be described as intentional action to bring about social or political change. ...


Feingold has consistently polled ahead of other potential Democratic presidential candidates who haven't run a national race before. Strategic Vision state polling data[29] supports this claim, placing Feingold fourth behind Hillary Clinton, Al Gore (who had repeatedly stated he had no interest in running) and John Edwards (except in Wisconsin where he stands only 2 percent behind Clinton). However, according to a Quinnipiac University poll taken from February 21–28, 2006, Feingold ranked 9th among a group of politicians for 'how people felt about them'.[30] REDIRECT Hillary Rodham Clinton   This is a redirect from a title with another method of capitalisation. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... This article is about the American attorney and politician. ... Quinnipiac University is a private four-year university in Hamden, Connecticut, located on about 500 acres (2 km²), just north of New Haven. ...


Following Democratic victories in the November 2006 mid-term elections, Feingold announced that he would not run for president in 2008. He said that running for president would detract from his focus on the Senate, and the likely prying into his recent divorce "would dismantle both my professional life (in the Senate) and my personal life."[1] In his parting comments, he warned his supporters against supporting anyone for the presidency who voted for the Iraq War, whether they later regretted it or not, saying his first choice for president in 2008 was someone who voted against the war, and his second choice is someone who wasn't in Congress but spoke out against the war at the time.[31]


Bills and policy positions

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Feingold's primary legislative focus has been on campaign finance reform, fair trade policies, health care reform, conservation and environmental protection, a multilateral foreign policy, Social Security, civil liberties, and the elimination of capital punishment and wasteful spending. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Political campaign Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ... For other uses, see Fair trade (disambiguation). ... A countrys foreign policy is a set of political goals that seeks to outline how that particular country will interact with other countries of the world and, to a lesser extent, non-state actors. ... Social Security, in the United States, currently refers to the Federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program. ... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ...


Feingold was the only Democratic senator to vote against a motion to dismiss Congress's 1998–1999 impeachment case of President Bill Clinton.[32] In a statement, Feingold said House prosecutors must have "every reasonable opportunity" to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Clinton should be removed from office on charges of perjury and obstruction of justice. Feingold ultimately voted against conviction on all charges. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Beyond a reasonable doubt is the highest level of burden of persuasion typically employed in the criminal procedure. ...


In 2001, Feingold voted for the confirmation of Attorney General John Ashcroft. This decision was not popular with his party, but Feingold explained that he voted based on respect for the right for a President to choose his Cabinet, not because of his own personal opinions on Ashcroft.[33] In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) is an American politician who was the 79th United States Attorney General. ...


Feingold has also been an opponent of NAFTA and other free trade agreements, a popular position among many anti-trade Democrats, but at odds with the pro-trade Democratic wing including the Democratic Leadership Council. NAFTA redirects here. ... Free trade is an economic concept referring to the selling of products between countries without tariffs or other trade barriers. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In May 2006, Feingold voted to support the Salazar Amendment that would declare English the "common language" of the country and dissented in the vote for the Inhofe Amendment, which would make English the "national language" of the United States.[34][35] The Inhofe Amendment is an amendment to the so-called Comprehensive Immigration Reform Act of 2006, a bill currently under debate in the United States Senate that would change current immigration law allowing more immigrants into the United States amounting according to the Heritage Foundation to 66-100 million in... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


On December 21, 2004, Feingold wrote an article for popular webzine Salon.com regarding his golfing trip to Greenville, Alabama.[36] After noting how friendly the people were, and that Wisconsin had many similar places, he expressed his sorrow that such a poverty-stricken area was "the reddest spot on the whole map," despite Republican policies that Feingold considered incredibly destructive to the lives of the poor and middle class. Alabama Governor Bob Riley and Greenville Mayor Dexter McLendon, both Republicans, were perturbed at Feingold's description of "check-cashing stores and abject trailer parks, and some of the hardest-used cars for sale on a very rundown lot." McLendon invited Feingold back for a more complete tour of the city, and Feingold agreed. He visited the city on March 28, 2005, making amends and increasing speculation about his presidential plans for 2008.[37] is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other places with the same name, see Greenville. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Map of results by state of the 2004 U.S. presidential election, representing states won by the Democrats as blue and those won by the GOP as red. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Robert Renfroe Bob Riley (born October 3, 1944) is an American politician in the Republican Party. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In May 2006, Feingold voted in favor of bill S.2611[38], an immigration reform bill that, among other things, would almost double the number of H-1B visas. The H-1B visa program allows American companies and universities to employ foreign scientists, engineers, programmers, and other professionals in the United States. ...


Campaign finance reform

Feingold is perhaps best known for his work alongside Senator John McCain on the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002, better-known as the McCain-Feingold bill, which took the two almost seven years to pass. For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act of 2002 (BCRA) is U.S. Congressional legislation which regulates the financing of political campaigns. ...


On July 14, 2005, Feingold introduced a bill to the Senate that would ban lobbyists from giving gifts to senators and impose a $50,000 fine for violating the ban, force lawmakers to sign statements saying that lobbyists did not pay their travel expenses; forbid lawmakers from traveling on corporate jets, bar congressmen, staffers, and executive branch officials from serving as lobbyists for two years after leaving office and require that lobbying reports be disclosed on a quarterly, rather than semi-annual, basis.[39] The bill is the Senate version of a bill by Congressman Marty Meehan (D-MA), who co-wrote the House version of McCain-Feingold, and Rahm Emanuel (D-IL). Neither version has yet come to a vote. The Feingold-McCain bill was initially waiting completion of McCain hearings on the issue, but the Jack Abramoff scandal has put it in the spotlight, along with several other more recent reform proposals. is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the political effort. ... Martin Thomas Marty Meehan (born December 30, 1956) is an American attorney and politician from the state of Massachusetts. ... Rahm Emanuel (born November 29, 1959) is an American politician. ... Jack Abramoff (born February 28, 1958) is an American political lobbyist, a Republican political activist and businessman who is a central figure in a series of high-profile political scandals. ...


Government spending

Feingold is also a well-known advocate for reductions in pork barrel spending and corporate welfare. Citizens Against Government Waste, the Concord Coalition, and Taxpayers for Common Sense, three nonpartisan organizations dedicated to those causes, have repeatedly commended him.[40] A pork barrel, literally, is a barrel in which pork is kept. ... Corporate welfare is a pejorative term, first coined by Ralph Nader in 1956, describing a governments bestowal of grants and/or tax breaks on corporations or other special favorable treatment from the government. ... Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW) is a prominent taxpayer watchdog group in the USA. Its stated goal is to eliminate waste, fraud, abuse and mismanagement in the federal government. ... The Concord Coalition is a nationwide, non-partisan, grassroots organization advocating fiscal responsibility while ensuring Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid are secure for all generations. ...


Feingold, who was elected to Congress on a promise not to accept pay raises while in office, has so far returned over $50,000 in such raises to the U.S. Treasury.[41] In addition, he is notoriously frugal in his office's spending and sends back the money that he does not use. In one six-month period in 1999, for example, his office received $1.787 million in appropriations and returned $145,000, a higher percentage than any other senator.[42] The U.S. Treasury building today. ...


PATRIOT Act

Feingold was the only senator to vote against the USA PATRIOT Act when first voted on in 2001.[43] At the time, Feingold stated that provisions in the act infringed upon citizens' civil liberties.[44] In the United States, the Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an Act of Congress which President George W. Bush signed into law... Civil liberties is the name given to freedoms that protect the individual from government. ...


When the bill was up for renewal in late December 2005, Feingold led a bipartisan coalition of senators that included Lisa Murkowski, Ken Salazar, Larry Craig, Dick Durbin, and John Sununu to remove some of the act's more controversial provisions. He led a successful filibuster against renewal of the act that ultimately led to a compromise on some of its provisions. This compromise bill passed the Senate on March 2, 2006, by 89-10. Feingold was among the 10 senators who voted nay, feeling that the bill still lacked necessary protections for some civil liberties. Lisa Ann Murkowski (born May 22, 1957) is an American politician. ... Kenneth Lee Salazar (born March 2, 1955) is an American politician, rancher, and environmentalist from the U.S. state of Colorado. ... This article is about the Idaho senator. ... Richard Joseph Durbin (born November 21, 1944) is an American politician. ... John Edward Sununu (born September 10, 1964) is a Republican United States Senator from New Hampshire. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


War in Iraq

Feingold was one of 23 US senators to vote against H.J. Resolution 114, which authorized President George W. Bush to use force against Iraq in 2002.[45] Iraq Resolution and Iraq War Resolution are popular names for the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002 (Public law 107-243, 116 Stat. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


On August 17, 2005, he became the first senator to call for the withdrawal of troops from Iraq and urge that a timetable for that withdrawal be set. He called other Democrats "timid" for refusing to take action sooner, and suggested December 31, 2006 as the date for total withdrawal of troops. On the subject of Bush's assertion that a deadline would be helpful to Iraqi insurgents, Feingold said, "I think he's wrong. I think not talking about endgames is playing into our enemies' hand."[46] is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Iraqi insurgency denotes groups using armed resistance against the US-led Coalition occupation of Iraq. ... EndGame is the name of a 1997 story arc of the Sonic the Hedgehog comic book published by published by Archie Comics. ...


On April 27, 2006, Feingold announced that he would move to amend an appropriations bill granting $106.5 billion in emergency spending measure for Iraq and Hurricane Katrina relief to require that troops withdraw completely from Iraq.[47] is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Appropriation is the act of taking possession of or assigning purpose to properties or ideas and is important in many topics, including: Appropriation (sociology) in relation to the spread of knowledge Appropriation (art) Appropriation (visual art) [1] Appropriation (music) in reference to the re-use and proliferation of different types... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


Call for a vote of censure

On March 13, 2006, Feingold introduced a resolution in the Senate to censure President Bush.[48] This was a result of allegations of illegal wiretapping, as reported in The New York Times, that Bush did not follow the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 (FISA), which mandates use of a surveillance court for approval of wiretaps on Americans. Feingold made a 25-minute speech on the Senate Floor declaring that Congress must "hold the president accountable for his actions". The U.S. Senate has not yet voted on the resolution, as it first needs to be considered by the Senate Judiciary Committee. It has received outspoken support from Senators Tom Harkin and Barbara Boxer, although most Democratic senators have avoided expressing a firm opinion on it. Senators John Kerry and Patrick Leahy have expressed support for the bill, but Feingold was able to find only three cosponsors. is the 72nd day of the year (73rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The NSA warrantless surveillance controversy concerns surveillance of persons within the United States incident to the collection of foreign intelligence by the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) as part of the war on terror. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) of 1978 prescribes procedures for the physical and electronic surveillance and collection of foreign intelligence information between or among foreign powers. FISA is codified in 50 U.S.C. §§1801-1811, 1821-29, 1841-46, and 1861-62. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... Thomas Richard Tom Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is a liberal Democratic Senator from Iowa, serving in his fourth senate term. ... Barbara Levy Boxer (born November 11, 1940) is an American politician and the current junior U.S. Senator from the State of California. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... Patrick Joseph Leahy (born March 31, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Vermont. ...


Feingold again called for Bush's censure in July 2007 for his management of the Iraq war, accusing him of mounting an "assault" against the Constitution.[49]


Health care reform

Feingold has long been an advocate for creating a system of universal health care in America. During his first run for the Senate, he endorsed the single-payer model, similar to that used by Canada. Once elected, he opposed the Clinton health care plan, saying that it did too much for the insurance industry and not enough for the uninsured. During the Bush administration, he has opposed the enactment of Medicare Part D and authored a bill to require the Senate leadership to submit health care reform bills.[50] Universal health care is a situation in which all residents of a geographic or political region have access to most types of health care. ... The Clinton health care plan was a 1993 healthcare reform package proposed by the administration of Bill Clinton, then sitting President of the United States. ... The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ... Medicare Part D is a federal program to subsidize the costs of prescription drugs for Medicare beneficiaries in the United States. ...


On July 24, 2006, at a press conference at the Martin Luther King Heritage Health Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Feingold announced that he had authored the State-Based Health Care Reform Act, a bill to create a pilot program for a system of universal health care under which each U.S. state would create a program to provide its citizenry with universal health insurance, and the federal government would provide the funding. The bill would create a non-partisan "Health Care Reform Task Force," which will provide five-year federal grants to two or three states. The program is expected to cost $32 billion over 10 years.[51] is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A member of Liberal Democratic Party Taizo Sugimura in an apology news conference in Japan A news conference or press conference is a media event in which newsmakers invite journalists to hear them speak and, most often, ask questions. ... For other places with the same name, see Milwaukee (disambiguation). ... A pilot experiment is a precursor to a full-scale study used to check if all operational parameters are in check. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... This article describes the government of the United States. ... Partisan may refer to: A member of a lightly-equipped irregular military force formed to oppose control of an area by a foreign power or by an army of occupation. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Federal assistance in the United States. ...


Gun issues

Feingold has a mixed record on gun rights and gun control issues, voting in favor of certain gun control legislation, while on the other hand voting to expand certain gun rights. On February 24, 2004, he voted against S.1805, a bill which would have extended the Federal ban on semi-automatic firearms.[52] In 2002, he voted for allowing airline pilots to carry firearms in cockpits.[53] He has spoken in support of the interpretation that the Second Amendment pertains to an individual right to own firearms, and in opposition to proposals for handgun bans and mandatory firearms registration. Gun politics is a set of legal issues surrounding the ownership, use, and control of firearms as well as safety issues related to firearms both through their direct use and through criminal use. ... The Federal Assault Weapons Ban (AWB) was a subtitle of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that included a prohibition on the sale to civilians of certain semi-automatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans... The Bill of Rights in the National Archives Amendment II (the Second Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, declares a well regulated militia as being necessary to the security of a free State, and prohibits infringement of the right of the people...


On the other hand, he has consistently voted in favor of bills to require background checks for firearms purchases at gun shows and to require that handguns be sold with trigger locks. A background check is the process of looking up official and commercial records about a person. ... Houston gun show at the George R. Brown Convention Center. ... Trigger lock on a revolver Close-up of the trigger lock, showing the warning A trigger lock is a device designed to prevent a firearm from being discharged while the device is in place. ...


In March 2004, he explained his position in a speech on the Senate floor:

I have never accepted the proposition that the gun debate is a black and white issue, a matter of 'you're with us, or you're against us.' Instead, I have followed what I believe is a moderate course, faithful to the Constitution and to the realities of modern society. I believe that the Second Amendment was not an afterthought, that it has meaning today and must be respected. I support the right to bear arms for lawful purposes — for hunting and sport and for self-protection. Millions of Americans own firearms legally and we should not take action that tells them that they are second-class citizens or that their constitutional rights are under attack. At the same time, there are actions we can and should take to protect public safety that do not infringe on constitutional rights.[54]

Ideological rankings

Americans For Democratic Action, a liberal advocacy group that rates members of Congress on a scale of 0 to 100, with zero being completely conservative and 100 completely liberal, gave Feingold a lifetime average rating of 98.[55] The American Conservative Union ranked him a 12, where 0 is most liberal and 100 is most conservative. The Concord Coalition, a nonpartisan advocacy group that pushes for fiscal responsibility, placed him on its "Senate Honor Roll" every year since 1997, and ranked him in the top two every year since 1998, making their suggestion that Feingold is also one of the top budget hawks in Congress. The Democratic Freedom Caucus, a group of libertarian-leaning Democrats, has endorsed him during his last two senate campaigns. Americans For Democratic Action (ADA) was formed in January 1947, when Eleanor Roosevelt, John Kenneth Galbraith, Reinhold Niebuhr, Hubert Humphrey and 200 other activists. ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of... Ths article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... The American Conservative Union (ACU) is a large conservative political lobbying group in the United States. ... The Concord Coalition is a nationwide, non-partisan, grassroots organization advocating fiscal responsibility while ensuring Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid are secure for all generations. ... From a Keynesian point of view, a balanced budget in the public sector is achieved when the government has enough fiscal discipline to be able to equate the revenues with expenditure over the business cycles. ... This article is about the political philosophy based on private property rights. ...


In 2004, the National Rifle Association gave him a grade of D (with F being the lowest grade and A the highest).[56] On environmental issues, he was given scores of 100 percent from the League of Conservation Voters[57], and 73 percent from CUSP.[58] The American Civil Liberties Union gave him a score of 89 percent.[59] This article concerns the National Rifle Association of the USA. For the UK organisation, see National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom The National Rifle Association, or NRA, is a non-profit group for the promotion of marksmanship, firearm safety, and the protection of hunting and personal protection firearm rights... The League of Conservation Voters is an American environmentalist lobby. ... The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is the common name for an American organization consisting of two separate entities. ...


Same-sex marriage

On April 4, 2006, Feingold told constituents at a listening session in Kenosha, Wisconsin, that he supported the legalization of same-sex marriage. Though Feingold had once voted against passage of the Defense of Marriage Act, this was the first time that he publicly announced his support for marriage rights for same-sex couples. Feingold's comments were in response to a question about whether or not he supported a ballot initiative that Wisconsinites voted on in November 2006 that incorporated a ban on same-sex marriage and all civil unions (same-sex or not) into the state constitution.[60]He joined Republican Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island and Democrats Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts, Ron Wyden of Oregon, and Mark Dayton of Minnesota as one of only five senators to publicly announce their support for same-sex marriage. is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nickname: K-town Keno Kenowhere Location of Kenosha within Wisconsin Coordinates: Country United States State Wisconsin Counties Kenosha Settled 1836 Government  - Mayor John M. Antaramian Population  - City 96,845  - Density  3,795. ... One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... The Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, is the commonly-used name of a federal law of the United States that is officially known as Pub. ... initiative, see Initiative (disambiguation). ... A civil union is one of several terms for a civil status similar to marriage, typically created for the purposes of allowing homosexual couples access to the benefits enjoyed by married heterosexuals (see also same-sex marriage); it can also be used by couples of differing sexes who do not... Lincoln Davenport Chafee (IPA pronunciation: , [CHAY-fee]) (born March 26, 1953) is a former United States Senator from Rhode Island. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Edward Kennedy Edward Moore Ted Kennedy, (born February 22, 1932, in Brookline, Massachusetts) is a Democratic U.S. senator from Massachusetts. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Ronald Lee Wyden (born May 3, 1949) to German American parents, is Oregons senior United States Senator. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ... Mark Brandt Dayton (born January 26, 1947) was a Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party U.S. Senator from Minnesota who served from 2001 – 2007 in the 107th, 108th, and 109th Congresses. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ...

Gay and lesbian couples should be able to marry and have access to the same rights, privileges and benefits that straight couples currently enjoy. . . [In a later interview:] The proposed ban on civil unions and marriage is a mean-spirited attempt to divide Wisconsin and I indicated that it should be defeated[61]

On May 18, 2006, Feingold again made news with his stance on marriage when he walked out of a meeting of the Senate Judiciary Committee shortly before a vote on a constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriage. GAY can mean: Gay, a term referring to homosexual men or women The IATA code for Gaya Airport Category: ... This article is about same-sex desire and sexuality among women. ... One version of a Heterosexuality symbol Heterosexuality is sexual or romantic attraction between opposite sexes, and is the most common sexual orientation among humans. ... As unregistered cohabitation Recognised in some regions Recognised prior to legalisation of same-sex marriage Netherlands (nationwide) (1998) Spain (12 of 17 communities) (1998) South Africa (nationwide) (1999) Belgium (nationwide) (2000) Canada (QC, NS and MB) (2001) Recognition debated See also Same-sex marriage Registered partnership Domestic partnership Common-law... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... The United States Federal Marriage Amendment (FMA) is a proposed amendment to the United States Constitution which would define marriage in the United States as a union of one man and one woman. ...


After Feingold objected to both the amendment and decision of Chairman Arlen Specter (R-PA) to move the meeting to an area of the Capitol Building not open to the public, Specter told Feingold, "I don't need to be lectured by you. You are no more a protector of the Constitution than am I. If you want to leave, good riddance." Arlen J. Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ...


Feingold then replied, "I've enjoyed your lecture, too, Mr. Chairman. See ya." He then left the room and did not return. Later that day, the committee voted to send the amendment to the full Senate.[62]


On July 29, 2006, Feingold was the keynote speaker at the Human Rights Campaign's annual gala at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, California.[63] is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... HRC logo The Human Rights Campaign (HRC) is one of the largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) equal rights organization in the United States. ... Colored flags flying high outside the Moscone Convention Center The Moscone Center is San Francisco, Californias largest convention center and exhibition hall. ... San Francisco redirects here. ...


Committee assignments

The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations is a standing committee of the United States Senate. ... The United States Senate Committee on Budget was established in 1974 by the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act. ... The United States Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is dedicated to overseeing the American Intelligence Community—the agencies and bureaus of the U.S. federal government who provide information and analysis for leaders of the executive and legislative branches. ... The United States Senate Special Committee on Aging was initially established in 1961 as a temporary committee, and becaming a permanent committee in 1977. ...

Electoral history

  • 2004 Race for U.S. Senate
  • 1998 Race for U.S. Senate
  • 1992 Race for U.S. Senate
    • Russ Feingold (D), 52%
    • Bob Kasten (R) (inc.), 46%
  • 1992 Race for U.S. Senate — Democratic Primary
    • Russ Feingold (D), 69%
    • Jim Moody (D), 14%
    • Joe Checota (D), 14%

Tim Michels is a member of the Wisconsin Republican Party. ... Mark Neumann Mark W. Neumann (born February 27, 1954) is an American politician and former Congressman from the state of Wisconsin. ... Robert Walter Bob Kasten Jr. ... Born James Powers Moody in Richlands, Tazewell County, Va. ...

Biographies

Feingold: A New Democratic Party by Sanford D. Horwitt.


References

  1. ^ a b Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Feingold rules out 2008 run for president. November 11, 2006.
  2. ^ U.S. Census, January 1, 1920, Wisconsin, Rock County, Janesville, enumeration district 112, p. 22-B, family 556. U.S. Census, January 1, 1920, Tennessee, Shelby County, Memphis, enumeration district 109, p. 2-A, family 29. Rachel Binstock entry; SS Nieuw Amsterdam Passenger Manifest, 17 February 1913, p. 932, line 8.
  3. ^ Opin, Ken. "Dole Rip, Gore Fire Up Crowd", Wisconsin State Journal, August 27, 1996. 
  4. ^ http://www.progressivepatriotsfund.com/about-senator-feingold/
  5. ^ Biography of U.S. Senator Russ Feingold. Retrieved on 2006-07-15.
  6. ^ Worths of state's U.S. senators vary greatly: Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel June 14, 2004; accessed August 21, 2006
  7. ^ Skiba, Katherine M.. "Feingold, wife announce plans to end marriage", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 12, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-05. 
  8. ^ Promises Made, Promises Kept. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  9. ^ a b Russ Feingold for United States Senate Multimedia. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  10. ^ Wisconsin Senate: The Candidates. Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  11. ^ Marcus, Greil. "The Elvis Test", San Francisco Examiner, Eye Candy Promotions, January 17, 1993. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  12. ^ Murray, Shailagh. "A Senate Maverick Acts to Force an Issue", Washington Post, March 15, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-05. 
  13. ^ Odegard, Sue. "Feingold tackles health care, capital punishment, COPS grants at River Falls Listening Session", River Falls Journal, 1999. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  14. ^ a b Sykes, Charles J.. "The next Bill Proxmire? — US Senate race between Democrat Russ Feingold and Republican Robert W. Kasten in Wisconsin", National Review, November 2, 1992. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  15. ^ a b Wagner, Jeff (September 17, 2004). A Republican Senator from Wisconsin in 2004?. WTMJ-AM. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  16. ^ Nichols, John (September 22, 2002). Rockin' in the Real World. The Nation. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  17. ^ Hendrie, Paul. "SNEAK ATTACKS: Issue Ads Evade Limits", Capital Eye, opensecrets.org, December 1998. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
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  23. ^ "Feingold's New Role", The Capital Times, January 4, 2005, pp. Editorial, p. 6-A. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  24. ^ Gilbert, Craig. "Feingold sizes up presidential race", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, February 4, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  25. ^ Conklin, Melanie. "Feingold For Virtual President 2008", Wisconsin State Journal, March 16, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  26. ^ http://www.runrussrun.com/
  27. ^ Baker, Peter. "Feingold Urges Troop Withdrawal By End of '06", Washington Post, August 18, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  28. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 109th Congress — 2nd Session. U.S. Senate. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  29. ^ Strategic Vision Poll Results. Strategic Vision. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  30. ^ Quinnipiac University (March 6, 2006). Rudy Giuliani, Barack Obama, John McCain Are Hottest, Quinnipiac University National Thermometer Shows; V.P. Cheney Gets Cold Shoulder From Voters. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  31. ^ http://www.jsonline.com/story/index.aspx?id=529983 Feingold rules out 2008 run for president]. November 11, 2006.
  32. ^ http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=132x3385887
  33. ^ http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1295/is_3_65/ai_71704779/pg_3
  34. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 109th Congress - 2nd Session, <http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=109&session=2&vote=00132>. Retrieved on 08-27-2007
  35. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 109th Congress - 2nd Session, <http://www.senate.gov/legislative/LIS/roll_call_lists/roll_call_vote_cfm.cfm?congress=109&session=2&vote=00131>. Retrieved on 08-27-2007
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  37. ^ Gilbert, Craig. "Feingold in Dixie on mission of diplomacy", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, March 29, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  38. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 109th Congress — 2nd Session. U.S. Senate. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  39. ^ Feingold Introduces Lobbying and Ethics Reform Bill, <http://feingold.senate.gov/~feingold/releases/05/07/2005714641.html>. Retrieved on 08-27-2007
  40. ^ http://www.russfeingold.org/jobs_economy.php
  41. ^ http://www.ontheissues.org/Social/Russell_Feingold_Principles_+_Values.htm
  42. ^ Marlin, Adam S.. "Russ Feingold: Mr. Good Government", VOTE.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  43. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 107th Congress — 1st Session. U.S. Senate. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  44. ^ Feingold, Russ (October 12, 2001). Russell Feingold — On Opposing The U.S.A. Patriot Act. Archipelago. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  45. ^ U.S. Senate Roll Call Votes 107th Congress — 2nd Session. U.S. Senate. Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  46. ^ Baker, Peter. "Feingold Urges Troop Withdrawal By End of '06", Washington Post, August 18, 2005. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  47. ^ Hulse, Carl. "Tough road ahead on Iraq funding", San Jose Mercury News, April 27, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  48. ^ Relating to the censure of George W. Bush. (Introduced in Senate). Library of Congress (March 13, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  49. ^ Sen. Feingold proposes censuring Bush
  50. ^ http://www.russfeingold.org/health_care.php
  51. ^ Schmid, John. "Feingold would give states sway over health care", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, July 24, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  52. ^ S. 1805, the Protection of Lawful Commerce in Arms Act, <http://democrats.senate.gov/dpc/dpc-new.cfm?doc_name=lb-108-2-49>. Retrieved on 08-27-2007
  53. ^ Senate votes to let pilots carry firearms, <http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3827/is_200209/ai_n9131759>. Retrieved on 08-27-2007
  54. ^ Statement of U.S. Senator Russ Feingold on the Gun Manufacturers Liability Bill (March 2, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  55. ^ Description of the Lifetime Voting Record. Americans for Democratic Action. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  56. ^ Wisconsin — 2004. National Rifle Association. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  57. ^ Senator Russ Feingold (D-WI). League of Conservation Voters. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  58. ^ Congressional Environmental Scorecard. Comprehensive US Sustainable Population. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  59. ^ ACLU Scorecard 108th Congress U.S. Senate. American Civil Liberties Union. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  60. ^ http://milwaukee.about.com/od/electionsandpolitics/i/civilunionsban.htm
  61. ^ "Russ Feingold: Legalize Gay Marriage", NewsMax Media, April 5, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-06. 
  62. ^ "Senate committee approves gay marriage ban", MSNBC, May 18, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-06-05. 
  63. ^ http://www.uwec.edu/NewsBureau/release/past/2002/02-12/1204Feingold.html

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Articles

  • Southern strategy for Feingold Sounding like a candidate, he seeks resonance with Alabama voters
  • Russ Feingold: Mr. Good Government by Adam Marlin
  • A Peculiar Politician by William Greider
  • A February 2005 interview of Feingold by C-SPAN's Brian Lamb
  • Russ Feingold interview by Matthew Rothschild
  • Sen. Russ Feingold: Dems Platform on Iraq a “Mistake”
  • Democratic senator says Bush violated law with wiretaps: He is a president, not a king
  • Feingold Beats Bush In Patriot Act Fight
  • American Prospect: Solid Feingold The Wisconsin senator is outshining most of the "foreign policy" Democrats.
  • American Prospect: The Lone Patriot, Russ Feingold’s courage needs to be honored by following his leadership.
  • Feingold Introduces Senate Resolution to Censure Bush
Political offices
Preceded by
Bob Kasten
United States Senator (Class 3) from Wisconsin
1993 – present
Served alongside: Herb Kohl
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Feingold, Russell Dana
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Wisconsin politician
DATE OF BIRTH March 2, 1953
PLACE OF BIRTH Janesville, Wisconsin, United States
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Russ Feingold - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4238 words)
Feingold was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, to a Jewish family that had settled in the area in 1917.
Feingold, who had little name recognition in the state and was campaigning in a primary against a pair of millionaire opponents, adopted several proposals to gain the electorate's attention.
Feingold's comments were in response to a question about whether or not he supported a ballot initiative that Wisconsinites voted on in November of 2006, which incorporated a ban on same-sex marriage and all civil unions (same-sex or not) into the state constitution.
Russ Feingold: Information from Answers.com (4215 words)
Another showed Feingold, standing next to a pair of half-sized cardboard cut-outs of his opponents, refusing to "stoop to their level" as the two were shown literally slinging mud at one another.
Feingold's primary legislative focus has been on campaign finance reform, fair trade policies, health care reform, conservation and environmental protection, a multilateral foreign policy, Social Security, civil libertarianism, and the elimination of capital punishment and wasteful spending.
Feingold's comments were in response to a question about whether or not he supported a ballot initiative that Wisconsinites will vote on in November, which would incorporate a ban on same-sex marriage and civil unions into the state constitution.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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