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A Rushlight is a type of candle formed using the dried pith of the rush plant as its wick. The pith was typically dipped in any household fat or grease that was available although beeswax or good tallow, especially mutton fat, improved the quality of the light. Jump to: navigation, search A lit candle. ... The centre dark spot (about 1 mm diameter) in this yew wood is the pith Pith is a light substance that is found in vascular plants. ... Genera Andesia Distichia Juncus - Rush Luzula - Woodrush Marsippospermum Oxychloë Prionium Rostkovia The Juncaceae, or the Rush Family, is a rather small monocot flowering plant family. ... Wick may refer to: Wick, Highland, in Caithness, Scotland Wick, Vale of Glamorgan, in Glamorgan, Wales Wick, Bristol, in South Gloucester, England This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Jump to: navigation, search Look up fat on Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The word grease can mean:- A type of industrial lubricant: see grease (lubricant). ... Beeswax is a product from a bee hive. ... Tallow is rendered beef or mutton fat (suet). ...


Long before electricity or even paraffin candles, a rushlight provided very economical lighting. A rushlight 2/3 of a metre long (about 2 feet) might burn for an hour and cost practically nothing to make. Jump to: navigation, search Electricity is a general term applied to phenomena involving a fundamental property of matter called an electric charge. ... Jump to: navigation, search Paraffin is a common name for a group of high molecular weight alkane hydrocarbons with the general formula CnH2n+2, where n is greater than about 20, discovered by Carl Reichenbach. ... Jump to: navigation, search A lit candle. ... Jump to: navigation, search The metre or (in American English) meter (symbol: m) is the SI base unit of length. ...

Sources of light / lighting:

Natural/prehistoric light sources: Jump to: navigation, search Prism splitting light Light is electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength that is visible to the eye (visible light) or, in a technical or scientific setting, electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength. ... Jump to: navigation, search Architect lamps Dark lighting in a concert hall allow laser effects to be visible In the 2005 Classical Spectacular performance, a state-of-the-art lighting system was used to accompany the music Lighting refers to the devices or techniques used for illumination, usually referring to...

Bioluminescence | Celestial objects | Lightning Bioluminescence is the production and emission of light by a living organism as the result of a chemical reaction during which chemical energy is converted to light energy. ... See also Lists of astronomical objects Categories: Astronomical objects ... Jump to: navigation, search Lightning over Pentagon City in Arlington County, Virginia Cloud to cloud lightning Lightning is a powerful natural electrostatic discharge produced during a thunderstorm. ...

Compact Fluorescent Lightbulb Image File history File links Download high resolution version (311x649, 278 KB) Summary I made this from an existing Public Domain JPEG. Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Combustion-based light sources: Jump to: navigation, search Combustion or burning is an exothermic reaction between a substance (the fuel) and a gas (the oxidizer), usually O2, to release heat. ...

Acetylene/Carbide lamps | Candles | Davy lamps | Fire | Gas lighting | Kerosene lamps | Lanterns | Limelights | Oil lamps | Rushlights Carbide lamps (acetylene lamps) are simple lamps that produce and burn acetylene by reacting calcium carbide with water. ... Jump to: navigation, search A lit candle. ... The Davy lamp is a safety lamp devised in 1815 by Humphry Davy. ... Jump to: navigation, search A large bonfire Fire is a form of combustion. ... Gas lighting is the process of burning piped natural gas or coal gas for illumination. ... A kerosene lamp, widely known in Britain as a paraffin lamp, is any type of lighting device which uses kerosene (paraffin) as a fuel. ... Stone lantern A lantern is a portable lighting device used to illuminate broad areas. ... Limelight is a type of stage lighting once used in theatres and music halls. ... Antique bronze oil lamp with Christian symbol (replica) Antique Greek oil lamp (replica) An oil lamp is a device used for lighting or for preserving a flame that is fueled by animal, vegetable or mineral oil. ...

Nuclear/direct chemical light sources: In nuclear physics, a nuclear reaction is a process in which two nuclei or nuclear particles collide, to produce products different to the initial products. ...

Betalights/Trasers | Chemoluminescence (Lightsticks) A betalight is an artificial light source powered by the radioactive decay of tritium (3H) gas. ... Traser is the generic name for glass tubes with a phosphor layer in them and Tritium (a Hydrogen isotope) gas inside the tube. ... Lightsticks Chemoluminescence (sometimes chemiluminescence) is the emission of light (luminescence) as the result of a chemical reaction. ... Three types of lightsticks in five colours A lightstick, also called a glowstick, is a transparent plastic tube which contains chemical fluids held apart in two compartments. ...

Electric light sources: Jump to: navigation, search Electricity is a general term applied to phenomena involving a fundamental property of matter called an electric charge. ...

Arc lamps | Incandescent light bulbs | Fluorescent lamps The 300,000-watt Plasma Arc Lamp in the Infrared Processing Center (IPC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory An arc lamp is a device that produces light by the sparking (or arcing, from voltaic arc or electric arc) of a high current between two carbon rod electrodes. ... Jump to: navigation, search An incandescent light bulb and its glowing filament. ... Jump to: navigation, search A compact fluorescent lamp with an integrated electronic ballast A fluorescent lamp is a type of lamp that uses electricity to excite mercury vapor in argon or neon gas, resulting in a plasma that produces short-wave ultraviolet light. ...

High-intensity discharge light sources: Jump to: navigation, search High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps include the types of electrical lights: mercury vapor, metal halide, high-pressure sodium and less common, xenon short-arc lamps. ...

Ceramic Discharge Metal Halide lamps | HMI lamps | Mercury-vapor lamps | Metal halide lamps | Sodium vapor lamps | Xenon arc lamps Ceramic Discharge Metal Halide lamps are a relativly new source of light that is a variation of the Mercury-vapor lamp. ... Jump to: navigation, search Hydrargyrum Medium-Arc Iodide, frequently called just HMI is a mercury-halide discharge short arc lamp with a color temperature of approximately 5600K. The name is derived from Hydrargyrum, an archaic term for mercury while Iodide indicates that iodine is the halogen used to form the... A Mercury-vapor lamp is a gas discharge lamp which uses mercury in an excited state to produce light. ... Jump to: navigation, search Metal halide lamps are similar to mercury vapor lamps, but instead of just mercury, they also contain sodium/scandium iodide and sometimes metals in the rare earth period combined with halogens in the halogen group of the periodic table. ... Jump to: navigation, search A sodium vapor lamp is a gas discharge lamp which uses sodium in an excited state to produce light. ... Xenon arc lamps are a source of artificial light. ...

Other electric light sources:

Electroluminescent (EL) lamps | Globar | Inductive lighting | LEDs | Neon and argon lamps | Nernst lamp | Sulfur lamp | Xenon flash lamps | Yablochkov candles Electroluminescence is an optical phenomenon and electrical phenomenon where a material such as a natural blue diamond emits light when an electric current is passed through it. ... Jump to: navigation, search A Globar is a silicon carbide bar of 5 to 10 mm width and 20 to 50 mm length which is electrically heated up to 1800 to 3000 degrees Fahrenheit (equivalent to 982 to 1649 degrees Celsius or 1255 to 1922 Kelvin) with a downstream variable... In contrast with all other electrical lamps that use electrical connections through the lamp envelope to transfer electrical power to the lamp, in electrodeless lamps the power needed to generate light is transferred from the outside of the lamp envelope by means of (electro)magnetic fields. ... Jump to: navigation, search Red, pure green, and blue LEDs. ... Lighting neon lamp, two 220/230 Volt and 110 V neon lamps and a screwdriver with neon lamp inside A neon lamp is a gas discharge lamp containing neon gas (or in types with different colors also other noble gas) at low pressure. ... Jump to: navigation, search Nernst lamp, complete, model B with cloche, DC-lamp 0,5 amp, 95 Volt, by courtesy of Landesmuseum für Technik und Arbeit in Mannheim, Germany, (Engl. ... In contrast with all other electrical lamps that use electrical connections through the lamp envelope to transfer electrical power to the lamp, in electrodeless lamps the power needed to generate light is transferred from the outside of the lamp envelope by means of (electro)magnetic fields. ... Xenon flash lamp being fired. ... A Yablochkov candle (sometimes electric candle) is a type of electric carbon arc lamp, invented in 1876 by Pavel Yablochkov. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rushlight - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (117 words)
A Rushlight is a type of candle formed using the dried pith of the rush plant as its wick.
The pith was typically dipped in any household fat or grease that was available although beeswax or good tallow, especially mutton fat, improved the quality of the light.
A rushlight 2/3 of a metre long (about 2 feet) might burn for an hour and cost practically nothing to make.
Benjamin Franklin & Rushlights (1805 words)
Rushlights, sometime known as “fatted rushes,” are made from the common bog rush, or soft rush (Juncus effusus), by stripping off almost all of the green cortex (outer layer) except for a thin strip needed to hold the pithy insides of the rush together.
The prepared rushlights were subsequently stored in metal or crock containers having lids to protect the contents from gnawing animals that would have been attracted by the scent of the fat.
As the rushlight burns close to the rush holder, release the clothespin’s jaws, then gripping the end of the unburned rushlight, slide forward, burning the remainder of the rushlight.
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